NACCHO Aboriginal Health News – ‘we must incorporate justice into health care’

feature tile: text: 'we must incorporate justice into health care' Donnella Mills NACCHO Chairperson - Aboriginal flag painted on brick wall, scales of justice vector image in yellow centre of flag and vector image of stethoscope around yellow circle centre of flag

‘We need to incorporate justice into health care’

According to Donnella Mills, who is the managing lawyer at LawRight Community Legal Centre, Chair of NACCHO, sits on James Cook University Council and is the project lawyer for the Wuchopperen Health Justice Partnership, “we need to incorporate justice into health care.”

Mills was central to the establishment of the Wuchopperen Health Justice Partnership, a partnership between Wuchopperen Health Service (Cairns) and LawRight that sees lawyers provide free legal advice, referral and casework to clients of the health service. “I kept seeing this missing link, we were talking about family wellbeing, child protection, youth detention, we were talking about issues around chronic disease and I just kept thinking how can we be delivering services when we are not connecting people to legal representation?” said Mills. “Our people will go to their ACCHO and tell their doctor about all of their concerns because the trust is there. The trust is not in the legal institution. We need to start talking about incorporating justice in the way we deliver primary health care.”

To view the National Indigenous Times article in full click here.

AHW trainee Darren Braun, Danila Dilba, Palmerston, Darwin NT. Image source: ABC News.

Aboriginal Health Worker trainee Darren Braun, Danila Dilba, Palmerston, Darwin NT. Image source: ABC News.

Vaccines a massive challenge for remote areas

Government health authorities are fine-tuning plans to distribute COVID-19 vaccines to remote and vulnerable Indigenous populations across Australia — a task an Aboriginal health organisation says is an unprecedented challenge.

remote community buildings with Uluru in background

There are an estimated 500 homelands and 70 remote communities in the NT alone — including Mutitjulu, at the base of Uluru. Image source: ABC News.

GP-led COVID-19 vaccine rollout

The Royal Australian College of General Practitioners (RACGP) has welcomed government confirmation that GPs will be at the forefront of Australia’s COVID-19 vaccine rollout. RACGP President Dr Karen Price said GPs will play an important role in the vaccine rollout. “This is a massive undertaking for our country and GPs will be essential. The majority of Australians go to their GP for their vaccinations and for many Australians they will do the same for their COVID-19 vaccine. Vaccinations are one of the greatest success stories of modern medicine and GP-led vaccination programs have been at the forefront all along.”

To view the RACGP’s media release in full click here.

gloved health professional administering a vaccine into an arm

Image source: ABC News.

Peak bodies support COVID-19 vaccine strategy

The Australasian Society for Infectious Diseases (ASID), the Australasian College for Infection Prevention and Control (ACIPC), and the Public Health Association of Australia (PHAA) have come out in support of the Commonwealth Government’s COVID-19 vaccine strategy, stressing that concerns about the ability of any vaccines to create herd immunity were not justified at this stage of the process. Immediate Past President of ASID Professor Josh Davis, ACIPC President Associate Professor Philip Russo, and PHAA President, Professor Tarun Weeramanthri said we need to wait until the Therapeutic Goods Administration has completed its review process of the available vaccines.

To view the media release in full click here.

open cardboard box with hundreds of vials of COVID-19 vaccines

Image source: Science News.

Supermarket profits before Aboriginal health

The NT government has caved in to liquor lobby pressure and imperilled the health of First Nations People by approving a Dan Murphy’s Darwin mega-store for Woolworths and lifting the licence cap for Coles.  According to Professor Lesley Russell and Dr Jeff McMullen the Aboriginal communities will pay the price with their health.

To view the full article published by Michael West Media Independent Journalists click here.

shipping container with spray painted Aboriginal flag heart & word Bagot, superimposed with logos for Woolworths and Dan Murphy's

Image source: BlackBusiness.

Back on Track diabetes campaign

Diabetes Australia and the National Diabetes Services Scheme will launch a new health campaign called Back on Track. The campaign has been developed on the back of research which shows that in the last year many Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people disengaged from their routine diabetes and health care management plans due to social distancing, fear of exposure to COVID-19, and a focus on other priorities.

The Back on Track campaign is specifically targeted to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people to encourage them to get ‘back on track’ with their diabetes self-care in 2021. It has been designed to provide practical, culturally appropriate and engaging messaging to encourage people to reconnect with their diabetes health. The messaging acknowledges that ‘things have been tough for everyone’ but that it is still important for people to look after themselves and look out for their friends and family too.

The steps to getting back on track (key messages) include:

  • Check in with our diabetes health team
  • Check our blood sugar and take our medications
  • Check that we are eating healthy food and being active every day
  • Check that we are looking after each other and taking time to look after ourselves.

Back on Track with our diabetes campaign banner

New diabetes research centres

The Medical Research Futures Fund will provide $10 million each for two new research centres to address diabetes and cardiovascular disease through the Targeted Translation Research Accelerator. The aim of the centres is to produce rapid improvements in preventing, treating and curing diabetes and cardiovascular disease, and their complications. A further $18 million of funding will go to support translational research projects in these areas.

To view the media release in full click here.

researcher looking down through a microscope, superimposed with transparent images of the cells

Image source: Australian Government Department of Health.

NACCHO housing for health position paper

Housing is a key determinant of health, yet Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people face a range of issues that prevent them from accessing housing that is affordable, adequate, safe and sustainable. Overcrowding is increasingly prevalent, making household members further susceptible to the burden of disease, psychological distress and other health and wellbeing issues. The COVID-19 pandemic is a stark reminder of the importance of housing for maintaining health and slowing and stopping the spread of disease. Significant Australian, state and territory government leadership and investment is urgently needed to Improve housing and health outcomes for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.

To view NACCHO’s housing policy position paper in full click here.

Walpiri Transient Camp, Katherine (NT) rudimentary tin dwellings in a poor state

Walpiri Transient Camp, Katherine (NT). Image source: The Conversation.

NSW – Wyong – Yerin Aboriginal Health Services Limited

Aboriginal Family Preservation Manager

Yerin Aboriginal Health Services Limited is looking to employ an Aboriginal Family Preservation Manager to provide high-quality management and leadership to the Family Preservation team so they can meet all required legal and practice standards for Family Preservation. This position will provide high quality culturally responsive leadership and management practices that focus on supporting effective, flexible, high quality, child-focused, and family-focused, culturally responsive interventions and supports so that our children and young people can remain safely with their families.

To view the position description and to apply click here. Applications close 9:00 am Wednesday 27 January 2021.Yerin Eleanor Duncan AHS logo

QLD – Toowoomba & Warwick – Carbal Medical Services

Aboriginal Health Worker x 2

Carbal Medical Services (Carbal) is a not-for-profit, charitable organisation that provides health services to members of the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities in and around Toowoomba and Warwick. The core function of Carbal is to provide medical services to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people through two medical practices and over 17 community programs covering the regions of Darling Downs and Southern Downs.

Carbal is seeking to fill two Aboriginal Health Worker positions based in Warwick and Toowoomba.

To view the position description and to apply click here.

Applications close COB Friday 5 February 2021.Carbal Medical Services logo, words & snake

NT – Darwin – Menzies School of Health Research

Champions4Change Project Coordinator – 6 months FT contract, possible extension

RHDAustralia supports the prevention, diagnosis and management of acute rheumatic fever (ARF) and rheumatic heart disease (RHD) in Australia. RHDAustralia is based at the Menzies School of Health Research and is funded under the Australian Government’s Rheumatic Fever Strategy. The Champions4Change (C4C) program is a culturally safe support program for people living with ARF and RHD. With support from RHDAustralia, the program is run by people from across Australia with the lived experience of ARF and RHD, designed and led by Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples and communities. The C4C Project Coordinator will contribute to the conceptual development of the C4C program using experience-based, co-design approaches, and will implement core components of the program.

For more information and the position description click here.

