NACCHO Aboriginal Health News Alert : New Report @ABSStats Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health survey shows mixed outcomes : But fewer of our mob are #Smoking

 “A new report shows mixed health outcomes for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people with a reduction in smoking and improvements in how people feel about their health but an increased proportion of people with chronic conditions causing significant health problems.

The 2018-19 National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Survey released today by the Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS) examines long-term health conditions, risk factors, and social and emotional well-being indicators.

The survey included Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people from all states and territories and included people in both non-remote and remote areas.” 

Please note formal NACCHO response press release out Friday 

Indigenous and Social Information Program Manager, Stephen Collett, said positive outcomes included a decrease in people aged 15 years and over who smoked every day, falling from 41 per cent in 2012-13 to 37 per cent in 2018-19.

“In addition, the proportion of young people who had never smoked increased between 2012-13 and 2018-19 from 77 per cent to 85 per cent for 15 to 17 year-olds and from 43 per cent to 50 per cent for those aged 18 to 24,” he said.

“The results also show a decline in the proportion of people aged 18 years and over who consumed more than four standard drinks on one occasion in the last 12 months, down from 57 per cent in 2012-13 to 54 per cent in 2018-19.”

However, 46 per cent of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people had one or more chronic conditions that posed a significant health problem, up from 40 per cent in 2012-13.

“People living in non-remote areas were more likely to report having one or more chronic conditions (48 per cent) than people living in remote areas (33 per cent).

“The proportion of people with diabetes was higher in remote areas (12 per cent) than non-remote areas (7 per cent) and similarly, rates of kidney disease were higher in remote areas (3.4 per cent) than non-remote areas (1.4 per cent).”

Between 2012-13 and 2018-19 the proportion of people who were overweight or obese increased both for children aged 2-14 years (up from 30 per cent to 37 per cent) and those aged 15 years and over (up from 66 per cent to 71 per cent).

More than four in 10 people (45 per cent) rated their health as excellent or very good, up from 39 per cent in 2012-13 and more than half (57 per cent) of children aged 2-17 years had seen a dentist or dental professional in the last 12 months.

Key statistics Health

  • More than four in 10 (46%) people had at least one chronic condition that posed a significant health problem in 2018–19, up from 40% in 2012–13.
  • The proportion of people with asthma in remote areas (9%) was around half the proportion for people living in non-remote areas (17%).
  • More than one in 10 people aged two years and over reported having anxiety (17%) or depression (13%).
  • More than four in 10 (45%) people aged 15 years and over rated their own health as excellent or very good in 2018–19, up from 39% in 2012–13.

Risk factors

  • The proportion of people aged 15 years and over who smoked every day decreased from 41% in 2012–13 to 37% in 2018–19.
  • The proportion of children aged 2–14 years who were overweight or obese increased from 30% in 2012–13 to 37% in 2018–19.
  • The proportion of people aged 15 years and over who had consumed the recommended number of serves of fruit per day declined for those living in remote areas from 49% in 2012–13 to 42% in 2018–19.
  • Sugar sweetened drinks were usually consumed every day by around one-quarter (24%) of people aged 15 years and over.

Use of health services

  • More than half (57%) of children aged 2–17 years had seen a dentist or dental professional in the last 12 months.
  • The proportion of people who did not see a GP when needed in the last 12 months was higher for those living in non-remote areas (14%) than remote areas (8%).

The National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Survey collected data on a broad range of health-related topics, language, cultural identification, education, labour force status, income and discrimination — for full details see Survey topics (appendix).

NACCHO Aboriginal health news: Smoking fall a win for Aboriginal health, but many problems remain: ABS report

 Koori Mail Handover

THE gap between the health of Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal Australians is still “significant”, according to NACCHO the peak body on Aboriginal  health.

It also says improving Aboriginal health should be a priority for all state and territory governments.

Report from Patricia Karvelas The Australian

Picture Above :Justin Mohamed Chair of NACCHO recently launching NACCHO Aboriginal Health newspaper ,with Trevor Kapeen Koori Mail

The Australian Bureau of Statistics’ Australian Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Survey 2012-13, released today, showed some “encouraging” results in reducing smoking rates but other areas needed more focus.

