NACCHO Aboriginal Women’s Health #IWD2019 : $35 million investment in #FourthActionPlan will respond to the needs, backgrounds and experiences of #Indigenous women and children affected by domestic, family and sexual violence.

Unfortunately however too many Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women face far higher levels of violence than the general community and that is why we need to put in place genuine Indigenous designed and Indigenous led solutions.
 
“The $35 million in Indigenous specific measures announced today will help tackle the drivers of family and domestic violence and address the specific needs of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people affected by violence.”

Minister for Indigenous Affairs, Nigel Scullion, said the investments announced as part of the Fourth Action Plan will respond to the needs, backgrounds and experiences of Indigenous women and children affected by domestic, family and sexual violence.: see Part 1 Below

Our Government’s first priority is to keep Australians safe. To hear the accounts of survivors, and see the statistics, it’s just not good enough .That’s why we are investing $328 million for the Fourth Action Plan to fund prevention, response and recovery initiatives.

This is the largest ever Commonwealth contribution to the National Plan. To stop violence against women, we need to counter the culture of disrespect towards women. A culture of disrespect towards women is a precursor to violence, and anyone who doesn’t see that is kidding themselves.   That’s why we are investing so heavily in prevention with $68.3 million to stop violence before it begins.

This is about changing attitudes to violence, and helping those who think violence is an option, to stop.

We will also develop Australia’s first national prevention strategy to stop domestic and family violence and sexual assault, and continue our work to change the attitudes and beliefs that can lead to violence.”

The Prime Minister said his Government would deliver the largest ever Commonwealth investment of $328 million for prevention and frontline services through the Fourth Action Plan of the National Plan to Reduce Violence against Women and their Children 2010-2022. See in Full Part 2

 

‘ This measure also supports an update of the Royal Australian College of General Practitioners’ Abuse and violence: Working with our patients in general practice  
 
After family and friends, it is GPs and other primary care providers who survivors of family and domestic violence turn to for support.

The quality of the response from the GP has been found to have a deep and profound impact on victims, influencing whether they seek help and support in the future.’

Federal Health Minister Greg Hunt said the Government is committing $9.6 million to boost family violence care. Of that funding, Minister Hunt said $2.1 million over three years will be invested to train 5000 primary care workers across Australia, including GPs, ‘to better respond and support family violence victims’ See Part 3 Below 

Part 1 : Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women and their children will receive support through the Federal Government’s $35 million investment as part of the Fourth Action Plan (4AP) of the National Plan to Reduce Violence Against Women and their Children 2010-2022.

The $35 million package includes:

  • Ongoing additional investment to continue and expand Indigenous specific projects funded under the Third Action Plan to keep women and their children safe from violence including funding to increase Family Violence Prevention Legal Services’ capacity to deliver holistic crisis support to Indigenous women and children
  • New funding to support Indigenous women and children through intensive family case management in remote areas and areas of high need so they are able to access services that work with the whole family to address the impacts of violence
  • Practical intervention programs to work with Indigenous young people and adults at risk of experiencing or using violence to address past trauma and equip them with the practical tools and skills to develop positive and violence-free relationships
  • $1.7 million to support the second stage of the Wiyi YaniU Thangani (Women’s Voices) national conversation with the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Social Justice Commissioner, June Oscar AO.

“These measures, funded out of the Indigenous Advancement Strategy, have been developed in partnership with Indigenous leaders, service providers and experts who have told us that investment is needed to provide wrap around support to women and their families impacted by domestic violence and to address the trauma and violence that is often a cause of future violence.

“These measures will also be rolled out in consultation with Indigenous Australians with the establishment of an expert consultative committee involving Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander leaders, experts and service providers such as representatives of the Family Violence Prevention Legal Services to ensure these measures are delivered in a culturally appropriate way, in the areas of highest need and with Indigenous organisations and service providers that can best meet the needs of women and their families. Appropriate monitoring and evaluation strategies will also be built into this work.

“On top of this investment, the Coalition Government will provide $2.5 million for the Office of the eSafety Commissioner to work with and assist Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women in communities across Australia to identify, report and protect themselves and their children from technology-facilitated abuse.

“Funding will also be provided to 1800RESPECT to improve accessibility for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people to ensure they have access to high quality and culturally appropriate counselling and support.

“Together these initiatives provide a comprehensive suite of measures to support Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander families, victims and survivors of family and domestic violence and builds on existing initiatives such as the Coalition’s record $121 million investment to 2020 for 14 Family Violence Prevention Legal Services,” Minister Scullion said.

If you or someone you know is impacted by sexual assault, domestic or family violence, call 1800RESPECT on 1800 737 732 or visit www.1800RESPECT.org.au.

Part 2 RECORD FUNDING TO REDUCE DOMESTIC VIOLENCE

Combating violence against women and children remains one of the Federal Government’s top priorities, as part of its plan to keep Australians safe.

The Prime Minister said his Government would deliver the largest ever Commonwealth investment of $328 million for prevention and frontline services through the Fourth Action Plan of the National Plan to Reduce Violence against Women and their Children 2010-2022.

“Our Government’s first priority is to keep Australians safe. To hear the accounts of survivors, and see the statistics, it’s just not good enough,” the Prime Minister said.

“That’s why we are investing $328 million for the Fourth Action Plan to fund prevention, response and recovery initiatives.

“This is the largest ever Commonwealth contribution to the National Plan.

“To stop violence against women, we need to counter the culture of disrespect towards women.

“A culture of disrespect towards women is a precursor to violence, and anyone who doesn’t see that is kidding themselves.

“That’s why we are investing so heavily in prevention with $68.3 million to stop violence before it begins.

“This is about changing attitudes to violence, and helping those who think violence is an option, to stop. “We will also develop Australia’s first national prevention strategy to stop domestic and family violence and sexual assault, and continue our work to change the attitudes and beliefs that can lead to violence.”

The National Plan connects the important work being done by all Australian governments, community organisations and individuals so that Australian women and children can live in safe communities.

The National Plan and the Government’s investments are the product of extensive consultations with frontline workers and survivors ahead of the release of the Fourth Action Plan 2019-22 in mid-2019.

Minister for Families and Social Services Paul Fletcher said the Commonwealth would invest $35 million in support and prevention measures for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities, and $78 million to provide safe places for people impacted by domestic and family violence.

“We will act against the different forms abuse can take, including preventing financial abuse and technology-facilitated abuse, and we have included specific measures targeted to address the risks faced by women with intellectual disability and Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women,” Minister Fletcher said.

The Commonwealth commitment will also fund targeted prevention initiatives to reach culturally and linguistically diverse communities and people with disability.

“Domestic violence is a risk that all women face – but we recognise that specific groups may have particular vulnerability, which is why there are specific targeted measures included in this package.”

“Today’s announcement brings Commonwealth investment in this space since 2013 to over $840 million,” said Mr Fletcher.

The Commonwealth’s commitment also provides $82 million for frontline services, including investments to improve and build on the systems responsible for keeping women and children safe, such as free training for health workers to identify and better support domestic violence victims, and the development of national standards for sexual assault responses.

The Coalition will investment $62 million in 1800RESPECT to support the service, which has rapidly grown in scope as more Australians find the courage to seek help and advice.

Minister for Women Kelly O’Dwyer said all women and children have the right to feel safe, and to feel supported to seek help when they need it.

“The statistics on this issue are shocking – one in six women have experienced physical or sexual violence by a current or former partner since the age of 15. This figure increases to nearly one in four women when violence by boyfriends, girlfriends and dates is included,” Minister O’Dwyer said.

“The safety of women and children is vitally important. Our Government has zero tolerance for violence against women and children.

“Whether it’s at home, in the workplace, in our communities or online, all women and children deserve to be safe.”

Summary of new measures:

  • $82 million for frontline services
  • $68 million for prevention strategies
  • $35 million in support and prevention measures for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities funded under the Indigenous Advancement Strategy.
  • $78 million to provide safe places for people impacted by domestic and family violence.
  • 1800RESPECT will receive $64 million to support the service.

The Coalition has taken strong action already to protect women and children, including:

  • introducing a minimum standard for domestic violence leave for the very first time;
  • banning the direct cross-examination of women by their alleged perpetrator during family law proceedings;
  • extending early release of superannuation on compassionate grounds to victims of family and domestic violence;
  • expanding Good Shepherd Microfinance’s No Interest Loan Scheme to 45,000 women experiencing family and domestic violence;
  • providing over 7,046 visas for women and children needing safe refuge through the Women at Risk program;
  • extending funding for Specialist Domestic Violence Units and Health Justice Partnerships including funding for additional financial support services;
  • funding support for an additional 31,200 families to resolve family law disputes quickly through mediation;
  • continuing advertising of the award winning Stop it at the Start campaign;
  • further funding 1800RESPECT, the National Sexual Assault, Domestic and Family Violence Counselling Service;
  • investing an additional $6.7 million in DV alert;
  • prioritising women and children who are escaping family violence in the $7.8 billion housing and homelessness agreement; and
  • establishing the eSafety Commissioner in 2017, expanding the scope of the Office of the Children’s eSafety Commissioner.

About the National Plan to Reduce Violence Against Women and their Children (2010-2022) (the National Plan)

The National Plan aims to connect the important work being done by all Australian governments, community organisations and individuals to reduce violence so that we can work together to ensure each year, less women experience violence and more women and their children live safely.

The Commonwealth Government is leading the development of the Fourth Action Plan 2019-2022 of the National Plan to Reduce Violence against Women and their Children 2010-2022 (the National Plan) in partnership with state and territory governments.

The Fourth Action Plan is the final action plan of the National Plan and is due for implementation from mid-2019.

For further information on the National Plan, visit

Part 3 Major funding boost for family violence training

FROM RACGP Post

Family violence has been in the spotlight, with two large funding pledges from the Federal Government.

In one announcement, Federal Health Minister Greg Hunt said the Government is committing $9.6 million to boost family violence care.

Of that funding, Minister Hunt said $2.1 million over three years will be invested to train 5000 primary care workers across Australia, including GPs, ‘to better respond and support family violence victims’.

That training will be delivered by accredited providers and will reflect evidence-based trauma-informed models of care and culturally appropriate care.

‘This measure also supports an update of the Royal Australian College of General Practitioners’ Abuse and violence: Working with our patients in general practice,’ Minister Hunt said.

‘After family and friends, it is GPs and other primary care providers who survivors of family and domestic violence turn to for support.

‘The quality of the response from the GP has been found to have a deep and profound impact on victims, influencing whether they seek help and support in the future.’

A further $7.5m will be provided over three years towards expanding the Recognise, Respond and Refer Program, an initiative of the Brisbane South Primary Health Network (PHN) to a further four PHN regions.

The trial states that it will:

  • deliver whole-of-practice training to GP staff to recognise the signs of family violence
  • develop locally relevant care and referral pathways for people who are, or are at risk of, experiencing family violence
  • provide post-training support to practices to assist them to put in place training to identify and support victims of family violence
  • develop models to integrate primary healthcare into the domestic and family violence sector in the local region, including clear roles for GPs.

