NACCHO Aboriginal Health Conferences and events : This week #WorldMentalHealthDay #WMHD2018 #MentalHealthPromise #10OCT This Month : Register and Download #NACCHOagm2018 Oct 30 – Nov 2 Program @hosw2018 #HOSW18 #HealingOurWay @June_Oscar #WomensVoices #IndigBizMth

 

This week 

World Mental Health Day Oct 10

World Mental Health Week Oct 7- 13 

Aboriginal & Torres Strait Islander HIV Awareness Week (ATSIHAW) 28th November to 5th December : Expression of Interest open but close 26 October

This Month

NACCHO AGM 2018 Brisbane Oct 30—Nov 2 Registrations now open : Download the Program 

Future events /conferences

Puggy Hunter Memorial Scholarship applications Close October 14 October
National guide to a preventive health assessment for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people (Third edition) Workshop 10 October 

Now open: Aged Care Regional, Rural and Remote Infrastructure Grant opportunity.$500,000  closes 24 October 2018

The fourth annual Indigenous Business Month this year will celebrate Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women in business, to coincide with the 2018 NAIDOC theme Because of Her, We Can.

 

Wiyi Yani U Thangani Women’s Voices project. 

2018 International Indigenous Allied Health Forum at the Mercure Hotel, Sydney, Australia on the 30 November 2018

AIDA Conference 2018 Vision into Action

Healing Our Spirit Worldwide
2nd National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Suicide Prevention Conference 20-21 November Perth

2019 Close the Gap for Vision by 2020 – National Conference 2019
This week 

This World Mental Health Day – on Wednesday 10 October – will be the biggest yet in Australia, with more than 700 organisations, companies, community groups and charities taking part, as well an official Guinness World Record Attempt in Wagga Wagga to raise awareness and reduce stigma.

The ‘Do You See What I See?’ campaign encourages people to make a #MentalHealthPromise and shed a more positive light on mental health in a bid to reduce stigma for the one in five Australians who are affected by mental illness annually.

More than 700 organisations have engaged with the campaign already this year, which has also seen more than 20,000 mental health promises made by individuals at http://www.1010.org.au .

Five days out from World Mental Health Day itself, on Wednesday 10 October, Mental Health Australia CEO Frank Quinlan says this year’s response has been the biggest ever.

“Year-on-year the interest in World Mental Health Day continues to grow and to me that’s a clear sign that we are reducing stigma, and more and more people are prepared to talk and hopefully seek help,” said Mr. Quinlan.

“We’ve seen a huge increase in the participation of workplaces over the last two years, and have tailored our messaging accordingly to encourage people to shed a more positive light on mental health at work.”

“We know from our recent Investing to Save Report with KPMG that investment in workplace initiatives could save the nation more than $4.5 billion, and to see some of the biggest employers in the country engage with this year’s campaign, is a clear sign that people are becoming more and more aware of just how important it is to look after mental health and wellbeing in the workplace.”

To help celebrate this year’s World Mental Health Day, and to add to the success of the campaign, Mental Health Australia has also linked up with the Wagga Wagga City Council and Bunnings Warehouse to attempt a Guinness World Record for the most number of people wearing high visibility vests in one location.

Aimed to again shed a positive light, and raise the visibility and awareness of mental health in a community, particularly amongst young men, tradies, farmers and their families, the high-viz world record attempt in Wagga on World Mental Health Day has already seen the people of the Riverina come together.

“We often speak about mentally healthy communities and this fun Guinness World Record Attempt has been a great opportunity to engage with, and unite the people of Wagga Wagga for a common goal,” said Mr. Quinlan.

“Thanks to the fantastic support of Bunnings and the Wagga Wagga City Council, as well as 3M and Triple M Riverina, we can’t wait to see a sea of high visibility vests in the Bunnings carpark next Wednesday morning, and who knows we might even break the current record of 2,136.”

To find out more or to register for the Guinness World Record Attempt go to www.1010.org.au/wagga (link is external)

Mental Health Australia would like to thank all the organisations who have shown their support this year and will be helping to raise awareness and reduce stigma next Wednesday 10 October on World Mental Health Day.

To find our more go to www.1010.org.au

Aboriginal & Torres Strait Islander HIV Awareness Week (ATSIHAW) 28th November to 5th December : Expression of Interest open but close 26 October

In 2017 we supported more than 60 ACCHS to run community events during ATSIHAW.

We are now seeking final EOIs to host 2018 ATSIHAW Events

EOI’s will remain open until 26th October 2018

ATSIHAW coincides each year with World AIDS Day- our aim is to promote conversation and action around HIV in our communities. Our long lasting theme of ATSIHAW is U AND ME CAN STOP HIV”.

If you would like to host an ATSIHAW event in 2018, please complete the EOI form here Expression of Interest 2018 and then send back to us to at  atsihaw@sahmri.com

Once registered we will send merchandise to your service to help with your event.

For more information about ATSIHAW please visit http://www.atsihiv.org.au/hiv-awareness-week/merchandise/

ATSIHAW on Facebook     https://www.facebook.com/ATSIHAW/

ATSIHAW on Twitter          https://twitter.com/atsihaw

NACCHO AGM 2018 Brisbane Oct 30—Nov 2 Registrations still open

Follow our conference using HASH TAG #NACCHOagm2018

Download Draft Program as at 2 October

NACCHO 7 Page Conference Program 2018_v3

Register HERE

Conference Website Link:

Accommodation Link:                   

The NACCHO Members’ Conference and AGM provides a forum for the Aboriginal community controlled health services workforce, bureaucrats, educators, suppliers and consumers to:

  • Present on innovative local economic development solutions to issues that can be applied to address similar issues nationally and across disciplines
  • Have input and influence from the ‘grassroots’ into national and state health policy and service delivery
  • Demonstrate leadership in workforce and service delivery innovation
  • Promote continuing education and professional development activities essential to the Aboriginal community controlled health services in urban, rural and remote Australia
  • Promote Aboriginal health research by professionals who practice in these areas and the presentation of research findings
  • Develop supportive networks
  • Promote good health and well-being through the delivery of health services to and by Indigenous and non-Indigenous people throughout Australia.

Conference Website Link

Puggy Hunter Memorial Scholarship applications Close October 14 October

The Puggy Hunter Memorial Scholarship Scheme is designed to encourage and assist undergraduate students in health-related disciplines to complete their studies and join the health workforce.

Dr Puggy Hunter was the NACCHO Chair 1991-2001

Puggy was the elected chairperson of the National Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation, (NACCHO), which is the peak national advisory body on Aboriginal health. NACCHO has a membership of over 144 + Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Services and is the representative body of these services. Puggy was the inaugural Chair of NACCHO from 1991 until his death.[1]

Puggy was the vice-chairperson of the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Council, the Federal Health Minister’s main advisory body on Aboriginal health established in 1996. He was also Chair of the National Public Health Partnership Aboriginal and Islander Health Working Group which reports to the Partnership and to the Australian Health Ministers Advisory Council. He was a member of the Australian Pharmaceutical Advisory Council (APAC), the General Practice Partnership Advisory Council, the Joint Advisory Group on Population Health and the National Health Priority Areas Action Council as well as a number of other key Aboriginal health policy and advisory groups on national issues.[1]

The scheme provides scholarships for Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander people studying an entry level health course.

Applications for PHMSS 2019 scholarship round are now open.

Click the button below to start your online application.

Applications must be completed and submitted before midnight AEDT (Sydney/Canberra time) Sunday 14 October 2018. After this time the system will shut down and any incomplete applications will be lost.

Eligible health areas

  • Aboriginal & Torres Strait Islander health work
  • Allied health (excluding pharmacy)
  • Dentistry/oral health (excluding dental assistants)
  • Direct entry midwifery
  • Medicine
  • Nursing; registered and enrolled

Eligibility criteria

Applications will be considered from applicants who are:

  • of Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander descent
    Applicants must identify as and be able to confirm their Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander status.
  • enrolled or intending to enrol in an entry level or graduate entry level health related course
    Courses must be provided by an Australian registered training organisation or university. Funding is not available for postgraduate study.
  • intending to study in the academic year that the scholarship is offered.

A significant number of applications are received each year; meeting the eligibility criteria will not guarantee applicants a scholarship offer.

Value of scholarship

Funding is provided for the normal duration of the course. Full time scholarship awardees will receive up to $15,000 per year and part time recipients will receive up to $7,500 per year. The funding is paid in 24 fortnightly instalments throughout the study period of each year.

Selection criteria

These are competitive scholarships and will be awarded on the recommendation of the independent selection committee whose assessment will be based on how applicants address the following questions:

  • Describe what has been your driving influence/motivation in wanting to become a health professional in your chosen area.
  • Discuss what you hope to accomplish as a health professional in the next 5-10 years.
  • Discuss your commitment to study in your chosen course.
  • Outline your involvement in community activities, including promoting the health and well-being of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.

The scholarships are funded by the Australian Government, Department of Health and administered by the Australian College of Nursing. The scheme was established in recognition of Dr Arnold ‘Puggy’ Hunter’s significant contribution to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health and his role as Chair of the National Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation.

Important links

Links to Indigenous health professional associations

Contact ACN

e scholarships@acn.edu.au
t 1800 688 628

National guide to a preventive health assessment for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people (Third edition) Workshop 10 October 

The RACGP and NACCHO invite you to a workshop to be held prior to GP18, that
will support your practice team to maximise the opportunity for the prevention of
disease at each health service visit.

A National Guide contributor and a cultural educator will discuss how best to utilise
the third edition of the National Guide when providing care for Aboriginal and Torres
Strait Islander people.

The workshop will also include a focus group exploring implementation of the
National Guide in both mainstream and Aboriginal Community Controlled Primary
Health Care Services (ACCHSs), as well as the characteristics of a culturally
responsive general practice.

Program

• Background and purpose of the National Guide
• Features of the National Guide, including:
• Recommendation tables
• Good practice points
• Evidence base
• Lifecycle wall chart
• Putting the National Guide

Date
Wednesday 10 October 2018

Time
Registration and lunch 12.00 pm
Workshop 12.30–4.00 pm

Venue
Jellurgal Aboriginal Cultural Centre
1711 Gold Coast Highway, Burleigh Heads

Cost
Free of charge

RSVP
Friday 5 October 2018

Registration essential

Registration
Email daniela.doblanovic@racgp.org.au
or call Daniela Doblanovic on 03 8699 0528.

We will then contact you to confirm

 

Now open: Aged Care Regional, Rural and Remote Infrastructure Grant opportunity.$500,000  closes 24 October 2018

This grant opportunity is designed to assist existing approved residential and home care providers in regional, rural and remote areas to invest in infrastructure. Commonwealth Home Support Programme services will also be considered, where there is exceptional need. Funding will be prioritised to aged care services most in need and where geographical constraints and significantly higher costs impede services’ ability to invest in infrastructure works.

Up to $500,000 (GST exclusive) will be available per service via a competitive application process.

Eligibility:

To be eligible you must be:

  • an approved residential or home care provider (as defined under the Aged Care Act 1997) or an approved Commonwealth Home Support Program (CHSP) provider in exceptional circumstances (refer Frequently asked Questions) ; and
  • currently operating an aged care service located in Modified Monash Model Classification 3-7 or if a CHSP provider, the service is located in MMM 6-7. (MMM Locator).

More Info Apply 

The fourth annual Indigenous Business Month this year will celebrate Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women in business, to coincide with the 2018 NAIDOC theme Because of Her, We Can.

Throughout October, twenty national Indigenous Business Month events will take place showcasing the talents of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women entrepreneurs from a variety of business sectors. These events aim to ignite conversations about Indigenous business development and innovation, focusing on women’s roles and leadership.

Indigenous Business Month is an initiative driven by the alumni of Melbourne Business School’s MURRA Indigenous Business Master Class, who see business as a way of providing positive role models for young Indigenous Australians and improving quality of life in Indigenous communities.

Since the launch of Indigenous Business Month in 2015, [1] the Indigenous business sector is one of the fastest growing sectors in Australia delivering over $1 billion in goods and services for the Australian economy.

Jason Eades, Director, Consulting at Social Ventures Australia and Indigenous Business Month 2018 host said:

It is a privilege to be involved in Indigenous Business Month, to be able to take the time to celebrate and acknowledge the great achievements of our Indigenous entrepreneurs and their respective businesses. Indigenous entrepreneurs are showing the rest of the world that we can do business and do it well, whilst maintaining our strong cultural values.”

The latest ABS Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Social Survey 2014-15 shows that only 51.5 percent of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women participate in the workforce compared to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander men at 65 percent.

The Australian Government has invested in a range of initiatives to increase Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women entrepreneurs in the work-placeincluding: [2) Continued funding for girls’ academies in high schools, so that young women can realise their leadership potential, greater access to finance and business support suited to the needs of Indigenous businesses with a focus on Indigenous entrepreneurs and start-ups, and expanding the ParentsNextprogram and Fund pre-employment projects via the new Launch into Work program providing flexibility to meet the specific needs of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women.

Michelle Evans, MURRA Program Director AND Associate Professor of Leadership at the University of Melbourne said:

The Indigenous Business Month’s aim is to inspire, showcase and engage the Indigenous business community. This year it is more significant than ever to support the female Indigenous business community and provide a platform for them to network and encourage young Indigenous women to consider developing a business as a career option.”

Indigenous Business Month runs from October 1 to October 31. Check out the website for an event near you (spaces are limited).

The initiative is supported by 33 Creative, Asia Pacific Social Impact Centre at the University of Melbourne, Iscariot Media, and PwC.

For more information on Indigenous Business Month visit

·         The Websitewww.indigenousbusinessmonth.com.au

·         Facebook

·         Twitter

·         LinkedIn

Wiyi Yani U Thangani Women’s Voices project.

June Oscar AO and her team are excited to hear from Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women and girls across the country as a part of the Wiyi Yani U Thangani Women’s Voices project.

Whilst we will not be able to get to every community, we hope to hear from as many women and girls as possible through this process. If we are not coming to your community we encourage you to please visit the Have your Say! page of the website to find out more about the other ways to have your voice included through our survey and submission process.

We will be hosting public sessions as advertised below but also a number of private sessions to enable women and girls from particularly vulnerable settings like justice and care to participate.

Details about current, upcoming and past gatherings appears below, however it is subject to change. We will update this page regularly with further details about upcoming gatherings closer to the date of the events.

Please get in touch with us via email wiyiyaniuthangani@humanrights.gov.au or phone on (02) 9284 9600 if you would like more information.

We look forward to hearing from you!

Pathways borders

Current gatherings

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women and girls are invited to register for one of the following gatherings

Pathways borders

Upcoming gatherings

If your community is listed below and you would like to be involved in planning for our visit or would like more information, please write to us at wiyiyaniuthangani@humanrights.gov.au or phone (02) 9284 9600.

Location Dates
Port Headland October 2018
Newman October 2018
Dubbo TBC
Brewarrina TBC
Rockhampton TBC
Longreach TBC
Kempsey TBC

Pathways borders

 

Download HERE

2018 International Indigenous Allied Health Forum at the Mercure Hotel, Sydney, Australia on the 30 November 2018.

This Forum will bring together Indigenous and First Nation presenters and panellists from across the world to discuss shared experiences and practices in building, supporting and retaining an Indigenous allied health workforce.

This full-day event will provide a platform to share information and build an integrated approach to improving culturally safe and responsive health care and improve health and wellbeing outcomes for Indigenous peoples and communities.

Delegates will include Indigenous and First Nation allied health professionals and students from Australia, Canada, the USA and New Zealand. There will also be delegates from a range of sectors including, health, wellbeing, education, disability, academia and community.

MORE INFO 

AIDA Conference 2018 Vision into Action


Building on the foundations of our membership, history and diversity, AIDA is shaping a future where we continue to innovate, lead and stay strong in culture. It’s an exciting time of change and opportunity in Indigenous health.

The AIDA conference supports our members and the health sector by creating an inspiring networking space that engages sector experts, key decision makers, Indigenous medical students and doctors to join in an Indigenous health focused academic and scientific program.

AIDA recognises and respects that the pathway to achieving equitable and culturally-safe healthcare for Indigenous Australians is dynamic and complex. Through unity, leadership and collaboration, we create a future where our vision translates into measureable and significantly improved health outcomes for our communities. Now is the time to put that vision into action.

Registrations Close August 31

Healing Our Spirit Worldwide

Global gathering of Indigenous people to be held in Sydney
University of Sydney, The Healing Foundation to co-host Healing Our Spirit Worldwide
Gawuwi gamarda Healing Our Spirit Worldwidegu Ngalya nangari nura Cadigalmirung.
Calling our friends to come, to be at Healing Our Spirit Worldwide. We meet on the country of the Cadigal.
In November 2018, up to 2,000 Indigenous people from around the world will gather in Sydney to take part in Healing Our Spirit Worldwide: The Eighth Gathering.
A global movement, Healing Our Spirit Worldwidebegan in Canada in the 1980s to address the devastation of substance abuse and dependence among Indigenous people around the world. Since 1992 it has held a gathering approximately every four years, in a different part of the world, focusing on a diverse range of topics relevant to Indigenous lives including health, politics, social inclusion, stolen generations, education, governance and resilience.
The International Indigenous Council – the governing body of Healing Our Spirit Worldwide – has invited the University of Sydney and The Healing Foundation to co-host the Eighth Gathering with them in Sydney this year. The second gathering was also held in Sydney, in 1994.
 Please also feel free to tag us in any relevant cross posting: @HOSW8 @hosw2018 #HOSW18 #HealingOurWay #TheUniversityofSydney

2nd National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Suicide Prevention Conference 20-21 November Perth

” The National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Suicide Prevention and World Indigenous Suicide Prevention Conference Committee invite and welcome you to Perth for the second National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Suicide Prevention Conference, and the second World Indigenous Suicide Prevention Conference.

Our Indigenous communities, both nationally and internationally, share common histories and are confronted with similar issues stemming from colonisation. Strengthening our communities so that we can address high rates of suicide is one of these shared issues. The Conferences will provide more opportunities to network and collaborate between Indigenous people and communities, policy makers, and researchers. The Conferences are unique opportunities to share what we have learned and to collaborate on solutions that work in suicide prevention.

This also enables us to highlight our shared priorities with political leaders in our respective countries and communities.

Conference Website 

2019 Close the Gap for Vision by 2020 – National Conference 2019
Indigenous Eye Health and co-host Aboriginal Medical Services Alliance Northern Territory (AMSANT) are pleased to announce the Close the Gap for Vision by 2020 – National Conference 2019 which will be held in Alice Springs, Northern Territory on Thursday 14 and Friday 15 March 2019 at the Alice Springs Convention Centre.
The 2019 conference will run over two days with the aim of bringing people together and connecting people involved in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander eye care from local communities, ACCOs, health services, non-government organisations, professional bodies and government departments from across the country. We would like to invite everyone who is working on or interested in improving eye health and care for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians.
More information available at: go.unimelb.edu.au/wqb6 

NACCHO Aboriginal Health Conferences and events : This week #NATSIHWAsym18 #WorldHeartDay2018 This Month : Register and Download #NACCHOagm2018 Oct 30 – Nov 2 Program @hosw2018 #HOSW18 #HealingOurWay @June_Oscar #WomensVoices #IndigBizMth

This week 

World Heart Day September 29

NATSIHWA National Professional Development Symposium 2018

This Month

NACCHO AGM 2018 Brisbane Oct 30—Nov 2 Registrations now open : Download the Program 

Future events /conferences

Puggy Hunter Memorial Scholarship applications Close October 14 October
National guide to a preventive health assessment for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people (Third edition) Workshop 10 October 

Now open: Aged Care Regional, Rural and Remote Infrastructure Grant opportunity.$500,000  closes 24 October 2018

The fourth annual Indigenous Business Month this year will celebrate Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women in business, to coincide with the 2018 NAIDOC theme Because of Her, We Can.

