NACCHO Members Aboriginal Health Good News : @Apunipima ‘s Mossman Gorge gains AGPAL Accreditation again

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‘ The people of Mossman Gorge deserve the best health care and facilities we can provide and I am incredibly proud of my team for their achievement.

’Mossman Gorge Primary Health Care Centre is a real family centred practice focussing on indigenous health and chronic disease, supported by a full complement of allied health services and a visiting physician.

So stringent are the standards that many mainstream clinics need more than one go to achieve accreditation.”

Sharryl Ellington, Practice Manager for the centre

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Watch a recent NACCHO TV interview

with Sharryl about her ACCHO journey

Mossman Gorge Primary Health Care Centre, the Aboriginal community controlled health service for Mossman Gorge, has achieved the coveted AGPAL Accreditation again with ease.

AGPAL Accreditation means that safe, high quality health care is delivered according to recognised national standards. Accreditation recognises the achievements of health care teams to meet the requirements of established standards contained within the Royal Australian College of General Practitioner Standards.

Accreditation reflects a practice’s commitment to continuous quality improvements – via systems, processes, policies, culture, risk management and staff training.

Providing services to the community of Mossman Gorge, the Primary Health Care Centre is run by Apunipima Cape York Health Council, the community controlled health organisation for Cape York.

With over 250 patients, the clinic offers a full range of comprehensive primary health care services including a doctor, nurse and maternal and child health worker supported by a range of visiting services.

Mossman Gorge Primary Health Care Centre is a real family centred practice focussing on indigenous health and chronic disease, supported by a full complement of allied health services and a visiting physician.

Chief Executive of Apunipima, Cleveland Fagan said, ‘This is a tremendous achievement that we can all be proud of. For many years it has been accepted that Aboriginal people can receive second rate health care and our mission at Apunipima is to provide health care that is second to none in Australia and this accreditation takes us one step closer to achieving that aim.’

It means we can really say to the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people of Mossman Gorge that they are getting “at least” the Australian standards of quality of primary health care that are available to any other community in Australia.’

 

NACCHO Aboriginal Health News : Renal nurse Rochelle has X Factor to be face of kidneys

untitled “The statistics are alarming with one in every three Australians at an increased risk of kidney disease,Due to chronic disease in Cape York being so prevalent, our mob are at greater risk of developing kidney disease and if I can do my bit with Kidney Health Australia then it’s a step in the right direction.”

Apunipima renal nurse Rochelle Pitt is taking her expertise in kidney health to a new level as the official ambassador for Kidney Health Australia.

When Rochelle isn’t behind a microphone, she is busy seeing clients in Cape York, helping them to look after their kidney health and educating them about the most simple but important organs in their bodies. In 2014, Rochelle, who is also a singer/songwriter, made it to the top eight in Channel 7’s X Factor and was dubbed the soul mamma of music on the reality television show because of her soul/jazz/blues style of music genre.

“As a renal nurse with Apunipima I’m able to help our people in the Cape and being a face for kidney health at the same time, is very exciting,” Rochelle said.

Despite relatively few early warning signs, Rochelle is always on the lookout to nip any precursors like high blood pressure and Type 2 diabetes in the bud, to help steer patients away from the path of Chronic Kidney Disease.

In 2012-13, almost one in five Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people aged over 18 years, had indicators of Chronic Kidney Disease. Indigenous Australians were likely to have signs of Chronic Kidney Disease, and four times more likely to have Stage 4-5 Chronic Kidney Disease than non-Indigenous Australians.

“The statistics are alarming with one in every three Australians at an increased risk of kidney disease,” she said. “Due to chronic disease in Cape York being so prevalent, our mob are at greater risk of developing kidney disease and if I can do my bit with Kidney Health Australia then it’s a step in the right direction.”

 

NACCHO Aboriginal Health Good News: Apunipima cooking up healthy lessons for life

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“The “Need for Feed Cape York Style “program gives participants the skills and knowledge about healthy eating from a young age to learn about the importance of having practical ways to prevent development of chronic disease and obesity.

“Good nutrition is important for lifelong healthy eating habits,The hands-on cooking program offers participants a chance to taste new recipes, master cooking skills and enhance understanding and enjoyment of healthy foods.”

Apunipima Community Nutritionist Kirby Murtha

Mixing cooking and education makes for a healthy lifestyle according to Apunipima Cape York Health Council. Students at Western Cape College Residential Campus in Weipa have learnt life skills surrounding nutrition thanks to a program, Need for Feed Cape York Style.

Need for Feed Cape York Style is based on Diabetes Queensland’s Need for Feed program, available to schools across the state. Delivered in the Cape, this specific program targets students aged from 10 to 16.

During term 2 of the school calendar, 15 Need for Feed sessions were held at the Weipa campus, offering students the opportunity to cook delicious and healthy meals. Apunipima Community Nutritionist Kirby Murtha said students cooked a variety of meals such as curry, stir fry, pasta and hot cakes and learnt about the importance of healthy meals.

The program gives participants the skills and knowledge about healthy eating from a young age to learn about the importance of having practical ways to prevent development of chronic disease and obesity.

“Good nutrition is important for lifelong healthy eating habits,” Ms Murtha said. “The hands-on cooking program offers participants a chance to taste new recipes, master cooking skills and enhance understanding and enjoyment of healthy foods.” The program covers a series of group-based workshops where participants learn about handling food safety, healthy cooking, modifying recipes, reading labels and healthy food and drink choices.

Need For Feed was delivered by Apunipima in partnership with Cape and Torres Hospital and Health Service Weipa-based dietitian, and school-based nurse.  “Without a collaborative effort from the campus’ teachers, carers and staff, the program would not have been as successful. This program gives students the ability to learn, develop and master skills that they will have with them for a life time.”

For more information about Need for Feed, visit www.needforfeed.org.au