NACCHO Aboriginal Health #Saveadate Events and Conferences : This week features 8 March #InternationalWomensDay #MorePowerfulTogetherand March 3- 9 #WorldHearingWeek and #HearingAwarenessWeek

This weeks featured NACCHO SAVE A DATE events

March 9 International Women’s Day #IWD

Download the 2019 Health Awareness Days Calendar 

9 March  Bush to Beach Project Grazing Style Light Indigenous Marathon Fundraiser

12- 13 March Overcoming Indigenous Family Violence 

14 March Workshop Brisbane Moving Beyond the Frontline project 

14 – 15 March 2019 Close the Gap for Vision by 2020 – National Conference 2019

21 March National Close the Gap Day

21 March Indigenous Ear Health Workshop Brisbane

22 March : The experts priorities for the 2019 Federal Election 

24 -27 March National Rural Health Alliance Conference

20 -24 May 2019 World Indigenous Housing Conference. Gold Coast

18 -20 June Lowitja Health Conference Darwin

2019 Dr Tracey Westerman’s Workshops 

7 -14 July 2019 National NAIDOC Grant funding round opens

23 -25 September IAHA Conference Darwin

24 -26 September 2019 CATSINaM National Professional Development Conference

5-8 November The Lime Network Conference New Zealand 

Featured Save date

March 9 International Women’s Day #IWD

International Women’s Day (IWD) will be celebrated on 8 March across all our 302 Aboriginal community controlled health clinics and 8 affiliates , where thousands of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander woman are involved daily in all aspects and levels of comprehensive Aboriginal primary health care delivery.

Professional and dedicated Indigenous Woman CEO’S , Doctors, Clinic Managers, Aboriginal Health Workers , Nurses, Receptionists etc.

We honour all the woman working in our #ACCHO’s over 45 years in #NT #NSW #QLD #WA #SA #VIC #ACT #TAS

VIEW NACCHO Tribute first published 2018

IWD is a global day celebrating the social, economic, cultural and political achievements of women.

Australia’s IWD 2019 theme, More Powerful Together, recognises the important role we all play – as women, men, non-binary and gender diverse people. It takes all of us, working in collaboration and across that which sometimes divides us, breaking down stereotypes and gendered roles to create a world where women and girls everywhere have equal rights and opportunities.

More Powerful Together is a clarion call to stand in unison for gender equality.

AIATSIS : Have you ordered your International Women’s Day poster yet?

This year’s features a wonderful portrait of the much loved and respected Yolŋu leader, Laurie Baymarrwaŋa.

We have limited numbers of the poster available to order, while stocks last

REQUEST HERE 

March 3-9 March Hearing Awareness Week

We are super excited to launch our in celebration of !

We’re calling on all Australians to take the first step toward healthy hearing by joining us. Check your hearing online now:

Part 2 Pictured above 

Sound Scouts is proud to participate in Hearing Awareness Week  from the 3rd to the 9th of March, 2019.  Thanks to Australian Hearing and funding from the Australian Government, you can download the app for free and test your child today.

Sound Scouts is the children’s hearing check designed to make testing easy. Sound Scouts incorporates the science of a hearing test in a fun game. The children don’t even know they are being tested.

Developed in collaboration with the National Acoustic Laboratories, Sound Scouts provides an instant report and guidance on next steps if a problem is detected.

EASY SETUP

Fun app-based test delivering an immediate report.

PROVEN

Published in the International Journal of Audiology, and recommended by
Australian Hearing.

AWARD WINNING

Highly recognised and  supported by NSW Health.

Hearing issues are a common cause of speech, learning and behavioural problems so it is important for all children to have their hearing tested. If a child struggles to hear, they’ll also struggle to learn. The World Health Organisation recommends children have their hearing tested when they start school*.

1 in 10 children are held back at school by hearing loss. Take action to ensure your child isn’t one of them.

WEBSITE 

Download the NACCHO 2019 Calendar Health Awareness Days

For many years ACCHO organisations have said they wished they had a list of the many Indigenous “ Days “ and Aboriginal health or awareness days/weeks/events.

With thanks to our friends at ZockMelon here they both are!

It even has a handy list of the hashtags for the event.

Download the 53 Page 2019 Health days and events calendar HERE

naccho zockmelon 2019 health days and events calendar

We hope that this document helps you with your planning for the year ahead.

Every Tuesday we will update these listings with new events and What’s on for the week ahead

To submit your events or update your info

Contact: Colin Cowell www.nacchocommunique.com

NACCHO Social Media Editor Tel 0401 331 251

Email : nacchonews@naccho.org.au

9 March  Bush to Beach Project Grazing Style Light Indigenous Marathon Fundraiser

The Port Macquarie Running Festival is happening over the weekend of the 9th-10th March 2019. As a part of this event we are running a fundraiser to support the important work being undertaken by Charlie & Tali Maher as a part of the Indigenous Marathon Project Running And Walking group. Come along to hear from Olympians Nova Peris, Steve Moneghette & Robert de Castella while meeting members of the Indigenous Marathon Project over lunch. We hope to see you there.

All funds raised will go towards the Bush to Beach Project. The project aims
to develop a strong relationship between the Northern Territory community of
Ntaria and the coastal community of Port Macquarie, with an exchange program
occurring several times throughout the year. This will include young Indigenous
people visiting the communities and participating in running and walking events
to promote healthy living. We thank you for your support.

Guest Speakers: Olympians Nova Peris, Steve Moneghetti & Robert de Castella.

Any enquiries please get in touch with Nina Cass or Charlie Maher (ninacass87@gmail.com / charles.maher@det.nsw.edu.au)

Tickets $59 Register HERE 

12- 13 March Overcoming Indigenous Family Violence 

Djirra has been chosen to be the charity partner of the next Overcoming Indigenous Family Violence conference organised by Aventedge in Melbourne on the 12th and 13th of March.

On the first day, Tuesday 12th of March, Marion Hansen, Djirra’s chairperson, will give the opening and closing address. At 10.30am, Djirra’s CEO Antoinette Braybrook will share her experience and knowledge on Supporting Aboriginal women, their children and communities to be safe, culturally strong and free from violence.

Family violence against Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people, predominantly women and their children, is a national crisis.

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities and their organisations hold the solutions to ending the disproportionate rates of family violence. However this requires the support and involvement of a range of stakeholders around the country.

The 5th annual Overcoming Indigenous Family Violence Forum (Melbourne & Perth) has partnered with Djirra and brings together representatives from Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Community Controlled Organisations, specialist family violence support and prevention services, community legal services, government, police and not-for-profit organisations.

During the course of this conference and 1-day workshop, we will explore critical issues in working to end family violence against Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people, including state and federal government initiatives; how frontline services are engaging in prevention, early intervention and response; learning from the stories and experiences of survivors of family violence; working more effectively with people who use violence towards accountability and behaviour change and the impacts of family violence on children and young people.

For more information on these events, pricing and discounts click below:
Melbourne | 12th-14th March 2019
Event homepage – www.ifv-mel.aventedge.com
Register here – http://elm.aventedge.com/ifv-mel-register

Perth | 5th-6th March 2019
Event homepage – www.ifv-per.aventedge.com
Register here – http://elm.aventedge.com/ifv-per/register

14 March Workshop Brisbane Moving Beyond the Frontline project 

An interactive workshop for currently enrolled Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health and medical students.

Panel conversations with

Associate Professor Chelsea Bond (UQ Poche)
Associate Professor Shannon Springer (Bond Uni)
Professor Mark Brough (QUT) &
Dr Bryan Mukandi (UQ Medicine)

The workshop shares key findings from the Moving Beyond the Frontline project to facilitate a broader conversation about how to foster culturally safe learning environments for Indigenous health and medical students. 

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students currently enrolled in a health or health related degree program (undergraduate or postgraduate), at any institution, are eligible to attend.

Register by 6 March to secure your place.

Catering will be provided.

** Please note that due to limited capacity, preference is to accomodate Australian Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander students **

For more information about Moving Beyond the Frontline project, visit the Lowitja Institute website or watch a short video about the project here: https://vimeo.com/278096582

For further information about the event, please email UQ Poche at poche@uq.edu.au

REGISTER HERE

14 – 15 March 2019 Close the Gap for Vision by 2020 – National Conference 2019

Indigenous Eye Health (IEH) at the University of Melbourne and co-host Aboriginal Medical Services Alliance Northern Territory (AMSANT), are pleased to invite you to register for the Close the Gap for Vision by 2020:Strengthen & Sustain – National Conference 2019 which will be held at the Alice Springs Convention Centre on Thursday 14 and Friday 15 March 2019 in the Northern Territory. This conference is also supported by our partners, Vision 2020 Australia, Optometry Australia and the Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Ophthalmologists.

The 2019 conference, themed ‘Strengthen & Sustain’ will provide opportunity to highlight the very real advances being made in Aboriginal and Torres Strait eye health. It will explore successes and opportunities to strengthen eye care and initiatives and challenges to sustain progress towards the goal of equitable eye care by 2020. To this end, the conference will include plenary speakers, panel discussions and presentations as well as upskilling workshops and cultural experiences.

Registration (including workshops, welcome reception and conference dinner) is $250. Registrations close on 28 February 2019.

Who should attend?

The conference is designed to bring people together and connect people involved in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander eye care from local communities, Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisations, health services, non-government organisations, professional bodies and government departments from across the country. We would like to invite everyone who is working on or interested in improving eye health and care for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians.

Speakers will be invited, however this year we will also be calling for abstracts for Table Top presentations and Poster presentations – further details on abstract submissions to follow.

Please share and forward this information with colleagues and refer people to this webpage where the conference program and additional informationwill become available in the lead up to the conference. Note: Please use the conference hashtag #CTGV19.

We look forward to you joining us in the Territory in 2019 for learning and sharing within the unique beauty and cultural significance of Central Australia.

Additional Information:

If you have any questions or require additional information, please contact us at indigenous-eyehealth@unimelb.edu.au or contact IEH staff Carol Wynne (carol.wynne@unimelb.edu.au; 03 8344 3984 email) or Mitchell Anjou (manjou@unimelb.edu.au; 03 8344 9324).

Close the Gap for Vision by 2020: Strengthen & Sustain – National Conference 2019 links:

– Conference General Information

– Conference Program

– Conference Dinner & Leaky Pipe Awards

– Staying in Alice Springs

More information available at: go.unimelb.edu.au/wqb6 

21 March National Close the Gap Day

Featured Save date

For the last 10 years many thousands of Australians from every corner of the country, in schools, businesses and community groups, have shown their support for Close the Gap by marking National Close the Gap Day each March.

This National Close the Gap Day, we have an opportunity to send our governments a clear message that Australians value health equality as a fundamental right for all.

On National Close the Gap Day we encourage you to host an activity in your workplace, home, community or school.

Our aim is to bring people together to share information, and most importantly, to take meaningful action in support of achieving Indigenous health equality by 2030.

How to get involved in National Close the Gap Day

  • Register your activity. You can download some online resources to support your event
  • Invite your friends, workmates and family to join you
  • Take action by signing the Close the Gap pledge and asking your friends and colleagues to do the same
  • Call, tweet or write to your local Member of Parliament and tell them that you want them to Close the Gap
  • Listen to and share the stories of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people on Facebook – visit our Close the Gap Facebook page.
  • Share your photos and stories on social media. Use the hashtag #ClosetheGap
  • Donate to help our work on Close the Gap

With events ranging from workplace morning teas, sports days, school events and public events in hospitals and offices around the country — tens of thousands of people take part each year to make a difference.

Your actions can create lasting change. Be part of the generation that closes the gap.

National Close the Gap Day is a time for all Australians to come together and commit to achieving health equality for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.

The Close the Gap Campaign will partner with Tharawal Aboriginal Aboriginal Medical Services, South Western Sydney, to host an exciting community event and launch our Annual Report.