Applications close Friday 22 January 2021.Menzies School of Health Research logo, words plus dot with 3 concentric circles orange black white

NSW – Blacktown/Campbelltown – OzChild

Aboriginal Practice Lead – identified position

OzChild in Blacktown/Campbelltown is looking for an Aboriginal Practice Lead to join its team. The position will be a part of the Dhiiyaan Mirri (family of stars), OzChild’s Bridging Cultures Unit (BCU) and will support the Functional Family Therapy Child Welfare (FFT-CW), Multi systemic Therapy for Child Abuse and Neglect (MST-CAN) and Treatment Foster Care Oregon (TFCO) Teams at Blacktown and Campbelltown. The position will be based a minimum of 2 days per week at each location, however this can be flexible based on need.

The Aboriginal Practice Lead Position within OzChild will work to ensure that participating First Nation families can benefit from these Evidence Based Models (EBMs), and from time to time other programs that OzChild may deliver. The Aboriginal Practice Lead will also facilitate access and receive support in a timely and culturally responsive manner.

Working with OzChild’s Teams, for the effective delivery of OzChild Services to First Nations Children, Young People and their Families/Kin/Carers, the Aboriginal Practice Lead will contribute from intake through to completion (when required) to the provision of culturally responsive services and a culturally safe working environment through consultation and engagement with OzChild staff, First Nations Peoples, stakeholders and relevant Aboriginal Community Controlled Organisations.

For more information and the position description click here.

Applications close Thursday 28 January 2021.two Aboriginal young girls, one kissing the other on the cheek, OzChild logo

NSW – Newcastle – University of Newcastle

Senior Lecturer in Nursing – FT x 1

The teaching team within the School of Nursing and Midwifery is led by award winning academics who are all specialists in their fields of practice and committed to teaching and learning strategies which develop and enhance nursing knowledge, and the full range of clinical and interpersonal skills needed by nurses and midwives to function as effective practitioners. The School enjoys a close collaboration with local area health services in providing clinical learning experiences for students, in the provision of graduate programs and in the conduct of clinical research. The aim is to prepare and develop nurses to function in a wide range of clinical settings, health facilities and rehabilitation services.

A vacancy exists for a full-time ongoing position located either at the Callaghan Campus or Central Coast, with an expectation to work across the Callaghan and Ourimbah (transitioning to Central Coast in mid-2021, subject to ANMAC approval) campuses as well as online.

In this role, you will promote and foster a collaborative, dynamic, productive and globally competitive research environment through research collaboration, external grant income, publication outputs, and research higher degree graduates. The promotion of excellence in teaching and learning through appropriate curriculum development and delivery is also a key requirement of this role.

For more information and the position description  click here.

Applications close Sunday 14 February 2021.University of Newcastle logo white on black vector of horse head and external image of the uni

NSW – southern NSW – Murra Mia Tenant Advocacy Service 

Tenant Advocates – FT x 2

Murra Mia Tenant Advocacy Service (Southern NSW Aboriginal TAAS) is seeking  two motivated Tenancy Advocates to engage with Aboriginal tenants whose tenancies are identified as at risk and provide a range of interventions.

For more information and the position description click here.

Applications close Wednesday 27 January 2021.outline of NSW, top black, bottom red, middle yellow house, state surrounded by red dots

NACCHO Aboriginal Health News: Cancer screening saves lives! It helps to keep our communities strong, safe and healthy

Cancer screening saves lives! It helps to keep our communities strong, safe and healthy

It’s really important for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities to keep taking care of our health, even during a pandemic.

COVID-19 has been on everyone’s mind and the safety of our communities has been a major priority. Cancer screening may have been put off or forgotten during this time.

However, cancer screening really does make a big difference to the health of our community members and families. When cancer is found early, treatment can be a lot more effective.

National screening programs are available in Australia for breast cancerbowel cancer and cervical cancer.

For further information about the campaign click here.

 

Australian Institute of Health and Welfare Report: Alcohol, tobacco and other drugs in Australia 

The consumption of alcohol, tobacco and other drugs is a major cause of preventable disease and illness in Australia. This report consolidates the most recently available information on alcohol, tobacco and other drug use in Australia, and includes key trends in the availability, consumption, harms and treatment for vulnerable populations. Further, information on a range of health, social and economic impacts of alcohol, tobacco and other drug use are highlighted.

This release includes data relating to COVID-19 since the beginning of the pandemic up to November 2020.

For other data and information from this period, please see our AIHW COVID-19 resources.

Aboriginal hands holding can of Bundaberg Rum & cigarette

Image source: ABC News website.

The 2021 Antimicrobial Academy -Improve antibiotic use and management of infections in your community

An exciting opportunity exists for 12 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health care professionals to enroll in the inaugural Hot North Antimicrobial Academy 2021. 

The Antimicrobial Academy is a fully subsidised 9-month online program for Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander health care workers (pharmacists, doctors, nurses or Aboriginal Health Practitioners) to build on their understanding and expertise in antibiotic resistance and to support further leadership of antibiotic use in our communities.

Further details available via the HOT NORTH Website, Opportunities Page, Antimicrobial Academy click here

The deadline for the submission have been extended till Sunday 20 December 2020. Please email statewide.ams@health.qld.gov.au or medicines@naccho.org.au or call (07) 3646 1886 for further information.

Tropical Australian Academic Health Centre & Hot North Improving Health Outcomes in the Tropical North Antimicrobial Academy 2021 banner

IHF Young Executive Leaders: Call for 2021 applications now open

Young executive leaders who have proven outstanding merit in healthcare management can have the chance to exchange with peers on capital healthcare issues, as well as to interact with talented thought leaders from all around the world. Through IHF Young Executive Leaders program, participants will build sustainable relationships and expand their network internationally. As a group, they will discuss current trends, challenges and opportunities for the young healthcare leaders of today, creating an environment for vibrant and exciting dialogue.

Through the IHF Young Executive Leaders program, participants will build sustainable relationships and expand their professional network. As a group, they will discuss current trends, challenges and opportunities for the young healthcare leaders of today, creating an environment for vibrant and exciting dialogue.

Through this program, the 2021 cohort will share experiences and work together on a topic related to the 2021 IHF World Hospital Congress which will take place in Barcelona with the overarching theme “PEOPLE ON BOARD: TRANSFORMING HEALTHCARE. Blending Agility, Responsiveness, Resilience.” 

Young executive leaders wishing to join the IHF YEL initiative can submit their applications until 25 January 2021.

For further info click here.

Award for Don Dale youth detention centre in the NT shows Indigenous-led, youth-justice solutions work

Amnesty International Australia welcomed the news that Danila Dilba – which took over the health services at Don Dale youth detention centre in the Northern Territory – has won the International Juvenile Justice Observatory (IJJO) Justice Without Borders International Award.

“This shows us that our people know what’s best for them, and Indigenous-led solutions like Olga Havnen and her team’s program at Danila Dilba are available to governments around the country,” Amnesty International Australia Indigenous Rights Advisor, Rodney Dillon said.

“The solutions to youth offending – and actually addressing the over representation of Indigenous people in Australia’s jails – are already there. We just need our State and Territory Governments to listen to the experts, like the IJJO.

“All the evidence shows that diversion, and getting kids out of watchhouses and bail houses is what’s effective on youth crime.

“With the right wrap around services in place, like those Danila Dilba provide, there is simply no reason not to raise the age of criminal responsibility.”

Danila Dilba Health Service logo

 
NSW – Armajun Aboriginal Health Service, Full Time – Glen Innes
 
Aboriginal Drug and Alcohol Caseworker (Aboriginal designated position)

Are you of Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander descent?

Do you already live in the Glen Innes district or looking for a tree change away from the hustle of the city and the pandemic? Are you looking for a cooler climate? Do you want to hike through the Washpool National Park, which offers wilderness walks, camping, and horse riding in stunning World Heritage surrounds? Do you want to learn to fossick for sapphires and topaz?

Do you possess formal qualifications in health, welfare, social work, alcohol and other drugs or related area at a TAFE level (Certificate IV minimum) or above and/or have substantial experience in any of these areas?

Would you like to become part of a great team providing culturally appropriate primary health care services to Aboriginal people and communities living in Glen Innes and surrounding districts?