My Health Records webinars from Consumer Health Forum 

Wiyi Yani U Thangani Women’s Voices project. 

2018 International Indigenous Allied Health Forum at the Mercure Hotel, Sydney, Australia on the 30 November 2018

AIDA Conference 2018 Vision into Action

Healing Our Spirit Worldwide
2nd National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Suicide Prevention Conference 20-21 November Perth

2019 Close the Gap for Vision by 2020 – National Conference 2019
This week 
World Heart Day September 29

Saturday 29 September is arguably the day of the most popular event in Australia, the AFL Grand Final, but it is also World Heart Day, which offers a good reminder of the impact that heart disease has on individuals and communities.

It also serves as a reminder that heart attack is common, disabling and preventable.

Heart attack is a big killer of Australians every year. One Australian has a heart attack every 10 minutes. However, the perception that people have a heart attack and leave hospital a few days later ‘cured’ is far from the truth. 

A heart attack is a life-changing event and people who survive are faced with adjusting to a ‘new normal’. That is, living with a life-long condition of heart disease that, for many, will impact their quality of life.

Heart attacks do vary in severity and while some people go on to live healthy lives, thousands of Australians who survive heart attacks every year experience lasting ill health that affects everyday life. This is the focus of the Heart Foundation’s 2018 Heart Attack Survivors Survey released this week, which highlights the disabling and ongoing impact a heart attack has on a person and their loved ones.

The Heart Attack Survivors survey provides a snapshot of how hundreds of heart attack survivors are faring in the first weeks, months and years after a heart attack. It also captures the often-untold story of a heart attack, which is the struggle many people experience in getting back to the life they knew before their heart attack.

While the Heart Foundation recommends people work towards resuming usual activities in a few weeks after their heart attack, the survey tells a different story. Results found one in four survivors have not been able to resume work at all, while a further quarter had resumed work but not at the same level as before their heart attack. 

Survivors’ exercise levels are also affected, with one in two survivors reporting they have not been able to return to pre-heart attack levels of exercise or have been unable to resume exercise at all.

Even performing basic activities such as showering and bathing is difficult, with one in four people saying they could not do so at the same level before their heart attack. These challenges can seriously affect the life of both the survivor and their family. While it’s important to talk about the prevention of heart attack, it’s just as important to talk about treatment and recovery.

Cardiac rehabilitation, which usually runs for 6 to 10 weeks, is a program coordinated by health professionals that helps heart attack survivors recover and get back to normal activities sooner. It is a critical step in a patient’s journey to better health after a heart attack and should be seen as an investment in the future – and this claim stacks up.  People are 40 per cent less likely to be readmitted to hospital and 25 per cent less likely to die from another heart attack if they have taken part in a cardiac rehab program.

The good news is that the latest survey findings show cardiac rehab attendance has increased by 30 per cent in the past two years.

In 2018, more than half (57 per cent) of heart attack survivors reported attending cardiac rehab with the majority (86 per cent) completing the program.

Cardiac rehab is critical to whether a survivor maintains lifestyle changes after a heart attack. Those who completed cardiac rehab were nearly 80 per cent more likely to increase their physical activity and maintain these changes than those who didn’t complete.

Medical professionals play a key role when it comes to people attending cardiac rehab after their heart attack.

Along with an increase in attendance, the latest survey results have also seen a significant increase in heart attack survivors reporting they discussed cardiac rehab with medical staff before leaving hospital. In addition to this, two in five survivors were told by medical staff to attend a rehab program, also a big increase. This is important because people who were told by medical staff to attend cardiac rehab were more than 60 per cent more likely to attend and complete than those who weren’t.

Created and led by the World Heart Federation (WHD), World Heart Day aims to combat the rising number of people with cardiovascular disease – among Australia’s most common and most costly disease groups. This year, the campaign includes a clear and simple call to action to encourage individuals to commit to healthier habits by making a heart promise.

We would ask that medical professionals make a promise to encourage more heart attack survivors to take on cardiac rehab, and that survivors promise themselves they will complete it. 

The best of the Heart Foundation, delivered monthly direct to your inbox

SIGN ME UP

 Get in touch 13 11 12

Do you have a question? Speak to a qualified health professional.

NATSIHWA National Professional Development Symposium 2018
Follow using HASHTAG  and @IndigenousX
This years Symposium will be focussed on upskilling our Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander Health Workers and Health Practitioners through a series of interactive workshops. Registrants will be able to participate in all workshops by rotating in groups over the 2 days. The aim of the symposium is to provide the registrants with new practical skills to take back to communities and open up a platform for Health Workers/Practitioners to network with other Individuals in the workforce from all over Australia.

NACCHO AGM 2018 Brisbane Oct 30—Nov 2 Registrations now open

Follow our conference using HASH TAG #NACCHOagm2018

Download Draft Program as at 2 October

NACCHO 7 Page Conference Program 2018_v3

Register HERE

Conference Website Link:

Accommodation Link:                   

The NACCHO Members’ Conference and AGM provides a forum for the Aboriginal community controlled health services workforce, bureaucrats, educators, suppliers and consumers to:

  • Present on innovative local economic development solutions to issues that can be applied to address similar issues nationally and across disciplines
  • Have input and influence from the ‘grassroots’ into national and state health policy and service delivery
  • Demonstrate leadership in workforce and service delivery innovation
  • Promote continuing education and professional development activities essential to the Aboriginal community controlled health services in urban, rural and remote Australia
  • Promote Aboriginal health research by professionals who practice in these areas and the presentation of research findings
  • Develop supportive networks
  • Promote good health and well-being through the delivery of health services to and by Indigenous and non-Indigenous people throughout Australia.

Conference Website Link

Puggy Hunter Memorial Scholarship applications Close October 14 October

The Puggy Hunter Memorial Scholarship Scheme is designed to encourage and assist undergraduate students in health-related disciplines to complete their studies and join the health workforce.

Dr Puggy Hunter was the NACCHO Chair 1991-2001

Puggy was the elected chairperson of the National Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation, (NACCHO), which is the peak national advisory body on Aboriginal health. NACCHO has a membership of over 144 + Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Services and is the representative body of these services. Puggy was the inaugural Chair of NACCHO from 1991 until his death.[1]

Puggy was the vice-chairperson of the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Council, the Federal Health Minister’s main advisory body on Aboriginal health established in 1996. He was also Chair of the National Public Health Partnership Aboriginal and Islander Health Working Group which reports to the Partnership and to the Australian Health Ministers Advisory Council. He was a member of the Australian Pharmaceutical Advisory Council (APAC), the General Practice Partnership Advisory Council, the Joint Advisory Group on Population Health and the National Health Priority Areas Action Council as well as a number of other key Aboriginal health policy and advisory groups on national issues.[1]

The scheme provides scholarships for Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander people studying an entry level health course.

Applications for PHMSS 2019 scholarship round are now open.

Click the button below to start your online application.

Applications must be completed and submitted before midnight AEDT (Sydney/Canberra time) Sunday 14 October 2018. After this time the system will shut down and any incomplete applications will be lost.

Eligible health areas

  • Aboriginal & Torres Strait Islander health work
  • Allied health (excluding pharmacy)
  • Dentistry/oral health (excluding dental assistants)
  • Direct entry midwifery
  • Medicine
  • Nursing; registered and enrolled

Eligibility criteria

Applications will be considered from applicants who are:

  • of Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander descent
    Applicants must identify as and be able to confirm their Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander status.
  • enrolled or intending to enrol in an entry level or graduate entry level health related course
    Courses must be provided by an Australian registered training organisation or university. Funding is not available for postgraduate study.
  • intending to study in the academic year that the scholarship is offered.

A significant number of applications are received each year; meeting the eligibility criteria will not guarantee applicants a scholarship offer.

Value of scholarship

Funding is provided for the normal duration of the course. Full time scholarship awardees will receive up to $15,000 per year and part time recipients will receive up to $7,500 per year. The funding is paid in 24 fortnightly instalments throughout the study period of each year.

Selection criteria

These are competitive scholarships and will be awarded on the recommendation of the independent selection committee whose assessment will be based on how applicants address the following questions:

  • Describe what has been your driving influence/motivation in wanting to become a health professional in your chosen area.
  • Discuss what you hope to accomplish as a health professional in the next 5-10 years.
  • Discuss your commitment to study in your chosen course.
  • Outline your involvement in community activities, including promoting the health and well-being of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.

The scholarships are funded by the Australian Government, Department of Health and administered by the Australian College of Nursing. The scheme was established in recognition of Dr Arnold ‘Puggy’ Hunter’s significant contribution to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health and his role as Chair of the National Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation.

Important links

Links to Indigenous health professional associations

Contact ACN

e scholarships@acn.edu.au
t 1800 688 628

National guide to a preventive health assessment for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people (Third edition) Workshop 10 October 

The RACGP and NACCHO invite you to a workshop to be held prior to GP18, that
will support your practice team to maximise the opportunity for the prevention of
disease at each health service visit.

A National Guide contributor and a cultural educator will discuss how best to utilise
the third edition of the National Guide when providing care for Aboriginal and Torres
Strait Islander people.

The workshop will also include a focus group exploring implementation of the
National Guide in both mainstream and Aboriginal Community Controlled Primary
Health Care Services (ACCHSs), as well as the characteristics of a culturally
responsive general practice.

Program

• Background and purpose of the National Guide
• Features of the National Guide, including:
• Recommendation tables
• Good practice points
• Evidence base
• Lifecycle wall chart
• Putting the National Guide

Date
Wednesday 10 October 2018

Time
Registration and lunch 12.00 pm
Workshop 12.30–4.00 pm

Venue
Jellurgal Aboriginal Cultural Centre
1711 Gold Coast Highway, Burleigh Heads

Cost
Free of charge

RSVP
Friday 5 October 2018

Registration essential

Registration
Email daniela.doblanovic@racgp.org.au
or call Daniela Doblanovic on 03 8699 0528.

We will then contact you to confirm

 

Now open: Aged Care Regional, Rural and Remote Infrastructure Grant opportunity.$500,000  closes 24 October 2018

This grant opportunity is designed to assist existing approved residential and home care providers in regional, rural and remote areas to invest in infrastructure. Commonwealth Home Support Programme services will also be considered, where there is exceptional need. Funding will be prioritised to aged care services most in need and where geographical constraints and significantly higher costs impede services’ ability to invest in infrastructure works.

Up to $500,000 (GST exclusive) will be available per service via a competitive application process.

Eligibility:

To be eligible you must be:

  • an approved residential or home care provider (as defined under the Aged Care Act 1997) or an approved Commonwealth Home Support Program (CHSP) provider in exceptional circumstances (refer Frequently asked Questions) ; and
  • currently operating an aged care service located in Modified Monash Model Classification 3-7 or if a CHSP provider, the service is located in MMM 6-7. (MMM Locator).

More Info Apply 

The fourth annual Indigenous Business Month this year will celebrate Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women in business, to coincide with the 2018 NAIDOC theme Because of Her, We Can.

Throughout October, twenty national Indigenous Business Month events will take place showcasing the talents of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women entrepreneurs from a variety of business sectors. These events aim to ignite conversations about Indigenous business development and innovation, focusing on women’s roles and leadership.

Indigenous Business Month is an initiative driven by the alumni of Melbourne Business School’s MURRA Indigenous Business Master Class, who see business as a way of providing positive role models for young Indigenous Australians and improving quality of life in Indigenous communities.

Since the launch of Indigenous Business Month in 2015, [1] the Indigenous business sector is one of the fastest growing sectors in Australia delivering over $1 billion in goods and services for the Australian economy.

Jason Eades, Director, Consulting at Social Ventures Australia and Indigenous Business Month 2018 host said:

It is a privilege to be involved in Indigenous Business Month, to be able to take the time to celebrate and acknowledge the great achievements of our Indigenous entrepreneurs and their respective businesses. Indigenous entrepreneurs are showing the rest of the world that we can do business and do it well, whilst maintaining our strong cultural values.”

The latest ABS Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Social Survey 2014-15 shows that only 51.5 percent of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women participate in the workforce compared to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander men at 65 percent.

The Australian Government has invested in a range of initiatives to increase Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women entrepreneurs in the work-placeincluding: [2) Continued funding for girls’ academies in high schools, so that young women can realise their leadership potential, greater access to finance and business support suited to the needs of Indigenous businesses with a focus on Indigenous entrepreneurs and start-ups, and expanding the ParentsNextprogram and Fund pre-employment projects via the new Launch into Work program providing flexibility to meet the specific needs of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women.

Michelle Evans, MURRA Program Director AND Associate Professor of Leadership at the University of Melbourne said:

The Indigenous Business Month’s aim is to inspire, showcase and engage the Indigenous business community. This year it is more significant than ever to support the female Indigenous business community and provide a platform for them to network and encourage young Indigenous women to consider developing a business as a career option.”

Indigenous Business Month runs from October 1 to October 31. Check out the website for an event near you (spaces are limited).

The initiative is supported by 33 Creative, Asia Pacific Social Impact Centre at the University of Melbourne, Iscariot Media, and PwC.

For more information on Indigenous Business Month visit

·         The Websitewww.indigenousbusinessmonth.com.au

·         Facebook

·         Twitter

·         LinkedIn

My Health Records webinars from Consumer Health Forum 

The recording of our second webinar that gives an overview of digital health in Australia and where My Health Record fits in the scheme of things is now up on our YouTube channel:

You can register here: http://www.webcasts.com.au/chf300818/. Next week, we have an in depth look at the risks.

If you have questions or thoughts about either, please use the links below to send them to us.

Consumer Estimates: My Health Record
Thursday, 4 October
12:30pm-1:30pm AEST

Register to attend | Find out more

 

Wiyi Yani U Thangani Women’s Voices project.

June Oscar AO and her team are excited to hear from Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women and girls across the country as a part of the Wiyi Yani U Thangani Women’s Voices project.

Whilst we will not be able to get to every community, we hope to hear from as many women and girls as possible through this process. If we are not coming to your community we encourage you to please visit the Have your Say! page of the website to find out more about the other ways to have your voice included through our survey and submission process.

We will be hosting public sessions as advertised below but also a number of private sessions to enable women and girls from particularly vulnerable settings like justice and care to participate.

Details about current, upcoming and past gatherings appears below, however it is subject to change. We will update this page regularly with further details about upcoming gatherings closer to the date of the events.

Please get in touch with us via email wiyiyaniuthangani@humanrights.gov.au or phone on (02) 9284 9600 if you would like more information.

We look forward to hearing from you!

Pathways borders

Current gatherings

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women and girls are invited to register for one of the following gatherings

Pathways borders

Upcoming gatherings

If your community is listed below and you would like to be involved in planning for our visit or would like more information, please write to us at wiyiyaniuthangani@humanrights.gov.au or phone (02) 9284 9600.

Location Dates
Port Headland October 2018
Newman October 2018
Dubbo TBC
Brewarrina TBC
Rockhampton TBC
Longreach TBC
Kempsey TBC

Pathways borders

 

Download HERE

2018 International Indigenous Allied Health Forum at the Mercure Hotel, Sydney, Australia on the 30 November 2018.

This Forum will bring together Indigenous and First Nation presenters and panellists from across the world to discuss shared experiences and practices in building, supporting and retaining an Indigenous allied health workforce.

This full-day event will provide a platform to share information and build an integrated approach to improving culturally safe and responsive health care and improve health and wellbeing outcomes for Indigenous peoples and communities.

Delegates will include Indigenous and First Nation allied health professionals and students from Australia, Canada, the USA and New Zealand. There will also be delegates from a range of sectors including, health, wellbeing, education, disability, academia and community.

MORE INFO 

AIDA Conference 2018 Vision into Action


Building on the foundations of our membership, history and diversity, AIDA is shaping a future where we continue to innovate, lead and stay strong in culture. It’s an exciting time of change and opportunity in Indigenous health.

The AIDA conference supports our members and the health sector by creating an inspiring networking space that engages sector experts, key decision makers, Indigenous medical students and doctors to join in an Indigenous health focused academic and scientific program.

AIDA recognises and respects that the pathway to achieving equitable and culturally-safe healthcare for Indigenous Australians is dynamic and complex. Through unity, leadership and collaboration, we create a future where our vision translates into measureable and significantly improved health outcomes for our communities. Now is the time to put that vision into action.

Registrations Close August 31

Healing Our Spirit Worldwide

Global gathering of Indigenous people to be held in Sydney
University of Sydney, The Healing Foundation to co-host Healing Our Spirit Worldwide
Gawuwi gamarda Healing Our Spirit Worldwidegu Ngalya nangari nura Cadigalmirung.
Calling our friends to come, to be at Healing Our Spirit Worldwide. We meet on the country of the Cadigal.
In November 2018, up to 2,000 Indigenous people from around the world will gather in Sydney to take part in Healing Our Spirit Worldwide: The Eighth Gathering.
A global movement, Healing Our Spirit Worldwidebegan in Canada in the 1980s to address the devastation of substance abuse and dependence among Indigenous people around the world. Since 1992 it has held a gathering approximately every four years, in a different part of the world, focusing on a diverse range of topics relevant to Indigenous lives including health, politics, social inclusion, stolen generations, education, governance and resilience.
The International Indigenous Council – the governing body of Healing Our Spirit Worldwide – has invited the University of Sydney and The Healing Foundation to co-host the Eighth Gathering with them in Sydney this year. The second gathering was also held in Sydney, in 1994.
 Please also feel free to tag us in any relevant cross posting: @HOSW8 @hosw2018 #HOSW18 #HealingOurWay #TheUniversityofSydney

2nd National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Suicide Prevention Conference 20-21 November Perth

” The National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Suicide Prevention and World Indigenous Suicide Prevention Conference Committee invite and welcome you to Perth for the second National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Suicide Prevention Conference, and the second World Indigenous Suicide Prevention Conference.

Our Indigenous communities, both nationally and internationally, share common histories and are confronted with similar issues stemming from colonisation. Strengthening our communities so that we can address high rates of suicide is one of these shared issues. The Conferences will provide more opportunities to network and collaborate between Indigenous people and communities, policy makers, and researchers. The Conferences are unique opportunities to share what we have learned and to collaborate on solutions that work in suicide prevention.

This also enables us to highlight our shared priorities with political leaders in our respective countries and communities.

Conference Website 

2019 Close the Gap for Vision by 2020 – National Conference 2019
Indigenous Eye Health and co-host Aboriginal Medical Services Alliance Northern Territory (AMSANT) are pleased to announce the Close the Gap for Vision by 2020 – National Conference 2019 which will be held in Alice Springs, Northern Territory on Thursday 14 and Friday 15 March 2019 at the Alice Springs Convention Centre.
The 2019 conference will run over two days with the aim of bringing people together and connecting people involved in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander eye care from local communities, ACCOs, health services, non-government organisations, professional bodies and government departments from across the country. We would like to invite everyone who is working on or interested in improving eye health and care for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians.
More information available at: go.unimelb.edu.au/wqb6 

NACCHO Aboriginal Health Conferences and events : This week #AustPH2018 #AIDAconf2018 #Saveadate @acn_tweet #PuggyHunter Scholarships @RACGP National Guide Workshop @hosw2018 #HOSW18 #HealingOurWay @June_Oscar #WomensVoices #NACCHOagm2018 #IndigBizMth

This week 

Australian Public Health Conference 2018 Cairns 26 to 28 September.

AIDA Conference 2018 Vision into Action Perth 26 – 28 September

Future events /conferences

Puggy Hunter Memorial Scholarship applications Close October 14 October

National guide to a preventive health assessment for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people (Third edition) Workshop 10 October 

Now open: Aged Care Regional, Rural and Remote Infrastructure Grant opportunity.$500,000  closes 24 October 2018

The fourth annual Indigenous Business Month this year will celebrate Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women in business, to coincide with the 2018 NAIDOC theme Because of Her, We Can.