Visit the website of our friends at ANTaR for more information and to register your support. https://antar.org.au/campaigns/national-close-gap-day

EVENT REGISTER

21 March Indigenous Ear Health Workshop Brisbane 

The Australian Society of Otolaryngology Head and Neck Surgery is hosting a workshop on Indigenous Ear Health in Brisbane on Thursday, 21 March 2019.

This meeting is the 7th to be organised by ASOHNS and is designed to facilitate discussion about the crucial health issue and impact of ear disease amongst Indigenous people.

The meeting is aimed at bringing together all stakeholders involved in managing Indigenous health and specifically ear disease, such as:  ENT surgeons, GPs, Paediatricians, Nurses, Audiologists, Speech Therapists, Allied Health Workers and other health administrators (both State and Federal).

Download Program and Contact 

Indigenous Ear Health 2019 Program

22 March : The experts priorities for the 2019 Federal Election 

Listen to 3 of Australia’s leading health advocates outline their top priorities for change

– Book Here

24 -27 March National Rural Health Alliance Conference

Interested in the health and wellbeing of rural or remote Australia?

This is the conference for you.

In March 2019 the rural health sector will gather in Hobart for the 15th National Rural Conference.  Every two years we meet to learn, listen and share ideas about how to improve health outcomes in rural and remote Australia.

Proudly managed by the National Rural Health Alliance, the Conference has a well-earned reputation as Australia’s premier rural health event.  Not just for health professionals, the Conference recognises the critical roles that education, regional development and infrastructure play in determining health outcomes, and we welcome people working across a wide variety of industries.

Join us as we celebrate our 15th Conference and help achieve equitable health for the 7 million Australians living in rural and remote areas.

Hobart and its surrounds was home to the Muwinina people who the Alliance acknowledges as the traditional and original owners of this land.  We pay respect to those that have passed before us and acknowledge today’s Tasmanian Aboriginal community as the custodians of the land on which we will meet.

More info 

20 -24 May 2019 World Indigenous Housing Conference. Gold Coast

Thank you for your interest in the 2019 World Indigenous Housing Conference.

The 2019 World Indigenous Housing Conference will bring together Indigenous leaders, government, industry and academia representing Housing, health, and education from around the world including:

  • National and International Indigenous Organisation leadership
  • Senior housing, health, and education government officials Industry CEOs, executives and senior managers from public and private sectors
  • Housing, Healthcare, and Education professionals and regulators
  • Consumer associations
  • Academics in Housing, Healthcare, and Education.

The 2019 World Indigenous Housing Conference #2019WIHC is the principal conference to provide a platform for leaders in housing, health, education and related services from around the world to come together. Up to 2000 delegates will share experiences, explore opportunities and innovative solutions, work to improve access to adequate housing and related services for the world’s Indigenous people.

Event Information:

Key event details as follows:
Venue: Gold Coast Convention and Exhibition Centre
Address: 2684-2690 Gold Coast Hwy, Broadbeach QLD 4218
Dates: Monday 20th – Thursday 23rd May, 2019 (24th May)

Registration Costs

  • EARLY BIRD – FULL CONFERENCE & TRADE EXHIBITION REGISTRATION: $1950 AUD plus booking fees
  • After 1 February FULL CONFERENCE & TRADE EXHIBITION REGISTRATION $2245 AUD plus booking fees

PLEASE NOTE: The Trade Exhibition is open Tuesday 21st May – Thursday 23rd May 2019

Please visit www.2019wihc.com for further information on transport and accommodation options, conference, exhibition and speaker updates.

Methods of Payment:

2019WIHC online registrations accept all major credit cards, by Invoice and direct debit.
PLEASE NOTE: Invoices must be paid in full and monies received by COB Monday 20 May 2019.

Please note: The 2019 WIHC organisers reserve the right of admission. Speakers, programs and topics are subject to change. Please visit http://www.2019wihc.comfor up to date information.

Conference Cancellation Policy

If a registrant is unable to attend 2019 WIHC for any reason they may substitute, by arrangement with the registrar, someone else to attend in their place and must attend any session that has been previously selected by the original registrant.

Where the registrant is unable to attend and is not in a position to transfer his/her place to another person, or to another event, then the following refund arrangements apply:

    • Registrations cancelled less than 60 days, but more than 30 days before the event are eligible for a 50% refund of the registration fees paid.
    • Registrations cancelled less than 30 days before the event are no longer eligible for a refund.

Refunds will be made in the following ways:

  1. For payments received by credit or debit cards, the same credit/debit card will be refunded.
  2. For all other payments, a bank transfer will be made to the payee’s nominated account.

Important: For payments received from outside Australia by bank transfer, the refund will be made by bank transfer and all bank charges will be for the registrant’s account. The Cancellation Policy as stated on this page is valid from 1 October 2018.

Terms & Conditions

please visit www.2019wihc.com

Privacy Policy

please visit www.2019wihc.com

 

18 -20 June Lowitja Health Conference Darwin


At the Lowitja Institute International Indigenous Health and Wellbeing Conference 2019 delegates from around the world will discuss the role of First Nations in leading change and will showcase Indigenous solutions.

The conference program will highlight ways of thinking, speaking and being for the benefit of Indigenous peoples everywhere.

Join Indigenous leaders, researchers, health professionals, decision makers, community representatives, and our non-Indigenous colleagues in this important conversation.

More Info 

2019 Dr Tracey Westerman’s Workshops 

More info and dates

7 -14 July 2019 National NAIDOC Grant funding round opens 

The opening of the 2019 National NAIDOC Grant funding round has been moved forward! The National NAIDOC Grants will now officially open on Thursday 24 January 2019.

Head to www.naidoc.org.au to join the National NAIDOC Mailing List and keep up with all things grants or check out the below links for more information now!

https://www.finance.gov.au/resource-management/grants/grantconnect/

https://www.pmc.gov.au/indigenous-affairs/grants-and-funding/naidoc-week-funding

23 -25 September IAHA Conference Darwin

 

24 -26 September 2019 CATSINaM National Professional Development Conference

 

 

The 2019 CATSINaM National Professional Development Conference will be held in Sydney, 24th – 26th September 2019. Make sure you save the dates in your calendar.

Further information to follow soon.

Date: Tuesday the 24th to Thursday the 26th September 2019

Location: Sydney, Australia

Organiser: Chloe Peters

Phone: 02 6262 5761

Email: admin@catsinam.org.au

 

5-8 November The Lime Network Conference New Zealand 

This years  whakatauki (theme for the conference) was developed by the Scientific Committee, along with Māori elder, Te Marino Lenihan & Tania Huria from .

To read about the conference & theme, check out the  website. 

NACCHO and @RACGP Aboriginal Women’s Health and #FamilyViolence : How to identify and provide early intervention for victims and perpetrators.

About four in 10 women who were physically injured [as a result of family violence] visited a health professional for their injuries
 
This information [from the report] offers important insights for those involved in family and domestic violence policy, as well as organisations which provide services for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples, aimed at preventing violence and supporting those affected by violence.’

ABS Director of the Centre of Excellence for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Statistics, Debbie Goodwin said.

 ” Chapter 16 of the RACGP NACCHO National Guide : ‘Family abuse and violence’, provides key recommendations on prevention interventions – screening, behavioural and environmental.

These recommendations aim to support healthcare professionals to develop a high level of awareness of the risks of family abuse and violence, and how to identify and provide early intervention for victims and perpetrators.”

National guide to a preventive health assessment for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people (

Published by NewsGP Morgan Liotta

The report forms part of the Australian Bureau of Statistics’ (ABS) publication National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Social Survey, 2014–15 and compares sociodemographic factors of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women who experienced family violence with those who did not in the year prior to the 2014–15 survey.

Key findings show that, among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander populations, around two in three women (72%) compared with one in three men (35%) were likely to identify an intimate partner or family member as at least one of the perpetrators in their most recent experience of physical violence.

Approximately one in 10 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women experienced family violence based on their most recent experience of physical violence.

Almost seven in 10 (68%) women who had experienced family violence reported that alcohol and/or other substances contributed to the incident:

  • More than half of women (53%) who had experienced family violence reported alcohol (by itself or with other substances) was a contributing factor
  • More than one in 10 (13%) reported that other substances alone were a contributing factor

When compared with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women who had not experienced any physical violence, those who had were:

  • more likely to report high or very high levels of psychological distress (69% compared with 34%)
  • more likely to have a mental health condition (53% compared with 31%)
  • more likely to report they had experienced homelessness at some time in their life (55% compared with 26%)
  • less likely to trust police in their local area (44% compared with 62%)
  • just as likely to trust their own doctor (77% compared with 83%)

The report underlines the role of GPs’ support for such people.

GP resources

  • The RACGP and the National Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation (NACCHO)’s National guide to a preventive health assessment for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people (National Guide), Chapter 16: ‘Family abuse and violence’, provides key recommendations on prevention interventions – screening, behavioural and environmental. These recommendations aim to support healthcare professionals to develop a high level of awareness of the risks of family abuse and violence, and how to identify and provide early intervention for victims and perpetrators.
  • The RACGP’s Abuse and violence: Working with our partners in general practice (White book), Chapter 11: ‘Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander violence’, outlines statistics and recommendations for healthcare professionals to show leadership at a community level through local organisations by advocating for provision of services that meet the needs of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples experiencing family violence.

NACCHO Aboriginal #Agedcare Health : Minister @KenWyattMP Download : The Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Aged Care #Consumer and Provider Action Plans to support the distinctive needs of our mob

” The Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Aged Care Action Plan Actions to support older Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people, to be launched today, addresses the distinctive support needs of older Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples and represents the first such aged care strategy since 1994. 

It is one of three aged care action plans being released under the Commonwealth’s Aged Care Diversity Framework, with the other two encompassing the needs of CALD communities and LGBTI people.( see below )

The action plan provides specific guidance to aged care providers on how to address the needs of Aboriginal peoples in enacting the overarching principles of the Aged Care Diversity Framework, which takes a human rights approach to driving cultural and systemic change in the aged care system, and to ensure that all Australians access safe, equitable and high-quality aged care services regardless of their ethnicity, culture, sexuality and life experiences.

Implementation of the plan will increase the accessibility of culturally safe aged care support and services to older Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples, and provide guidance to mainstream service providers seeking to increase the cultural safety and appropriateness of the services they offer to Aboriginal people.

In particular this plan emphasises the need for mainstream service providers to collaborate and/or co-design services with Aboriginal community-controlled organisations.

Noeleen Tunny is manager of VACCHO’s Policy and Advocacy Unit

Originally published in Croakey

Read all NACCHO Aboriginal Health and Elder care Articles HERE

Download the Action Plans HERE

actions-to-support-older-aboriginal-and-torres-strait-islander-people-a-guide-for-consumers

actions-to-support-older-aboriginal-and-torres-strait-islander-people-a-guide-for-aged-care-providers

Minister Wyatt honoured to join Elders & such an amazing group of dedicated and talented advocates for Aboriginal & Torres Strait Islander Aged Care, launching Australia’s first Aged Care Diversity Action Plan for First Nations people. Thanks – at Parliament House

Part 1 : Aged Care Diversity Framework

From Here

The Hon Ken Wyatt AM MP, Minister for Senior Australians and Aged Care and Minister for Indigenous Health, established an Aged Care Sector Committee Diversity Sub-Group to advise the Government on the development of an Aged Care Diversity Framework and action plans.

The Aged Care Diversity Framework (the Framework) was launched on 6 December 2017.

