NACCHO Aboriginal Employment and Training news: Opportunity to report to the PM Tony Abbott on Aboriginal health employment and training needs

2013_CCHEP launch

Jobs are the key to improving opportunities for all Australians.

It would be a shame to miss this great opportunity to put the focus on Aboriginal community controlled health and away from the mining sector.

Here is your opportunity to tell the Prime Minister of Australia, the Hon Tony Abbott MP your needs in the Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Sector.Picture above Congress Alice Springs

STAKEHOLDERS MEETING DATES BELOW

Or written submissions close 31 December  2013

DETAILS HERE

The Commonwealth Government believes more needs to be done to boost Indigenous employment and support Indigenous Australians to get ahead.

All Australians yearn to see practical and genuine improvement in the lives of Indigenous people.

Too often, employment and training programmes provide ‘training for training’s sake’ without the practical skills that people need to fill the jobs that exist.

To address this, the Prime Minister of Australia, the Hon Tony Abbott MP, has asked Mr Andrew Forrest to lead a Review of Indigenous Training and Employment Programmes.

This Review will report to the Prime Minister in April 2014, providing practical recommendations to ensure Indigenous training and employment services are targeted and administered to connect unemployed Indigenous people with real and sustainable jobs.

It will consider ways to dramatically improve how services can better respond to employers who want to provide sustainable employment and end the cycle of Indigenous disadvantage. Innovative approaches that secure real jobs will be central to the Review, including practical life training and mentoring.

The Parliamentary Secretary to the Prime Minster, the Hon Alan Tudge MP, will guide and shape the Review process with Mr Forrest.

Date for consultations

Perth Friday 15 November 2013 …9.45am – 11.15am Perth Convention Centre 21 Mounts Bay Rd, Perth

Adelaide Tuesday 19 November 2013…9.45am – 11.15am Adelaide Convention Centre North Terrace, Adelaide

 Alice Springs Tuesday 19 November 2013…3.45pm – 5.15pm Alice Springs Convention Centre 93 Barrett Dr, Alice Springs

Kununurra Wednesday 20 November 2013…9.45am – 11.15am Ord River Sports Club Chestnut Dr, Kununurra

 Darwin Wednesday 20 November 2013…5.30pm – 7.00pm Darwin Convention Centre Stokes Hill Rd, Darwin

Brisbane Thursday 21 November 2013…9.45am – 11.15am Brisbane City Hall 64 Adelaide St, Brisbane

 Sydney Thursday 21 November 2013…5.15pm – 6.45pm Masonic Conference Centre 66 Goulburn St, Sydney

Melbourne Friday 22 November 2013…9.45am – 11.15am Melbourne Town Hall Cnr Swanston and Collins Street, Melbourne

There is so much goodwill from employers.

The challenge, though, is to convert good intentions into practical change for the better.

As Chair of the Review, Mr Forrest is looking for breakthrough ideas to, once and for all, end the disparity in employment for Indigenous Australians. Your input is vital. In order to realise real change, new and sustainable solutions are needed.

To have your say, you may wish to participate in a meeting with Mr Forrest and the Review team, or lodge a concise written submission.

Further information is provided at How to get involved. This website will be updated regularly to include details of meetings and how to participate.

Are you interested in working in Aboriginal health at a national level?

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Are you interested in working in Aboriginal health?

NACCHO is the national authority in comprehensive Aboriginal primary health care currently has a wide range of job opportunities in the pipeline.

Current NACCHO job opportunities

NACCHO political alert : Aboriginal Australians suffering “the racism of low expectations”

A T and M

Prime Minister Tony Abbott will today announce the appointment of Mr Forrest to run the review which will be required to report back to him by April 7 next year according to reports in NEWS LTD

INDIGENOUS Australians are suffering “the racism of low expectations” about their job prospects, billionaire miner Andrew Forrest has claimed after taking the reins of a review of Federal Government Aboriginal employment programs.

SEE NACCHO NEWS ALERT: RACISM A DRIVER OF ABORIGINAL ILL HEALTH

The review will provide recommendations to ensure indigenous training and employment services are run to connect unemployed indigenous people with real and sustainable jobs.

It will also consider ways that training and employment services can better link to the commitment of employers and end the cycle of indigenous disadvantage.

Mr Forrest said that while indigenous Australians “continue to suffer the racism of low expectations”, they could make the greatest social and economic contribution to workplaces and the nation when given the opportunity.

“I am looking forward to hearing from as many people as possible throughout this review, to ensure all successful models of training that lead to employment are fully considered,” he said.

“I have seen in my own company Aboriginal people who have turned their lives around when given the guarantee of a job at the completion of training.”

Mr Abbott said the review delivered on an election commitment and showed his government was committed to boosting job opportunities for indigenous Australians.

“Too often, employment and training programs provide ‘training for training’s sake’ without the practical skills that people need to fill the jobs that exist,” he said.

“It is important that attention be given not just to skills training, but practical life education and ongoing mentoring to make sure jobs are lasting and careers are developed for indigenous Australians.”

Mr Abbott has promised to spend a week every year in an indigenous community as Prime Minister.

Mr Forrest said the review would throw open the books of government funding.

“We cannot measure the impact of labour market interventions without examining them from a systems perspective,” he said.