Australian Public Health Conference 2018 Cairns 26 to 28 September.

NACCHO AGM 2018 Brisbane Oct 30—Nov 2 Registrations now open

My Health Records webinars from Consumer Health Forum 

Wiyi Yani U Thangani Women’s Voices project. 

2018 International Indigenous Allied Health Forum at the Mercure Hotel, Sydney, Australia on the 30 November 2018

NATSIHWA National Professional Development Symposium 2018

AIDA Conference 2018 Vision into Action

Healing Our Spirit Worldwide
2019 Close the Gap for Vision by 2020 – National Conference 2019
Puggy Hunter Memorial Scholarship applications Close October 14 October

The Puggy Hunter Memorial Scholarship Scheme is designed to encourage and assist undergraduate students in health-related disciplines to complete their studies and join the health workforce.

Dr Puggy Hunter was the NACCHO Chair 1991-2001

Puggy was the elected chairperson of the National Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation, (NACCHO), which is the peak national advisory body on Aboriginal health. NACCHO has a membership of over 144 + Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Services and is the representative body of these services. Puggy was the inaugural Chair of NACCHO from 1991 until his death.[1]

Puggy was the vice-chairperson of the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Council, the Federal Health Minister’s main advisory body on Aboriginal health established in 1996. He was also Chair of the National Public Health Partnership Aboriginal and Islander Health Working Group which reports to the Partnership and to the Australian Health Ministers Advisory Council. He was a member of the Australian Pharmaceutical Advisory Council (APAC), the General Practice Partnership Advisory Council, the Joint Advisory Group on Population Health and the National Health Priority Areas Action Council as well as a number of other key Aboriginal health policy and advisory groups on national issues.[1]

The scheme provides scholarships for Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander people studying an entry level health course.

Applications for PHMSS 2019 scholarship round are now open.

Click the button below to start your online application.

Applications must be completed and submitted before midnight AEDT (Sydney/Canberra time) Sunday 14 October 2018. After this time the system will shut down and any incomplete applications will be lost.

Eligible health areas

  • Aboriginal & Torres Strait Islander health work
  • Allied health (excluding pharmacy)
  • Dentistry/oral health (excluding dental assistants)
  • Direct entry midwifery
  • Medicine
  • Nursing; registered and enrolled

Eligibility criteria

Applications will be considered from applicants who are:

  • of Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander descent
    Applicants must identify as and be able to confirm their Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander status.
  • enrolled or intending to enrol in an entry level or graduate entry level health related course
    Courses must be provided by an Australian registered training organisation or university. Funding is not available for postgraduate study.
  • intending to study in the academic year that the scholarship is offered.

A significant number of applications are received each year; meeting the eligibility criteria will not guarantee applicants a scholarship offer.

Value of scholarship

Funding is provided for the normal duration of the course. Full time scholarship awardees will receive up to $15,000 per year and part time recipients will receive up to $7,500 per year. The funding is paid in 24 fortnightly instalments throughout the study period of each year.

Selection criteria

These are competitive scholarships and will be awarded on the recommendation of the independent selection committee whose assessment will be based on how applicants address the following questions:

  • Describe what has been your driving influence/motivation in wanting to become a health professional in your chosen area.
  • Discuss what you hope to accomplish as a health professional in the next 5-10 years.
  • Discuss your commitment to study in your chosen course.
  • Outline your involvement in community activities, including promoting the health and well-being of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.

The scholarships are funded by the Australian Government, Department of Health and administered by the Australian College of Nursing. The scheme was established in recognition of Dr Arnold ‘Puggy’ Hunter’s significant contribution to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health and his role as Chair of the National Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation.

Important links

Links to Indigenous health professional associations

Contact ACN

e scholarships@acn.edu.au
t 1800 688 628

National guide to a preventive health assessment for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people (Third edition) Workshop 10 October 

The RACGP and NACCHO invite you to a workshop to be held prior to GP18, that
will support your practice team to maximise the opportunity for the prevention of
disease at each health service visit.

A National Guide contributor and a cultural educator will discuss how best to utilise
the third edition of the National Guide when providing care for Aboriginal and Torres
Strait Islander people.

The workshop will also include a focus group exploring implementation of the
National Guide in both mainstream and Aboriginal Community Controlled Primary
Health Care Services (ACCHSs), as well as the characteristics of a culturally
responsive general practice.

Program

• Background and purpose of the National Guide
• Features of the National Guide, including:
• Recommendation tables
• Good practice points
• Evidence base
• Lifecycle wall chart
• Putting the National Guide

Date
Wednesday 10 October 2018

Time
Registration and lunch 12.00 pm
Workshop 12.30–4.00 pm

Venue
Jellurgal Aboriginal Cultural Centre
1711 Gold Coast Highway, Burleigh Heads

Cost
Free of charge

RSVP
Friday 5 October 2018

Registration essential

Registration
Email daniela.doblanovic@racgp.org.au
or call Daniela Doblanovic on 03 8699 0528.

We will then contact you to confirm

 

Now open: Aged Care Regional, Rural and Remote Infrastructure Grant opportunity.$500,000  closes 24 October 2018

This grant opportunity is designed to assist existing approved residential and home care providers in regional, rural and remote areas to invest in infrastructure. Commonwealth Home Support Programme services will also be considered, where there is exceptional need. Funding will be prioritised to aged care services most in need and where geographical constraints and significantly higher costs impede services’ ability to invest in infrastructure works.

Up to $500,000 (GST exclusive) will be available per service via a competitive application process.

Eligibility:

To be eligible you must be:

  • an approved residential or home care provider (as defined under the Aged Care Act 1997) or an approved Commonwealth Home Support Program (CHSP) provider in exceptional circumstances (refer Frequently asked Questions) ; and
  • currently operating an aged care service located in Modified Monash Model Classification 3-7 or if a CHSP provider, the service is located in MMM 6-7. (MMM Locator).

More Info Apply 

The fourth annual Indigenous Business Month this year will celebrate Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women in business, to coincide with the 2018 NAIDOC theme Because of Her, We Can.

Throughout October, twenty national Indigenous Business Month events will take place showcasing the talents of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women entrepreneurs from a variety of business sectors. These events aim to ignite conversations about Indigenous business development and innovation, focusing on women’s roles and leadership.

Indigenous Business Month is an initiative driven by the alumni of Melbourne Business School’s MURRA Indigenous Business Master Class, who see business as a way of providing positive role models for young Indigenous Australians and improving quality of life in Indigenous communities.

Since the launch of Indigenous Business Month in 2015, [1] the Indigenous business sector is one of the fastest growing sectors in Australia delivering over $1 billion in goods and services for the Australian economy.

Jason Eades, Director, Consulting at Social Ventures Australia and Indigenous Business Month 2018 host said:

It is a privilege to be involved in Indigenous Business Month, to be able to take the time to celebrate and acknowledge the great achievements of our Indigenous entrepreneurs and their respective businesses. Indigenous entrepreneurs are showing the rest of the world that we can do business and do it well, whilst maintaining our strong cultural values.”

The latest ABS Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Social Survey 2014-15 shows that only 51.5 percent of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women participate in the workforce compared to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander men at 65 percent.

The Australian Government has invested in a range of initiatives to increase Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women entrepreneurs in the work-placeincluding: [2) Continued funding for girls’ academies in high schools, so that young women can realise their leadership potential, greater access to finance and business support suited to the needs of Indigenous businesses with a focus on Indigenous entrepreneurs and start-ups, and expanding the ParentsNextprogram and Fund pre-employment projects via the new Launch into Work program providing flexibility to meet the specific needs of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women.

Michelle Evans, MURRA Program Director AND Associate Professor of Leadership at the University of Melbourne said:

The Indigenous Business Month’s aim is to inspire, showcase and engage the Indigenous business community. This year it is more significant than ever to support the female Indigenous business community and provide a platform for them to network and encourage young Indigenous women to consider developing a business as a career option.”

Indigenous Business Month runs from October 1 to October 31. Check out the website for an event near you (spaces are limited).

The initiative is supported by 33 Creative, Asia Pacific Social Impact Centre at the University of Melbourne, Iscariot Media, and PwC.

For more information on Indigenous Business Month visit

·         The Websitewww.indigenousbusinessmonth.com.au

·         Facebook

·         Twitter

·         LinkedIn

Australian Public Health Conference 2018 Cairns 26 to 28 September.

Click here to proceed to the Conference website.

The Australian Public Health Conference (formally the PHAA Annual Conference) is the flag ship event for PHAA to engage with PHAA members and non-members alike. The Conference was first established in the 1970’s and will be celebrating its 45th year in 2018.

The 2018 Australian Public Health Conference will present a national and multi-disciplinary perspective on public health issues. PHAA members and non-members can contribute to discussions on the broad range of public health issues and exchange ideas, knowledge and information on the latest developments in public health.

Through development of public health policies, advocacy, research and training, PHAA seeks better health outcomes for Australian’s and the Conference acts as a pathway for public health professionals to connect and share new and innovative ideas that can be applied to local settings and systems to help create and improve health systems for local communities.

In 2018, the Australian Public Health Conference will be held at the Pullman Cairns International from Wednesday 26 to Friday 28 September.

NACCHO AGM 2018 Brisbane Oct 30—Nov 2 Registrations now open

Follow our conference using HASH TAG #NACCHOagm2018

Register HERE

Conference Website Link:

Accommodation Link:                   

The NACCHO Members’ Conference and AGM provides a forum for the Aboriginal community controlled health services workforce, bureaucrats, educators, suppliers and consumers to:

  • Present on innovative local economic development solutions to issues that can be applied to address similar issues nationally and across disciplines
  • Have input and influence from the ‘grassroots’ into national and state health policy and service delivery
  • Demonstrate leadership in workforce and service delivery innovation
  • Promote continuing education and professional development activities essential to the Aboriginal community controlled health services in urban, rural and remote Australia
  • Promote Aboriginal health research by professionals who practice in these areas and the presentation of research findings
  • Develop supportive networks
  • Promote good health and well-being through the delivery of health services to and by Indigenous and non-Indigenous people throughout Australia.

Conference Website Link

My Health Records webinars from Consumer Health Forum 

The recording of our second webinar that gives an overview of digital health in Australia and where My Health Record fits in the scheme of things is now up on our YouTube channel:

You can register here: http://www.webcasts.com.au/chf300818/. Next week, we have an in depth look at the risks.

If you have questions or thoughts about either, please use the links below to send them to us.

Consumer Estimates: My Health Record
Thursday, 4 October
12:30pm-1:30pm AEST

Register to attend | Find out more

 

Wiyi Yani U Thangani Women’s Voices project.

June Oscar AO and her team are excited to hear from Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women and girls across the country as a part of the Wiyi Yani U Thangani Women’s Voices project.

Whilst we will not be able to get to every community, we hope to hear from as many women and girls as possible through this process. If we are not coming to your community we encourage you to please visit the Have your Say! page of the website to find out more about the other ways to have your voice included through our survey and submission process.

We will be hosting public sessions as advertised below but also a number of private sessions to enable women and girls from particularly vulnerable settings like justice and care to participate.

Details about current, upcoming and past gatherings appears below, however it is subject to change. We will update this page regularly with further details about upcoming gatherings closer to the date of the events.

Please get in touch with us via email wiyiyaniuthangani@humanrights.gov.au or phone on (02) 9284 9600 if you would like more information.

We look forward to hearing from you!

Pathways borders

Current gatherings

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women and girls are invited to register for one of the following gatherings

Pathways borders

Upcoming gatherings

If your community is listed below and you would like to be involved in planning for our visit or would like more information, please write to us at wiyiyaniuthangani@humanrights.gov.au or phone (02) 9284 9600.

Location Dates
Yarrabah September 2018
Weipa September 2018
Torres Strait Islands October 2018
Port Headland October 2018
Newman October 2018
Dubbo TBC
Brewarrina TBC
Rockhampton TBC
Longreach TBC
Kempsey TBC

Pathways borders

 

Download HERE

2018 International Indigenous Allied Health Forum at the Mercure Hotel, Sydney, Australia on the 30 November 2018.

This Forum will bring together Indigenous and First Nation presenters and panellists from across the world to discuss shared experiences and practices in building, supporting and retaining an Indigenous allied health workforce.

This full-day event will provide a platform to share information and build an integrated approach to improving culturally safe and responsive health care and improve health and wellbeing outcomes for Indigenous peoples and communities.

Delegates will include Indigenous and First Nation allied health professionals and students from Australia, Canada, the USA and New Zealand. There will also be delegates from a range of sectors including, health, wellbeing, education, disability, academia and community.

MORE INFO 

 NATSIHWA National Professional Development Symposium 2018

We’re excited to release the dates for the 2018 National Professional Development Symposium to be held in Alice Springs on 2nd-4th October. More details are to be released in the coming weeks; a full sponsorship prospectus and registration logistics will be advertised asap via email and newsletter.

This years Symposium will be focussed on upskilling our Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander Health Workers and Health Practitioners through a series of interactive workshops. Registrants will be able to participate in all workshops by rotating in groups over the 2 days. The aim of the symposium is to provide the registrants with new practical skills to take back to communities and open up a platform for Health Workers/Practitioners to network with other Individuals in the workforce from all over Australia.

We look forward to announcing more details soon!

AIDA Conference 2018 Vision into Action


Building on the foundations of our membership, history and diversity, AIDA is shaping a future where we continue to innovate, lead and stay strong in culture. It’s an exciting time of change and opportunity in Indigenous health.

The AIDA conference supports our members and the health sector by creating an inspiring networking space that engages sector experts, key decision makers, Indigenous medical students and doctors to join in an Indigenous health focused academic and scientific program.

AIDA recognises and respects that the pathway to achieving equitable and culturally-safe healthcare for Indigenous Australians is dynamic and complex. Through unity, leadership and collaboration, we create a future where our vision translates into measureable and significantly improved health outcomes for our communities. Now is the time to put that vision into action.

Registrations Close August 31

Healing Our Spirit Worldwide

Global gathering of Indigenous people to be held in Sydney
University of Sydney, The Healing Foundation to co-host Healing Our Spirit Worldwide
Gawuwi gamarda Healing Our Spirit Worldwidegu Ngalya nangari nura Cadigalmirung.
Calling our friends to come, to be at Healing Our Spirit Worldwide. We meet on the country of the Cadigal.
In November 2018, up to 2,000 Indigenous people from around the world will gather in Sydney to take part in Healing Our Spirit Worldwide: The Eighth Gathering.
A global movement, Healing Our Spirit Worldwidebegan in Canada in the 1980s to address the devastation of substance abuse and dependence among Indigenous people around the world. Since 1992 it has held a gathering approximately every four years, in a different part of the world, focusing on a diverse range of topics relevant to Indigenous lives including health, politics, social inclusion, stolen generations, education, governance and resilience.
The International Indigenous Council – the governing body of Healing Our Spirit Worldwide – has invited the University of Sydney and The Healing Foundation to co-host the Eighth Gathering with them in Sydney this year. The second gathering was also held in Sydney, in 1994.
 Please also feel free to tag us in any relevant cross posting: @HOSW8 @hosw2018 #HOSW18 #HealingOurWay #TheUniversityofSydney
2019 Close the Gap for Vision by 2020 – National Conference 2019
Indigenous Eye Health and co-host Aboriginal Medical Services Alliance Northern Territory (AMSANT) are pleased to announce the Close the Gap for Vision by 2020 – National Conference 2019 which will be held in Alice Springs, Northern Territory on Thursday 14 and Friday 15 March 2019 at the Alice Springs Convention Centre.
The 2019 conference will run over two days with the aim of bringing people together and connecting people involved in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander eye care from local communities, ACCOs, health services, non-government organisations, professional bodies and government departments from across the country. We would like to invite everyone who is working on or interested in improving eye health and care for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians.
More information available at: go.unimelb.edu.au/wqb6 

NACCHO Aboriginal Health Conferences and events #Saveadate @hosw2018 #HOSW18 #HealingOurWay @June_Oscar #WomensVoices #NACCHOagm2018 #IndigBizMth

Future events /conferences

Now open: Aged Care Regional, Rural and Remote Infrastructure Grant opportunity.$500,000  closes 24 October 2018

The fourth annual Indigenous Business Month this year will celebrate Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women in business, to coincide with the 2018 NAIDOC theme Because of Her, We Can.

Australian Public Health Conference 2018 Cairns 26 to 28 September.

National Indigenous Human Rights Awards 2018 Nomiations Close 21st of September

NACCHO AGM 2018 Brisbane Oct 30—Nov 2 Registrations now open

My Health Records webinars from Consumer Health Forum 

Wiyi Yani U Thangani Women’s Voices project. 

2018 International Indigenous Allied Health Forum at the Mercure Hotel, Sydney, Australia on the 30 November 2018

NATSIHWA National Professional Development Symposium 2018

AIDA Conference 2018 Vision into Action

Healing Our Spirit Worldwide
2019 Close the Gap for Vision by 2020 – National Conference 2019

Now open: Aged Care Regional, Rural and Remote Infrastructure Grant opportunity.$500,000  closes 24 October 2018

This grant opportunity is designed to assist existing approved residential and home care providers in regional, rural and remote areas to invest in infrastructure. Commonwealth Home Support Programme services will also be considered, where there is exceptional need. Funding will be prioritised to aged care services most in need and where geographical constraints and significantly higher costs impede services’ ability to invest in infrastructure works.

Up to $500,000 (GST exclusive) will be available per service via a competitive application process.

Eligibility:

To be eligible you must be:

  • an approved residential or home care provider (as defined under the Aged Care Act 1997) or an approved Commonwealth Home Support Program (CHSP) provider in exceptional circumstances (refer Frequently asked Questions) ; and
  • currently operating an aged care service located in Modified Monash Model Classification 3-7 or if a CHSP provider, the service is located in MMM 6-7. (MMM Locator).

More Info Apply 

The fourth annual Indigenous Business Month this year will celebrate Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women in business, to coincide with the 2018 NAIDOC theme Because of Her, We Can.

Throughout October, twenty national Indigenous Business Month events will take place showcasing the talents of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women entrepreneurs from a variety of business sectors. These events aim to ignite conversations about Indigenous business development and innovation, focusing on women’s roles and leadership.

Indigenous Business Month is an initiative driven by the alumni of Melbourne Business School’s MURRA Indigenous Business Master Class, who see business as a way of providing positive role models for young Indigenous Australians and improving quality of life in Indigenous communities.

Since the launch of Indigenous Business Month in 2015, [1] the Indigenous business sector is one of the fastest growing sectors in Australia delivering over $1 billion in goods and services for the Australian economy.

Jason Eades, Director, Consulting at Social Ventures Australia and Indigenous Business Month 2018 host said:

It is a privilege to be involved in Indigenous Business Month, to be able to take the time to celebrate and acknowledge the great achievements of our Indigenous entrepreneurs and their respective businesses. Indigenous entrepreneurs are showing the rest of the world that we can do business and do it well, whilst maintaining our strong cultural values.”

The latest ABS Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Social Survey 2014-15 shows that only 51.5 percent of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women participate in the workforce compared to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander men at 65 percent.

The Australian Government has invested in a range of initiatives to increase Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women entrepreneurs in the work-placeincluding: [2) Continued funding for girls’ academies in high schools, so that young women can realise their leadership potential, greater access to finance and business support suited to the needs of Indigenous businesses with a focus on Indigenous entrepreneurs and start-ups, and expanding the ParentsNextprogram and Fund pre-employment projects via the new Launch into Work program providing flexibility to meet the specific needs of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women.