The Framework is an overarching set of principles designed to ensure an accessible aged care system where people, regardless of their individual social, cultural, linguistic, religious, spiritual, psychological, medical and care needs are able to access respectful and inclusive aged care services. The Framework takes a human-rights based approach in line with the World Health Organization principles of:

  • non-discrimination
  • availability
  • accessibility
  • acceptability
  • quality
  • accountability

Development of the Framework was informed through:

Action plans

Three action plans have been developed under the Framework to assist aged care service providers and government to address specific barriers and challenges faced by:

  • Older Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples
  • Older people from Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Backgrounds
  • Older lesbian, gay, bisexual, trans and gender diverse, and intersex peoples

In addition there is a shared action plan and government action plan to support all diverse older people.

The action plans are informed by extensive public and aged care sector consultations.

An action plan for older people who are homeless, or at risk of homelessness, is currently being developed.

Part 2 : Actions to support older Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in aged care

Originally published in Croakey

While the gap in life expectancy for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples is still significant, there are people living into their older years who require aged care support that meets their diverse needs.

The 65 and over Aboriginal population is projected to grow by 200 per cent by 2031, making it critical for us to get aged care right now.

Aboriginal Australians are affected by chronic disease more frequently and at a younger age than non-Indigenous people. In some areas the prevalence of dementia is almost five times that of non-Indigenous Australians, with higher rates of self-reported falls, incontinence and pain. Yet despite these statistics, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples are less likely than the general population to access aged care.

Successive iterations of the Productivity Commission’s Report on Government Services indicate that Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples who are eligible to receive an aged care assessment are less likely to be assessed than their counterparts in both the general population and in culturally and linguistically diverse (CALD) communities. This disparity was evident both at a national level and in each Australian jurisdiction and suggests a need to support better engagement of older Aboriginal people within the aged care system.

Stolen Generations

Adding further complexity to the space is the fact that 100% of the Stolen Generation will be at least 50 years old by 2023, i.e. eligible for aged care as Aboriginal people can access these services earlier due to their broader lower life expectancy. This group will require sensitive, trauma-informed care that does not re-traumatise them.

The Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Aged Care Action Plan Actions to support older Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people, to be launched tomorrow, addresses the distinctive support needs of older Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples and represents the first such aged care strategy since 1994.  It is one of three aged care action plans being released under the Commonwealth’s Aged Care Diversity Framework, with the other two encompassing the needs of CALD communities and LGBTI people.

The action plan provides specific guidance to aged care providers on how to address the needs of Aboriginal peoples in enacting the overarching principles of the Aged Care Diversity Framework, which takes a human rights approach to driving cultural and systemic change in the aged care system, and to ensure that all Australians access safe, equitable and high-quality aged care services regardless of their ethnicity, culture, sexuality and life experiences.

Collaboration

The Institute of Urban Indigenous Health (based in Brisbane) and the Victorian Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation (VACCHO) collaborated in the development of the plan. VACCHO coordinated the consultation process in NSW, Victoria, Tasmania and SA.

Consultations with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people, and aged care providers included:

  • 629 completed surveys
  • 51 individual consultations carried out by the project team and members of the working group = these complemented the survey data and explored in more detail issues being raised in the survey responses and views expressed by members of the Working Group; and
  • a written submission from the Healing Foundation in recognition of the specific issues related to ageing and the needs of the Stolen Generations.

Implementation of the plan will increase the accessibility of culturally safe aged care support and services to older Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples, and provide guidance to mainstream service providers seeking to increase the cultural safety and appropriateness of the services they offer to Aboriginal people. In particular this plan emphasises the need for mainstream service providers to collaborate and/or co-design services with Aboriginal community-controlled organisations.

To quote the plan: “The plan can assist providers to identify actions they could take to deliver more inclusive and culturally appropriate services for consumers. It acknowledges that there is no ‘one-size-fits-all’ approach to diversity, and that each provider will be starting from a different place and operating in a different context.”

VACCHO and its members, including those members who themselves provide aged care supports,  look forward to working with aged care providers to ensure the best, culturally appropriate care is provided to older Aboriginal people; they are the keepers of culture, and deserve to be respected and valued.

Noeleen Tunny is manager of VACCHO’s Policy and Advocacy Unit

NACCHO #SaveaDate : This week features @NationalFVPLS #OchreRibbon2019, and #DontSilenceTheViolence @ScottMorrisonMP Releases #ClosingTheGap Report @HealingOurWay #SorryDay

12- 19 February Ochre Ribbon Week 

Download the 2019 Health Awareness Days Calendar 

13 February 11 th Anniversary Sorry Day

14 February Closing the Gap Report Released by Prime Minister 

14 February Aboriginal Men’s Gathering 

20 February IAHA 2019 Special General Meeting Web Conference.

22 February Awabakal ACCHO Strong Youth Launch

6 March AIATSIS Culture and Policy Symposium

9 March  Bush to Beach Project Grazing Style Light Indigenous Marathon Fundraiser

12- 13 March Overcoming Indigenous Family Violence 

14 – 15 March 2019 Close the Gap for Vision by 2020 – National Conference 2019

21 March National Close the Gap Day

21 March Indigenous Ear Health Workshop Brisbane

24 -27 March National Rural Health Alliance Conference

20 -24 May 2019 World Indigenous Housing Conference. Gold Coast

18 -20 June Lowitja Health Conference Darwin

2019 Dr Tracey Westerman’s Workshops 

7 -14 July 2019 National NAIDOC Grant funding round opens

24 -26 September 2019 CATSINaM National Professional Development Conference

5-8 November The Lime Network Conference New Zealand 

12- 19 February Ochre Ribbon Week 

The Ochre Ribbon Campaign is an initiative supported by the National Family Violence Prevention Legal Services Forum and its member organisations across Australia, including Djirra.

The Ochre Ribbon Campaign raises awareness of the devastating impacts of family violence in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities and calls for action to end the violence against Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people – especially our women and children.

How to get involved?

  • Wear an Orange Ribbon.
  • Start conversations on how violence against Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women devastates communities and destroys families. In comparison with other women, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women are 32 times more likely to be hospitalised from family violence and 10 times more likely to be killed as a result of violent assault. use the information from the National Forum to help you.
  • Follow the National Family Violence Prevention Legal Services Forum on Facebook and Twitter
  • Share your thoughts on Twitter and Facebook using the hashtags #OchreRibbon2019, and #DontSilenceTheViolence, and tag the National FVPLS Forum twitter page @NationalFVPLS
  • Use the Ochre Ribbon Facebook frame, image and banner:
      

12- 13 March Overcoming Indigenous Family Violence 

Djirra has been chosen to be the charity partner of the next Overcoming Indigenous Family Violence conference organised by Aventedge in Melbourne on the 12th and 13th of March.

On the first day, Tuesday 12th of March, Marion Hansen, Djirra’s chairperson, will give the opening and closing address. At 10.30am, Djirra’s CEO Antoinette Braybrook will share her experience and knowledge on Supporting Aboriginal women, their children and communities to be safe, culturally strong and free from violence.

Family violence against Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people, predominantly women and their children, is a national crisis.

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities and their organisations hold the solutions to ending the disproportionate rates of family violence. However this requires the support and involvement of a range of stakeholders around the country.

The 5th annual Overcoming Indigenous Family Violence Forum (Melbourne & Perth) has partnered with Djirra and brings together representatives from Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Community Controlled Organisations, specialist family violence support and prevention services, community legal services, government, police and not-for-profit organisations.

During the course of this conference and 1-day workshop, we will explore critical issues in working to end family violence against Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people, including state and federal government initiatives; how frontline services are engaging in prevention, early intervention and response; learning from the stories and experiences of survivors of family violence; working more effectively with people who use violence towards accountability and behaviour change and the impacts of family violence on children and young people.

For more information on these events, pricing and discounts click below:
Melbourne | 12th-14th March 2019
Event homepage – www.ifv-mel.aventedge.com
Register here – http://elm.aventedge.com/ifv-mel-register

Perth | 5th-6th March 2019
Event homepage – www.ifv-per.aventedge.com
Register here – http://elm.aventedge.com/ifv-per/register

Download the 2019 Health Awareness Days

For many years ACCHO organisations have said they wished they had a list of the many Indigenous “ Days “ and Aboriginal health or awareness days/weeks/events.

With thanks to our friends at ZockMelon here they both are!

It even has a handy list of the hashtags for the event.

Download the 53 Page 2019 Health days and events calendar HERE

naccho zockmelon 2019 health days and events calendar

We hope that this document helps you with your planning for the year ahead.

Every Tuesday we will update these listings with new events and What’s on for the week ahead

To submit your events or update your info

Contact: Colin Cowell www.nacchocommunique.com

NACCHO Social Media Editor Tel 0401 331 251

Email : nacchonews@naccho.org.au

13 February 11 th Anniversary Sorry Day

14 February Closing the Gap Report 2019 Released by Prime Minister

14 February Aboriginal Men’s Gathering 

15 February NACCHO RACGP Survey closes 

Survey until 15 Feb 2019 : To participate in a short survey, please CLICK HERE

Please tell us your ideas for

-improving quality of 715 health checks

-clinical software -implementation of the National Guide

-culturally responsive healthcare for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people

In 2018–19, NACCHO and the RACGP are working on further initiatives and we want your input!

More info 

20 February IAHA 2019 Special General Meeting Web Conference.

The Indigenous Allied Health Australia Ltd (IAHA) Board would like to thank you for your continued support of IAHA and invite you to participate in the special General Meeting of IAHA to be held at 1:00 pm (Canberra time) on Wednesday 20 February 2019 at Units 3-4, Ground Floor, 9-11 Napier Close, Deakin ACT 2600.

Attending General Meeting using Zoom conferencing

Members have the option to attend the General Meeting using “Zoom” remote conferencing services by video or voice link.  Instructions to help use Zoom are available here and detailed below.

To join the meeting go to:
https://zoom.us/j/313336712

OR One tap mobile
+61280152088,,313336712# Australia
+61871501149,,313336712# Australia

Dial by your location
+61 2 8015 2088 Australia
+61 8 7150 1149 Australia
Meeting ID: 313 336 712

Find your local number: https://zoom.us/u/adnswZr8cW

Agenda for General Meeting

The key items for the General Meeting are to consider and vote on resolutions to:

  • remove IAHA’s current auditor and appoint a replacement auditor; and
  • amend IAHA’s company constitution.

Documents for the meeting

The documents for the meeting are:

  • A letter to Members from the Company Secretary with details of the special General Meeting and how to participate click here
  • Notice of General Meeting (including the Explanatory Notes and Proxy Form) click here;
  • a letter from an IAHA Member nominating a new company auditor click here; and
  • a copy of IAHA’s company constitution, with marked-up text to show the proposed changes to be considered by Members, click here.

Members will be required to use their own computer hardware and software to access this facility and are solely responsible for connecting to the conference by 1:00 pm (Canberra time) on the meeting day.

RSVP if you intend to attend/participate
in the special General Meeting

Members who plan to attend the meeting either in person or through Zoom are asked to register for the meeting.

Please email the Company Secretary at secretary@iaha.com.au to register, preferably by 1:00pm Monday 18 February 2019.

21 February Galambila ACCHO Gumbaynggirr Cultural Show for Coffs Harbour Pharmacists 

Please join us in the evening on Thursday the 21st of February 2019 for a Gumbaynggirr Cultural Show.

Through the QUMAX program (Quality Use of Medicines for Maximised for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people), Galambila AHS will be hosting a cultural event for pharmacists, pharmacy assistants and health professionals in Coffs Harbour to learn more about our local indigenous culture. QUMAX Cultural Awareness activities aim to improve culturally sensitive care for Aboriginal clients and enhance the working relationship between Galambila and local pharmacies.

