NACCHO Aboriginal #MentalHealth and #CoronaVirus News Alert No 19 #KeepOurMobSafe : Intro @JuliaGillard 10 Help/ supports from @beyondblue Looking after your mental health during the coronavirus outbreak plus managing your mental health while in self-isolation or quarantine

1.Try to maintain perspective

2.Find a healthy balance in relation to media coverage

3.Access good quality information

4.Try to maintain a practical and calm approach

5.Try not to make assumptions

6.Managing your mental health while in self-isolation or quarantine

7.Children and young people

8.Support for those experiencing financial hardship

9.Health care workers

10.Seek support

See NACCHO Corona Virus Home Page

Read all 18 NACCHO Aboriginal Health and Coronas Virus Alerts HERE

“These are uncertain times. There are many unknowns.

As humans, we’re hardwired to crave stability. If you’re feeling worried and unsettled that is perfectly understandable.

I felt that myself during my recent period of self-isolation in London. At an event for young people called WE Day, I spent quite a bit of time with Sophie Trudeau, the First Lady of Canada.

When she became unwell and tested positive for COVID-19, I was concerned about potentially becoming sick a long way from home.

What I found reassuring was that the public health advice that was so clear.  The recommendation to me was to self-isolate for 14 days from the time of contact.

Fortunately, I stayed fit and well in that period and all my London friends and colleagues, as well as visiting Aussie mates, made sure I had food and stayed connected with video conferences, calls and silly messages.

On my return to Australia I will self-isolate for another 14 days, and I know family and friends will help me through.

For me, this experience has reinforced how a significant part of the solution to this pandemic rests with us.

The daily decisions we make now are critical and every single one of us has a part to play.

Our individual acts can have a powerful collective impact, helping protect those most at risk in our community.

Simple things really matter – good hand hygiene, avoiding mass gatherings, keeping a 1.5 metre distance between ourselves and others, and staying home if we’re unwell or if we’ve been in contact with someone who is.

Beyond Blue recognises and understands the feelings of anxiety, distress and concern many people may be experiencing in relation to the coronavirus (COVID-19) and offers the following wellbeing advice.”

Julia Gillard Chair BeyondBlue : Read full Press Release Here

1.Try to maintain perspective

While it is reasonable for people to be concerned about the outbreak of coronavirus, try to remember that medical, scientific and public health experts around the world are working hard to contain the virus, treat those affected and develop a vaccine as quickly as possible.

2.Find a healthy balance in relation to media coverage

Being exposed to large volumes of negative information can heighten feelings of anxiety. While it’s important to stay informed, you may find it useful to limit your media intake if it is upsetting you or your family.

3.Access good quality information

It’s important to get accurate information from credible sources such as those listed below. This will also help you maintain perspective and feel more in control.

4.Try to maintain a practical and calm approach

Widespread panic can complicate efforts to manage the outbreak effectively. Do your best to stay calm and follow official advice, particularly around observing good hygiene habits.

The Australian Psychological Society has advice about maintaining positive mental health during the outbreak.

5.Try not to make assumptions

To contribute to a sense of community wellbeing, try to remember that the coronavirus can affect anyone regardless of their nationality or ethnicity and remember that those with the disease have not done anything wrong.

6.Managing your mental health while in self-isolation or quarantine

There are a number of ways to support your mental health during periods of self-isolation or quarantine.

  • Remind yourself that this is a temporary period of isolation to slow the spread of the virus.
  • Remember that your effort is helping others in the community avoid contracting the virus.
  • Stay connected with friends, family and colleagues via email, social media, video conferencing or telephone.
  • Connect with others via the Beyond Blue forums thread: Coping during the coronavirus outbreak.
  • Engage in healthy activities that you enjoy and find relaxing.
  • Keep regular sleep routines and eat healthy foods.
  • Try to maintain physical activity.
  • Establish routines as best possible and try to view this period as a new experience that can bring health benefits.
  • For those working from home, try to maintain a healthy balance by allocating specific work hours, taking regular breaks and, if possible, establishing a dedicated work space.
  • Avoid news and social media if you find it distressing.

7.Children and young people

Families and caregivers of children and young people should discuss news of the virus with those in their care in an open and honest way. Try to relate the facts without causing alarm, and in a way that is appropriate for their age and temperament. It is important to listen to any questions they may have, to let them know that they are safe and that it’s normal to feel concerned.

If the media or the news is getting too much for them, encourage them to limit their exposure. This video has some useful tips for talking to young people about scary stuff in the news.

Beyond Blue’s Be You initiative has also developed the following resources to help educators support children and young people’s mental health during the coronavirus outbreak.