Michelle Evans, MURRA Program Director AND Associate Professor of Leadership at the University of Melbourne said:

The Indigenous Business Month’s aim is to inspire, showcase and engage the Indigenous business community. This year it is more significant than ever to support the female Indigenous business community and provide a platform for them to network and encourage young Indigenous women to consider developing a business as a career option.”

Indigenous Business Month runs from October 1 to October 31. Check out the website for an event near you (spaces are limited).

The initiative is supported by 33 Creative, Asia Pacific Social Impact Centre at the University of Melbourne, Iscariot Media, and PwC.

For more information on Indigenous Business Month visit

·         The Websitewww.indigenousbusinessmonth.com.au

·         Facebook

·         Twitter

·         LinkedIn

Australian Public Health Conference 2018 Cairns 26 to 28 September.

Click here to proceed to the Conference website.

The Australian Public Health Conference (formally the PHAA Annual Conference) is the flag ship event for PHAA to engage with PHAA members and non-members alike. The Conference was first established in the 1970’s and will be celebrating its 45th year in 2018.

The 2018 Australian Public Health Conference will present a national and multi-disciplinary perspective on public health issues. PHAA members and non-members can contribute to discussions on the broad range of public health issues and exchange ideas, knowledge and information on the latest developments in public health.

Through development of public health policies, advocacy, research and training, PHAA seeks better health outcomes for Australian’s and the Conference acts as a pathway for public health professionals to connect and share new and innovative ideas that can be applied to local settings and systems to help create and improve health systems for local communities.

In 2018, the Australian Public Health Conference will be held at the Pullman Cairns International from Wednesday 26 to Friday 28 September.

National Indigenous Human Rights Awards 2018 Nomiations Close 21st of September

On Wednesday 17 October, the 5th annual National Indigenous Human Rights Awards (NIHRA) will be held in the Stranger Dining Room, NSW Parliament House. NIHRA recognises and celebrates Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander persons who have significantly contributed to the advancement of human rights and social justice in Australia.
Speakers will include Noongar woman from the Wagyl Kaip area in the South West corner of Western Australia Megan Krakouer, political leaders, Indigenous elders and other human rights luminaries.
NIHRA remains the primary platform in celebrating the work of individuals who are working towards a harmonious, equitable and fair Australia and take steps to remedy inequity. It is through NIHRA that we honour and recognise their hard work. Having grown from strength to strength since it began in 2014, NIHRA is now a premiere event attracting Federal and State interest in our Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities, and the significant work still needed to improve their livelihood.
I encourage all members of the community to join in this event and nominate individuals to further the cause of Human Rights & Social Justice in our Indigenous communities and to recognise the outstanding contribution of Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander award recipients.
If you require any further information, please contact my office on (02) 9230 2526 or email Louay.Moustapha@parliament.nsw.gov.au
To nominate someone for the awards, please go to:
(ONLINE APPLICATION) https://bit.ly/2MahVEp
Online Entries close 11:59PM, 21st of September 2018 (AEST)
All applications sent by mail must be received before 5:00pm on 21st of September 2018 (AEST)

NACCHO AGM 2018 Brisbane Oct 30—Nov 2 Registrations now open

Follow our conference using HASH TAG #NACCHOagm2018

Register HERE

Conference Website Link:

Accommodation Link:                   

The NACCHO Members’ Conference and AGM provides a forum for the Aboriginal community controlled health services workforce, bureaucrats, educators, suppliers and consumers to:

  • Present on innovative local economic development solutions to issues that can be applied to address similar issues nationally and across disciplines
  • Have input and influence from the ‘grassroots’ into national and state health policy and service delivery
  • Demonstrate leadership in workforce and service delivery innovation
  • Promote continuing education and professional development activities essential to the Aboriginal community controlled health services in urban, rural and remote Australia
  • Promote Aboriginal health research by professionals who practice in these areas and the presentation of research findings
  • Develop supportive networks
  • Promote good health and well-being through the delivery of health services to and by Indigenous and non-Indigenous people throughout Australia.

Conference Website Link

My Health Records webinars from Consumer Health Forum 

The recording of our second webinar that gives an overview of digital health in Australia and where My Health Record fits in the scheme of things is now up on our YouTube channel:

You can register here: http://www.webcasts.com.au/chf300818/. Next week, we have an in depth look at the risks.

If you have questions or thoughts about either, please use the links below to send them to us.

Consumer Estimates: My Health Record
Thursday, 4 October
12:30pm-1:30pm AEST

Register to attend | Find out more

 

Wiyi Yani U Thangani Women’s Voices project.

June Oscar AO and her team are excited to hear from Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women and girls across the country as a part of the Wiyi Yani U Thangani Women’s Voices project.

Whilst we will not be able to get to every community, we hope to hear from as many women and girls as possible through this process. If we are not coming to your community we encourage you to please visit the Have your Say! page of the website to find out more about the other ways to have your voice included through our survey and submission process.

We will be hosting public sessions as advertised below but also a number of private sessions to enable women and girls from particularly vulnerable settings like justice and care to participate.

Details about current, upcoming and past gatherings appears below, however it is subject to change. We will update this page regularly with further details about upcoming gatherings closer to the date of the events.

Please get in touch with us via email wiyiyaniuthangani@humanrights.gov.au or phone on (02) 9284 9600 if you would like more information.

We look forward to hearing from you!

Pathways borders

Current gatherings

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women and girls are invited to register for one of the following gatherings

Pathways borders

Upcoming gatherings

If your community is listed below and you would like to be involved in planning for our visit or would like more information, please write to us at wiyiyaniuthangani@humanrights.gov.au or phone (02) 9284 9600.

Location Dates
Yarrabah September 2018
Weipa September 2018
Torres Strait Islands October 2018
Port Headland October 2018
Newman October 2018
Dubbo TBC
Brewarrina TBC
Rockhampton TBC
Longreach TBC
Kempsey TBC

Pathways borders

 

Dr Tracy Westerman’s 2018 Training Workshops
For more details and July dates

 

Download HERE

2018 International Indigenous Allied Health Forum at the Mercure Hotel, Sydney, Australia on the 30 November 2018.

This Forum will bring together Indigenous and First Nation presenters and panellists from across the world to discuss shared experiences and practices in building, supporting and retaining an Indigenous allied health workforce.

This full-day event will provide a platform to share information and build an integrated approach to improving culturally safe and responsive health care and improve health and wellbeing outcomes for Indigenous peoples and communities.

Delegates will include Indigenous and First Nation allied health professionals and students from Australia, Canada, the USA and New Zealand. There will also be delegates from a range of sectors including, health, wellbeing, education, disability, academia and community.

MORE INFO 

 NATSIHWA National Professional Development Symposium 2018

We’re excited to release the dates for the 2018 National Professional Development Symposium to be held in Alice Springs on 2nd-4th October. More details are to be released in the coming weeks; a full sponsorship prospectus and registration logistics will be advertised asap via email and newsletter.

This years Symposium will be focussed on upskilling our Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander Health Workers and Health Practitioners through a series of interactive workshops. Registrants will be able to participate in all workshops by rotating in groups over the 2 days. The aim of the symposium is to provide the registrants with new practical skills to take back to communities and open up a platform for Health Workers/Practitioners to network with other Individuals in the workforce from all over Australia.

We look forward to announcing more details soon!

AIDA Conference 2018 Vision into Action


Building on the foundations of our membership, history and diversity, AIDA is shaping a future where we continue to innovate, lead and stay strong in culture. It’s an exciting time of change and opportunity in Indigenous health.

The AIDA conference supports our members and the health sector by creating an inspiring networking space that engages sector experts, key decision makers, Indigenous medical students and doctors to join in an Indigenous health focused academic and scientific program.

AIDA recognises and respects that the pathway to achieving equitable and culturally-safe healthcare for Indigenous Australians is dynamic and complex. Through unity, leadership and collaboration, we create a future where our vision translates into measureable and significantly improved health outcomes for our communities. Now is the time to put that vision into action.

Registrations Close August 31

Healing Our Spirit Worldwide

Global gathering of Indigenous people to be held in Sydney
University of Sydney, The Healing Foundation to co-host Healing Our Spirit Worldwide
Gawuwi gamarda Healing Our Spirit Worldwidegu Ngalya nangari nura Cadigalmirung.
Calling our friends to come, to be at Healing Our Spirit Worldwide. We meet on the country of the Cadigal.
In November 2018, up to 2,000 Indigenous people from around the world will gather in Sydney to take part in Healing Our Spirit Worldwide: The Eighth Gathering.
A global movement, Healing Our Spirit Worldwidebegan in Canada in the 1980s to address the devastation of substance abuse and dependence among Indigenous people around the world. Since 1992 it has held a gathering approximately every four years, in a different part of the world, focusing on a diverse range of topics relevant to Indigenous lives including health, politics, social inclusion, stolen generations, education, governance and resilience.
The International Indigenous Council – the governing body of Healing Our Spirit Worldwide – has invited the University of Sydney and The Healing Foundation to co-host the Eighth Gathering with them in Sydney this year. The second gathering was also held in Sydney, in 1994.
 Please also feel free to tag us in any relevant cross posting: @HOSW8 @hosw2018 #HOSW18 #HealingOurWay #TheUniversityofSydney
2019 Close the Gap for Vision by 2020 – National Conference 2019
Indigenous Eye Health and co-host Aboriginal Medical Services Alliance Northern Territory (AMSANT) are pleased to announce the Close the Gap for Vision by 2020 – National Conference 2019 which will be held in Alice Springs, Northern Territory on Thursday 14 and Friday 15 March 2019 at the Alice Springs Convention Centre.
 
The 2019 conference will run over two days with the aim of bringing people together and connecting people involved in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander eye care from local communities, ACCOs, health services, non-government organisations, professional bodies and government departments from across the country. We would like to invite everyone who is working on or interested in improving eye health and care for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians.
 
More information available atgo.unimelb.edu.au/wqb6  
 

 

 

 

NACCHO Aboriginal Health Conferences and events #Saveadate @June_Oscar #WomensVoices #NACCHOagm2018 #SuicidePrevention #FASDAwarenessDay #FASDAwarenessMonth @CHFofAustralia #MyHealthRecords @crehealthequity

This week

FASD Awareness Day 9 September

Suicide Prevention Day 10 September 

Canberra Symposium: 40 years on from WHO’s Alma-Ata Declaration on Primary Health Care 12 September 

Future events /conferences

Australian Public Health Conference 2018 Cairns 26 to 28 September.

National Indigenous Human Rights Awards 2018 Nomiations Close 21st of September

NACCHO AGM 2018 Brisbane Oct 30—Nov 2 Registrations now open

My Health Records webinars from Consumer Health Forum 

Wiyi Yani U Thangani Women’s Voices project. 

2018 International Indigenous Allied Health Forum at the Mercure Hotel, Sydney, Australia on the 30 November 2018

NATSIHWA National Professional Development Symposium 2018

AIDA Conference 2018 Vision into Action

CATSINaM Professional Development Conference

Healing Our Spirit Worldwide

This week

FASD Awareness Day 9 September

Read all 20 + NACCHO FASD articles HERE

Suicide Prevention Day 10 September 

Canberra Symposium: 40 years on from WHO’s Alma-Ata Declaration on Primary Health Care 12 September 

Join leading international and national experts in the field to talk about the future of primary health care in Australia.

It’s 40 years since the iconic WHO Alma-Ata Declaration on Primary Health Care vowed to achieve Health for All by the Year 2000. That aim was not achieved in Australia or elsewhere.
The extent of health inequity in Australia is increasing and comprehensive primary health care (an approach to health which includes quality primary care and attention to the social determinants of health) holds a key to reversing this.
Hear from:
• Professor David Sanders, University of Western Cape
• Professor James Macinko, University of California, Los Angeles (via video link up)
• Professor Michael Kidd, University of Toronto
• Professor Fran Baum, Flinders University
Immerse yourself in lively panel discussions from key movers and shakers in primary health care.
Canberra Symposium
Wednesday 12 September 2018
11.00am – 5.00pm
Australian National University

Australian Public Health Conference 2018 Cairns 26 to 28 September.

Click here to proceed to the Conference website.

The Australian Public Health Conference (formally the PHAA Annual Conference) is the flag ship event for PHAA to engage with PHAA members and non-members alike. The Conference was first established in the 1970’s and will be celebrating its 45th year in 2018.

The 2018 Australian Public Health Conference will present a national and multi-disciplinary perspective on public health issues. PHAA members and non-members can contribute to discussions on the broad range of public health issues and exchange ideas, knowledge and information on the latest developments in public health.

Through development of public health policies, advocacy, research and training, PHAA seeks better health outcomes for Australian’s and the Conference acts as a pathway for public health professionals to connect and share new and innovative ideas that can be applied to local settings and systems to help create and improve health systems for local communities.

In 2018, the Australian Public Health Conference will be held at the Pullman Cairns International from Wednesday 26 to Friday 28 September.

National Indigenous Human Rights Awards 2018 Nomiations Close 21st of September

On Wednesday 17 October, the 5th annual National Indigenous Human Rights Awards (NIHRA) will be held in the Stranger Dining Room, NSW Parliament House. NIHRA recognises and celebrates Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander persons who have significantly contributed to the advancement of human rights and social justice in Australia.
Speakers will include Noongar woman from the Wagyl Kaip area in the South West corner of Western Australia Megan Krakouer, political leaders, Indigenous elders and other human rights luminaries.
NIHRA remains the primary platform in celebrating the work of individuals who are working towards a harmonious, equitable and fair Australia and take steps to remedy inequity. It is through NIHRA that we honour and recognise their hard work. Having grown from strength to strength since it began in 2014, NIHRA is now a premiere event attracting Federal and State interest in our Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities, and the significant work still needed to improve their livelihood.
I encourage all members of the community to join in this event and nominate individuals to further the cause of Human Rights & Social Justice in our Indigenous communities and to recognise the outstanding contribution of Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander award recipients.
If you require any further information, please contact my office on (02) 9230 2526 or email Louay.Moustapha@parliament.nsw.gov.au
To nominate someone for the awards, please go to:
(ONLINE APPLICATION) https://bit.ly/2MahVEp
Online Entries close 11:59PM, 21st of September 2018 (AEST)
All applications sent by mail must be received before 5:00pm on 21st of September 2018 (AEST)

NACCHO AGM 2018 Brisbane Oct 30—Nov 2 Registrations now open

Follow our conference using HASH TAG #NACCHOagm2018

Register HERE

Conference Website Link:

Accommodation Link:                   

The NACCHO Members’ Conference and AGM provides a forum for the Aboriginal community controlled health services workforce, bureaucrats, educators, suppliers and consumers to:

  • Present on innovative local economic development solutions to issues that can be applied to address similar issues nationally and across disciplines
  • Have input and influence from the ‘grassroots’ into national and state health policy and service delivery
  • Demonstrate leadership in workforce and service delivery innovation
  • Promote continuing education and professional development activities essential to the Aboriginal community controlled health services in urban, rural and remote Australia
  • Promote Aboriginal health research by professionals who practice in these areas and the presentation of research findings
  • Develop supportive networks
  • Promote good health and well-being through the delivery of health services to and by Indigenous and non-Indigenous people throughout Australia.

Conference Website Link

My Health Records webinars from Consumer Health Forum 

The recording of our second webinar that gives an overview of digital health in Australia and where My Health Record fits in the scheme of things is now up on our YouTube channel:

You can register here: http://www.webcasts.com.au/chf300818/. Next week, we have an in depth look at the risks.

 

If you have questions or thoughts about either, please use the links below to send them to us.

Digital inclusion, health literacy and My Health Record
Thursday, 13 September
3pm-4pm AEST

Ask a question | Register to attend | Find out more

Consumer Estimates: My Health Record
Thursday, 4 October
12:30pm-1:30pm AEST

Register to attend | Find out more

 

Wiyi Yani U Thangani Women’s Voices project.

June Oscar AO and her team are excited to hear from Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women and girls across the country as a part of the Wiyi Yani U Thangani Women’s Voices project.

Whilst we will not be able to get to every community, we hope to hear from as many women and girls as possible through this process. If we are not coming to your community we encourage you to please visit the Have your Say! page of the website to find out more about the other ways to have your voice included through our survey and submission process.

We will be hosting public sessions as advertised below but also a number of private sessions to enable women and girls from particularly vulnerable settings like justice and care to participate.

Details about current, upcoming and past gatherings appears below, however it is subject to change. We will update this page regularly with further details about upcoming gatherings closer to the date of the events.

Please get in touch with us via email wiyiyaniuthangani@humanrights.gov.au or phone on (02) 9284 9600 if you would like more information.

We look forward to hearing from you!

Pathways borders

Current gatherings

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women and girls are invited to register for one of the following gatherings

Pathways borders

Upcoming gatherings

If your community is listed below and you would like to be involved in planning for our visit or would like more information, please write to us at wiyiyaniuthangani@humanrights.gov.au or phone (02) 9284 9600.

Location Dates
Alice Springs September 2018
Tennant Creek September 2018
Yarrabah September 2018
Weipa September 2018
Torres Strait Islands October 2018
Port Headland October 2018
Newman October 2018
Dubbo TBC
Brewarrina TBC
Rockhampton TBC
Longreach TBC
Kempsey TBC

Pathways borders

 

Dr Tracy Westerman’s 2018 Training Workshops
For more details and July dates

 

Download HERE

 2018 International Indigenous Allied Health Forum at the Mercure Hotel, Sydney, Australia on the 30 November 2018.

This Forum will bring together Indigenous and First Nation presenters and panellists from across the world to discuss shared experiences and practices in building, supporting and retaining an Indigenous allied health workforce.

This full-day event will provide a platform to share information and build an integrated approach to improving culturally safe and responsive health care and improve health and wellbeing outcomes for Indigenous peoples and communities.

Delegates will include Indigenous and First Nation allied health professionals and students from Australia, Canada, the USA and New Zealand. There will also be delegates from a range of sectors including, health, wellbeing, education, disability, academia and community.

MORE INFO 

 NATSIHWA National Professional Development Symposium 2018

We’re excited to release the dates for the 2018 National Professional Development Symposium to be held in Alice Springs on 2nd-4th October. More details are to be released in the coming weeks; a full sponsorship prospectus and registration logistics will be advertised asap via email and newsletter.

This years Symposium will be focussed on upskilling our Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander Health Workers and Health Practitioners through a series of interactive workshops. Registrants will be able to participate in all workshops by rotating in groups over the 2 days. The aim of the symposium is to provide the registrants with new practical skills to take back to communities and open up a platform for Health Workers/Practitioners to network with other Individuals in the workforce from all over Australia.

We look forward to announcing more details soon!

AIDA Conference 2018 Vision into Action


Building on the foundations of our membership, history and diversity, AIDA is shaping a future where we continue to innovate, lead and stay strong in culture. It’s an exciting time of change and opportunity in Indigenous health.

The AIDA conference supports our members and the health sector by creating an inspiring networking space that engages sector experts, key decision makers, Indigenous medical students and doctors to join in an Indigenous health focused academic and scientific program.

AIDA recognises and respects that the pathway to achieving equitable and culturally-safe healthcare for Indigenous Australians is dynamic and complex. Through unity, leadership and collaboration, we create a future where our vision translates into measureable and significantly improved health outcomes for our communities. Now is the time to put that vision into action.

Registrations Close August 31

CATSINaM Professional Development Conference

Venue: Hilton Adelaide 

Location: 233 Victoria Square, Adelaide, SA 

Timing: 8:30am – 5:30pm

We invite you to be part of the CATSINaM Professional Development Conference held in Adelaide, Australia from the 17th to the 19th of September 2018.
The Conference purpose is to share information while working towards an integrated approach to improving the outcomes for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians. The Conference also provides an opportunity to highlight the very real difference being made in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health by our Members.
To this end, we are offering a mixed mode experience with plenary speaker sessions, panels, and presentations as well as professional development workshops.