The event will be run by Clark Webb and his team at Bularri Muurlay Nyanggan Aboriginal Corporation (BMNAC). BMNAC recently won a Bronze Medal at the 2018 NSW Tourism Awards for Excellence in Aboriginal Tourism. To see more information on what this great organisation is all about, visit their website at the following link: https://bmnac.org.au/

The night will include the following:

– Traditional Welcome to Country

– Traditional fire making

– Introductory Gumbaynggirr Language Lesson

– Sharing of traditional Gumbaynggirr dreaming stories that connect participants to our local landscape

– Uses of various varieties of plants, including medicinal

– Damper and tea will be provided on the night

Please RSVP by COB on Monday 18th of February 2019 via Eventbrite. Get in quick as places will be limited!

BOOK HERE 

22 February Awabakal ACCHO Strong Youth Launch

Featuring MC Sean Choolburra and performances by Koori Rep, Shanelle Dargan (as seen on X-Factor) and Last Kinnection.

RSVP: 0457 868 980 or zkhan@awabakal.org by February 15.

6 March AIATSIS Culture and Policy Symposium 

Info and Register

9 March  Bush to Beach Project Grazing Style Light Indigenous Marathon Fundraiser

The Port Macquarie Running Festival is happening over the weekend of the 9th-10th March 2019. As a part of this event we are running a fundraiser to support the important work being undertaken by Charlie & Tali Maher as a part of the Indigenous Marathon Project Running And Walking group. Come along to hear from Olympians Nova Peris, Steve Moneghette & Robert de Castella while meeting members of the Indigenous Marathon Project over lunch. We hope to see you there.

All funds raised will go towards the Bush to Beach Project. The project aims
to develop a strong relationship between the Northern Territory community of
Ntaria and the coastal community of Port Macquarie, with an exchange program
occurring several times throughout the year. This will include young Indigenous
people visiting the communities and participating in running and walking events
to promote healthy living. We thank you for your support.

Guest Speakers: Olympians Nova Peris, Steve Moneghetti & Robert de Castella.

Any enquiries please get in touch with Nina Cass or Charlie Maher (ninacass87@gmail.com / charles.maher@det.nsw.edu.au)

Tickets $59 Register HERE 

12- 13 March Overcoming Indigenous Family Violence 

14 – 15 March 2019 Close the Gap for Vision by 2020 – National Conference 2019

Indigenous Eye Health (IEH) at the University of Melbourne and co-host Aboriginal Medical Services Alliance Northern Territory (AMSANT), are pleased to invite you to register for the Close the Gap for Vision by 2020:Strengthen & Sustain – National Conference 2019 which will be held at the Alice Springs Convention Centre on Thursday 14 and Friday 15 March 2019 in the Northern Territory. This conference is also supported by our partners, Vision 2020 Australia, Optometry Australia and the Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Ophthalmologists.

The 2019 conference, themed ‘Strengthen & Sustain’ will provide opportunity to highlight the very real advances being made in Aboriginal and Torres Strait eye health. It will explore successes and opportunities to strengthen eye care and initiatives and challenges to sustain progress towards the goal of equitable eye care by 2020. To this end, the conference will include plenary speakers, panel discussions and presentations as well as upskilling workshops and cultural experiences.

Registration (including workshops, welcome reception and conference dinner) is $250. Registrations close on 28 February 2019.

Who should attend?

The conference is designed to bring people together and connect people involved in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander eye care from local communities, Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisations, health services, non-government organisations, professional bodies and government departments from across the country. We would like to invite everyone who is working on or interested in improving eye health and care for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians.

Speakers will be invited, however this year we will also be calling for abstracts for Table Top presentations and Poster presentations – further details on abstract submissions to follow.

Please share and forward this information with colleagues and refer people to this webpage where the conference program and additional informationwill become available in the lead up to the conference. Note: Please use the conference hashtag #CTGV19.

We look forward to you joining us in the Territory in 2019 for learning and sharing within the unique beauty and cultural significance of Central Australia.

Additional Information:

If you have any questions or require additional information, please contact us at indigenous-eyehealth@unimelb.edu.au or contact IEH staff Carol Wynne (carol.wynne@unimelb.edu.au; 03 8344 3984 email) or Mitchell Anjou (manjou@unimelb.edu.au; 03 8344 9324).

Close the Gap for Vision by 2020: Strengthen & Sustain – National Conference 2019 links:

– Conference General Information

– Conference Program

– Conference Dinner & Leaky Pipe Awards

– Staying in Alice Springs

More information available at: go.unimelb.edu.au/wqb6 

21 March National Close the Gap Day

Description

National Close the Gap Day is a time for all Australians to come together and commit to achieving health equality for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.

The Close the Gap Campaign will partner with Tharawal Aboriginal Aboriginal Medical Services, South Western Sydney, to host an exciting community event and launch our Annual Report.

Visit the website of our friends at ANTaR for more information and to register your support. https://antar.org.au/campaigns/national-close-gap-day

EVENT REGISTER

21 March Indigenous Ear Health Workshop Brisbane 

The Australian Society of Otolaryngology Head and Neck Surgery is hosting a workshop on Indigenous Ear Health in Brisbane on Thursday, 21 March 2019.

This meeting is the 7th to be organised by ASOHNS and is designed to facilitate discussion about the crucial health issue and impact of ear disease amongst Indigenous people.

The meeting is aimed at bringing together all stakeholders involved in managing Indigenous health and specifically ear disease, such as:  ENT surgeons, GPs, Paediatricians, Nurses, Audiologists, Speech Therapists, Allied Health Workers and other health administrators (both State and Federal).

Download Program and Contact 

Indigenous Ear Health 2019 Program

24 -27 March National Rural Health Alliance Conference

Interested in the health and wellbeing of rural or remote Australia?

This is the conference for you.

In March 2019 the rural health sector will gather in Hobart for the 15th National Rural Conference.  Every two years we meet to learn, listen and share ideas about how to improve health outcomes in rural and remote Australia.

Proudly managed by the National Rural Health Alliance, the Conference has a well-earned reputation as Australia’s premier rural health event.  Not just for health professionals, the Conference recognises the critical roles that education, regional development and infrastructure play in determining health outcomes, and we welcome people working across a wide variety of industries.

Join us as we celebrate our 15th Conference and help achieve equitable health for the 7 million Australians living in rural and remote areas.

Hobart and its surrounds was home to the Muwinina people who the Alliance acknowledges as the traditional and original owners of this land.  We pay respect to those that have passed before us and acknowledge today’s Tasmanian Aboriginal community as the custodians of the land on which we will meet.

More info 

20 -24 May 2019 World Indigenous Housing Conference. Gold Coast

Thank you for your interest in the 2019 World Indigenous Housing Conference.

The 2019 World Indigenous Housing Conference will bring together Indigenous leaders, government, industry and academia representing Housing, health, and education from around the world including:

  • National and International Indigenous Organisation leadership
  • Senior housing, health, and education government officials Industry CEOs, executives and senior managers from public and private sectors
  • Housing, Healthcare, and Education professionals and regulators
  • Consumer associations
  • Academics in Housing, Healthcare, and Education.

The 2019 World Indigenous Housing Conference #2019WIHC is the principal conference to provide a platform for leaders in housing, health, education and related services from around the world to come together. Up to 2000 delegates will share experiences, explore opportunities and innovative solutions, work to improve access to adequate housing and related services for the world’s Indigenous people.

Event Information:

Key event details as follows:
Venue: Gold Coast Convention and Exhibition Centre
Address: 2684-2690 Gold Coast Hwy, Broadbeach QLD 4218
Dates: Monday 20th – Thursday 23rd May, 2019 (24th May)

Registration Costs

  • EARLY BIRD – FULL CONFERENCE & TRADE EXHIBITION REGISTRATION: $1950 AUD plus booking fees
  • After 1 February FULL CONFERENCE & TRADE EXHIBITION REGISTRATION $2245 AUD plus booking fees

PLEASE NOTE: The Trade Exhibition is open Tuesday 21st May – Thursday 23rd May 2019

Please visit www.2019wihc.com for further information on transport and accommodation options, conference, exhibition and speaker updates.

Methods of Payment:

2019WIHC online registrations accept all major credit cards, by Invoice and direct debit.
PLEASE NOTE: Invoices must be paid in full and monies received by COB Monday 20 May 2019.

Please note: The 2019 WIHC organisers reserve the right of admission. Speakers, programs and topics are subject to change. Please visit http://www.2019wihc.comfor up to date information.

Conference Cancellation Policy

If a registrant is unable to attend 2019 WIHC for any reason they may substitute, by arrangement with the registrar, someone else to attend in their place and must attend any session that has been previously selected by the original registrant.

Where the registrant is unable to attend and is not in a position to transfer his/her place to another person, or to another event, then the following refund arrangements apply:

    • Registrations cancelled less than 60 days, but more than 30 days before the event are eligible for a 50% refund of the registration fees paid.
    • Registrations cancelled less than 30 days before the event are no longer eligible for a refund.

Refunds will be made in the following ways:

  1. For payments received by credit or debit cards, the same credit/debit card will be refunded.
  2. For all other payments, a bank transfer will be made to the payee’s nominated account.

Important: For payments received from outside Australia by bank transfer, the refund will be made by bank transfer and all bank charges will be for the registrant’s account. The Cancellation Policy as stated on this page is valid from 1 October 2018.

Terms & Conditions

please visit www.2019wihc.com

Privacy Policy

please visit www.2019wihc.com

 

18 -20 June Lowitja Health Conference Darwin


At the Lowitja Institute International Indigenous Health and Wellbeing Conference 2019 delegates from around the world will discuss the role of First Nations in leading change and will showcase Indigenous solutions.

The conference program will highlight ways of thinking, speaking and being for the benefit of Indigenous peoples everywhere.

Join Indigenous leaders, researchers, health professionals, decision makers, community representatives, and our non-Indigenous colleagues in this important conversation.

More Info 

2019 Dr Tracey Westerman’s Workshops 

More info and dates

7 -14 July 2019 National NAIDOC Grant funding round opens 

The opening of the 2019 National NAIDOC Grant funding round has been moved forward! The National NAIDOC Grants will now officially open on Thursday 24 January 2019.

Head to www.naidoc.org.au to join the National NAIDOC Mailing List and keep up with all things grants or check out the below links for more information now!

https://www.finance.gov.au/resource-management/grants/grantconnect/

https://www.pmc.gov.au/indigenous-affairs/grants-and-funding/naidoc-week-funding

24 -26 September 2019 CATSINaM National Professional Development Conference

 

 

The 2019 CATSINaM National Professional Development Conference will be held in Sydney, 24th – 26th September 2019. Make sure you save the dates in your calendar.

Further information to follow soon.

Date: Tuesday the 24th to Thursday the 26th September 2019

Location: Sydney, Australia

Organiser: Chloe Peters

Phone: 02 6262 5761

Email: admin@catsinam.org.au

 

5-8 November The Lime Network Conference New Zealand 

This years  whakatauki (theme for the conference) was developed by the Scientific Committee, along with Māori elder, Te Marino Lenihan & Tania Huria from .

To read about the conference & theme, check out the  website. 

 

NACCHO Aboriginal #MentalHealth and #JunkFood : Increasing how much exercise we get and switching to a healthy diet can also play an important role in treating – and even preventing – depression

” The review found that across 41 studies, people who stuck to a healthy diet had a 24-35% lower risk of depressive symptoms than those who ate more unhealthy foods.