Glen Innes offers an attractive lifestyle including a well serviced and friendly rural community, laid back living, short commuting times, affordable housing, easy access to NSW north coast beaches and larger regional centres, and terrific recreational and sporting facilities. The Glen Innes district has a deep cultural and spiritual significance for traditional owners, the Ngoorabul people.

Applicants must obtain a job package and address the selection criteria in the position description as well as attach a current resume to their application. 

On-going applications for this position will be accepted.

Job Package: Belinda Butler bbutler@armajun.org.au  0267 219 777 Enquiries: Jenny Ryan jryan@armajun.org.au   0267 219 777  www.armajun.org.au

NSW – OzChild in Blacktown/Campbelltown

Aboriginal Practice Lead

The position will be a part of our Dhiiyaan Mirri (family of stars), OzChild’s Bridging Cultures Unit (BCU) and will support their Functional Family Therapy Child Welfare (FFT-CW), Multi systemic Therapy for Child Abuse and Neglect (MST-CAN) and Treatment Foster Care Oregon (TFCO) Teams at Blacktown and Campbelltown. The position will be based a min of 2 days per week at each location, however this can be flexible based on need.

The Aboriginal Practice Lead Position within OzChild will work to ensure that participating First Nation families can benefit from these Evidence Based Models (EBMs), and from time to time other programs that OzChild may deliver in the future. The Aboriginal Practice Lead will also facilitate access and receive support in a timely and culturally responsive manner.

Working with OzChild’s Teams, for the effective delivery of OzChild Services to First Nations Children, Young People and their Families /Kin /Carers, the Aboriginal Practice Lead will contribute from intake through to completion (when required) to the provision of culturally responsive services and a culturally safe working environment through consultation and engagement with OzChild staff, First Nations Peoples, stakeholders and relevant Aboriginal Community Controlled Organisations.

To apply for the position click here.

Cairns, Adelaide or Alice Springs – CRANAplus

Professional Officer, Workforce Development Nursing

A senior position in our Workforce Development programs, driving initiatives to support Nursing across remote and regional Australia.

This position is responsible for professional knowledge contribution, project management, and industry networking to strengthen resources and pipelines encouraging and supporting nurses in rural and / or remote practice.

Be sector aware and reactive to the needs of the remote health workforce.

  • Contribute professional knowledge and experience to a range of projects and priorities engaged by the Office of the Chief Operating Officer, including contribution to the development of consultation papers and position statements.
  • Strategic and operational management of CRANAplus programs, including remote areas nurse (RAN) certification program and RAN standards, fellowship, awards, and scholarships, conference abstract committee, and other programs identified in the annual busines plan.
  • Develop and drive Continuous Professional Development initiatives, including:
    – Author or curate clinical articles or updates for the quarterly CRANAplus Magazine
    – Professional Services guest presenter webinar series
    – Contribute to the development of on-line or e-resources for CRANAplus members and wider community stakeholders
    – Participate in the delivery of professional development workshops, as required, to remote workforces.

To submit your application, please email your resume to kati@crana.org.au, outlining your alignment to the above four criteria. This position will close as of Monday 11 January 2021.

For the position description click here.

 

 

NACCHO Aboriginal Health News: Reconciliation Barometer shows heightened racism in 2020

feature tile reconciliation barometer 2020 and feet below marchers with flag we can health together

Reconciliation Barometer shows racism heightened in 2020

The 2020 Australian Reconciliation Barometer—a national research study conducted by Reconciliation Australia every two years—shows that the global and local Black Lives Matter movements have challenged  experiences and understanding of racism in Australia. “This year’s Barometer shows more Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people reporting an incident of racial prejudice than the 2018 barometer,” said Reconciliation Australia CEO, Karen Mundine. “Just over half of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander respondents reported to have experienced at least one form of racial prejudice in the last six months.”

“More Australians now agree with the statement that ‘Australia is a racist country’, a rise across the board in understanding how racism operates. In 2020 we have seen increasing political and social polarisation due to uncertainty and disruption from COVID-19. Through the 2020 Barometer we hear many more people speaking up, speaking the truth, asking the hard questions, seeing the hard facts, and moving from a space of safe to brave on issues affecting Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples.”

You can view the full 2020 Reconciliation Barometer report, including a summary of the report, by clicking here.

group of Aboriginal girls with Deadly choices t-shirts

Image source: Reconciliation Australia website.

Permanent telehealth model being developed

The AMA will work with the Federal Government to make Medicare-funded telehealth a permanent part of the Australian healthcare system. Health Minister Greg Hunt announced the partnership approach during a joint media conference with AMA President, Dr Omar Khorshid. “The AMA has been working with the Government on how to embed telehealth into the Australian healthcare system for months,” Dr Khorshid said. “The AMA has long advocated for telehealth consultations to be subsidised under the Medicare Benefits Schedule (MBS). “The temporary COVID-19 arrangements have allowed us to test the model, and shown where refinements can be made. MBS-funded telehealth has been embraced by doctors and patients alike.”

To view the AMA’s media release regarding the model click here.

man on mobile phone pointing to Aboriginal hand on computer screen

Image source: The Medical Journal of Australia.

Nurses support public drunkenness decriminalisation

Victoria is close to the decriminalisation of public drunkenness, three decades since the Royal Commission into Aboriginal Deaths in Custody first made the recommendation. The Australian Nursing and Midwifery Federation (Victorian Branch) has welcomed the Andrews Government’s decision to review all recommendations of its Expert Reference Group’s report Seeing the clear light of day. The report reinforces that no one should be in a police cell just because they are intoxicated. ANMF supports the two-year implementation period which will enable the Andrews Government to develop a public health model response to replace the jail cell. The implementation period will include trial sites before rolling the approach out across the state.

To view the ANMF (Victorian Branch) media release click here.

Daughters Apryl Watson and Kimberly Watson with photos of their mother Tanya Day outside Coroners Court.

Daughters Apryl Watson and Kimberly Watson with photos of their mother Tanya Day (who was arrested under the public drunkenness law in Victoria and latter died in custody) outside Coroners Court. Image source: The Age.

Mental health lessons from 2020

Menal Illness Education ACT will co-host a stimulating panel discussion on Wednesday 2 December 1.00pm–2.20pm (AEDT) to unpack how paid and unpaid workloads have changed in 2020 and the impacts on wellbeing, particularly for women. The discussion will cover the following topics:

  • We will look at the positives and challenges coming out of the current environment. 
  • Discuss how roles have changed from a range of perspectives and how we have and can respond to those changes as individuals, partners and organisations.
  • Provide strategies and resources on how to identify and respond to the shifting balance.

This session is for everyone, whether you are single, in a couple, a parent or a carer.

The event will be held on Teams. To register pleas click here.tile Lessons from 2020 strategies to balance the mental load

Stolen Generations bus back on healing mission

Bus operator CDC NSW has committed to a partnership in support of Australia’s indigenous people’s ‘Stolen Generations truth telling’. In cementing its partnership with Kinchela Boys Home Aboriginal Corporation (KBHAC) during its first KBHAC Mobile Education Centre (MEC) community visit post COVID-19, CDC NSW driver Mikhail Mikhail steered the MEC bus to a Healing Session at Aboriginal Health and Medical Research Council (AH&MRC) in Little Bay, where it was unveiled to a group of Kinchela Boy’s Home survivors and AH&MRC staff. The MEC – a converted commuter bus nicknamed ‘Benny’ featuring an audio-visual system and printed historical information on Stolen Generations – is the first of its kind and integral to helping KBHAC members tell their stories in a range of locations. To read the full article click here.

Stolen Generations bus

Image source: Australasian Bus & Coach website.

Urgent need to close digital divide

New analysis commissioned by the Australian Communications Consumer Action Network (ACCAN) shows that urgent action is needed to address the digital divide in remote Indigenous communities in the wake of COVID-19 lockdowns. While much of the nation turned to digital services such as videoconferencing and telehealth during the rolling lockdowns put into place during the COVID-19 pandemic, very few remote Indigenous communities were able to work or learn from home, or access government and health services online.