More info

The CATSINaM Gala Dinner and Awards evening,  held on the 18th of September, purpose is to honour the contributions of distinguished Members to the field.
Healing Our Spirit Worldwide

Global gathering of Indigenous people to be held in Sydney
University of Sydney, The Healing Foundation to co-host Healing Our Spirit Worldwide
Gawuwi gamarda Healing Our Spirit Worldwidegu Ngalya nangari nura Cadigalmirung.
Calling our friends to come, to be at Healing Our Spirit Worldwide. We meet on the country of the Cadigal.
In November 2018, up to 2,000 Indigenous people from around the world will gather in Sydney to take part in Healing Our Spirit Worldwide: The Eighth Gathering.
A global movement, Healing Our Spirit Worldwidebegan in Canada in the 1980s to address the devastation of substance abuse and dependence among Indigenous people around the world. Since 1992 it has held a gathering approximately every four years, in a different part of the world, focusing on a diverse range of topics relevant to Indigenous lives including health, politics, social inclusion, stolen generations, education, governance and resilience.
The International Indigenous Council – the governing body of Healing Our Spirit Worldwide – has invited the University of Sydney and The Healing Foundation to co-host the Eighth Gathering with them in Sydney this year. The second gathering was also held in Sydney, in 1994.
 Please also feel free to tag us in any relevant cross posting: @HOSW8 @hosw2018 #HOSW8 #HealingOurWay #TheUniversityofSydney

NACCHO Save a date Aboriginal Health Conferences and Events #NACCHOAgm2018 This week #AHPA2018 #WomensVoices @CHFofAustralia #MyHealthRecord #Next weeks #StrokeWeek2018 Institute for Urban Indigenous Health @IUIH_ System of Care Conference, 27 -28 August Brisbane

NACCHO AGM 2018 Brisbane Oct 30—Nov 2 Registrations now open

Consumer Health Forum My Health Record Webinar 23 August

AHPA Health Promotion Symposium 23-24 August

National Stroke Week – Monday 3 to Sunday 9 September 2018.

Wiyi Yani U Thangani Women’s Voices project.

Institute for Urban Indigenous Health (IUIH) System of Care Conference, 27 -28 August Brisbane Registrations Close Friday 24 August 

Dr Tracy Westerman’s 2018 Training Workshops

NACCHO OCHRE DAY HOBART 27-28 August 

NATSIHWA National Professional Development Symposium 2018

AIDA Conference 2018 Vision into Action

CATSINaM Professional Development Conference

Healing Our Spirit Worldwide

NACCHO AGM 2018 Brisbane Oct 30—Nov 2 Registrations now open

Follow our conference using HASH TAG #NACCHOagm2018

Register HERE

Conference Website Link:

Accommodation Link:                   

The NACCHO Members’ Conference and AGM provides a forum for the Aboriginal community controlled health services workforce, bureaucrats, educators, suppliers and consumers to:

  • Present on innovative local economic development solutions to issues that can be applied to address similar issues nationally and across disciplines
  • Have input and influence from the ‘grassroots’ into national and state health policy and service delivery
  • Demonstrate leadership in workforce and service delivery innovation
  • Promote continuing education and professional development activities essential to the Aboriginal community controlled health services in urban, rural and remote Australia
  • Promote Aboriginal health research by professionals who practice in these areas and the presentation of research findings
  • Develop supportive networks
  • Promote good health and well-being through the delivery of health services to and by Indigenous and non-Indigenous people throughout Australia.

Conference Website Link

Consumer Health Forum My Health Record Webinar 23 August

Do you have questions about in Australia, and where fits in the big picture? Ask them here to be answered by an expert health panel at our webinar this Thursday, 23 Aug from 3-4pm

REGISTER /INFO

 

AHPA Health Promotion Symposium 23-24 August

This week in Canberra Aboriginal Health:

We need to do better: What will we do better? How will we do it?

Speakers: Ms Stephanie Harvey, Associate Professor James Charles, Ms Donisha Duff & Mr Patrick Johnson

National Stroke Week – Monday 3 to Sunday 9 September 2018.

Every step counts towards a healthy life.

This year, Stroke Foundation is encouraging Australians to discover how easy it is to fit healthy habits into their day and do their part to prevent stroke.

It’s estimated that more than 80 percent of strokes can be prevented simply by managing risk factors and living a healthy lifestyle. There are some risk factors for stroke which can’t be prevented like age, family history and prior stroke. If you’re male, your risk is also higher.

There are two ways to approach this: first by talking to your doctor and secondly by taking ownership of your own health.

Take charge of your own health:

  • Eat well.
  • Stay active.
  • Be smoke free.
  • Moderate alcohol intake.
  • Visit your doctor for a health check to help manage blood pressure, type 2 diabetes and atrial fibrillation (irregular heart beat).

Read more about stroke prevention

There is still time to register:

Wiyi Yani U Thangani Women’s Voices project.

June Oscar AO and her team are excited to hear from Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women and girls across the country as a part of the Wiyi Yani U Thangani Women’s Voices project.

Whilst we will not be able to get to every community, we hope to hear from as many women and girls as possible through this process. If we are not coming to your community we encourage you to please visit the Have your Say! page of the website to find out more about the other ways to have your voice included through our survey and submission process.

We will be hosting public sessions as advertised below but also a number of private sessions to enable women and girls from particularly vulnerable settings like justice and care to participate.

Details about current, upcoming and past gatherings appears below, however it is subject to change. We will update this page regularly with further details about upcoming gatherings closer to the date of the events.

Please get in touch with us via email wiyiyaniuthangani@humanrights.gov.au or phone on (02) 9284 9600 if you would like more information.

We look forward to hearing from you!

Pathways borders

Current gatherings

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women and girls are invited to register for one of the following gatherings 

Emerton

Location Date Time Address Who? Registration
Babaayn Aboriginal Corporation Tuesday 21 August 11:00am – 2:00pm 252 – 254 Luxford Rd Emerton Aboriginal and Torres Strait
Islander Women and Girls
Register

Redfern

Location Date Time Address Who? Registration
Redfern Community Centre Thursday 23 August 10:00am – 2:00pm Redfern Community Centre, 29-53 Hugo Street, Redfern NSW Aboriginal and Torres Strait
Islander Women and Girls
Register

Canberra, Wreck Bay and Nowra

Canberra
Location Date Time Address Who? Registration
Gugan Gulwan Youth Aboriginal Corporation Tuesday 28 August 2018 9:00am – 1:00pm 1 Gratton Court Waniassa ACT 2903 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Women and Girls Register
The Department of the Prime Minister and Cabinet Tuesday 28 August 2018 2:00pm – 5:30pm Central Plaza 16 Bowes Place, Phillip ACT 2606 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Women in the Australian Public Service only Register
Women’s Legal Centre Wednesday 29 August 2018 12:30pm – 4:30pm Conference Room, Ground Floor, 21 Barry Dr, Turner ACT 2601 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Women and Girls Register
Wreck Bay
Jervis Bay High School Thursday 30 August 2018 12:00pm – 4:00pm Dykes Avenue Jervis Bay ACT 2540 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Women and Girls Register
Nowra
Nowra Showground Friday 31 August 2018 09:00am – 1:30pm Committee Room, Nowra Showground, 20 West Street, Nowra NSW 2541 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Women and Girls Register

Pathways borders

Upcoming gatherings

If your community is listed below and you would like to be involved in planning for our visit or would like more information, please write to us at wiyiyaniuthangani@humanrights.gov.au or phone (02) 9284 9600.

Location Dates
Alice Springs September 2018
Tennant Creek September 2018
Yarrabah September 2018
Weipa September 2018
Torres Strait Islands October 2018
Port Headland October 2018
Newman October 2018
Dubbo TBC
Brewarrina TBC
Rockhampton TBC
Longreach TBC
Kempsey TBC

Pathways borders

Institute for Urban Indigenous Health (IUIH) System of Care Conference, 27 -28 August Brisbane Registrations Close Friday 24 August 

Registrations are currently open for the inaugural Institute for Urban Indigenous Health (IUIH) System of Care Conference, to be held on Monday 27 and Tuesday 28 August 2018 in Brisbane.

This conference will focus on IUIH’s successful approach to Closing the Gap in Indigenous health and would be of interest to people working in

• Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Community Controlled Health Services
• Primary Health Networks (PHNs)
• Health and Hospital Boards and management
• Government Departments
• the University Sector
• the NGO sectorCome along and gain fresh insights into the ways in which a cross-sector and integrated system can make real impacts on the health of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples as we share the research behind the development and implementation of this system.
Featuring presentations by speakers across a range of specialisations including clinic set up, clinical governance, systems integration, wrap around services such as allied and social health, workforce development and research evidence.
For more information you can
·         Watch this video –https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6O1pQfZMLnk
·         Visit the conference registration website –https://www.ivvy.com.au/event/IUIH18/
·         Call us (07) 3828 3600
·         Email events@iuih.org.au

 

Dr Tracy Westerman’s 2018 Training Workshops
For more details and July dates

 

Download HERE
NACCHO OCHRE DAY HOBART 27-28 August 

The recent week-long #MensHealthWeek focus offered a “timely reminder” to all men to consider their health and wellbeing and the impact that their ill health or even the early loss of their lives could have on the people who love them. The statistics speak for themselves – we need to look after ourselves better .

That is why I am encouraging all men to take their health seriously, this week and every week of the year, and I have made men’s health a particular priority for Indigenous health.”

Federal Minister for Indigenous Health and Aged Care Ken Wyatt who will appear via Video 

Please note this EVENT is now closed Fully Booked

To celebrate #MensHealthWeek NACCHO has launched its National #OchreDay2018 Mens Health Summit program

Download OCHRE DAY 2018 Program HERE

NACCHO Ochre Day Program_WEB 2018

The NACCHO Ochre Day Health Summit in August provides a national forum for all Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander male delegates, organisations and communities to learn from Aboriginal male health leaders, discuss their health concerns, exchange share ideas and examine ways of improving their own men’s health and that of their communities

Aboriginal male health is approached negatively, with programmes only aimed at males as perpetrators. Examples include alcohol, tobacco and other drug services, domestic violence, prison release, and child sexual abuse programs. These programmes are vital, but are essentially aimed at the effects of males behaving badly to others, not for promoting the value of males themselves as an essential and positive part of family and community life.

To address the real social and emotional needs of males in our communities, NACCHO proposes a positive approach to male health and wellbeing that celebrates Aboriginal masculinities, and uphold our traditional values of respect for our laws, respect for Elders, culture and traditions, responsibility as leaders and men, teachers of young males, holders of lore, providers, warriors and protectors of our families, women, old people, and children.

More Details HERE

NACCHO’s approach is to support Aboriginal males to live longer, healthier lives as males for themselves. The flow-on effects will hopefully address the key effects of poor male behaviour by expecting and encouraging Aboriginal males to be what they are meant to be.

In many communities, males have established and are maintaining men’s groups, and attempting to be actively involved in developing their own solutions to the well documented men’s health and wellbeing problems, though almost all are unfunded and lack administrative and financial support.

To assist NACCHO to strategically develop this area as part of an overarching gender/culture based approach to service provision, NACCHO decided it needed to raise awareness, gain support for and communicate to the wider Australian public issues that have an impact on the social, emotional health and wellbeing of Aboriginal Males.

It was subsequently decided that NACCHO should stage a public event that would aim to achieve this and that this event be called “NACCHO Ochre Day”.

 

 NATSIHWA National Professional Development Symposium 2018

We’re excited to release the dates for the 2018 National Professional Development Symposium to be held in Alice Springs on 2nd-4th October. More details are to be released in the coming weeks; a full sponsorship prospectus and registration logistics will be advertised asap via email and newsletter.

This years Symposium will be focussed on upskilling our Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander Health Workers and Health Practitioners through a series of interactive workshops. Registrants will be able to participate in all workshops by rotating in groups over the 2 days. The aim of the symposium is to provide the registrants with new practical skills to take back to communities and open up a platform for Health Workers/Practitioners to network with other Individuals in the workforce from all over Australia.

We look forward to announcing more details soon!

AIDA Conference 2018 Vision into Action


Building on the foundations of our membership, history and diversity, AIDA is shaping a future where we continue to innovate, lead and stay strong in culture. It’s an exciting time of change and opportunity in Indigenous health.

The AIDA conference supports our members and the health sector by creating an inspiring networking space that engages sector experts, key decision makers, Indigenous medical students and doctors to join in an Indigenous health focused academic and scientific program.

AIDA recognises and respects that the pathway to achieving equitable and culturally-safe healthcare for Indigenous Australians is dynamic and complex. Through unity, leadership and collaboration, we create a future where our vision translates into measureable and significantly improved health outcomes for our communities. Now is the time to put that vision into action.

Registrations Close August 31

CATSINaM Professional Development Conference

Venue: Hilton Adelaide 

Location: 233 Victoria Square, Adelaide, SA 

Timing: 8:30am – 5:30pm

We invite you to be part of the CATSINaM Professional Development Conference held in Adelaide, Australia from the 17th to the 19th of September 2018.
The Conference purpose is to share information while working towards an integrated approach to improving the outcomes for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians. The Conference also provides an opportunity to highlight the very real difference being made in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health by our Members.
To this end, we are offering a mixed mode experience with plenary speaker sessions, panels, and presentations as well as professional development workshops.

More info

The CATSINaM Gala Dinner and Awards evening,  held on the 18th of September, purpose is to honour the contributions of distinguished Members to the field.
Healing Our Spirit Worldwide

Global gathering of Indigenous people to be held in Sydney
University of Sydney, The Healing Foundation to co-host Healing Our Spirit Worldwide
Gawuwi gamarda Healing Our Spirit Worldwidegu Ngalya nangari nura Cadigalmirung.
Calling our friends to come, to be at Healing Our Spirit Worldwide. We meet on the country of the Cadigal.
In November 2018, up to 2,000 Indigenous people from around the world will gather in Sydney to take part in Healing Our Spirit Worldwide: The Eighth Gathering.
A global movement, Healing Our Spirit Worldwidebegan in Canada in the 1980s to address the devastation of substance abuse and dependence among Indigenous people around the world. Since 1992 it has held a gathering approximately every four years, in a different part of the world, focusing on a diverse range of topics relevant to Indigenous lives including health, politics, social inclusion, stolen generations, education, governance and resilience.
The International Indigenous Council – the governing body of Healing Our Spirit Worldwide – has invited the University of Sydney and The Healing Foundation to co-host the Eighth Gathering with them in Sydney this year. The second gathering was also held in Sydney, in 1994.
 Please also feel free to tag us in any relevant cross posting: @HOSW8 @hosw2018 #HOSW8 #HealingOurWay #TheUniversityofSydney

NACCHO Save a date Aboriginal Health Conferences and Events #OchreDay2018 #MaleHealth Program Released #NACCHOAgm2018 Presenters Wanted and Institute for Urban Indigenous Health @IUIH_ System of Care Conference, 27 -28 August Brisbane

NACCHO AGM 2018 Brisbane Oct 30—Nov 2 Registrations and Expressions of Interest now open

Follow our conference using HASH TAG #NACCHOagm2018

Register HERE

Conference Website Link:

Accommodation Link:                   

The NACCHO Members’ Conference and AGM provides a forum for the Aboriginal community controlled health services workforce, bureaucrats, educators, suppliers and consumers to:

  • Present on innovative local economic development solutions to issues that can be applied to address similar issues nationally and across disciplines
  • Have input and influence from the ‘grassroots’ into national and state health policy and service delivery
  • Demonstrate leadership in workforce and service delivery innovation
  • Promote continuing education and professional development activities essential to the Aboriginal community controlled health services in urban, rural and remote Australia
  • Promote Aboriginal health research by professionals who practice in these areas and the presentation of research findings
  • Develop supportive networks
  • Promote good health and well-being through the delivery of health services to and by Indigenous and non-Indigenous people throughout Australia.

Conference Website Link

Expressions of Interest to present see below 

NACCHO is now calling for EOI’s from Affiliates , Member Services and stakeholders for Case Studies and Presentations for the 2018 NACCHO Members’ Conference. This is an opportunity to show case grass roots best practice at the Aboriginal Community Controlled service delivery level.

Download the Application

NACCHO Members Expressions of Interest to present to the Brisbane Conference 2018 on Day 1

In doing so honouring the theme of this year’s NACCHO Members Conference; ‘Investing in What Works – Aboriginal Community Controlled Health’. We are seeking EOIs for the following Conference Sessions.

Day 1 Wednesday 31 October 2018

Concurrent Session 1 (1.15 – 2.00pm) – topics can include Case Studies but are not limited to:

  • Workforce Innovation
  • Best Practice Primary Health Care for Clients with Chronic Disease
  • Challenges and Opportunities
  • Sustainable Growth
  • Harnessing Resources (Medicare, government and other)
  • Engagement/Health Promotion
  • Models of Primary Health Care and
  • Clinical and Service Delivery.

EOI’s will focus on the title of this session within the context of Urban, Regional, Rural or Remote.  Each presentation will be 10-15 minutes in either the Plenary or Breakout rooms.

OR

Table Top Presentations (2.00-3.00pm)

Presenters will speak from the lectern and provide a brief presentation on a key project or program currently being delivered by their service.

Presentation will be 10 minutes in duration-with 5 minutes to present and
5 minutes for discussion and questions from delegates.

How to submit an EOI

Please provide the following information and submit via email to NACCHO-AGM@naccho.org.au by COB Monday 21st August 2018.

  • Name of Member Service
  • Name of presenter(s)
  • Name of program
  • Name of session
  • Contact details: Phone | Mobile | Email

Provide the key points you want to cover – in no more than 500 words outline the program/ project/ topic you would like to present on. Describe how your presentation/case study supports the 2018 NACCHO Members’ Conference theme ‘Investing in what works – Aboriginal Community Controlled Healt

SUBMIT DAY 1

SUBMIT DAY 2 

Institute for Urban Indigenous Health (IUIH) System of Care Conference, 27 -28 August Brisbane 

Registrations are currently open for the inaugural Institute for Urban Indigenous Health (IUIH) System of Care Conference, to be held on Monday 27 and Tuesday 28 August 2018 in Brisbane.

This conference will focus on IUIH’s successful approach to Closing the Gap in Indigenous health and would be of interest to people working in

• Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Community Controlled Health Services
• Primary Health Networks (PHNs)
• Health and Hospital Boards and management
• Government Departments
• the University Sector
• the NGO sectorCome along and gain fresh insights into the ways in which a cross-sector and integrated system can make real impacts on the health of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples as we share the research behind the development and implementation of this system.
Featuring presentations by speakers across a range of specialisations including clinic set up, clinical governance, systems integration, wrap around services such as allied and social health, workforce development and research evidence.
For more information you can
·         Watch this video –https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6O1pQfZMLnk
·         Visit the conference registration website –https://www.ivvy.com.au/event/IUIH18/
·         Call us (07) 3828 3600
·         Email events@iuih.org.au

 

Dr Tracy Westerman’s 2018 Training Workshops
For more details and July dates

 

Download HERE

The recent week-long #MensHealthWeek focus offered a “timely reminder” to all men to consider their health and wellbeing and the impact that their ill health or even the early loss of their lives could have on the people who love them. The statistics speak for themselves – we need to look after ourselves better .

That is why I am encouraging all men to take their health seriously, this week and every week of the year, and I have made men’s health a particular priority for Indigenous health.”