KEY FINDINGS BELOW or

ABS REPORT and more INFO

Justin Mohamed, Chair of the National Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation (NACCHO), said the fact that the National Partnership Agreement (NPA) to Close the Gap had not been renewed by all state and territory governments meant that hundreds of health programs that were improving health outcomes were now at risk.

DOWNLOAD THE NACCHO PRESS RELEASE

“The investment in programs to stop Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people from smoking is reaping rewards with smoking rates on the decrease,” Mr Mohamed said.

“It is critical that investment in these programs continues so we maintain the downward trend.

“The fact that two in five Aboriginal people are still daily smokers means we need to keep our focus on the programs that are working such as those run nationally by Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Services.”

Mr Mohamed said another pleasing result was the reduction in the prevalence of ear and hearing problems since 2001.

“However we are still seeing rates of diabetes, asthma and heart and kidney disease are way too high in both remote and urban Aboriginal communities. Obesity rates are 1.5 times non-Aboriginal communities and other areas of concern are alcohol consumption and mental health.”

Mr Mohamed said improving Aboriginal health required long-term commitment and investment, and leadership at the national level.

“There are no quick fixes in Aboriginal health. Todays report shows we are making some headway but achieving generational change means maintaining the momentum,” he said.

“Inaction on the NPA means many of the health programs and services that have contributed to the gains seen in the ABS report will literally have to close their doors within months.”

He said getting the states and territories back on board with a new agreement must now be a priority for the new Coalition government.

“Aboriginal community controlled health services are making a difference in their communities and they need to see continued support from all levels of government.”

KEY FINDINGS

General health

  • In 2012–13, around two in five (39.2%) Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people aged 15 years and over considered themselves to be in very good or excellent health, while 7.2% rated their health as poor.
  • Based on age standardised proportions, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people aged 15 years and over were around half as likely as non-Indigenous people to have reported excellent or very good health (rate ratio of 0.6).


Long-term health conditions

Asthma

  • In 2012–13, one in six (17.5%) Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people had asthma.
  • Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in non-remote areas were twice as likely as those in remote areas to have asthma (19.6% compared with 9.9%).
  • Based on age standardised proportions, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people were twice as likely as non-Indigenous people to have asthma (rate ratio of 1.9) (Endnote 1).

Ear diseases and hearing loss

  • In 2012–13, around one in eight (12.3%) Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people reported diseases of the ear and/or hearing problems.
  • Based on age standardised proportions, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people were more likely than non-Indigenous people to have diseases of the ear and/or hearing problems (rate ratio of 1.3) (Endnote 1).

Heart and circulatory diseases

  • In 2012–13, around one in eight (12.0%) Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people had heart disease.
  • Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander rates for heart disease were significantly higher than the comparable rates for non-Indigenous people in all age groups from 15–54 years.
  • Based on age standardised proportions, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people were more likely than non-Indigenous people to have asthma (rate ratio of 1.2) (Endnote 1).

Diabetes/high sugar levels

  • In 2012–13, around one in twelve (8.2%) Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people had diabetes mellitus and/or high sugar levels in their blood or urine.
  • Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander rates for diabetes/high sugar levels were between three and five times as high as the comparable rates for non-Indigenous people in all age groups from 25 years and over.
  • Based on age standardised proportions, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people were three times as likely as non-Indigenous people to have diabetes/high sugar levels (rate ratio of 3.3) (Endnote 1).


Health risk factors

Tobacco smoking

  • ln 2012–13, two in five (41.0%) Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people aged 15 years and over smoked on a daily basis.
  • Rates of daily smoking for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people have come down from 50.9% in 2002 and 44.6% in 2008
  • In 2012–13, current daily smoking was still more prevalent among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people than non-Indigenous people in every age group
  • Based on age standardised proportions, the gap between the daily smoking rate in the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander population and non-Indigenous population was 27 percentage points in 2001 and was 25 percentage points in 2012–13 (Endnote 1).