These findings suggest improving your diet could be a cost-effective complementary treatment for depression and could reduce your risk of developing a mental illness.

From the Conversation / Megan Lee

 ” NACCHO Campaign 2013 : Our ‘Aboriginal communities should take health advice from the fast food industry’ a campaign that eventually went global, reaching more than  20 million Twitter followers.”

See over 60 NACCHO Healthy Foods Articles HERE

See over 200 NACCHO Mental Health articles HERE 

Worldwide, more than 300 million people live with depression. Without effective treatment, the condition can make it difficult to work and maintain relationships with family and friends.

Depression can cause sleep problems, difficulty concentrating, and a lack of interest in activities that are usually pleasurable. At its most extreme, it can lead to suicide.

Depression has long been treated with medication and talking therapies – and they’re not going anywhere just yet. But we’re beginning to understand that increasing how much exercise we get and switching to a healthy diet can also play an important role in treating – and even preventing – depression.

So what should you eat more of, and avoid, for the sake of your mood?

Ditch junk food

Research suggests that while healthy diets can reduce the risk or severity of depression, unhealthy diets may increase the risk.

Of course, we all indulge from time to time but unhealthy diets are those that contain lots of foods that are high in energy (kilojoules) and low on nutrition. This means too much of the foods we should limit:

  • processed and takeaway foods
  • processed meats
  • fried food
  • butter
  • salt
  • potatoes
  • refined grains, such as those in white bread, pasta, cakes and pastries
  • sugary drinks and snacks.

The average Australian consumes 19 serves of junk food a week, and far fewer serves of fibre-rich fresh food and wholegrains than recommended. This leaves us overfed, undernourished and mentally worse off.

Here’s what to eat instead

Mix it up. Anna Pelzer

Having a healthy diet means consuming a wide variety of nutritious foods every day, including:

  • fruit (two serves per day)
  • vegetables (five serves)
  • wholegrains
  • nuts
  • legumes
  • oily fish
  • dairy products
  • small quantities of meat
  • small quantities of olive oil
  • water.

This way of eating is common in Mediterranean countries, where people have been identified as having lower rates of cognitive decline, depression and dementia.

In Japan, a diet low in processed foods and high in fresh fruit, vegetables, green tea and soy products is recognised for its protective role in mental health.

How does healthy food help?

A healthy diet is naturally high in five food types that boost our mental health in different ways:

Complex carbohydrates found in fruits, vegetables and wholegrains help fuel our brain cells. Complex carbohydrates release glucose slowly into our system, unlike simple carbohydrates (found in sugary snacks and drinks), which create energy highs and lows throughout the day. These peaks and troughs decrease feelings of happiness and negatively affect our psychological well-being.

Antioxidants in brightly coloured fruit and vegetables scavenge free radicals, eliminate oxidative stress and decrease inflammation in the brain. This in turn increases the feelgood chemicals in the brain that elevate our mood.

Omega 3 found in oily fish and B vitamins found in some vegetables increase the production of the brain’s happiness chemicals and have been known to protect against both dementia and depression.

Salmon is an excellent source of omega 3. Caroline Attwood

Pro and prebiotics found in yoghurt, cheese and fermented products boost the millions of bacteria living in our gut. These bacteria produce chemical messengers from the gut to the brain that influence our emotions and reactions to stressful situations.

Research suggests pro- and prebiotics could work on the same neurological pathways that antidepressants do, thereby decreasing depressed and anxious states and elevating happy emotions.

What happens when you switch to a healthy diet?

An Australian research team recently undertook the first randomised control trial studying 56 individuals with depression.

Over a 12-week period, 31 participants were given nutritional consulting sessions and asked to change from their unhealthy diets to a healthy diet. The other 25 attended social support sessions and continued their usual eating patterns.

The participants continued their existing antidepressant and talking therapies during the trial.

At the end of the trial, the depressive symptoms of the group that maintained a healthier diet significantly improved. Some 32% of participants had scores so low they no longer met the criteria for depression, compared with 8% of the control group.

The trial was replicated by another research team, which found similar results, and supported by a recent review of all studies on dietary patterns and depression. The review found that across 41 studies, people who stuck to a healthy diet had a 24-35% lower risk of depressive symptoms than those who ate more unhealthy foods.

These findings suggest improving your diet could be a cost-effective complementary treatment for depression and could reduce your risk of developing a mental illness.

 

NACCHO Aboriginal Health and #SocialDeterminants : Download @AIHW Report : Indicators of socioeconomic inequalities in #cardiovascular disease #heartattack #stroke, #diabetes and chronic #kidney disease @ACDPAlliance

 ” Most apparent are inequalities in chronic disease among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people and non-Indigenous Australians. Social and economic factors are estimated to account for slightly more than one-third (34%) of the ‘good health’ gap between the 2 groups, with health risk factors such as high blood pressure, smoking and risky alcohol consumption explaining another 19%, and 47% due to other, unexplained factors.

 An estimated 11% of the total health gap can be attributed to the overlap, or interactions between the social determinants and health risk factors (AIHW 2018a).

Download the AIHW Report HERE aihw-cdk-12

‘By better understanding the role social inequality plays in chronic disease, governments at all levels can develop stronger, evidence based policies and programs aimed at preventing and managing these diseases, leading to better health outcomes across our community,’

AIHW spokesperson Dr Lynelle Moonn noted that these three diseases are common in Australia and, in addition to the personal costs to an individual’s health and quality of life, they have a significant economic burden in terms of healthcare costs and lost productivity

AIHW Website for more info 

Government investment is essential to encourage health checks, improve understanding of the risk factors for chronic disease, and implement policies and programs to reduce chronic disease risk, particularly in areas of socioeconomic disadvantage,

Chair of the Australian Chronic Disease Prevention Alliance Sharon McGowan said that the data revealed stark inequities in health status amongst Australians.

Download Press Release Here : australianchronicdiseasepreventionalliance

The Australian Chronic Disease Prevention Alliance is calling on the Government to target these health disparities by increasing the focus on prevention and supporting targeted health checks to proactively manage risk.

AIHW Press Release

Social factors play an important role in a person’s likelihood of developing and dying from certain chronic diseases, according to a new report from the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare (AIHW).

The report, Indicators of socioeconomic inequalities in cardiovascular disease, diabetes and chronic kidney disease, examines the relationship between socioeconomic position, income, housing and education and the likelihood of developing and dying from several common chronic diseases—cardiovascular disease (which includes heart attack and stroke), diabetes and chronic kidney disease.

Above image NACCHO Library

The report reveals that social disadvantage in these areas is linked to higher rates of disease, as well as poorer outcomes, including a greater likelihood of dying.

‘Across the three chronic diseases we looked at—cardiovascular disease, diabetes and chronic kidney disease— we saw that people in the lowest of the 5 socioeconomic groups had, on average, higher rates of these diseases than those in the highest socioeconomic groups,’ said AIHW spokesperson Dr Lynelle Moon.

‘And unfortunately, we also found higher death rates from these diseases among people in the lowest socioeconomic groups.’

The greatest difference in death rates between socioeconomic groups was among people with diabetes.

‘For women in the lowest socioeconomic group, the rate of deaths in 2016 where diabetes was an underlying or associated cause of death was about 2.4 times as high as the rate for those in the highest socioeconomic group. For men, the death rate was 2.2 times as high,’ Dr Moon said.

‘Put another way, if everyone had the same chance of dying from these diseases as people in the highest socioeconomic group, in a one year period there would be 8,600 fewer deaths from cardiovascular disease, 6,900 fewer deaths from diabetes, and 4,800 fewer deaths from chronic kidney disease.’

Importantly, the report also suggests that in many instances the gap between those in the highest and lowest socioeconomic groups is growing.

‘For example, while the rate of death from cardiovascular disease has been falling across all socioeconomic groups, the rate has been falling more dramatically for men in the highest socioeconomic group—effectively widening the gap between groups,’ Dr Moon said.

The report also highlights the relationship between education and health, with higher levels of education linked to lower rates of disease and death.

‘If all Australians had the same rates of disease as those with a Bachelor’s degree or higher, there would have been 7,800 fewer deaths due to cardiovascular disease, 3,700 fewer deaths due to diabetes, and 2,000 fewer deaths due to chronic kidney disease in 2011–12,’ Dr Moon said.

Housing is another social factor where large inequalities are apparent. Data from 2011–12 shows that for women aged 25 and over, the rate of death from chronic kidney disease was 1.5 times as high for those living in rental properties compared with women living in properties they owned. For men, the rate was 1.4 times as high for those in rental properties.

Dr Moon noted that these three diseases are common in Australia and, in addition to the personal costs to an individual’s health and quality of life, they have a significant economic burden in terms of healthcare costs and lost productivity.

‘By better understanding the role social inequality plays in chronic disease, governments at all levels can develop stronger, evidence based policies and programs aimed at preventing and managing these diseases, leading to better health outcomes across our community,’ she said

Underlying causes of socioeconomic inequalities in health

There are various reasons why socioeconomically disadvantaged people experience poorer health. Evidence points to the close relationship between people’s health and the living and working conditions which form their social environment.

Factors such as socioeconomic position, early life, social exclusion, social capital, employment and work, housing and the residential environment— known collectively as the ‘social determinants of health’—can act to either strengthen or to undermine the health of individuals and communities (Wilkinson & Marmot 2003).

These social determinants play a key role in the incidence, treatment and outcomes of chronic diseases. Social determinants can be seen as ‘causes of the causes’—that is, as the foundational determinants which influence other health determinants such as individual lifestyles and exposure to behavioural and biological risk factors.

Socioeconomic factors influence chronic disease through multiple mechanisms. Socioeconomic disadvantage may adversely affect chronic disease risk through its impact on mental health, and in particular, on depression. Socioeconomic gradients exist for multiple health behaviours over the life course, including for smoking, overweight and obesity, and poor diet.

When combined, these unhealthy behaviours help explain much of the socioeconomic health gap. Current research also seeks to link social factors and biological processes which affect chronic disease. In CVD, for example, socioeconomic determinants of health have been associated with high blood pressure, high cholesterol, chronic stress responses and inflammation (Havranek et al. 2015).

The direction of causality of social determinants on health is not always one-way (Berkman et al. 2014). To illustrate, people with chronic conditions may have a reduced ability to earn an income; family members may reduce or cease employment to provide care for those who are ill; and people or families whose income is reduced may move to disadvantaged areas to access low-cost housing.

Action on social determinants is often seen as the most appropriate way to tackle unfair and avoidable socioeconomic inequalities. There are significant opportunities for reducing death and disability from CVD, diabetes and CKD through addressing their social determinants.

Summary

Australians as a whole enjoy good health, but the benefits are not shared equally by all. People who are socioeconomically disadvantaged have, on average, greater levels of cardiovascular disease (CVD), diabetes and chronic kidney disease (CKD).

This report uses latest available data to measure socioeconomic inequalities in the incidence, prevalence and mortality from these 3 diseases, and where possible, assess whether these inequalities are growing. Findings include that, in 2016:

  • males aged 25 and over living in the lowest socioeconomic areas of Australia had a heart attack rate 1.55 times as high as males in the highest socioeconomic areas. For females, the disparity was even greater, at 1.76 times as high
  • type 2 diabetes prevalence for females in the lowest socioeconomic areas was 2.07 times as high as for females in the highest socioeconomic areas. The prevalence for males was 1.70 times as high
  • the rate of treated end-stage kidney disease for males in the lowest socioeconomic areas was 1.52 times as high as for males in the highest socioeconomic areas. The rate for females was 1.75 times as high
  • the CVD death rate for males in the lowest socioeconomic areas was 1.52 times as high as for males in the highest socioeconomic areas. For females, the disparity was slightly less, at 1.33 times as high
  • if all Australians had the same CVD death rate as people in the highest socioeconomic areas in 2016, the total CVD death rate would have declined by 25%, and there would have been 8,600 fewer deaths.