Federal Minister for Indigenous Health and Aged Care Ken Wyatt who will appear via Video 

Please note this EVENT is now closed Fully Booked

To celebrate #MensHealthWeek NACCHO has launched its National #OchreDay2018 Mens Health Summit program

Download OCHRE DAY 2018 Program HERE

NACCHO Ochre Day Program_WEB 2018

The NACCHO Ochre Day Health Summit in August provides a national forum for all Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander male delegates, organisations and communities to learn from Aboriginal male health leaders, discuss their health concerns, exchange share ideas and examine ways of improving their own men’s health and that of their communities

 

 

 

Aboriginal male health is approached negatively, with programmes only aimed at males as perpetrators. Examples include alcohol, tobacco and other drug services, domestic violence, prison release, and child sexual abuse programs. These programmes are vital, but are essentially aimed at the effects of males behaving badly to others, not for promoting the value of males themselves as an essential and positive part of family and community life.

To address the real social and emotional needs of males in our communities, NACCHO proposes a positive approach to male health and wellbeing that celebrates Aboriginal masculinities, and uphold our traditional values of respect for our laws, respect for Elders, culture and traditions, responsibility as leaders and men, teachers of young males, holders of lore, providers, warriors and protectors of our families, women, old people, and children.

More Details HERE

NACCHO’s approach is to support Aboriginal males to live longer, healthier lives as males for themselves. The flow-on effects will hopefully address the key effects of poor male behaviour by expecting and encouraging Aboriginal males to be what they are meant to be.

In many communities, males have established and are maintaining men’s groups, and attempting to be actively involved in developing their own solutions to the well documented men’s health and wellbeing problems, though almost all are unfunded and lack administrative and financial support.

To assist NACCHO to strategically develop this area as part of an overarching gender/culture based approach to service provision, NACCHO decided it needed to raise awareness, gain support for and communicate to the wider Australian public issues that have an impact on the social, emotional health and wellbeing of Aboriginal Males.

It was subsequently decided that NACCHO should stage a public event that would aim to achieve this and that this event be called “NACCHO Ochre Day”.

 

7. NATSIHWA National Professional Development Symposium 2018

We’re excited to release the dates for the 2018 National Professional Development Symposium to be held in Alice Springs on 2nd-4th October. More details are to be released in the coming weeks; a full sponsorship prospectus and registration logistics will be advertised asap via email and newsletter.

This years Symposium will be focussed on upskilling our Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander Health Workers and Health Practitioners through a series of interactive workshops. Registrants will be able to participate in all workshops by rotating in groups over the 2 days. The aim of the symposium is to provide the registrants with new practical skills to take back to communities and open up a platform for Health Workers/Practitioners to network with other Individuals in the workforce from all over Australia.

We look forward to announcing more details soon!

8.AIDA Conference 2018 Vision into Action


Building on the foundations of our membership, history and diversity, AIDA is shaping a future where we continue to innovate, lead and stay strong in culture. It’s an exciting time of change and opportunity in Indigenous health.

The AIDA conference supports our members and the health sector by creating an inspiring networking space that engages sector experts, key decision makers, Indigenous medical students and doctors to join in an Indigenous health focused academic and scientific program.

AIDA recognises and respects that the pathway to achieving equitable and culturally-safe healthcare for Indigenous Australians is dynamic and complex. Through unity, leadership and collaboration, we create a future where our vision translates into measureable and significantly improved health outcomes for our communities. Now is the time to put that vision into action.

Registrations Close August 31

9.CATSINaM Professional Development Conference

Venue: Hilton Adelaide 

Location: 233 Victoria Square, Adelaide, SA 

Timing: 8:30am – 5:30pm

We invite you to be part of the CATSINaM Professional Development Conference held in Adelaide, Australia from the 17th to the 19th of September 2018.
The Conference purpose is to share information while working towards an integrated approach to improving the outcomes for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians. The Conference also provides an opportunity to highlight the very real difference being made in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health by our Members.
To this end, we are offering a mixed mode experience with plenary speaker sessions, panels, and presentations as well as professional development workshops.

More info

The CATSINaM Gala Dinner and Awards evening,  held on the 18th of September, purpose is to honour the contributions of distinguished Members to the field.

10.Healing Our Spirit Worldwide

Global gathering of Indigenous people to be held in Sydney
University of Sydney, The Healing Foundation to co-host Healing Our Spirit Worldwide
Gawuwi gamarda Healing Our Spirit Worldwidegu Ngalya nangari nura Cadigalmirung.
Calling our friends to come, to be at Healing Our Spirit Worldwide. We meet on the country of the Cadigal.
In November 2018, up to 2,000 Indigenous people from around the world will gather in Sydney to take part in Healing Our Spirit Worldwide: The Eighth Gathering.
A global movement, Healing Our Spirit Worldwidebegan in Canada in the 1980s to address the devastation of substance abuse and dependence among Indigenous people around the world. Since 1992 it has held a gathering approximately every four years, in a different part of the world, focusing on a diverse range of topics relevant to Indigenous lives including health, politics, social inclusion, stolen generations, education, governance and resilience.
The International Indigenous Council – the governing body of Healing Our Spirit Worldwide – has invited the University of Sydney and The Healing Foundation to co-host the Eighth Gathering with them in Sydney this year. The second gathering was also held in Sydney, in 1994.
 Please also feel free to tag us in any relevant cross posting: @HOSW8 @hosw2018 #HOSW8 #HealingOurWay #TheUniversityofSydney

NACCHO Save a date Events @ATSICHSBris #DentalHealthWeek @DeadlyChoices Plus #OchreDay2018 August 27-28 #NACCHOAgm2018 and Institute for Urban Indigenous Health @IUIH_ System of Care Conference, 27 -28 August Brisbane

9 August : Beyond Survival March for Aboriginal Rights – Better Solutions for a Better Future

NSW Aboriginal Land Council and the Coalition of Aboriginal Peak Organisations (CAPO) says it is time governments and policy-makers commit to actively engaging the expertise of Aboriginal community controlled organisations.

“That is why we are marching on the International Day of the World’s Indigenous Peoples,” said Councillor Roy Ah-See, Chair of NSWALC and Co-Chair of CAPO.

“CAPO’s expertise across health, education, cultural and family connections, community care, the legal system and Land Rights spans more than 200 years.

And the Land Rights network continues to support our people and communities to access quality health care, decent housing, education, sustainable employment and economic participation.”

Cr Ah-See said that current policy is built on shifting sands, while the knowledge and expertise of Aboriginal community controlled organisations provide the solid foundation for a better future for our people.

“That is why it is vital we all take this opportunity to walk together in solidarity and march for Aboriginal Rights and community control on a highly significant day,” Cr Ah-See said.

“Aboriginal organisations have the solutions and we are the ones who should have control of what our children’s future will look like.”

The Beyond Survival March for Aboriginal Rights is on Thursday August 9 at 11am, leaving from Hyde Park North to NSW Parliament House.

Facebook Event: https://www.facebook.com/events/838450799683432/

6-12 August Dental Health Week

This year during Dental Health Week (6 – 12 August), the ADA is reminding everyone to #WatchYourMouth, in the light of the latest national survey conducted by the Association that showed Australians are not prioritising their oral health.

It follows the launch earlier this year by the ADA of Australia’s Oral Health Tracker which was developed in response to data showing that just over 52% of Australians are only brushing once a day instead of the recommended twice daily and nearly two in five (38%) never floss or clean in between their teeth. Australians also need more regular dental check-ups, with 69% only going to the dentist when they have a problem.

This is especially concerning given the fact that tooth decay is Australia’s most common disease, with one in five adults having untreated tooth decay and one in five also have gum disease, with oral cancer rates also on the rise.

To help combat these figures, Dental Health Week 2018 is stressing these four key tips for good oral health:

• Brush twice a day with fluoridated toothpaste
• Clean in between your teeth with floss or interdental brushes
• Eat a healthy diet, limit sugary foods and drinks
• Visit your dentist regularly

Dr Hugo Sachs, ADA President said Dental Health Week is an opportunity for people to take a look and learn more about why a healthy mouth is so important.

“Good oral health is vital to good overall health, so watching your mouth will help maintain your general wellbeing. Watching your mouth means: brushing and flossing, eating a healthy diet, lowering our sugar and alcohol intake, stopping smoking and seeing your dentist for regular check-ups. These good habits will greatly reduce the risk of oral disease.”

This year’s Ambassador for Dental Health Week 2018, MasterChef 2016 runner-up and restaurateur Matt Sinclair, added:

“Quality oral hygiene has always been paramount in my life; it was something we were raised to be very conscious of. Mum would never allow us to go to school or bed without brushing our teeth and our regular dentist check-ups were compulsory. As the Dental Health Week Ambassador, I’m encouraging Australians to watch their mouth and take their oral health seriously.

“Working as a chef, I’m constantly tasting food throughout the day, so I’m more aware of the importance of looking after my mouth. Simple regular oral hygiene habits, seeing a dentist for checkups and eating good quality fresh food will ensure our mouths and teeth can continue to perform for us.”

To follow the extensive range of Dental Health Week events, search #DentalHealthWeek and #WatchYourMouth on FacebookTwitter and Instagram 

FEATURED ACCHO ATSICHS Brisbane
We have two clinics to keep your whole mouth healthy & your smile deadly.
For more info call: Gabba – 3240 8922 or Logan – 3029 6518 WEBSITE

Am I eligible?

To be eligible for appointments at our dental clinics you must:

  • reside in South East Queensland and identify as Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander
  • be a regular ongoing patient with one of our ATSICHS Brisbane medical clinics and be up to date with your annual health check. If you are a new patient to ATSICHS Brisbane, our GPs will need to have had a chance to review your medical records.

We encourage kids to get their health check prior to their dental appointment. We have a dental van at the Murri School that specialises in children’s dental care. We can also see kids at our two other clinics.

If you are a non Indigenous patient with an Indigenous spouse you may be eligible for care. Please contact our dental team for further information.

Read more about our dental eligibility

What if I’m not an ATSICHS Brisbane client?

If you do not currently attend one of our ATSICHS Brisbane medical clinics, you are invited to transfer your medical records and become a regular ongoing medical patient. You will then become eligible for dental care once your health check is completed.

If you prefer not to attend one of our medical clinics, you are unable to access the dental clinics at Woolloongabba or Logan.

What are my alternatives?

Other choices for dental care are:

  • Queensland Health Oral Health – if you are a holder of a Centrelink concession card call them on 1300 300 850 OR
  • a private dentist of your choice.

Access and fees

  • There are no fees for the general dental care provided the eligibility criteria is met.
  • Fees do apply for laboratory work, e.g., mouth guards, denture and crown work.
  • Treatment is provided to the majority of children via the Child Dental Benefits Scheme.
  • Aged pensioners are eligible for free acrylic dentures.

Our team

Our dental team consists of dentists, oral health therapists, dental assistants, dental technicians and a dental prosthetist.

We support the training of dental students, by providing clinical placements for final year dental students throughout the year.

Our services

Our services include:

  • emergency treatment for toothache, trauma and wisdom teeth
  • routine dental checkups and screening
  • fillings
  • extractions
  • root canal on anterior teeth
  • wisdom teeth extractions
  • dentures and crowns
  • mouth guards and splints
  • specialist referrals
  • simple orthodontic procedures
  • scaling and cleaning with oral health promotion
  • regular recalls and follow up.

Dental services are available at our Woolloongabba and Logan clinics.

All services are provided in the clinics and staff are supportive of visiting and participating in community days and other special events to provide information on dental care and disease prevention.

WEBSITE

Institute for Urban Indigenous Health (IUIH) System of Care Conference, 27 -28 August Brisbane 

Registrations are currently open for the inaugural Institute for Urban Indigenous Health (IUIH) System of Care Conference, to be held on Monday 27 and Tuesday 28 August 2018 in Brisbane.

This conference will focus on IUIH’s successful approach to Closing the Gap in Indigenous health and would be of interest to people working in

• Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Community Controlled Health Services
• Primary Health Networks (PHNs)
• Health and Hospital Boards and management
• Government Departments
• the University Sector
• the NGO sectorCome along and gain fresh insights into the ways in which a cross-sector and integrated system can make real impacts on the health of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples as we share the research behind the development and implementation of this system.
Featuring presentations by speakers across a range of specialisations including clinic set up, clinical governance, systems integration, wrap around services such as allied and social health, workforce development and research evidence.
For more information you can
·         Watch this video –https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6O1pQfZMLnk
·         Visit the conference registration website –https://www.ivvy.com.au/event/IUIH18/
·         Call us (07) 3828 3600
·         Email events@iuih.org.au

 

NACCHO AGM 2018 Brisbane Oct 30—Nov 2 Registrations and Expressions of Interest now open

Follow our conference using HASH TAG #NACCHOagm2018

Brisbane Oct 30—Nov 2

Register HERE

Conference Website Link:

Accommodation Link:                   

The NACCHO Members’ Conference and AGM provides a forum for the Aboriginal community controlled health services workforce, bureaucrats, educators, suppliers and consumers to:

  • Present on innovative local economic development solutions to issues that can be applied to address similar issues nationally and across disciplines
  • Have input and influence from the ‘grassroots’ into national and state health policy and service delivery
  • Demonstrate leadership in workforce and service delivery innovation
  • Promote continuing education and professional development activities essential to the Aboriginal community controlled health services in urban, rural and remote Australia
  • Promote Aboriginal health research by professionals who practice in these areas and the presentation of research findings
  • Develop supportive networks
  • Promote good health and well-being through the delivery of health services to and by Indigenous and non-Indigenous people throughout Australia.

Expressions of Interest to present

NACCHO is now calling for EOI’s from Affiliates , Member Services and stakeholders for Case Studies and Presentations for the 2018 NACCHO Members’ Conference. This is an opportunity to show case grass roots best practice at the Aboriginal Community Controlled service delivery level.

Download the Application

NACCHO Members Expressions of Interest to present to the Brisbane Conference 2018 on Day 1

In doing so honouring the theme of this year’s NACCHO Members Conference; ‘Investing in What Works – Aboriginal Community Controlled Health’. We are seeking EOIs for the following Conference Sessions.

Day 1 Wednesday 31 October 2018

Concurrent Session 1 (1.15 – 2.00pm) – topics can include Case Studies but are not limited to:

  • Workforce Innovation
  • Best Practice Primary Health Care for Clients with Chronic Disease
  • Challenges and Opportunities
  • Sustainable Growth
  • Harnessing Resources (Medicare, government and other)
  • Engagement/Health Promotion
  • Models of Primary Health Care and
  • Clinical and Service Delivery.

EOI’s will focus on the title of this session within the context of Urban, Regional, Rural or Remote.  Each presentation will be 10-15 minutes in either the Plenary or Breakout rooms.

OR

Table Top Presentations (2.00-3.00pm)

Presenters will speak from the lectern and provide a brief presentation on a key project or program currently being delivered by their service.

Presentation will be 10 minutes in duration-with 5 minutes to present and
5 minutes for discussion and questions from delegates.

Conference Website Link

 

Dr Tracy Westerman’s 2018 Training Workshops
For more details and July dates

 

Download HERE

The recent week-long #MensHealthWeek focus offered a “timely reminder” to all men to consider their health and wellbeing and the impact that their ill health or even the early loss of their lives could have on the people who love them. The statistics speak for themselves – we need to look after ourselves better .

That is why I am encouraging all men to take their health seriously, this week and every week of the year, and I have made men’s health a particular priority for Indigenous health.”

Federal Minister for Indigenous Health and Aged Care Ken Wyatt who will be a keynote speaker at NACCHO Ochre Day in August

To celebrate #MensHealthWeek NACCHO has launches its National #OchreDay2018 Mens Health Summit program and registrations

The NACCHO Ochre Day Health Summit in August provides a national forum for all Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander male delegates, organisations and communities to learn from Aboriginal male health leaders, discuss their health concerns, exchange share ideas and examine ways of improving their own men’s health and that of their communities

More Details HERE

All too often Aboriginal male health is approached negatively, with programmes only aimed at males as perpetrators. Examples include alcohol, tobacco and other drug services, domestic violence, prison release, and child sexual abuse programs. These programmes are vital, but are essentially aimed at the effects of males behaving badly to others, not for promoting the value of males themselves as an essential and positive part of family and community life.

To address the real social and emotional needs of males in our communities, NACCHO proposes a positive approach to male health and wellbeing that celebrates Aboriginal masculinities, and uphold our traditional values of respect for our laws, respect for Elders, culture and traditions, responsibility as leaders and men, teachers of young males, holders of lore, providers, warriors and protectors of our families, women, old people, and children.

More Details HERE

NACCHO’s approach is to support Aboriginal males to live longer, healthier lives as males for themselves. The flow-on effects will hopefully address the key effects of poor male behaviour by expecting and encouraging Aboriginal males to be what they are meant to be.

In many communities, males have established and are maintaining men’s groups, and attempting to be actively involved in developing their own solutions to the well documented men’s health and wellbeing problems, though almost all are unfunded and lack administrative and financial support.

To assist NACCHO to strategically develop this area as part of an overarching gender/culture based approach to service provision, NACCHO decided it needed to raise awareness, gain support for and communicate to the wider Australian public issues that have an impact on the social, emotional health and wellbeing of Aboriginal Males.

It was subsequently decided that NACCHO should stage a public event that would aim to achieve this and that this event be called “NACCHO Ochre Day”.

The two day conference is free: To register

7. NATSIHWA National Professional Development Symposium 2018

We’re excited to release the dates for the 2018 National Professional Development Symposium to be held in Alice Springs on 2nd-4th October. More details are to be released in the coming weeks; a full sponsorship prospectus and registration logistics will be advertised asap via email and newsletter.

This years Symposium will be focussed on upskilling our Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander Health Workers and Health Practitioners through a series of interactive workshops. Registrants will be able to participate in all workshops by rotating in groups over the 2 days. The aim of the symposium is to provide the registrants with new practical skills to take back to communities and open up a platform for Health Workers/Practitioners to network with other Individuals in the workforce from all over Australia.

We look forward to announcing more details soon!

8.AIDA Conference 2018 Vision into Action


Building on the foundations of our membership, history and diversity, AIDA is shaping a future where we continue to innovate, lead and stay strong in culture. It’s an exciting time of change and opportunity in Indigenous health.

The AIDA conference supports our members and the health sector by creating an inspiring networking space that engages sector experts, key decision makers, Indigenous medical students and doctors to join in an Indigenous health focused academic and scientific program.

AIDA recognises and respects that the pathway to achieving equitable and culturally-safe healthcare for Indigenous Australians is dynamic and complex. Through unity, leadership and collaboration, we create a future where our vision translates into measureable and significantly improved health outcomes for our communities. Now is the time to put that vision into action.

AIDA Awards
Nominate our members’ outstanding contributions towards improving the health and life outcomes of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples.

9.CATSINaM Professional Development Conference

Venue: Hilton Adelaide 

Location: 233 Victoria Square, Adelaide, SA 

Timing: 8:30am – 5:30pm

We invite you to be part of the CATSINaM Professional Development Conference held in Adelaide, Australia from the 17th to the 19th of September 2018.
The Conference purpose is to share information while working towards an integrated approach to improving the outcomes for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians. The Conference also provides an opportunity to highlight the very real difference being made in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health by our Members.
To this end, we are offering a mixed mode experience with plenary speaker sessions, panels, and presentations as well as professional development workshops.

More info

The CATSINaM Gala Dinner and Awards evening,  held on the 18th of September, purpose is to honour the contributions of distinguished Members to the field.