With access by service providers limited by travel restrictions, many people were left without access to essential services. In some remote communities, the Wi-Fi hotspot, the only point of access, was switched off to avoid people congregating. “COVID-19 saw communities without food and necessities of life because of the lack of access to adequate, reliable, and robust telecommunications,” said ACCAN Board Member and proud Torres Strait Islander, Dr Heron Loban.

To view the full article click here.

3 Aboriginal women and two Aboriginal children with iPad outdoors sand

Image source: sarahharroldblog wbsite.

Pius X win training awards

In a first for Moree, staff of Pius X Aboriginal Medical Service (AMS) have made a clean sweep of GP Synergy’s New England/North West GP training awards, taking out all three regional awards on offer. Pius X’s practice manager Ros Rose was named Practice Manager of the Year, GP supervisor Dr Hamze Hamze was named Supervisor of the Year and GP in training Dr Nada Abu Alrub was named Registrar of the Year in GP Synergy’s New England/North West GP training awards.

To read the full article click here.

3 Pius X staff holding bunch of flowers each and award certificates

Pius X’s GP in training Dr Nada Abu Alrub, practice manager Ros Rose and GP supervisor Dr Hamze Hamze. Image source: Moree Champion News.

COVID-19 vaccination survey

Do you provide immunisations? Do you transport vaccinations or receive them in your workplace? Do you work in rural or remote settings?

Finally, some good COVID-19 news, there have been some positive outcomes in the race outcomes in the race for the COVID-19 vaccine. Nurses, midwives, doctors and Aboriginal Health Practitioners working in primary health care will be very busy in 2021. They will be at the coalface of health promotion, allaying people’s fears, and organising the immunisation logistics to protect their communities. The focus will be on those most at risk, the elderly, men, and the health workforce.

Scaling-up rapid mass immunisation means more trained staff will be needed to administer the vaccinations and provide transportation logistics. The cold chain is only as effective as its ‘weakest’ link. There are many people involved in vaccine cold chain to rural and remote communities, some of whom do not routinely receive training in relation to medicines storage, such as transport drivers, Aboriginal Health Workers, and administration staff.

Central Australian Rural Practitioners Association have made a training video, telling the story of a vaccine’s journey from a supply centre to administration in a remote Aboriginal community, and would like your feedback. Please view the video here and then take 2–3 minutes to complete the 13 question survey here.

image from vaccine journey video. cartoon of cold box being handed between people

Image source: CARPA Inc. Vaccine Story video slide.

60% in remote communities have hearing loss

Chronic ear disease contributes to widespread hearing loss among Indigenous people in Australia. In 2020 it was found 40% of Indigenous people have hearing loss, 60% in remote communities with 79% of people with hearing loss not knowing they did not hear as well as others. Dr Damien Howard and Jody Barney have produced a new video on Indigenous hearing loss. To view the video click here. To take the 13 question survey (approved by the NT Department of Health and Menzies School of Health Research) click here.

cartoon of Aboriginal woman trying to hear on a telephone

Grow Local Cert IV in Mental Health

Despite the challenges this year due to COVID-19, Grow Local participants have worked hard towards completing their Grow Local Certificate IV in Mental Health, meaning communities throughout Western Australia will have additional mental health support available to those who may be struggling. The program has proven to not only be an effective way of meeting these community needs, but also a popular one, with more than 60 participants graduating in towns throughout the state in the coming weeks. The training is provided to community in partnership with the Australian Medical Association (WA), along with support from local organisations including Milligan House, who offered the use of their meeting rooms for the monthly workshops.

To view the WA Primary Health Alliance media release click here.

The World AIDS Day Parliamentary Breakfast is tomorrow

Event begins tomorrow at 7:20am AEDT (for 7:30am start) via Zoom https://us02web.zoom.us/j/81494660983

Each year we ask international and Australian HIV/AIDS experts to share their perspectives on HIV/AIDS in the world and our country, and the outlook for the future. We hope you will find their articles interesting and informative.

Please see the link to the World AIDS Day booklet here.

SA – can be based anywhere across SA – Nunyara Aboriginal Health Service Inc.

Systems Implementation Coordinator Aboriginal disAbility Alliance

SA West Coast ACCHO Network (SAWCAN) is a consortia supporting 4,976 Aboriginal people in a region that stretches from Whyalla in the east, right over to the WA border. Nunyara is acting as the lead agent of the consortia and is seeking to employ a suitably qualified person as the Systems Implementation Coordinator to apply a systems-focused approach in the capacity building of Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation (ACCHO) staff to ensure the seamless integration of NDIS within the comprehensive primary health care model.

To view the job description click here.

Applications close 5.00pm Wednesday 9 December 2020.

SA – Whyalla – Nunyara Aboriginal Health Service Inc.

FT Community Activator – 12 month contract

The Nunyara Aboriginal Health Service is an RACGP accredited service that provides culturally appropriate health care, health promotion and education programs for the Aboriginal community in Whyalla. Nunyara is looking to engage an energetic and motivated person to work as a Community Activator within the Aboriginal disAbility Alliance project. This position will provide assertive outreach and advocacy to Aboriginal people living with a disability, their families and carers in a culturally sensitive manner, breaking down barriers to accessing the NDIS and developing trust and rapport.

To view the job description click here.

Applications close 5.00pm Friday 11 December 2020.Nunyara Aboriginal Health Service Inc. logo

ACT – Canberra – Bimberi Residential Services

FT Family Engagement Officer – temporary

Bimberi Residential Services is seeking an experienced, committed and suitably qualified person to fill the Family Engagement Officer role.

The Family Engagement Officer is designed to assist with the engagement of young people and their families and to promote Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander practices and perspectives, in the day to day functions across Bimberi Residential Services. The role also is involved in promoting initiatives and developing innovative approaches to meeting client and program needs.

To view the job description click here.

Applications close Friday 11 December 2020.

external view of Bimberi Youth Dentention Centre ACT

Image source: ABC News website.

NSW – Dubbo – Coonamble Aboriginal Health Service

FT Psychologist – 2 year contract, possibility of extension

Coonamble Aboriginal Health Service (CAHS) is seeking an enthusiastic and committed person to fill a full-time position of Psychologist within the highly successful Aboriginal community-controlled organisation Dubbo Regional Aboriginal Health Service (DRAHS) Social & Emotional Wellbeing Department. This is a busy clinical role working with clients to prevent, diagnose and treat psychological issues within a health clinic in NSW.

To view the job description click here.

Applications close Friday 11 December 2020.

ACT – Canberra – OzChild

OzChild, an organisation established to support vulnerable children and young people by providing healing, preventing abuse and neglect, and strengthening families so all children and young people are safe, respected, and nurtured, and reach their full potential, is looking to employ a Family Practitioner and a Team Leader in their Functional Family Therapy (FFT) program. Both roles will strengthen the benefit of services to children, young people and their families in specified areas utilising an evidence based program. This evidence-based program has been developed to support families, with children and youth aged 12 to 18 years, in the home and the community. To view the position descriptions for the roles click on the role titles below.

Family Practitioner – Functional Family Therapy (FFT)

Team Leader – Functional Family Therapy

To apply, please contact the OzChild HR advisor Paul Ridley by phone 03 9695 2243 or to email click here.two Aboriginal young girls, one kissing the other on the cheek, OzChild logo

feature image text 'child protection system sets First Nations people with disability up to fail, photo of Aboriginal youth leaning on wire gate and broken wire fence in desert landscape

NACCHO Aboriginal Health News: Child protection system sets PWD up to fail

feature image text 'child protection system sets First Nations people with disability up to fail, photo of Aboriginal youth leaning on wire gate and broken wire fence in desert landscape

Child protection system sets PWD up to fail

First Nations people with disability (PWD) will tell the Disability Royal Commission this week about the structural violence they experience in the child-protection system around Australia. “We are among the most seriously disadvantaged members of the Australian community, and are also experts on the impact of policies on us,” says First Peoples Disability Network CEO Damian Griffis.

“This week, a number of First Nations people with disability will give evidence about the different racist and ableist systems that harm our children.” Mr Griffiths says the child protection system is “hostile and complicated.  Child removal is an ever present threat, and reality in our communities. It has become part of the community vernacular, and families live with the legacies of trauma from the removal of their parents and grandparents,” he says. 