8.Support for those experiencing financial hardship

As the ongoing spread of the coronavirus continues to affect the global economy, many people in Australia are losing jobs, livelihoods and financial stability. For information and services provided by the Australian government, please visit Services Australia.

If you are experiencing financial hardship, National Debt Helpline offers free financial counselling.

9.Health care workers

Health care workers may feel extra stress during the COVID-19 outbreak. This is a normal response in these unprecedented circumstances. Such feelings are not a sign of weakness and it’s important to acknowledge this. There are practical ways to manage your mental health during this time, including:

  • getting enough rest during work hours and between shifts
  • eating healthy foods and engaging in physical activity
  • keeping in contact with colleagues, family and friends by phone or online
  • being aware of where you can access mental health support at work
  • if you’re a manager, trying to create mentally healthy work structures.

It’s important the general public recognises the pressure that health systems and workers themselves are under and takes steps to support them where possible. Following government advice about ways individuals can help slow the spread of the virus will support the health care workers who are saving lives and keeping people safe.

10.Seek support

It’s normal to feel overwhelmed or stressed by news of the outbreak. We encourage people who have experienced mental health issues in the past to:

  • activate your support network
  • acknowledge feelings of distress
  • seek professional support early if you’re having difficulties.

For those already managing mental health issues, continue with your treatment plan and monitor for any new symptoms.

Social contact and maintaining routines can be supportive for our mental health and wellbeing. In circumstances where this is not possible, staying connected with friends and family online or by phone may assist. Beyond Blue also has a dedicated page on its forums about coping during the coronavirus outbreak.

Acknowledge feelings of distress and seek further professional support if required.

Beyond Blue has fact sheets about anxiety and offers other practical advice and resources at beyondblue.org.au.

The Beyond Blue Support Service offers short term counselling and referrals by phone and webchat on 1300 22 4636.

NACCHO member health news alert:Short film highlights healing for depression in urban Aboriginal communities

New Microsoft Publisher Document (6)

Stories for keeping strong :

PREVIEW of the NEW URBAN version

Previous Arrernte Central Australia VIEW here at beyondblue site

A short film will be launched today, Tuesday 4 June, to highlight the importance of family, community and services in helping people with depression to regain social and emotional wellbeing.

beyondblue collaborated with The Aboriginal Medical Service of Western Sydney and producers, isee-ilearn, to develop the script and produce the film Story for Keeping Strong

beyondblue CEO Kate Carnell AO said Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people who live with psychological stress, especially depression and anxiety, may not recognise it or talk to family, friends or a health professional about their symptoms.

“We are pleased to have funded this very important project and we hope the film raises awareness of how to talk to someone who might be depressed and assist them to get appropriate help,” Ms Carnell said.

 Nell Angus, Team Leader, Indigenous and Priority Communities at beyondblue said Story for Keeping Strong features a conversation about depression between members of an extended family – a young Aboriginal man talks with two Elders, an Aunt and a young Aboriginal woman.

“The project took 12 months to complete with the first step being to establish a Story Development Group, and the group members defined what depression looks like for them, their family and their community.

“Based on this consultation, the group discussed the things that disconnect people, families and communities and the things that bring them together to start healing. These ideas of a family discussion became the foundation of the story. It is a family conversation about reconnecting to life and community that could be happening in your neighbour’s home,” she said.

The voices of five members of the Western Sydney Aboriginal community were recorded to tell the stories and their photographs taken as a basis for the animation.

beyondblue thanks the five ‘stars’ – Uncle Dennis Dunn, Uncle Kerry McKenzie, Aunty Daphne Bell, Ronald Robinson and Natalie Andrews – for taking part.

 Uncle Dennis Dunn, a Wiradjuri Elder and a ‘star’ in the short film, said he felt positive in helping to develop the story because it related to his people within the urban community of the Western Sydney region.

“The (Keeping Strong) film is so culturally-appropriate to many clans within our communities and it is understood by the community.

“As an Aboriginal Elder, I am often asked, ‘How often do I visit an Aboriginal community?’ and I reply ‘every single day’ as the majority of people think that Aboriginal communities only exist in rural or remote areas. Personally, it shows you how invisible our communities are to the people who live and work side by side with us.

“I feel proud when working with people, Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal, who care about our mob and who help to bring change for our people,” Uncle Dennis said.

The Story for Keeping Strong 

is being launched by the Aboriginal Medical Service Western Sydney, 2 Palmerston Road, Mount Druitt.

A two-minute version of the Western Sydney video is available for preview with the full five-minute version to be available after the launch. Contact Aboriginal Medical Service Western Sydney for broadcast-quality version of the short film