10.Healing Our Spirit Worldwide

Global gathering of Indigenous people to be held in Sydney
University of Sydney, The Healing Foundation to co-host Healing Our Spirit Worldwide
Gawuwi gamarda Healing Our Spirit Worldwidegu Ngalya nangari nura Cadigalmirung.
Calling our friends to come, to be at Healing Our Spirit Worldwide. We meet on the country of the Cadigal.
In November 2018, up to 2,000 Indigenous people from around the world will gather in Sydney to take part in Healing Our Spirit Worldwide: The Eighth Gathering.
A global movement, Healing Our Spirit Worldwidebegan in Canada in the 1980s to address the devastation of substance abuse and dependence among Indigenous people around the world. Since 1992 it has held a gathering approximately every four years, in a different part of the world, focusing on a diverse range of topics relevant to Indigenous lives including health, politics, social inclusion, stolen generations, education, governance and resilience.
The International Indigenous Council – the governing body of Healing Our Spirit Worldwide – has invited the University of Sydney and The Healing Foundation to co-host the Eighth Gathering with them in Sydney this year. The second gathering was also held in Sydney, in 1994.
 Please also feel free to tag us in any relevant cross posting: @HOSW8 @hosw2018 #HOSW8 #HealingOurWay #TheUniversityofSydney

NACCHO Aboriginal Health #Saveadate Features #NAIDOCWeek #BecauseofHerWeCan Mum Shirl and NACCHO Women Leadership Tributes : Wiyi Yani U Thangani (Women’s Voices) #NACCHOagm2018 Registrations and Expression of Interest to present NOW OPEN

NAIDOC WEEK 2018 Tribute

NAIDOC Week celebrations will kicked off yesterday highlighting the histories, rich cultures, and outstanding achievements of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples.

The 2018 theme #Becauseofherwecan highlighted the past and present contributions of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women.

NAIDOC Week is an opportunity to celebrate the achievements of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women – who are strong role models and leaders in their homes, communities and society more broadly

We can all play a part in improving outcomes for women and this year’s theme provides an opportunity to press even harder for progress in our ACCHO’s

These woman in our Part 1 and 2 tribute today represent the 45 years of ACCHO’s advocating for culturally respectful, needs based approach to improving the health and wellbeing outcomes of our people in the past and now into our healthy futures.

Part 1 Coleen Shirley Perry Smith AM MBE (22 November 1921 – 28 April 1998), better known as Mum Shirl, was a prominent Wiradjuri woman, social worker and humanitarian activist committed to justice and welfare of Aboriginal Australians. She was a founding member of the Aboriginal Legal Service, the Aboriginal Medical Service, the Aboriginal Tent Embassy, the Aboriginal Children’s Service and the Aboriginal Housing Company in Redfern, a suburb of Sydney. During her lifetime she was recognised as an Australian National Living Treasure

Mum Shirl was born as Coleen Shirley Smith in the Erambie Mission, near Cowra in 1921 to Joseph and Isabell Smith. She did not attend a regular school because of her epilepsy and was taught by her grandfather and learned 16 different Aboriginal Languages. She began to visit Aboriginal people in jail after one of her brothers was incarcerated and she discovered that her visits were beneficial to other prisoners as well.

Her community activism also saw her accompanying indigenous people who were unfamiliar with the legal system to court when they had been charged with a crime. Her nickname came from her habit of replying, “I’m his mum” whenever officials queried her relationship with the prisoners – the name by which she became widely known.[1]

Because of her work visiting Aboriginal prisoners, Mum Shirl is the only woman in Australia to have been given unrestricted access to prisons in New South Wales. “She’d be at one end of the state one day, and seen at the other end of the state the next day. The department wasn’t getting her from A to B. She used to rely on family and friends to get her around,” said Ron Woodham from NSW Corrective Services.[2] Later the Department of Corrective Services revoked her pass, making her prisoner support work near impossible.[3]

Smith’s welfare work, however, was not confined only to prisons and the legal system. She also spent considerable time and money finding homes for children whose parents could not look after them, and helping displaced children to find their own parents again. The children with nowhere to go often ended up living with her. By the early 1990s she had raised over 60 children. Likewise, many people with no family or friends in Sydney arrived at Mum Shirl’s Redfern house seeking shelter.

In 1970, Smith, along with Ken Brindle, and Chicka and Elsa Dixon, were the guiding force behind a group of young Aboriginal men and women who were involved in the campaign for land rights by the Gurindji people. This same group, with Fred Hollows and others helped to establish Aboriginal Medical Service in July 1971. They also helped establish the Aboriginal Legal Service in 1971, the Aboriginal Black Theatre, the Aboriginal Tent Embassy, the Aboriginal Children’s Service, the Aboriginal Housing Company and the Detoxification Centre at Wiseman’s Ferry.[4]

Part 2

NACCHO Aboriginal Women’s Health Leadership #IWD2018 We honour all the woman working in our #ACCHO’s over 45 years in #NT #NSW #QLD #WA #SA #VIC #ACT #TAS

  1. NSW : Dr Naomi Mayers one of the founders of Aboriginal Medical Service in Redfern ,AHMRC and NACCHO
  2. VIC: Jill Gallagher AO VACCHO CEO 2001-2018
  3. QLD : Pamela Mam establishment of the Aboriginal and Islander Community Health Service and Jimbelunga Nursing centre
  4. SA : Mary Buckskin (1955 – 2015 ) CEO of AHCSA for 8 years
  5. NT : Donna Ah Chee CEO Congress Alice Springs , NACCHO Board Member, Chair AMSANT former CEO NACCHO
  6. WA : Vicki O’Donnell. Chair AHCWA : CEO – Kimberley Aboriginal Medical Services.
  7. ACT : Julie Tongs OAM CEO Winnunga Nimmityjah Aboriginal Health Service, NACCHO Board Member,
  8. TAS. Heather Sculthorpe CEO Tasmanian Aboriginal Centre

10.Read over 336 NACCHO Aboriginal Women’s Health articles published in past 6 years

NAIDOC Week will be held from 8 – 15 July, guided by the theme ‘Because of her, we can!’ in recognition of the role of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women

NAIDOC Week celebrations will kick off today, highlighting the histories, rich cultures, and outstanding achievements of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples.

Minister for Indigenous Affairs, Nigel Scullion said that the 2018 theme highlighted the past and present contributions of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women.

“NAIDOC Week is an opportunity to celebrate the achievements of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women – who are strong role models and leaders in their homes, communities and society more broadly,” said Minister Scullion.

“The Turnbull Government proudly supports NAIDOC Week each year, and I am pleased to announce that a record number of organisations have received funding to celebrate 2018 NAIDOC Week.

This year, 528 organisations received grants through the Turnbull Government’s 2018 NAIDOC Week grants round.

The 2018 NAIDOC Week grants will support a variety of events in all states and territories, including a NAIDOC Touch Football Cup, historical recordings, art workshops, and cultural showcases and a Koori Cook Off.

“These grants support communities across the country to hold their own events, spreading understanding and pride of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander cultures – the oldest continuing culture in the world.

Many of the 2018 NAIDOC Week grant recipients will hold events in honour of the theme, including the Celebrating Tiwi Women Awards, the Djab Wurrung Women Elders event in Budja Budja, Victoria and a women’s story telling film and portrait exhibition project in Ballarat.

The week will culminate in the National NAIDOC Awards Ceremony, held in Sydney on 13 July to recognise the outstanding contributions of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples in their communities and beyond.

The Turnbull Government is also supporting Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women every other week of the year through culturally appropriate, place-based and Indigenous-led services delivered mostly through Indigenous owned and controlled organisations as part of the $5 billion Indigenous Advancement Strategy (IAS).

Through the IAS we are investing $41 million in women and girls specific education programmes, more than $140 million in domestic violence prevention and support measures, in addition to the $100 million Third Action Plan, as well as a range of health and cultural initiatives for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women.

The Turnbull Government is proud to be partnering with the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Social Justice Commissioner, Ms June Oscar AO, who in February this year commenced a landmark national consultation process with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women and girls.

The Wiyi Yani U Thangani (Women’s Voices) project commissioned by Minister Scullion is a national conversation with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women and girls’ to understand their priorities, challenges and aspirations.

Findings will inform key policies and programs such as the Closing the Gap refresh, future investment under the Indigenous Advancement Strategy and development of the Fourth Action Plan of the National Plan to Reduce Violence Against Women and Their Children. Consultations are continuing through to November 2018.

The Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Social Justice Commissioner, June Oscar AO, warmly invites Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women and girls to come together as part of the Wiyi Yani U Thangani (Women’s Voices) project.

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women and girls have many strengths and play a central role in bringing about positive social change for our families and communities.

Dr Jackie Huggins will be hosting these engagements on behalf of the Commissioner. Dr Huggins and the team will be speaking with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women (18+) and girls (aged 12-17) through a series of community gatherings across the country, to hear directly about their needs, aspirations and ideas for change.

Please see details and registration options below.

EVENT DETAILS: Northern Territory – Borroloola, Katherine, Tiwi Islands and Darwin

Please join us for one of the following sessions and register by clicking on the relevant link. You can also email us at wiyiyaniuthangani@humanrights.gov.au or phone us on (02) 9284 9600.


Borroloola – Monday 23rd July 2018

  • Who: Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Women and Girls
  • Time: 9:30am – 1:30pm
  • Location: Mabunji Aboriginal Resource Centre, 2087 Robinson Road, Borroloola, NT 0854

Please click here to register for this event.


Borroloola – Tuesday 24th July 2018
  • Who: Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Women and Girls
  • Time: 9:30am – 1:30pm
  • Location: Mabunji Aboriginal Resource Centre, 2087 Robinson Road, Borroloola, NT 0854

Please click here to register for this event.


Katherine – Thursday 26th July 2018

  • Who: Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Women and Girls
  • Time: 9.30am – 1:30pm​
  • Location: Flinders University, O’Keefe House, Katherine Hospital, Giles Street, Katherine, NT 0850

Please click here to register for this event.


Wurrumiyanga (Bathurst Island) – Monday 30th July 2018

  • Who: Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Women and Girls
  • Time: 10.30am – 2.30pm
  • Location: Tiwi Enterprises – Mantiyupwi Motel – Meeting Room, Lot 969 Wurrumiyanga, NT 0822

Please click here to register for this event.


Pirlangimpi (Melville Island) – Wednesday 1st August 2018
  • Who: Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Women and Girls
  • Time: 9:30am – 1:30pm
  • Location: TBC

Please click here to register for this event.


Darwin – Thursday 2nd August 2018

  • Who: Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Women and Girls
  • Time: 9:30am- 1.30pm
  • Location: Michael Long Learning & Leadership Centre – Conference Room, 70 Abala Rd Marrara, Darwin, NT 0812

Please click here to register for this event.


Palmerston – Friday 3rd August 2018

  • Who: Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Women and Girls
  • Time: 9:30am – 1:30pm
  • Location: Palmerston Recreation Centre – Community Room, 11 The Boulevard, Palmerston, NT 0831

Please click here to register for this event.


Refreshments: Refreshments will be provided. Please register to ensure there is sufficient catering and please call or email to let us know any dietary requirements you may have.

Accessibility: The venue is accessible for people using wheelchairs. If you have any access or support requirements, such as an interpreter, please call or email us.

More information: Please see the website for further information about Wiyi Yani U Thangani (Women’s Voices), including a list of our planned gatherings.

If you are unable to attend this gathering, we would still like to hear from you through our submission process. For more details visit the submission page.

We hope you can take part in this important national conversation dedicated to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women and girls.

Please share this invitation with others who may be interested in attending.

Should you have any questions please email wiyiyaniuthangani@humanrights.gov.au or phone (02) 9284 9600.

To find out more about NAIDOC Week and events in your community, visit naidoc.org.au.

 

NACCHO AGM 2018 Brisbane Oct 30—Nov 2 Registrations and Expressions of Interest now open

Follow our conference using HASH TAG #NACCHOagm2018

Brisbane Oct 30—Nov 2

Register HERE

Conference Website Link:          

Accommodation Link:                   

Book your early bird conference registrations before 30 June and save money per delegate.

The NACCHO Members’ Conference and AGM provides a forum for the Aboriginal community controlled health services workforce, bureaucrats, educators, suppliers and consumers to:

  • Present on innovative local economic development solutions to issues that can be applied to address similar issues nationally and across disciplines
  • Have input and influence from the ‘grassroots’ into national and state health policy and service delivery
  • Demonstrate leadership in workforce and service delivery innovation
  • Promote continuing education and professional development activities essential to the Aboriginal community controlled health services in urban, rural and remote Australia
  • Promote Aboriginal health research by professionals who practice in these areas and the presentation of research findings
  • Develop supportive networks
  • Promote good health and well-being through the delivery of health services to and by Indigenous and non-Indigenous people throughout Australia.

Expressions of Interest to present

NACCHO is now calling for EOI’s from Affiliates , Member Services and stakeholders for Case Studies and Presentations for the 2018 NACCHO Members’ Conference. This is an opportunity to show case grass roots best practice at the Aboriginal Community Controlled service delivery level.

Download the Application

NACCHO Members Expressions of Interest to present to the Brisbane Conference 2018 on Day 1

In doing so honouring the theme of this year’s NACCHO Members Conference; ‘Investing in What Works – Aboriginal Community Controlled Health’. We are seeking EOIs for the following Conference Sessions.

Day 1 Wednesday 31 October 2018

Concurrent Session 1 (1.15 – 2.00pm) – topics can include Case Studies but are not limited to:

  • Workforce Innovation
  • Best Practice Primary Health Care for Clients with Chronic Disease
  • Challenges and Opportunities
  • Sustainable Growth
  • Harnessing Resources (Medicare, government and other)
  • Engagement/Health Promotion
  • Models of Primary Health Care and
  • Clinical and Service Delivery.

EOI’s will focus on the title of this session within the context of Urban, Regional, Rural or Remote.  Each presentation will be 10-15 minutes in either the Plenary or Breakout rooms.

OR

Table Top Presentations (2.00-3.00pm)

Presenters will speak from the lectern and provide a brief presentation on a key project or program currently being delivered by their service.

Presentation will be 10 minutes in duration-with 5 minutes to present and
5 minutes for discussion and questions from delegates.

Conference Website Link

 

Dr Tracy Westerman’s 2018 Training Workshops
For more details and July dates

 

July 11-12 National NAIDOC Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Woman’s Conference in Sydney.

When the National NAIDOC Committee announced the 2018 Theme: Because of Her, We Can in November 2017 there was a huge round of applause around Australia particularly from Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Women.

Amongst those women were Christine Ross, Sharon Kinchela and Chris Figg who all agreed we needed to celebrate this fabulous theme.

So, with great excitement Ngiyani Pty Ltd announced they would host a National NAIDOC Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Women’s Conference to be held on 11 – 12 July 2018 at UNSW Kensington Campus Sydney. They are utlising the services of Christine Ross Consultancy as the Project Manager.

For all event enquires please call 1300 807 374 or email christine.ross@live.com.au

 

4 August National Children’s Day

National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Children’s Day (Children’s Day) is a time for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander families to celebrate the strengths and culture of their children. The day is an opportunity for all Australians to show their support for Aboriginal children, as well as learn about the crucial impact that community, culture and family play in the life of every Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander child.

Children’s Day is held on 4 August each year and is coordinated by SNAICC – National Voice for our Children. Children’s Day was first observed in 1988, with 2017 being the 29th celebration. Each year SNAICC produces and distributes resources to help organisations, services, schools, and communities celebrate.

The theme for Children’s Day 2018 is SNAICC – Celebrating Our Children for 30 Years.

Our children are the youngest people from the longest living culture in the world, with rich traditions, lore and customs that have been passed down from generation to generation. Our children are growing up strong with connection to family, community and country. Our children are the centre of our families and the heart of our communities. They are our future and the carriers of our story.

This year, we invite communities to take a walk down memory lane, as we revisit some of the highlights of the last 30 years. We look back on the empowering protest movements instigated by community that had led to the establishment of the first Children’s Day on 4 August 1988. We look back at all of the amazing moments we’ve shared with our children over the years, and how we’re watching them grow into leaders.

We look back to see what we’ve achieved, and decide where we want to go from here to create a better future for our children. If you have celebrated Children’s Day at any time during the past 30 years, we would love to hear from you.

Website

Download HERE

The recent week-long #MensHealthWeek focus offered a “timely reminder” to all men to consider their health and wellbeing and the impact that their ill health or even the early loss of their lives could have on the people who love them. The statistics speak for themselves – we need to look after ourselves better .

That is why I am encouraging all men to take their health seriously, this week and every week of the year, and I have made men’s health a particular priority for Indigenous health.”

Federal Minister for Indigenous Health and Aged Care Ken Wyatt who will be a keynote speaker at NACCHO Ochre Day in August

To celebrate #MensHealthWeek NACCHO has launches its National #OchreDay2018 Mens Health Summit program and registrations

The NACCHO Ochre Day Health Summit in August provides a national forum for all Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander male delegates, organisations and communities to learn from Aboriginal male health leaders, discuss their health concerns, exchange share ideas and examine ways of improving their own men’s health and that of their communities

More Details HERE

All too often Aboriginal male health is approached negatively, with programmes only aimed at males as perpetrators. Examples include alcohol, tobacco and other drug services, domestic violence, prison release, and child sexual abuse programs. These programmes are vital, but are essentially aimed at the effects of males behaving badly to others, not for promoting the value of males themselves as an essential and positive part of family and community life.

To address the real social and emotional needs of males in our communities, NACCHO proposes a positive approach to male health and wellbeing that celebrates Aboriginal masculinities, and uphold our traditional values of respect for our laws, respect for Elders, culture and traditions, responsibility as leaders and men, teachers of young males, holders of lore, providers, warriors and protectors of our families, women, old people, and children.

More Details HERE

NACCHO’s approach is to support Aboriginal males to live longer, healthier lives as males for themselves. The flow-on effects will hopefully address the key effects of poor male behaviour by expecting and encouraging Aboriginal males to be what they are meant to be.

In many communities, males have established and are maintaining men’s groups, and attempting to be actively involved in developing their own solutions to the well documented men’s health and wellbeing problems, though almost all are unfunded and lack administrative and financial support.

To assist NACCHO to strategically develop this area as part of an overarching gender/culture based approach to service provision, NACCHO decided it needed to raise awareness, gain support for and communicate to the wider Australian public issues that have an impact on the social, emotional health and wellbeing of Aboriginal Males.

It was subsequently decided that NACCHO should stage a public event that would aim to achieve this and that this event be called “NACCHO Ochre Day”.

The two day conference is free: To register

 

October 30 2018 NACCHO Annual Members’ Conference and AGM SAVE A DATE

Follow our conference using HASH TAG #NACCHOagm2018

This is Brisbane Oct 30—Nov 2

The NACCHO Members’ Conference and AGM provides a forum for the Aboriginal community controlled health services workforce, bureaucrats, educators, suppliers and consumers to:

  • Present on innovative local economic development solutions to issues that can be applied to address similar issues nationally and across disciplines
  • Have input and influence from the ‘grassroots’ into national and state health policy and service delivery
  • Demonstrate leadership in workforce and service delivery innovation
  • Promote continuing education and professional development activities essential to the Aboriginal community controlled health services in urban, rural and remote Australia
  • Promote Aboriginal health research by professionals who practice in these areas and the presentation of research findings
  • Develop supportive networks
  • Promote good health and well-being through the delivery of health services to and by Indigenous and non-Indigenous people throughout Australia.

More Info soon

6. NACCHO Aboriginal Male Health Ochre Day 27-28 August

More info

7. NATSIHWA National Professional Development Symposium 2018

We’re excited to release the dates for the 2018 National Professional Development Symposium to be held in Alice Springs on 2nd-4th October. More details are to be released in the coming weeks; a full sponsorship prospectus and registration logistics will be advertised asap via email and newsletter.

This years Symposium will be focussed on upskilling our Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander Health Workers and Health Practitioners through a series of interactive workshops. Registrants will be able to participate in all workshops by rotating in groups over the 2 days. The aim of the symposium is to provide the registrants with new practical skills to take back to communities and open up a platform for Health Workers/Practitioners to network with other Individuals in the workforce from all over Australia.

We look forward to announcing more details soon!