Health Justice Australia CEO Donnella Mills says the current child protection system risks setting people with disability and their families up to fail, “First Nations people with disability and their families in contact with child protection systems face multiple, intersecting problems that result from intersectional and institutional discrimination,” she says. 

To view the full article click here.

placards against steps with Hands off our kids, black babies belong with black families

Image source: The Guardian.

Infectious skin diseases researcher awarded

The Australian Museum Eureka Awards (the “Oscars of science”) celebrate research and innovation, leadership, science engagement and school science. “Science is at the core of everything we do and we are committed to supporting and showcasing the work of Australian scientists,” Australian Museum Research Institute Professor Kristofer Helgen said.

The Emerging Leader in Science award went to Associate Professor Asha Bowen, who is Head of Vaccines and Infectious Diseases at the Telethon Kids institute. Her work over the years has significantly changed the way indigenous children with skin infections are treated.

To listen to Associate Professor Bowe being interviewed on ABC RN Breakfast with Fran Kelly click here.

portrait of Associate Professor Asha Bowen standing outside on path with trees in the background

Image source: RHD Action.

Parents fear child services

Treating mental health episodes more like a physical injury could help prevent the long-term removal of children of Indigenous parents with a disability, a national inquiry has heard. Mental health worker Christine May has told a hearing of the Royal Commission into Violence, Abuse, Neglect and Exploitation of People with Disability that when a parent with a mental illness had a psychotic episode and needed to stay in hospital it should be regarded as a period of treatment. “If I broke my leg I wouldn’t have an order taken out on my child,” she said.

Unless parents are deemed dangerous, Ms May said, they shouldn’t have to fight to keep their children when services could provide treatment for them to become well and be re-assessed. She recommended the Queensland Health program Cultural Healing she works for be expanded across the state.

To view the full article click here.

young Aboriginal child in shadows outside with tricycle and parts of other play equipment visible

Image source: SBS NITV website.

Increased clinical trial access for regional Australia

Much is riding on $125 million in Federal Government funding, announced in the recent budget and aimed at addressing this disparity and providing access to life-saving clinical trials in the regions. “This funding is our last chance to get it right, to deliver a higher level national health system,” said Sabe Sabesan, a doctor who was central to developing Queensland’s model of delivering medical support to regional communities via telehealth. His program has paved the way for the next step towards making clinical treatment trials available to all patients regardless of their location.

Oncologist Craig Underhill is hopeful the clinical trials would not only drive an improvement in cancer outcomes but enable research in other chronic health areas affecting regional patients, such as geriatric oncology, Indigenous health and palliative care.

To view the article in full click here.

health professional at desk conducting telehealth session

Image source: National Rural Health Alliance online magazine, Partyline.

Lung cancer signs free webinar

According to the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare (AIHW) estimated trend lines indicate a significant increase in the lung cancer incidence and mortality rates for Indigenous Australians over time. For non-Indigenous Australians, the age-standardised incidence rate for lung cancer has been relatively stable, while the mortality rate has fallen. Estimated trend lines indicate a significant decrease in the lung cancer mortality rate for non-Indigenous Australians.

Symptoms of lung cancer are often vague and can be overlooked, however, early and rapid investigation and referral is necessary for optimal patient outcomes. How can GPs give themselves the best chance of identifying possible lung cancer in busy primary care practice?

Cancer Australia invites you to join them in an upcoming webinar on investigating symptoms and signs of lung cancer in primary care: Symptoms and signs that might be lung cancer – a new guide to optimal investigation and referral in general practice – 7.00pm-8.00pm (AEDT) Wednesday 2 December 2020.

T join the FREE webinar click here and to learn about Cancer Australia’s new resource Investigation symptoms of lung cancer: a guide for all health professionals click here.

doctor's hand pointing to x-ray of lung

Image source: SBS News website.

Good Medicine Better Health resources survey

NPS MedicineWise is are seeking Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander consumer input to assist the development of Good Medicine Better Health (GMBH) consumer resources. Lived experience, and preferred format and learning styles will help us to develop consumer driven, culturally appropriate and accessible resources that deliver key information about quality use of medicines. 

To view the invitation for consumers to share their lived experience and/or community experience of a range of health issues click here and to access the link to the consumer participation survey click here.

The purpose of the survey is to elicit information about age, region (metro, regional, rural or remote), education level, willingness to be involved and preferred contact details. The GMBH team will then contact willing participants to arrange one-on-one phone interviews, online focus groups or workshops.

portrait shot Aboriginal woman and Aboriginal boy and girl, Good Medicine Better Health banner

Image source: NPS MedicineWise.

Native millet could change lives

Native millet on Gamilaraay country in western NSW is the most economically viable native grain for future farm enterprises, a University of Sydney study has found. The University of Sydney Institute of Agriculture study is the most comprehensive trial of Indigenous paddock-to-plate produce in Australia and was done in consultation with local communities and Black Duck Foods, owned by Aboriginal foods expert Bruce Pascoe. The one-year research project into the environmental, economic and cultural viability of growing native grains for bread on Gamilaraay country near Moree and Narrabri was released on 9 November 2020.

“Gamilaraay and Yuwaalaraay country in north-west NSW is one of the largest Aboriginal language groups in Australia, and they are proudly known as grass people,” said Dr Angela Pattison, study leader from the University of Sydney Institute of Agriculture and Plant Breeding Institute at Narrabri.

To view the full article click here.

loaf of bread on breadboard, bread being broken between fingers, man and woman in crop field

Image source: The University of Sydney website.

NT  Darwin and Palmerston region – Danila Dilba Health Service

Multiple positions: Head of ICT, Dietitian, Occupational Therapist, Physiotherapist, Mental Health Nurse, Community Support Worker

Danila Dilba Health Service is going through a dynamic period of expansion and growth. As a result of robust growth in services and in order to meet increasing client need, they are looking for people to join their team and be part of delivering important services to the Darwin and Palmerston region.

These are important roles where you’ll be able to contribute to improving the health and wellbeing of Indigenous Australians. Danila Dilba will provide great learning opportunities and give you the chance to grow your skills and progress your career.

For further information and to apply click here. Applications close Monday 7 December 2020.Danila Dilba Health Service logo

feature tile Aboriginal fingers holding cashless debit card, words 'cashless debit card 'not worth the human cost''

NACCHO Aboriginal Health News: Welfare cards ‘not worth the human cost’

feature tile Aboriginal fingers holding cashless debit card, words 'cashless debit card 'not worth the human cost''

Welfare cards ‘not worth the human cost’

Cashless debit cards for welfare recipients are not worth the human cost, senators have been told. The Morrison government plans to make the cards permanent in existing trial sites and move welfare recipients in the NT and the Cape York onto the system. A Senate inquiry probing the enabling legislation has heard from academics, charities and Indigenous groups.

Anti-card campaigner Kathryn Wilkes said the system was cruel and demeaning. She told senators the scheme – which limits most welfare spending – had caused stress and mental anguish. “This program is not worth the human cost,” Ms Wilkes said. Fellow campaigner Amanda Smith said the government was legislating segregation. “Whatever the government wants to label what they’re doing, they’re creating and investing in a system of permanent social and economic apartheid,” she said.

Aboriginal Peak Organisations Northern Territory chief John Paterson said the public money earmarked for making the card permanent would be better spent on Indigenous housing, education and health. “We want to get people off the welfare treadmill, we want to create jobs,” he said.

Healthy eating – what works at the store

Supermarkets and food retail stores are the principal source of people’s food and beverage needs and are therefore a prime setting to implement changes designed to increase the purchase of healthy food and decrease the purchase of unhealthy food in order to improve population diet and health. There is growing awareness that where foods are placed in shelves is an important marketing strategy.

A recent study from NZ, involving a retailer/academic collaboration, explored the impact of more prominent shelf placement of healthier products. However, the study found that placing healthier breakfast cereals at adult eye level had no impact on sales. Failure to show any meaningful outcomes is not uncommon in this research area, so it is great to see some results from a study with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities in remote Australia. The Lancet has just published a study led by Professor Anna Peeters at Monash University in conjunction with the Arnhem Land Progress Aboriginal Corporation (ALPA)which owns and manages community stores in remote Australia and has looked at the implementation of the co-designed Healthy Stores 2020 strategy.