Alcohol consumption

  • In 2012–13, around one in six (18.0%) Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people aged 15 years and over had consumed more than two standard drinks per day on average, exceeding the lifetime risk guidelines.
  • Based on age standardised proportions, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people aged 15 years and over and non-Indigenous people were exceeding the lifetime risk guidelines at similar rates (rate ratio of 1.0).
  • In 2012–13, just over half (53.6%) Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people aged 15 years and over had consumed more than four standard drinks on a single occasion in the past year, exceeding the threshold for single occasion risk.
  • Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women aged 35 years and over were significantly more likely than non-Indigenous women in this age group to have exceeded the threshold for single occasion risk
  • Based on age standardised proportions, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people aged 15 years and over were more likely than non-Indigenous people to have exceeded the single occasion risk guidelines (rate ratio of 1.1)(Endnote 1).

Illicit substance use

  • In 2012–13, just over one in five (21.7%) Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people aged 15 years and over said that they had used an illicit substance in the previous year.
  • Marijuana was the most commonly reported illicit drug, having been used by one in six (18%) Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people aged 15 years and over in the previous year.

Overweight and obesity

  • In 2012–13, almost one-third (30.4%) of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children aged 2–14 years were overweight or obese according to their BMI
  • In 2012–13, two-thirds (65.6%) Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people aged 15 years and over were overweight or obese (28.6% and 37.0% respectively), according to their BMI.
  • Obesity rates for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander females and males were significantlyhigher than the comparable rates for non-Indigenous people in almost every age group.

Exercise levels – non-remote areas only

  • In 2012–13, three in five (62%) Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people aged 18 years and over were physically inactive and one in ten (10%) had exercise at high intensity.
  • Based on age standardised proportions, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander adults in non-remote areas were more likely than non-Indigenous people to have been sedentary or exercising at low intensity (rate ratio of 1.1) and were only half as likely to have been exercising at high intensity (rate ratio of 0.6) (Endnote 1).
  • In 2012–13, just under half (46%) of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander adults in non-remote areas had met the National Physical Activity (NPA) Guidelines target of 30 minutes of moderate intensity physical activity on most days (or a total of 150 minutes per week).
  • Based on age standardised proportions, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander adults in non-remote areas were less likely than non-Indigenous people to have met the NPA targets of 150 minutes of moderate intensity exercise per week or 150 minutes and 5 sessions per week (rate ratio of 0.8 for both) (Endnote 1).


Physical measurements

Waist circumference

  • In 2012–13, 60.4% of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander men aged 18 years and over had a waist circumference that put them at an increased risk of developing chronic diseases, while 81.4% of women had an increased level of risk.
  • On average, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander men aged 18 years and over had a waist measurement of 99.7 cm, while women had a waist measurement of 97.4 cm.

Blood pressure

  • In 2012–13, one in five (20.3%) Aboriginal and Torres Strait islander adults had measured high blood pressure (systolic or diastolic blood pressure equal to or greater than 140/90 mmHg).
  • Based on age standardised proportions, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander adults were more likely than non-Indigenous people to have high blood pressure (rate ratio of 1.2) (Endnote 1).

Health-related actions

Consultations with health professionals

In 2012–13, in the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander population

  • just over one in five (21.9%) people had consulted a GP or specialist in the last two weeks
  • one in five (18.5%) people had visited a health professional (other than a doctor) in the last two weeks
  • one in twenty (4.8%) people aged two years and over had visited a dental professional in the last two weeks.
  • Between 2001 and 2012–13, use of health professionals (other than GP/specialist) increased significantly from 16.3% to 18.5%.
  • Between 2001 and 2012–13, consultation rates for GP/specialist and dental professionals have remained largely unchanged.

Hospital visits and admissions

In 2012–13, in the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander population

  • around one in sixteen (6.0%) people had visited the casualty/outpatients/day clinic in the last two weeks
  • around one in six (18.0%) people had been admitted to a hospital in the previous year.

ENDNOTE

1. Difference between the age standardised proportion for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people and non-Indigenous people is statistically significant

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