“By understanding the way they connect, and where the gaps are, we can inform policies that will provide holistic support for indigenous jobseekers so they can add value to the workplace on day one of the job.”

NACCHO JOB OPPORTUNITIES

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Are you interested in working in Aboriginal health?

NACCHO as the national authority in comprenhesive Aboriginal primary health care currently has a wide range of job opportunities in the pipeline.

Register your current or future interest with our HR TEAM HERE

NACCHO political alert: Aboriginal health policy merry-go-round keeps spinning

Tony

“Behind the idea of “empowered communities” stands that torchbearer of new thinking, Cape York’s Noel Pearson, in alliance with a corporate partnerships network, Jawun. Their blueprint calls for “better governance structures” and more effective service delivery; a long list of concerned figures from Australia’s business leadership backs the vision

What the new Empowered Communities concept Pearson is proposing brings to the scene is simply a distrust of government and public service, and a wish for power to swing somehow to the governed, to the administered. Indigenous organisations would thus sit in judgment on the agencies that fund them, a pattern without obvious national precedent

WITH much fanfare, flanked by the new elite counsellors of Aboriginal Australia, Tony Abbott stepped forward this week in Sydney to support “empowered” indigenous communities and a grand audit of governmental spending on indigenous affairs.

A fresh path, but the wrong solution to the right problem.

Behind the idea of “empowered communities” stands that torchbearer of new thinking, Cape York’s Noel Pearson, in alliance with a corporate partnerships network, Jawun. Their blueprint calls for “better governance structures” and more effective service delivery; a long list of concerned figures from Australia’s business leadership backs the vision.

An Abbott administration will give them $5 million in start-up funds to set up an indigenous-backed productivity panel and evaluate the vast spending now poured into special indigenous programs across the continent. It is a slight decision with momentous consequences: it signals with a trumpet the prime ministerial candidate’s willingness to embrace radical proposals and his acceptance that the federal bureaucracy is failing in its tasks.

This newest initiative, though, adds fresh layers of confusion to a confused scene. There is a grave need for clear thought in Aboriginal policy-making, particularly in the remote communities of the north and centre where the need for a new model is most urgent. The problems lie in government programs, with government – and it is by government that they must be solved.

This is not virgin terrain. The commonwealth commissioned a review of its $3.5 billion worth of indigenous specific programs that was completed three years ago and reported “dismally poor returns”. There is an existing Productivity Commission that makes its regular voluminous reports on Aboriginal disadvantage.

What the new Empowered Communities concept Pearson is proposing brings to the scene is simply a distrust of government and public service, and a wish for power to swing somehow to the governed, to the administered. Indigenous organisations would thus sit in judgment on the agencies that fund them, a pattern without obvious national precedent.

Is the bureaucracy in need of this supplement? The commonwealth has long been quietly sympathetic to the idea of a spectrum of different approaches to social projects, and has funded various public-private ventures handsomely, in the thought that they may achieve results in key areas: among them the Generation One scheme championed by mining magnate Andrew Forrest and the Australian Indigenous Education Foundation of financier Andrew Penfold.

Pearson and Jawun are fishing in the same pond, in the hope that indigenous influence over program funding can build some dividend. Social power, though, grows slowly, from cohesion and community economic strength: it cannot be given by adjusting the state’s mechanisms, only claimed.

This moment in the politics of Aboriginal governance needs a phase change more than a corporatisation. The crisis has not grown purely because of the public service overstaffing and the administrative failures of the great power departments in Canberra, or the constant policy vacillations of successive regimes. It also has come from the intensity of governmental desire for improvement, from ever-increasing programs.

This hyper-administration is matched by poor understanding of conditions on the ground, an assumption that Aboriginal communities are somehow different in their needs from the rest of the bush, and an unwillingness to invest in national development infrastructure in remote regions of Australia. All this suggests a need for regional, not racialised, thinking in the pursuit of remote community advancement. The roadblocks that are specific to the communities are already well-identified and need no evaluation, only action: they are passive welfare, communal land tenure, poor education and a pandemic of alcohol and drug abuse. Against this backdrop, outside panels to advise on service delivery are mere distractions.

The public service has responsibility for delivering public programs and should be rewarded according to outcomes. A new cadre of specially trained and qualified remote area experts is needed as a dedicated stream within the public service, in just the way specialist remote area teachers must be recruited from the best of their profession and given career-long contracts; it would be logical for such experts to be locals by origin.

If a change of government comes next weekend, there is an opportunity for a complete rethink of government in indigenous areas, by government, rather than through the hasty creation of parallel structures. The crisis is at ground level and much of it relates precisely to the powerlessness of communities before bureaucrats.

Take the example of the remote Ngaanyatjarra lands of the western desert.

The newly imposed “remote jobs and communities program” just launched by the federal government has stripped $3.5m from the region and doomed it to slow extinction through lack of services. Its local governing bodies lack powerful friends such as Jawun, which has given its patronage instead to the NPY Women’s Council, a fringe group with no responsibility for core service delivery.

Abbott stands with Pearson, and he stands on the verge of office – but should he take power, it is the Australian public service, not some collection of corporate well-wishers, that will have to take prime responsibility for resolving the remote indigenous community crisis.