To read the full article click here.

9 infographic tiles representing store strategies to encourage healthy eating

Image source: croakey website.

Let’s work together towards Closing the Gap

The Coalition of Peaks (CoPs) is a representative body of around 50 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander community-controlled peak organisations and members that have come together to change the way Australian governments work with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples. Community-controlled organisations work for and are accountable to their communities, not governments. They believe Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples should have a meaningful say on policies and programs that impact on them through formal partnerships with Australian governments at all levels.

The CoPs and all Australian Governments signed a new National Agreement on Closing the Gap in July this year. This was an historic and exciting moment because it was the first time a national agreement about First Nations people had been made in partnership with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples, through their community-controlled organisations.

To find out more about the National Agreement on Closing the Gap go to the Coalitions of Peaks website here.CTG Historial Agreement COP tile - cartoon Aboriginal hand holding paper with title National Agreement

NACCHO CEO honoured for COVID-19 response

The Australian Healthcare and Hospitals Association (AHHA) has announced it is jointly awarding the 2020 Sidney Sax medal for outstanding contributions to the development and improvement of Australian healthcare. Patricia Turner AM, CEO NACCHO is one of the award recipients for the significant leadership and proactive response as the COVID-19 pandemic began to impact Australia’s health system and communities. Pat Turner ensured that the PM, state premiers and chief ministers took urgent action to protect communities, close down access and prioritise safety to prevent community transmission of COVID-19. Ensuring that governments worked in partnership with communities, and placing culture at the heart of preventative measures, were key to successfully keeping communities safe. In comparison to the devastating incidence of COVID-19 in Indigenous communities abroad, rates of COVID-19 in First Nations peoples in Australia remain proportionately lower than the rest of the population. This successful model of community leadership will have long-term positive impact for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities working in partnership with governments.

To read the full press release click here.

Pat Turner at meeting Aoriginal and Torres Strait Islander flags in background

Patricia Turner AM Image source: Alice Springs News.

Palawa woman new AIDA President

The Australian Indigenous Doctors’ Association (AIDA) has announced a new Board of Directors, including the elections of Dr Tanya Schramm, a Palawa woman,  as the AIDA President. Tanya is a former AIDA Board member, a General Practitioner and also works for the University of Tasmania as a senior lecturer in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health. Vice President – Dr Simone Raye is a proud Bardi Jabbir Jabbir woman from the Kimberley. Simone was closely involved with the initial meetings that lead to the formation of AIDA. Simone hopes to strengthen relationships with specialty colleges to help First Nations students and trainees achieve Fellowship and be leaders within their chosen field.

To read the AIDA media release click here.

portrait image of Dr Tanya Schramm

Dr Tanya Schramm. Image source: Australian Indigenous Doctors’ Association website.

Food security essential for remote communities

Dietitians Australia is calling for the Government to ensure all Australians have access to affordable, safe, and nutritious food, regardless of their location. This comes ahead of the final report from the Senate Inquiry into Food Pricing and Food Security in Remote Indigenous Communities. Submitting a written response earlier thisyear, Dietitians Australia proposed 16 key recommendations, including the need to develop and implement a national strategy on food security, as well as elevating the status of community stores to an essential service.

“A National Food and Nutrition Security Strategy which includes local voices from remote Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities, is vital to creating practical solutions to support adequate food access,” said Robert Hunt, CEO of Dietitians Australia. “Local food stores often provide the only source of food available for purchase in the community.

GPs encouraged to take up mental health training

The Royal Australian College of General Practitioners (RACGP) is encouraging GPs in rural and remote Australia to undertake new mental health training to help children who’ve experienced disasters. It comes as GPs across the nation are dealing with increasing mental health presentations in the wake of the COVID-19 pandemic and last summer’s devastating bushfires, and with the next fire season approaching. There are two e-learning courses from Emerging Minds, National Workforce Centre for Child Mental Health available to RACGP members on the website: https://www.racgp.org.au/special-pages/login. The first builds knowledge and skills in child mental health assessment and management in general practice, and the second focuses on supporting children and families after natural disaster or community trauma – including in the immediate aftermath, short and long term.

To view the RACGP’s press release click here.

vector image person sitting head on knees whole of back fragments flying off

Image source: UKRI Medical Research Council.

Reducing racism in healthcare organisations

The impact of institutional racism in healthcare, and the steps organisations can take to improve health outcomes for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples, is just one of the topics being explored as part of Dietitians Australia’s inaugural webinar series for NAIDOC week (8–15 November 2020). Dr Chris Bourke, a Gamilaroi man and Strategic Programs Director at Australian Healthcare and Hospitals Association, will be calling on the healthcare sector to reflect on their governance and structure to improve the outcomes of their healthcare for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.

Dr Bourke, who is Australia’s first Indigenous dentist, highlights the importance of engaging both Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people and non-Indigenous people in organisational leadership positions, ensuring a strong foundation to provide equitable healthcare. “Statistics show that just under 50% of the factors that contribute to poor health of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people are related to racism, intergenerational trauma and lack of cultural safety. We all play a role in reducing this inequality, but to influence change within an organisation, First Australians must be included within the governing team,” said Dr Bourke. Without action, the ongoing impacts of institutional racism are alarming. 

To view the Dietitians Australia media release, including details of how to register for their NAIDOC Week events click here.

protesters holding signs No Room for Racism

Image source: SBS NITV website.

Music’s role as health determinant

A proud descendant of the Wiradjuri First People of Australia, Griffith University researcher Associate Professor Naomi Sunderland (Queensland Conservatorium Research Centre), has been awarded $820,000 Australian Research Council (ARC) funding (including a Discovery Australian Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Award) for the project titled The role of First Nations’ music as a determinant of health’.

This project aims to track how First Nations’ music and musicians are shaped by, and in turn may shape, powerful social determinants of health in Australia. The project responds to calls for health approaches that are strength based, First Nations-led, and culturally secure.

Aboriginal man from Bowraville Richie Jarrett singing into microphone, Aboriginal flag as backdrop

Richie Jarrett. Image source: Guardian News.

Sista Connections support college students

feature tile text 'partnering withACCHOs key to tackling health disparity', painting of brick wall with Aboriginal flag overlaid with hand holding stethoscope for yellow centre of flag

NACCHO Aboriginal Health News: Partnering with ACCHOs key to tackling health disparity

feature tile text 'partnering withACCHOs key to tackling health disparity', painting of brick wall with Aboriginal flag overlaid with hand holding stethoscope for yellow centre of flag

Partnering with ACCHOs key to tackling health disparity

The Heart Foundation has welcomed a NSW Government announcement of a $7.4 million investment towards its Closing the Gap commitment. “Investing in and partnering with Aboriginal Community Controlled Organisations, as well as enabling them to lead the way, is key to tackling the conditions of disadvantage that affect Indigenous Australians, such as housing and health,” said Heart Foundation Group CEO, Adjunct Professor John Kelly AM. “This commitment also recognises that community and Indigenous leadership is a pivotal step forward in Closing the Gap and ending rheumatic heart disease (RHD) for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples. “The NSW Government’s expansion of the Aboriginal Community Controlled organisations in the key sectors of early childhood, housing, disability and health is a step closer to making sustainable change to close the gap.

To view the full article click here.

Weigelli Centre Aboriginal Corporation metal sign

Image source: Aboriginal Medical Research Council of NSW website.

Record high vaccination rates

More Australian families are vaccinating their children, with new figures showing four quarters of growth in all childhood coverage rates to September 2020, the highest on record. Each year, the Morrison Government invests more than $400 million in the National Immunisation Program to protect young and vulnerable Australians. The highest rates of vaccination are among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children at five years, at more than 97%. The coverage rate for all five-year-olds continues to grow towards the aspirational 95% target. In the year to September 2020, it reached 94.9%. Among all two-year-old children, the coverage rate has risen to almost 92.4 per cent, which is the first time it has climbed above 92 per cent since 2014. The Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander two-year-old vaccination rate has also risen to almost 91.2 per cent in the current quarter.