CVD death rates have declined for both males and females in all socioeconomic areas since 2001— however there have been greater falls for males in higher socioeconomic areas, and as a result, inequalities in male CVD death rates have grown.

  • Both absolute and relative inequality in male CVD death rates increased—the rate difference increasing from 62 per 100,000 in 2001 to 78 per 100,000 in 2011, and the relative index of inequality (RII) from 0.25 in 2001 to 0.53 in 2016.

Often, the health outcomes affected by socioeconomic inequalities are greater when assessed by individual characteristics (such as income level or highest educational attainment), than by area.

  • Inequalities in CVD death rates by highest education level in 2011–12 (RII = 1.05 for males and 1.05 for females) were greater than by socioeconomic area in 2011 (0.50 for males and 0.41 for females).

The impact on death rates of socioeconomic inequality was generally greater for diabetes and CKD than for CVD.

  • In 2016, the diabetes death rate for females in the lowest socioeconomic areas was 2.39 times as high as for females in the highest socioeconomic areas. This compares to a ratio 1.75 times as high for CKD, and 1.33 for CVD. For males, the equivalent rate ratios were 2.18 (diabetes), 1.64 (CKD) and 1.52 (CVD).viii

Part 2

 

NACCHO Aboriginal #MentalHealth and #SuicidePrevention : @ozprodcom issues paper on #MentalHealth in Australia is now available. It asks a range of questions which they seek information and feedback on. Submissions or comments are due by Friday 5 April.

 ” Many Australians experience difficulties with their mental health. Mental illness is the single largest contributor to years lived in ill-health and is the third largest contributor (after cancer and cardiovascular conditions) to a reduction in the total years of healthy life for Australians (AIHW 2016).

Almost half of all Australian adults have met the diagnostic criteria for an anxiety, mood or substance use disorder at some point in their lives, and around 20% will meet the criteria in a given year (ABS 2008). This is similar to the average experience of developed countries (OECD 2012, 2014).”

Download the PC issues paper HERE mental-health-issues

See Productivity Commission Website for More info 

“Clearly Australia’s mental health system is failing Aboriginal people, with Aboriginal communities devastated by high rates of suicide and poorer mental health outcomes. Poor mental health in Aboriginal communities often stems from historic dispossession, racism and a poor sense of connection to self and community. 

It is compounded by people’s lack of access to meaningful and ongoing education and employment. Drug and alcohol related conditions are also commonly identified in persons with poor mental health.

NACCHO Chairperson, Matthew Cooke 2015 Read in full Here 

Read over 200 Aboriginal Mental Health Suicide Prevention articles published by NACCHO over the past 7 years 

Despite a plethora of past reviews and inquiries into mental health in Australia, and positive reforms in services and their delivery, many people are still not getting the support they need to maintain good mental health or recover from episodes of mental ill‑health. Mental health in Australia is characterised by:

  • more than 3 100 deaths from suicide in 2017, an average of almost 9 deaths per day, and a suicide rate for Indigenous Australians that is much higher than for other Australians (ABS 2018)
  • for those living with a mental illness, lower average life expectancy than the general population with significant comorbidity issues — most early deaths of psychiatric patients are due to physical health conditions
  • gaps in services and supports for particular demographic groups, such as youth, elderly people in aged care facilities, Indigenous Australians, individuals from culturally diverse backgrounds, and carers of people with a mental illness
  • a lack of continuity in care across services and for those with episodic conditions who may need services and supports on an irregular or non-continuous basis
  • a variety of programs and supports that have been successfully trialled or undertaken for small populations but have been discontinued or proved difficult to scale up for broader benefits
  • significant stigma and discrimination around mental ill-health, particularly compared with physical illness.

The Productivity Commission has been asked to undertake an inquiry into the role of mental health in supporting social and economic participation, and enhancing productivity and economic growth (these terms are defined, for the purpose of this inquiry, in box 1).

By examining mental health from a participation and contribution perspective, this inquiry will essentially be asking how people can be enabled to reach their potential in life, have purpose and meaning, and contribute to the lives of others. That is good for individuals and for the whole community.

Background

In 2014-15, four million Australians reported having experienced a common mental disorder.

Mental health is a key driver of economic participation and productivity in Australia, and hence has the potential to impact incomes and living standards and social engagement and connectedness. Improved population mental health could also help to reduce costs to the economy over the long term.

Australian governments devote significant resources to promoting the best possible mental health and wellbeing outcomes. This includes the delivery of acute, recovery and rehabilitation health services, trauma informed care, preventative and early intervention programs, funding non-government organisations and privately delivered services, and providing income support, education, employment, housing and justice. It is important that policy settings are sustainable, efficient and effective in achieving their goals.

Employers, not-for-profit organisations and carers also play key roles in the mental health of Australians. Many businesses are developing initiatives to support and maintain positive mental health outcomes for their employees as well as helping employees with mental illhealth continue to participate in, or return to, work.

Scope of the inquiry

The Commission should consider the role of mental health in supporting economic participation, enhancing productivity and economic growth. It should make recommendations, as necessary, to improve population mental health, so as to realise economic and social participation and productivity benefits over the long term.

Without limiting related matters on which the Commission may report, the Commission should:

  • examine the effect of supporting mental health on economic and social participation, productivity and the Australian economy;
  • examine how sectors beyond health, including education, employment, social services, housing and justice, can contribute to improving mental health and economic participation and productivity;
  • examine the effectiveness of current programs and Initiatives across all jurisdictions to improve mental health, suicide prevention and participation, including by governments, employers and professional groups;
  • assess whether the current investment in mental health is delivering value for money and the best outcomes for individuals, their families, society and the economy;
  • draw on domestic and international policies and experience, where appropriate; and
  • develop a framework to measure and report the outcomes of mental health policies and investment on participation, productivity and economic growth over the long term.

The Commission should have regard to recent and current reviews, including the 2014 Review of National Mental Health Programmes and Services undertaken by the National Mental Health Commission and the Commission’s reviews into disability services and the National Disability Insurance Scheme.

The Issues Paper
The Commission has released this issues paper to assist individuals and organisations to participate in the inquiry. It contains and outlines:

  • the scope of the inquiry
  • matters about which we are seeking comment and information
  • how to share your views on the terms of reference and the matters raised.

Participants should not feel that they are restricted to comment only on matters raised in the issues paper. We want to receive information and comment on any issues that participants consider relevant to the inquiry’s terms of reference.

Key inquiry dates

Receipt of terms of reference 23 November 2018
Initial consultations November 2018 to April 2019
Initial submissions due 5 April 2019
Release of draft report Timing to be advised
Post draft report public hearings Timing to be advised
Submissions on the draft report due Timing to be advised
Consultations on the draft report November 2019 to February 2020
Final report to Government 23 May 2020

Submissions and brief comments can be lodged

Online (preferred): https://www.pc.gov.au/inquiries/current/mental-health/submissions
By post: Mental Health Inquiry
Productivity Commission
GPO Box 1428, Canberra City, ACT 2601

Contacts

Inquiry matters: Tracey Horsfall Ph: 02 6240 3261
Freecall number: Ph: 1800 020 083
Website: http://www.pc.gov.au/mental-health

Subscribe for inquiry updates

To receive emails updating you on the inquiry consultations and releases, subscribe to the inquiry at: http://www.pc.gov.au/inquiries/current/mentalhealth/subscribe

 

 Definition of key terms
Mental health is a state of wellbeing in which every individual realises his or her own potential, can cope with the normal stresses of life, can work productively and fruitfully, and is able to make a contribution to his or her community.

Mental illness or mental disorder is a health problem that significantly affects how a person feels, thinks, behaves and interacts with other people. It is diagnosed according to standardised criteria.

Mental health problem refers to some combination of diminished cognitive, emotional, behavioural and social abilities, but not to the extent of meeting the criteria for a mental illness/disorder.

Mental ill-health refers to diminished mental health from either a mental illness/disorder or a mental health problem.

Social and economic participation refers to a range of ways in which people contribute to and have the resources, opportunities and capability to learn, work, engage with and have a voice in the community. Social participation can include social engagement, participation in decision making, volunteering, and working with community organisations. Economic participation can include paid employment (including self-employment), training and education.

Productivity measures how much people produce from a given amount of effort and resources. The greater their productivity, the higher their incomes and living standards will tend to be.

Economic growth is an increase in the total value of goods and services produced in an economy. This can be achieved, for example, by raising workforce participation and/or productivity.

Sources: AIHW (2018b); DOHA (2013); Gordon et al. (2015); PC (2013, 2016, 2017c); SCRGSP (2018); WHO (2001).

An improvement in an individual’s mental health can provide flow-on benefits in terms of increased social and economic participation, engagement and connectedness, and productivity in employment (figure 1).

This can in turn enhance the wellbeing of the wider community, including through more rewarding relationships for family and friends; a lower burden on informal carers; a greater contribution to society through volunteering and working in community groups; increased output for the community from a more productive workforce; and an associated expansion in national income and living standards. These raise the capacity of the community to invest in interventions to improve mental health, thereby completing a positive reinforcing loop.

The inquiry’s terms of reference (provided at the front of this paper) were developed by the Australian Government in consultation with State and Territory Governments. The terms of reference ask the Commission to make recommendations to improve population mental health so as to realise higher social and economic participation and contribution benefits over the long term.

Assessing the consequences of mental ill-health

The costs of mental ill-health for both individuals and the wider community will be assessed, as well as how these costs could be reduced through changes to the way governments and others deliver programs and supports to facilitate good mental health.

The Commission will consider the types of costs summarised in figure 4. These will be assessed through a combination of qualitative and quantitative analysis, drawing on available data and cost estimates, and consultations with inquiry participants and topic experts. We welcome the views of inquiry participants on other costs that we should take into account.

 

NACCHO Aboriginal Women’s Health : The @DebKilroy #sistersinside #Freethepeople campaign to free Aboriginal women jailed for unpaid fines has raised almost $300K : We do not need to criminalise poverty.

 

“Originally the campaign asked people to give up two coffees in their week and donate $10 so we could raise $100,000.

“However less than two days later, more than a $100,000 was raised, so the target is now to hit 10,000 donors.”

Campaign organiser Debbie Kilroy, the CEO of advocacy charity Sisters Inside, told Pro Bono News the campaign now aimed to go well beyond the 6,000 donors they had currently. See Part 1 Below 

The money will be there for any woman who’s imprisoned, and the money will be spent on the community for women who have warrants for their arrest by the police.

“Every cent will be spent for the purposes of that … particularly Aboriginal mothers are the ones we want to target and prioritise to pay those fines, so those warrants are revoked, so they don’t end up in prison.”

Ms Kilroy told the ABC the money raised by donors would be spent on supporting formerly incarcerated women and ensuring any outstanding warrants were paid so the women were not at risk of jail. See Part 2 below 

Donate at the the GOFUNDME PAGE

” NACCHO supports the abolition of prisons for First Nations women. The incarceration of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Island women should be a last resort measure.

It is time to consider a radical restructuring of the relationship between Aboriginal people and the state.