8.AIDA Conference 2018 Vision into Action


Building on the foundations of our membership, history and diversity, AIDA is shaping a future where we continue to innovate, lead and stay strong in culture. It’s an exciting time of change and opportunity in Indigenous health.

The AIDA conference supports our members and the health sector by creating an inspiring networking space that engages sector experts, key decision makers, Indigenous medical students and doctors to join in an Indigenous health focused academic and scientific program.

AIDA recognises and respects that the pathway to achieving equitable and culturally-safe healthcare for Indigenous Australians is dynamic and complex. Through unity, leadership and collaboration, we create a future where our vision translates into measureable and significantly improved health outcomes for our communities. Now is the time to put that vision into action.

AIDA Awards
Nominate our members’ outstanding contributions towards improving the health and life outcomes of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples.

9.CATSINaM Professional Development Conference

Venue: Hilton Adelaide 

Location:  233 Victoria Square, Adelaide, SA 

Timing: 8:30am – 5:30pm

We invite you to be part of the CATSINaM Professional Development Conference held in Adelaide, Australia from the 17th to the 19th of September 2018.
The Conference purpose is to share information while working towards an integrated approach to improving the outcomes for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians. The Conference also provides an opportunity to highlight the very real difference being made in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health by our Members.
To this end, we are offering a mixed mode experience with plenary speaker sessions, panels, and presentations as well as professional development workshops.

More info

The CATSINaM Gala Dinner and Awards evening,  held on the 18th of September, purpose is to honour the contributions of distinguished Members to the field.

10.Healing Our Spirit Worldwide

Global gathering of Indigenous people to be held in Sydney
University of Sydney, The Healing Foundation to co-host Healing Our Spirit Worldwide
Gawuwi gamarda Healing Our Spirit Worldwidegu Ngalya nangari nura Cadigalmirung.
Calling our friends to come, to be at Healing Our Spirit Worldwide. We meet on the country of the Cadigal.
In November 2018, up to 2,000 Indigenous people from around the world will gather in Sydney to take part in Healing Our Spirit Worldwide: The Eighth Gathering.
A global movement, Healing Our Spirit Worldwidebegan in Canada in the 1980s to address the devastation of substance abuse and dependence among Indigenous people around the world. Since 1992 it has held a gathering approximately every four years, in a different part of the world, focusing on a diverse range of topics relevant to Indigenous lives including health, politics, social inclusion, stolen generations, education, governance and resilience.
The International Indigenous Council the governing body of Healing Our Spirit Worldwide has invited the University of Sydney and The Healing Foundation to co-host the Eighth Gathering with them in Sydney this year. The second gathering was also held in Sydney, in 1994.
 Please also feel free to tag us in any relevant cross posting: @HOSW8 @hosw2018 #HOSW8 #HealingOurWay #TheUniversityofSydney

NACCHO #Saveadates #NACCHOagm2018 Registrations and Expression of Interest to present NOW OPEN Plus National #OchreDay2018 Men’s Health Summit program and registrations

NACCHO AGM 2018 Brisbane Oct 30—Nov 2 Registrations and Expressions of Interest now open

Follow our conference using HASH TAG #NACCHOagm2018

Brisbane Oct 30—Nov 2

Register HERE

Conference Website Link:          

Accommodation Link:                   

Book your early bird conference registrations before 30 June and save money per delegate.

The NACCHO Members’ Conference and AGM provides a forum for the Aboriginal community controlled health services workforce, bureaucrats, educators, suppliers and consumers to:

  • Present on innovative local economic development solutions to issues that can be applied to address similar issues nationally and across disciplines
  • Have input and influence from the ‘grassroots’ into national and state health policy and service delivery
  • Demonstrate leadership in workforce and service delivery innovation
  • Promote continuing education and professional development activities essential to the Aboriginal community controlled health services in urban, rural and remote Australia
  • Promote Aboriginal health research by professionals who practice in these areas and the presentation of research findings
  • Develop supportive networks
  • Promote good health and well-being through the delivery of health services to and by Indigenous and non-Indigenous people throughout Australia.

Expressions of Interest to present

NACCHO is now calling for EOI’s from Affiliates , Member Services and stakeholders for Case Studies and Presentations for the 2018 NACCHO Members’ Conference. This is an opportunity to show case grass roots best practice at the Aboriginal Community Controlled service delivery level.

Download the Application

NACCHO Members Expressions of Interest to present to the Brisbane Conference 2018 on Day 1

In doing so honouring the theme of this year’s NACCHO Members Conference; ‘Investing in What Works – Aboriginal Community Controlled Health’. We are seeking EOIs for the following Conference Sessions.

Day 1 Wednesday 31 October 2018

Concurrent Session 1 (1.15 – 2.00pm) – topics can include Case Studies but are not limited to:

  • Workforce Innovation
  • Best Practice Primary Health Care for Clients with Chronic Disease
  • Challenges and Opportunities
  • Sustainable Growth
  • Harnessing Resources (Medicare, government and other)
  • Engagement/Health Promotion
  • Models of Primary Health Care and
  • Clinical and Service Delivery.

EOI’s will focus on the title of this session within the context of Urban, Regional, Rural or Remote.  Each presentation will be 10-15 minutes in either the Plenary or Breakout rooms.

OR

Table Top Presentations (2.00-3.00pm)

Presenters will speak from the lectern and provide a brief presentation on a key project or program currently being delivered by their service.

Presentation will be 10 minutes in duration-with 5 minutes to present and
5 minutes for discussion and questions from delegates.

Conference Website Link

2 – 4 July 2018 First Nations Governance Forum; :  Canberra

Museum of Australian Democracy
Old Parliament House, Canberra

As Australia’s national university, ANU has an obligation to constructively contribute to the discussion of policy reform and processes of significant issues concerning Indigenous Australia.

The University seeks to reignite national debate about Australia’s First Nations governance models and their contribution to policy. We are in a unique position to facilitate an International Indigenous-led discussion, with academic rigour, on some of the most challenging issues affecting the country.

We recognise that the academic expertise on these issues is distributed among universities around Australia and the world and welcomes contributions from interested parties.

Forum details

In 2018 ANU will host the First Nations Governance Forum with a goal to provide a series of policy options relevant to Australia through learning from models in other colonial settler states that demonstrate Indigenous peoples leadership in the governance of their affairs. The Forum will include a welcome dinner, keynote presentations, a series of high-level panel discussions and workshop sessions.

The Forum will be hosted with the support of Australia’s Federal Indigenous parliamentarians, Indigenous leaders, academics, government, leading international policy makers and other interested stakeholders. The Forum will consider First Nations governance reform in Australia and, share the experiences of Indigenous people in comparable jurisdictions including Aotearoa (New Zealand), Canada, USA and Scandinavian countries. The Forum will build on the extensive work undertaken on this issue including the Report of the Expert Panel on Recognising Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples in the Constitution (2012), the Report of the Joint Select Committee on Constitutional Recognition of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples (2015) and the Uluru Statement from the Heart (2017).

Attendance options

Broad participation in the Forum from across the community is encouraged and supported. The Forum is a public event. Attendance is free (though attendees will be responsible for their own expenses including travel, accommodation and meals). The Forum will also be live-streamed and recorded to ensure remote access.

The following attendance options are available:

  1. Onsite
    An Expression of Interest process will be conducted for a limited number of seats available at the Museum of Australian Democracy. Complete the Expression of Interest form by 13 June. Applicants will be selected across representative groups and notified in the first week of June.
  2. Live-stream at ANU
    A facilitated, live-streamed broadcast will be hosted at Llewellyn Hall on the ANU campus. Those who are unsuccessful in registering a place at the Museum of Australian Democracy are encouraged to register to attend this event at Llewellyn Hall.
  3. Remote live-streaming
    The Forum will also be live-streamed across the internet, ensuring access for everyone. Register your interest to participate in the national live-stream.

* Note: the Forum is a public event and will be live-streamed and recorded, and research may be conducted using data obtained from the event. Live-stream analytics data from the event may be collected and used in research.

EVENT WEBSITE

Dr Tracy Westerman’s 2018 Training Workshops
For more details and July dates

8 July : Because of Her, We Can! – NAIDOC Week 2018 will be held nationally from Sunday 8 July and continue through to Sunday 15 July.

As pillars of our society, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women have played – and continue to play – active and significant roles at the community, local, state and national levels.

As leaders, trailblazers, politicians, activists and social change advocates, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women fought and continue to fight, for justice, equal rights, our rights to country, for law and justice, access to education, employment and to maintain and celebrate our culture, language, music and art.

They continue to influence as doctors, lawyers, teachers, electricians, chefs, nurses, architects, rangers, emergency and defence personnel, writers, volunteers, chief executive officers, actors, singer songwriters, journalists, entrepreneurs, media personalities, board members, accountants, academics, sporting icons and Olympians, the list goes on.

They are our mothers, our elders, our grandmothers, our aunties, our sisters and our daughters.

Sadly, Indigenous women’s role in our cultural, social and political survival has often been invisible, unsung or diminished.

For at least 65,000 years, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women have carried our dreaming stories, songlines, languages and knowledge that have kept our culture strong and enriched us as the oldest continuing culture on the planet.

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women were there at first contact.

They were there at the Torres Strait Pearlers strike in 1936, the Day of Mourning in 1938, the 1939 Cummeragunja Walk-Off, at the 1946 Pilbara pastoral workers’ strike, the 1965 Freedom Rides, the Wave Hill walk off in 1966, on the front line of the Aboriginal Tent Embassy in 1972 and at the drafting of the Uluru Statement.

They have marched, protested and spoken at demonstrations and national gatherings for the proper recognition of our rights and calling for national reform and justice.

Our women were heavily involved in the campaign for the 1967 Referendum and also put up their hands to represent their people at the establishment of national advocacy and representative bodies from the National Aboriginal Congress (NAC) to ATSIC to Land Councils and onto the National Congress for Australia’s First Peoples.

They often did so while caring for our families, maintaining our homes and breaking down cultural and institutionalised barriers and gender stereotypes.

Our women did so because they demanded a better life, greater opportunities and – in many cases equal rights – for our children, our families and our people.

They were pioneering women like Barangaroo, Truganini, Gladys Elphick, Fannie Cochrane-Smith, Evelyn Scott, Pearl Gibbs, Oodgeroo Noonuccal, Celuia Mapo Salee, Thancoupie, Justine Saunders, Gladys Nicholls, Flo Kennedy, Essie Coffey, Isabel Coe, Emily Kame Kngwarreye, Eleanor Harding, Mum Shirl, Ellie Gaffney and Gladys Tybingoompa.

Today, they are trailblazers like Joyce Clague, Yalmay Yunupingu, Evonne Goolagong Cawley, Nova Peris, Carol Martin, Elizabeth Morgan, Barbara Shaw, Rose Richards, Vonda Malone, Margaret Valadian, Lowitja O’Donoghue, June Oscar, Pat O’Shane, Pat Anderson Jill Milroy, Banduk Marika, Linda Burney and Rosalie Kunoth-Monks – to name but a few.

Their achievements, their voice, their unwavering passion give us strength and have empowered past generations and paved the way for generations to come.

WEBSITE

Because of her, we can!

Download the National NAIDOC Logo and other social media resources.

July 11-12 National NAIDOC Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Woman’s Conference in Sydney.

When the National NAIDOC Committee announced the 2018 Theme: Because of Her, We Can in November 2017 there was a huge round of applause around Australia particularly from Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Women.

Amongst those women were Christine Ross, Sharon Kinchela and Chris Figg who all agreed we needed to celebrate this fabulous theme.

So, with great excitement Ngiyani Pty Ltd announced they would host a National NAIDOC Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Women’s Conference to be held on 11 – 12 July 2018 at UNSW Kensington Campus Sydney. They are utlising the services of Christine Ross Consultancy as the Project Manager.

For all event enquires please call 1300 807 374 or email christine.ross@live.com.au

Only 200 spots left. Go to the Registration Site

4 August National Children’s Day

National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Children’s Day (Children’s Day) is a time for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander families to celebrate the strengths and culture of their children. The day is an opportunity for all Australians to show their support for Aboriginal children, as well as learn about the crucial impact that community, culture and family play in the life of every Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander child.

Children’s Day is held on 4 August each year and is coordinated by SNAICC – National Voice for our Children. Children’s Day was first observed in 1988, with 2017 being the 29th celebration. Each year SNAICC produces and distributes resources to help organisations, services, schools, and communities celebrate.

The theme for Children’s Day 2018 is SNAICC – Celebrating Our Children for 30 Years.

Our children are the youngest people from the longest living culture in the world, with rich traditions, lore and customs that have been passed down from generation to generation. Our children are growing up strong with connection to family, community and country. Our children are the centre of our families and the heart of our communities. They are our future and the carriers of our story.

This year, we invite communities to take a walk down memory lane, as we revisit some of the highlights of the last 30 years. We look back on the empowering protest movements instigated by community that had led to the establishment of the first Children’s Day on 4 August 1988. We look back at all of the amazing moments we’ve shared with our children over the years, and how we’re watching them grow into leaders.

We look back to see what we’ve achieved, and decide where we want to go from here to create a better future for our children. If you have celebrated Children’s Day at any time during the past 30 years, we would love to hear from you.

Website

Download HERE

The recent week-long #MensHealthWeek focus offered a “timely reminder” to all men to consider their health and wellbeing and the impact that their ill health or even the early loss of their lives could have on the people who love them. The statistics speak for themselves – we need to look after ourselves better .

That is why I am encouraging all men to take their health seriously, this week and every week of the year, and I have made men’s health a particular priority for Indigenous health.”

Federal Minister for Indigenous Health and Aged Care Ken Wyatt who will be a keynote speaker at NACCHO Ochre Day in August

To celebrate #MensHealthWeek NACCHO has launches its National #OchreDay2018 Mens Health Summit program and registrations

The NACCHO Ochre Day Health Summit in August provides a national forum for all Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander male delegates, organisations and communities to learn from Aboriginal male health leaders, discuss their health concerns, exchange share ideas and examine ways of improving their own men’s health and that of their communities

More Details HERE

All too often Aboriginal male health is approached negatively, with programmes only aimed at males as perpetrators. Examples include alcohol, tobacco and other drug services, domestic violence, prison release, and child sexual abuse programs. These programmes are vital, but are essentially aimed at the effects of males behaving badly to others, not for promoting the value of males themselves as an essential and positive part of family and community life.

To address the real social and emotional needs of males in our communities, NACCHO proposes a positive approach to male health and wellbeing that celebrates Aboriginal masculinities, and uphold our traditional values of respect for our laws, respect for Elders, culture and traditions, responsibility as leaders and men, teachers of young males, holders of lore, providers, warriors and protectors of our families, women, old people, and children.

More Details HERE

NACCHO’s approach is to support Aboriginal males to live longer, healthier lives as males for themselves. The flow-on effects will hopefully address the key effects of poor male behaviour by expecting and encouraging Aboriginal males to be what they are meant to be.

In many communities, males have established and are maintaining men’s groups, and attempting to be actively involved in developing their own solutions to the well documented men’s health and wellbeing problems, though almost all are unfunded and lack administrative and financial support.

To assist NACCHO to strategically develop this area as part of an overarching gender/culture based approach to service provision, NACCHO decided it needed to raise awareness, gain support for and communicate to the wider Australian public issues that have an impact on the social, emotional health and wellbeing of Aboriginal Males.

It was subsequently decided that NACCHO should stage a public event that would aim to achieve this and that this event be called “NACCHO Ochre Day”.

The two day conference is free: To register

 

October 30 2018 NACCHO Annual Members’ Conference and AGM SAVE A DATE

Follow our conference using HASH TAG #NACCHOagm2018

This is Brisbane Oct 30—Nov 2

The NACCHO Members’ Conference and AGM provides a forum for the Aboriginal community controlled health services workforce, bureaucrats, educators, suppliers and consumers to:

  • Present on innovative local economic development solutions to issues that can be applied to address similar issues nationally and across disciplines
  • Have input and influence from the ‘grassroots’ into national and state health policy and service delivery
  • Demonstrate leadership in workforce and service delivery innovation
  • Promote continuing education and professional development activities essential to the Aboriginal community controlled health services in urban, rural and remote Australia
  • Promote Aboriginal health research by professionals who practice in these areas and the presentation of research findings
  • Develop supportive networks
  • Promote good health and well-being through the delivery of health services to and by Indigenous and non-Indigenous people throughout Australia.

More Info soon

6. NACCHO Aboriginal Male Health Ochre Day 27-28 August

More info

7. NATSIHWA National Professional Development Symposium 2018

We’re excited to release the dates for the 2018 National Professional Development Symposium to be held in Alice Springs on 2nd-4th October. More details are to be released in the coming weeks; a full sponsorship prospectus and registration logistics will be advertised asap via email and newsletter.

This years Symposium will be focussed on upskilling our Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander Health Workers and Health Practitioners through a series of interactive workshops. Registrants will be able to participate in all workshops by rotating in groups over the 2 days. The aim of the symposium is to provide the registrants with new practical skills to take back to communities and open up a platform for Health Workers/Practitioners to network with other Individuals in the workforce from all over Australia.

We look forward to announcing more details soon!

8.AIDA Conference 2018 Vision into Action


Building on the foundations of our membership, history and diversity, AIDA is shaping a future where we continue to innovate, lead and stay strong in culture. It’s an exciting time of change and opportunity in Indigenous health.

The AIDA conference supports our members and the health sector by creating an inspiring networking space that engages sector experts, key decision makers, Indigenous medical students and doctors to join in an Indigenous health focused academic and scientific program.

AIDA recognises and respects that the pathway to achieving equitable and culturally-safe healthcare for Indigenous Australians is dynamic and complex. Through unity, leadership and collaboration, we create a future where our vision translates into measureable and significantly improved health outcomes for our communities. Now is the time to put that vision into action.

AIDA Awards
Nominate our members’ outstanding contributions towards improving the health and life outcomes of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples.

9.CATSINaM Professional Development Conference

Venue: Hilton Adelaide 

Location:  233 Victoria Square, Adelaide, SA 

Timing: 8:30am – 5:30pm

We invite you to be part of the CATSINaM Professional Development Conference held in Adelaide, Australia from the 17th to the 19th of September 2018.
The Conference purpose is to share information while working towards an integrated approach to improving the outcomes for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians. The Conference also provides an opportunity to highlight the very real difference being made in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health by our Members.
To this end, we are offering a mixed mode experience with plenary speaker sessions, panels, and presentations as well as professional development workshops.

More info

The CATSINaM Gala Dinner and Awards evening,  held on the 18th of September, purpose is to honour the contributions of distinguished Members to the field.

10.Healing Our Spirit Worldwide

Global gathering of Indigenous people to be held in Sydney
University of Sydney, The Healing Foundation to co-host Healing Our Spirit Worldwide
Gawuwi gamarda Healing Our Spirit Worldwidegu Ngalya nangari nura Cadigalmirung.
Calling our friends to come, to be at Healing Our Spirit Worldwide. We meet on the country of the Cadigal.
In November 2018, up to 2,000 Indigenous people from around the world will gather in Sydney to take part in Healing Our Spirit Worldwide: The Eighth Gathering.
A global movement, Healing Our Spirit Worldwidebegan in Canada in the 1980s to address the devastation of substance abuse and dependence among Indigenous people around the world. Since 1992 it has held a gathering approximately every four years, in a different part of the world, focusing on a diverse range of topics relevant to Indigenous lives including health, politics, social inclusion, stolen generations, education, governance and resilience.
The International Indigenous Council the governing body of Healing Our Spirit Worldwide has invited the University of Sydney and The Healing Foundation to co-host the Eighth Gathering with them in Sydney this year. The second gathering was also held in Sydney, in 1994.
 Please also feel free to tag us in any relevant cross posting: @HOSW8 @hosw2018 #HOSW8 #HealingOurWay #TheUniversityofSydney