To view the media release  click here.

NSW $7.4m for new National CTG Agreement

The NSW Government has announced funding of $7.4 million as a first step to begin state-based actions to support the National Agreement on Closing the Gap. Minister for Aboriginal Affairs Don Harwin confirmed this new investment at the 400th meeting of the NSW Aboriginal Land Council (NSWALC), held at Broken Hill. “This investment demonstrates the NSW Government’s commitment to achieving a critical priority under the Closing the Gap National Agreement – strengthening the capacity of Aboriginal Community Controlled organisations,” Mr Harwin said.

To view the media release click here.

Closing the Gap banner Aboriginal art black and white hands thumbs interlocked

Image source: Wellington Aboriginal Corporation Health Service.

Better hospital healthcare free webinar

Australian Healthcare & Hospitals Association (AHHA), with support from HESTA, is presenting a free webinar on better healthcare in hospitals for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people during NAIDOC week. The webinar will cover the latest research from Australia and North America on how hospitals can deliver better care. Following the presentations a Q&A session will be facilitated by AHHA Strategic Programs Director. 

Webinar: Better healthcare in hospitals for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people

Date:  0.30 am – 11.30 am Thursday 12 November 2020 (EDST).

To register for the free webinar click here.

female Aboriginal patient, Aboriginal support person and Aboriginal health worker in hospital room

Image source: Creative Spirits website.

Changing the future of heart health

Heart disease is one of Australia’s biggest health problems, representing one in four of all deaths, with over one thousand people a day hospitalised and costing the economy $7 billion each year.

Monash University is aiming to change the future of heart health, with the establishment of the Victorian Heart Institute (VHI), which will focus on training and leading a future focused workforce, extensive research and innovation to deliver measurable change in the rates of heart disease in Australia. The Institute will be located within the Victorian Heart Hospital (VHH) upon its completion in 2022. The VHH is a collaborative partnership between the Victorian Government, Monash Health and Monash University and will be Australia’s first stand-alone heart hospital and research facility. 

To mark the launch of the Victorian Heart Institute and explore the important issues around heart health, Monash University will be hosting a free live event A Different Lens: Matters of the Heart at 7.30 pm on Thursday 5 November 2020 with leading experts in heart disease. For more information about the event and how to join click here.

National health campaign: How’s Your Head Today? 

A national COVID-19 mental health campaign How’s your head today? is being rolled out to urge people to prioritise their mental health, raise awareness about how to identify when something is wrong, and encourage people to seek help. The campaign has been launched on TV, radio, in shopping centres and venues, online and through social mediaand will continue through to next year. How’s your head today? encourages all Australians to check in with how they are feeling. Through animated characters, the campaign recognises the emotions many people are feeling and illustrates the actions they can take to help themselves feel better.

To view the media release click here.

Greg Inglis' face & text 'I want people to know that they're not alone'

Greg Inglis opens up about mental health battles. Image source: ABC Australian Story.

Stars Foundation program for young women

Students at Newman Senior High School will be among the first in WA to take part in a motivating mentoring program for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander girls and young women. The pilot of the Stars Foundation program would run at Newman Senior High School and Butler College in Perth. Stars Foundation staff will work with the school communities this year to identify the needs of the students before the program starts in 2021. The Stars Foundation program provides mentoring and targeted support to improve the health and education outcomes of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander girls and young women. The program at Newman Senior High School will operate full time in a dedicated ‘Stars Room’ supporting students to develop their confidence, self-esteem and the life skills needed for school and beyond.

To view the full article click here.

close up face of Aboriginal young girl with Aboriginal face paint and Stars Foundation logo

Image source: Stars Foundation Facebook page.

Community pharmacies critical role during disasters

The report of the Royal Commission into National Natural Disaster Arrangements has acknowledged the critical role played by community pharmacies during disasters. The report also called for the inclusion of primary healthcare workers, including pharmacists, in disaster management and planning bodies. The report says Australian, State and Territory Governments “should develop arrangements that facilitate greater inclusion of primary healthcare providers in disaster management, including: representation on relevant disaster committees and plans, and providing training, education and other supports”.

Elsewhere the report highlights the importance of community pharmacists and other healthcare providers by stating they are generally the main point of contact that Australians have with the health system. “They are the entry level to the health system and are a broad group, including general practitioners, pharmacists, Aboriginal health workers, nurses and allied health professionals. Primary care providers have valuable local knowledge and strong connections with the communities they support,” the report says. The importance of continued dispensing during emergencies also is highlighted in the report.

To view the full article click here.

male and female Aboriginal people with pharmacy sign

Image source: The Conversation.

Lung cancer symptoms

Lung cancer remains the fourth most commonly diagnosed cancer in Australia and the most common cause of cancer death according to Australian Institute of Health and Welfare data. Smoking is linked to as many as 80 per cent of lung cancers with current smokers almost nine times more likely to develop lung cancer than people who have never smoked.

November is Lung Cancer Awareness Month and the WA is community is being reminded of the symptoms of lung cancer and what to do if they notice any unusual changes to their body. The Cancer Council WA Cancer Prevention and Research Director, Melissa Ledger, said many people don’t realise a cough which lasts for three weeks or more needs to be investigated. “If you have a long standing cough that worsens or changes for three weeks or more, it needs to be investigated,” Ms Ledger said. “If you have repeated chest infections, you notice you are becoming more short of breath or lacking energy, and have had any of these symptoms for more than four weeks, they should be investigated too. “If you cough up blood – even once – it’s really important to visit your doctor, clinic nurse or Aboriginal health worker right away to find out the cause. “It doesn’t mean you’ve got cancer, often it turns out to be something less serious, though,” she says. “Remember, the chances of successful treatment are much higher when cancer is found early,” Ms Ledger said.

To view the Cancer Council WA’s full article click here.

David Gulpilil with image of his younger self as an actor on a computer screen in the background

In July 2019 Yolngu traditional dancer and actor David Gulpilil revealed he was dying from lung cancer. Image source: SBS NITV.

Culturally secure community services funding

The WA McGowan Government has allocated an immediate additional $1.2 million to deliver workforce development in the mental health, alcohol and other drug community sector. This initial suite of programs will support workforce development in key areas identified by peak bodies, service providers, stakeholders and consumers and carers. They cover key focus areas of need including building the peer workforce; Aboriginal culturally secure services; building capacity in trauma-informed care; and providing employment pathways.

The programs follow the release of the WA Mental Health, Alcohol and Other Drug Workforce Strategic Framework 2020–2025, which outlines priority areas and principles to guide the growth and development of the mental health, alcohol and other drug workforce in WA. The workforce development program will include future phases and will support peer workers, the Aboriginal workforce, clinicians, counsellors, social workers and more who assist and care for people with mental health, alcohol and other drug issues.

To view the media release click here.

Aboriginal painting of a head with footprints across the head

Image source: NSW Governement SafeWork website.

CTG education target will improve health

The new National Agreement on Closing the Gap has a higher education target for the first time. It’s also the first time an agreement between governments on Indigenous issues was negotiated and signed by Indigenous Australians. The Coalition of Aboriginal Peak Organisations represented Indigenous Australians. Endorsed by the National Cabinet on July 30 this year, the 10-year agreement replaces the 2008 National Indigenous Reform Agreement. The higher education target is for 70% of Indigenous Australians between 25 and 34 years of age to have a tertiary qualification by 2031.

In 2016, 42.3% of Indigenous Australians in this age group had tertiary qualifications at the target’s required level. The proportion had more than doubled from 18.9% in 2001. By contrast, however, 72% of non-Indigenous Australians had such qualifications in 2016. Achieving higher Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander education levels has a flow on impact of improvements in other CTG targets including health, child protection, housing, employment, community safety, language and land.

To view the full article click here.

11 Aboriginal graduates Cooktown Townsville

Image source: The Bouverie Centre.