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people and their communities must be part of the design, decision-making and implementation of government funded policies, programs and services that aim to reduce – or abolish –the imprisonment of our women.

Increased government investment is needed in community-led prevention and early intervention programs designed to reduce violence against women and provide therapeutic services for vulnerable women and girls. Programs and services that are holistic and culturally safe, delivered by Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander organisations.

NACCHO calls for a full partnership approach in the Closing the Gap Refresh, so that Aboriginal people are at the centre of decision-making, design and delivery of policies that impact on them.

We are seeking a voice to the Commonwealth Parliament, so we have a say over the laws that affect us. “

Pat Turner NACCHO CEO Speaking at  Sisters Inside 9th International Conference 15 Nov 2018

Read full speaking notes HERE

Part 1: The campaign was launched on 5 January with the aim of raising $100,000 – enough to clear the debt of 100 women in Western Australia who have been imprisoned or are at risk of being imprisoned for unpaid court fines.

But as of this morning 16 January the campaign has already raised $280,460, after attracting international attention.

Australie: une cagnotte pour faire libérer des femmes aborigènes

WA is the only state that regularly imprisons people for being unable to pay fines, and ALP research in 2014 found that more than 1,100 people in WA had been imprisoned for unpaid fines each year since 2010.

Under current state laws, the registrar of the Fines Enforcement Registry, who is an independent court officer, can issue warrants for unpaid court fines as a last resort.

The campaign’s crowdfunding page said this system meant Aboriginal mothers were languishing in prison because they did not have the capacity to pay fines.

“They are living in absolute poverty and cannot afford food and shelter for their children let alone pay a fine. They will never have the financial capacity to pay a fine,” the page said.

Money raised from the campaign has already led to the release of one woman from jail, while another three women have had their fines paid so they won’t be arrested.

Campaign organisers are currently working on paying the fines for another 30 women.

The success of the campaign has put pressure on the WA government to reform the law to stop vulnerable people entering jail.

Kilroy said the current law criminalised poverty and she criticised the Labor government’s inaction on the issue despite making a pledge to repeal the lawwhile in opposition.

“The government said prior to their election victory that this was one of their policy platforms, but it’s now been two years and nothing has changed,” she said.

“It’s just not good enough. It does not take that long to change the laws and so we’re calling on the government to change the law as a matter of urgency.”

A spokeswoman for WA Attorney-General John Quigley told Pro Bono News the government intended to introduce a comprehensive package of amendments to the law in the first half of 2019, so warrants could only be handed down by a court.

“These reforms are designed to ensure that people who can afford to pay their fines do, and those that cannot have opportunities to pay them off over time or work them off in other ways,” the spokesperson said.

The Department of Justice has denied the campaign’s claim that single Aboriginal mothers made up the majority of those in prison who could not pay fines.

Departmental figures provided to Pro Bono News state that on 6 January, two females were held for unpaid fines, one of whom identified as Aboriginal.

According to the department, data suggests there has not been an Aboriginal woman in jail in WA for unpaid fines since the campaign started on 5 January.

Part 2 Update from ABC Website Fewer fine defaulters now in prison: Government

The WA Department of Justice said numbers of people jailed solely for fine defaulting had fallen sharply in the past 12 months — with the average daily population falling to “single digits”.

WA Attorney-General John Quigley agreed, saying said recent figures also showed a recent drop in the number of Indigenous women in custody for fine defaulting.

Mr Quigley said the issue of fine defaulters going to prison would be addressed very soon.

“I have a whole raft of changes to the laws through the Cabinet, and [they] are currently with the Parliamentary Council for drafting to Parliament,” he said.

“I have been working assiduously with the registrar of fines … to find other ways to reduce the numbers.”

In terms of the money raised by Sisters Inside, Mr Quigley said he hoped it was being put to good use.

Ms Kilroy told the ABC the money raised by donors would be spent on supporting formerly incarcerated women and ensuring any outstanding warrants were paid so the women were not at risk of jail.

“The money will be there for any woman who’s imprisoned, and the money will be spent on the community for women who have warrants for their arrest by the police.

“Every cent will be spent for the purposes of that … particularly Aboriginal mothers are the ones we want to target and prioritise to pay those fines, so those warrants are revoked, so they don’t end up in prison.”

Call for income-appropriate fines

WA Aboriginal Legal Service chief executive Dennis Eggington said Indigenous women, and those in poverty, were disproportionately affected by the practice of jailing for fines.

“Fines do not have any correlation to someone’s income. If you get $420 on Centrelink and then face a $1,000 fine you are in real trouble and you are not going to be able to pay the fine,” he said.

A head shot of Dennis Eggington with Aboriginal colours in the background.

PHOTO Dennis Eggington for some people it’s easier to go to jail than find the money for fines.

ABC NEWS: SARAH COLLARD

“WA could lead the country at looking at a way where fines are appropriate to the income no matter the offence.”

“It’s really a matter of indirect discrimination. If women are being overrepresented in warrants of commitment, that is having a devastating impact on children and their families.”

He said there was a culture which had led to many Indigenous people feeling as though they had no choice but to go prison for fines.

“It’s much easier to do a couple of days in jail and cut your fine out than to try and find the money to pay the fine,” Mr Eggington said.

”It’s an indictment on the country; It’s an indictment on Australia as a whole that we as one of the most disadvantaged group in Australia have had to develop those ways to survive.

“It’s a terrible, terrible thing

NACCHO Aboriginal Health and #chronicdisease @SandroDemaio How #obesity ups your chronic disease risk and what to do about it

” Almost two in every three Australian adults are now overweight or obese, as are one in four of our children.

This rising obesity burden is the outcome of a host of factors, many of which are beyond our individual control – and obesity is linked to a number of chronic diseases.”

Dr Sandro Demaio is an Aussie medical doctor and global expert on non-communicable diseases. Co-host of the ABC TV series ‘Ask the Doctor’, author of 30 scientific papers and ‘The Doctor’s Diet’ (a cookbook based on science) see Part 2 below 

This article was originally published HERE 

Part 1 NACCHO Policy

” The committee heard that Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisations (ACCHOs) run effective programs aimed at preventing and addressing the high prevalence of obesity in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities.

Ms Pat Turner, Chief Executive Officer of National Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation (NACCHO), gave the example of the Deadly Choices program, which is about organised sports and activities for young people.

She explained that to participate in the program, prospective participants need to have a health check covered by Medicare, which is an opportunity to assess their current state of health and map out a treatment plan if necessary.

However, NACCHO is of the view that ACCHOs need to be better resourced to promote healthy nutrition and physical activity.

Access to healthy and fresh foods in remote Australia

Ms Turner also pointed out that ‘the supply of fresh foods to remote communities and regional communities is a constant problem’.

From NACCHO Submission Read here 

” Many community members in the NT who suffer from chronic illnesses would benefit immensely from using Health Care Homes.

Unfortunately, with limited English, this meant an increased risk of them being inadvertently excluded from the initiative.

First, Italk Alice Springs produced the English version of the story. Then using qualified interpreters, they produced Aboriginal language versions in eight languages: Anmatyerre, Alyawarr, Arrernte, East Side Kriol, West Side Kriol, Pitjatjantjara, Warlpiri and Yolngu Matha

Read Article HERE

Figure 2.22-1 Proportion of persons 15 years and over (age-standardised) by BMI category and Indigenous status, 2012–13
Proportion of persons 15 years and over (age-standardised)

Source: ABS and AIHW analysis of 2012–13 AATSIHS

Read over 60 Aboriginal Health and Obesity articles published by NACCHO over past 7 Years

What is chronic disease?

Chronic disease is a broad term, which includes type 2 diabetes, heart disease, cancers, certain lung conditions, mental illness and genetic disorders. They are often defined by having complex and multiple causes, and are long-term or persistent (‘chronic’ actually means long-term).

How is obesity linked to chronic disease?

Obesity increases the risk of developing certain chronic diseases, including cardiovascular diseases (heart disease and stroke), sleep disorders, type 2 diabetes and at least 13 types of cancer.

Type 2 diabetes and obesity:

Obesity is the leading risk factor for type 2 diabetes, and even being slightly overweight increases this risk. Type 2 diabetes is characterised physiologically by decreased insulin secretion as well as increased insulin resistance due to a combination of genetic and environmental factors. Left uncontrolled, this can lead to a host of nasty outcomes like blindness, kidney problems, heart disease and even loss of feeling in our hands and feet.

Obstructive sleep apnoea and obesity:

This is another chronic disease often linked to obesity. Sleep apnoea is caused when our large air passage is partially or fully blocked by a combination of factors, including the weight of fat tissue sitting on our neck. It can cause us to jolt awake, gasping for oxygen. It leads to poor sleep, which adds physiological pressure to critical organs.

A woman preparing vegetables for a meal

Cancer and obesity:

This is a disease of altered gene expression. It originates from changes to the cell’s DNA caused by a range of factors, including inherited mutations, inflammation, hormones, and external factors including tobacco use, radiation from the sun, and carcinogenic agents in food. Strong evidence also links obesity to a number of cancers including throat cancer, bowel cancer, cancer of the liver, gallbladder and bile ducts, pancreatic cancer, breast cancer, endometrial cancer and kidney cancer.

Obesity is also associated with high blood pressure and increased risk of heart attack and stroke.

This might sound overwhelming, but it’s not all bad news. Here are a few things we can all start to do today to reduce our risk of obesity and associated chronic disease:

1. Eat more fruit and veg

Most dietary advice revolves around eating less. But if we can replace an unhealthy diet with an abundance of fresh, whole fruits and vegetables – at least two servings of fruit per day and five servings of vegetables – we can reduce our risk of obesity whilst still embracing our love for good food.

2. Limit our alcohol consumption

Forgo that glass of wine or beer after a long hard day at work and opt instead for something else that helps us relax. Pure alcohol is inherently full of energy – containing twice the energy per gram as sugar. This energy is surplus and non-essential to our nutritional needs, so contributes to our widening waistlines. And whether we’re out for drinks with mates or at a function, we can reduce our consumption by spacing out our drinks and holding off before reaching for another glass.

3. Get moving

While not everyone loves a morning sprint, there are many enjoyable ways to maintain a sufficient level of physical activity. Doing some form of exercise for at least 30 minutes each day is an effective way of keeping our waistlines in check. So, take a break to stretch out the muscles a few times during the workday, spend an afternoon at the local pool, get out into the garden or take some extra time to ride or walk to work. If none of these appeal, do some research to find the right exercise that will be fun and achievable.

Two women exercising in a park together

4. Buddy up

There’s nothing like a bit of peer pressure to get us healthy and active. Pick a friend who has the same goals and encourage each other to keep going. Sign up for exercise classes together, meet for a walk, have them over for a healthy meal, share tips and seek out support when feeling uninspired.

5. Prioritise sleep

Some argue that sleep is the healthy icing on the longevity cake. The benefits of a good night’s sleep are endless, with recent research suggesting it can even benefit our decision-making and self-discipline, making it easier to resist that ‘between-meal’ treat. Furthermore, lack of sleep can increase our appetite and see us lose the enthusiasm to stay active.

Above all, we need to foster patience and perseverance when it comes to achieving a healthy weight. It might not happen overnight, but it is within reach.

Let’s start today!

Co-host of the ABC TV series ‘Ask the Doctor’, author of 30 scientific papers and ‘The Doctor’s Diet’ (a cookbook based on science), Dr Sandro Demaio is an Aussie medical doctor and global expert on non-communicable diseases.