Housing and health linked

The World Health Organisation has always been interested in housing as one of the big “causes of the causes”, of the social determinants, of health. The WHO launched evidence-based guidelines for healthy housing policies in 2019. Australia is behind the eight ball on healthy housing. Other governments, including in the US, UK and NZ acknowledge housing as an important contributor to the burden of disease. These countries have major policy initiatives focused on this agenda. In Australia, however, we do housing and we do health, but they sit in different portfolios of government and aren’t together in the (policy) room often enough. Housing should be embedded in our National Preventive Health Strategy.

The COVID-19 pandemic has forced us to rethink how we approach health and protect our populations. It has amplified social and economic vulnerability. The pandemic has almost certainly brought housing and health together in our minds. Housing – its ability to provide shelter, its quality, location, warmth – has proven to be a key factor in the pandemic’s “syndemic” nature. That is, as well as shaping exposure to the virus itself, housing contributes to the social patterning of chronic diseases that increase COVID-19 risks.

To view the full article click here.

Aboriginal art from APY lands SA showing poor living environment

Image source: Health Habitat Housing for health website.

Medicines Australia-NACCHO Committee seeks representatives 

Consumer representatives are being sought to participate in the Medicines Australia-NACCHO Committee. As the national leadership body for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health in Australia NACCHO provides advice and guidance to the Australian Government on policy and budget matters while advocating for community-developed health solutions that contribute to the quality of life and improved health for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples. Medicines Australia leads the research-based medicines industry of Australia. Its members discover, develop and manufacture prescription medicine products, biotherapeutic products and vaccines that bring health, social and economic benefits to Australia.

NACCHO and Medicines Australia have established a Committee to lead and support medicine related measures that improve health outcomes for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander clients and communities. The role of the Committee is to provide advice for projects, programs and services in addressing the medicines priorities and challenges faced by Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people across Australia. The Committee is comprised of representatives from the ACCH sector, including NACCHO, and from Medicines Australia and its members. 

The Committee is now recruiting for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander consumer representatives.

Interested consumers will have some experience with the health system and Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander consumer issues. The appointment is for a twelve-month term, with the possibility of extension.  The meetings will be held quarterly and are virtual. If you are interested, please email a letter of endorsement from a supporting health consumer organisation with discussion of your links to health consumer base and/or community using this link. You may consider including a short CV (no longer than two pages) in pdf format. The deadline is COB 16 November 2020.

The nominations will be reviewed by a small panel of NACCHO and Medicines Australia representatives and based on a set of criteria related to the consumer’s skills, knowledge and experience. Please contact NACCHO here if you have any questions.

range of multi-coloured pills

Image source: Australian Journal of Pharmacy website.

NSW – Taree – Biripi Aboriginal Corporation Medical Centre

Aged Care Manager

Biripi Aboriginal Corporation Medical Centre (BACMC) provides a wide range of culturally-appropriate health and well-being services covering communities across the mid-northern NSW region. BACMC have a vacancy for an Aged care Manager who will responsible for the day to day management of the Aged Care team to meet the strategic goals of BACMC.

To view the job description click here. Application close 9.00 am Monday 9 November 2020.Biripi Aboriginal Corporation Medical Centre banner

NACCHO Aboriginal Health News: CPR during COVID-19 – Guidelines

feature tile CPR training

CPR during COVID-19 Guidelines

CPR training hands on dummy & National COVID-19 Clinical Evidence Taskforce logo

The National COVID-19 Clinical Evidence Taskforce has recently issued guidance on CPR during the pandemic. Healthcare workers and trained first aid responders are being urged not to delay commencing cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) because of the COVID-19 pandemic. The Taskforce, in partnership with the Infection Control Expert Group (ICEG), have published new clinical flowcharts to guide clinicians and first aid responders in delivering potentially lifesaving CPR as safely as possible.

View the new flowcharts and the Australian guidelines for the clinical care of people with COVID-19 here.

NACCHO CEO 2021 Australian of the Year nominee

Pat Turner had been nominated for Australian of the Year in the ACT!

An Arrernte and Gurdanji woman, Patricia Turner AM has successfully negotiated with all levels of government to ensure that the concerns of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples are given respectful consideration. As CEO of the NACCHO, and the Lead Convener of the Coalition of Peaks, Pat has an invaluable record of improving Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health outcomes. Pat’s leadership at NACCHO is creating real, meaningful and lasting change that will strengthen and support community-based Aboriginal health services.

She is the driving force behind a partnership between the Council of Australian Governments (COAG) and the Coalition of Peaks to facilitate shared decision making. One of the key outcomes from this partnership is a new national network funding agreement on Closing the Gap, which will help keep Aboriginal health in the hands of our communities. For her outstanding contribution to public service, Pat has been awarded the Order of Australia.

To read the full article in the Canberra Times click here.

NACCHO CEO Pat Turne sitting in a chair smiling with woven dog sculptures on a small table behind her & an a colourful Aboriginal painting of a bird

Portrait of Patricia Turner AM in her office in Canberra. Picture by Sean Davey.

SWAMS Mental Health Awards finalist

The South West Aboriginal Medical Service are celebrating being named a finalist for the Even Keel Bipolar Support Association Diversity Award at the 2020 WA Mental Health Awards. The award aims to recognise organisations that make an outstanding contribution to mental health. The medical service’s mental health team, called Kaat Darabiny (What you thinking?) senior prevention worker Lisa Collard said they were excited about the announcement. “We are excited and honored to be finalists for this award and very grateful that we are able to connect with and care for our wonderful local Aboriginal Community,” she said.

The team has also launched a new Tools in Schools Program for at risk children and teens. “The Tools in Schools Program is especially designed to support and engage directly with students who are struggling emotionally or behaviorally,” Ms Collard said. “It is an early intervention program to give these kids tools and skills they need to deal with their emotions. We want to give them a safe place to have a yarn about their issues, feelings and let them know they have somewhere to go and someone to talk to.” “So far, the response from schools and students has been very positive. The way the program is structured and delivered in small groups allows us to really connect with and empower the students,” Ms Collard said.

To see the full article click here.

the Kaat Darabiny team at South West Aboriginal Medical Service

Image source: Bunbury Mail.

Architecture awards for Puntukurnu AMS

Kaunitz Yeung Architecture won four awards at the 2020 International Architecture MasterPrize (AMP) including three awards across Healthcare, Green Building and Best of the Best, for Puntukurnu Aboriginal Medical Services (PAMS) Newman clinic. The Architecture MasterPrize is an international competition that honours designs in the disciplines of architecture, interior design and landscape architecture across the world.

The Newman clinic was commissioned by the Puntukurnu Aboriginal Medical Services (PAMS) and called for a state-of-the-art, regional primary health care facility to be the physical embodiment of the ethos of PAMS – community focused, connected to country, incorporating culture and providing the highest standard of primary health care.

To view the full article click here.

external view of Puntukurnu AMA WA

Image source: Architecture & Design website.

Melioidosis warning for Top End

Residents and visitors to the Top End need to be aware about the increased risk of getting the potentially deadly disease, Melioidosis, following recent wet weather. Dr Vicki Krause Director of the NT Centre for Disease Control said increased rainfall expected this year due to an active La Niña event meant there would be a greater risk of Melioidosis, a disease caused by the bacteria called Burkholderia pseudomallei that lives below the soil’s surface during the dry season. Territorians are urged to take precautions to avoid Melioidosis this wet season, with about 50 cases reported in the Top End between October and May each year. “Melioidosis can lead to severe pneumonia and blood poisoning with 10-15 per cent of infections in past years leading to death, even with the best medical care,” Dr Krause said. “Cuts and sores are the perfect entry point for the bacteria to invade the body, but it can also be inhaled if it gets stirred up by wind.”

To view the Northern Territory Government’s media release in full click here.

muddy legs with rubber sandals walking across muddy grassy wet ground

Image source: Katherine Times.

Intentional self-harm a leading cause of death

New data released by the Australian Bureau of Statistics has revealed that intentional self-harm is the fifth leading cause of death for Indigenous Australians. The data also highlighted the alarming reality that suicide is the second leading cause of death for Indigenous males, with individuals aged between 15–24 years-old over four times more likely to commit suicide than non-Indigenous people in the same age bracket. The data also revealed suicide was the leading cause of death for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children aged 5–17-years-old between 2015–2019.

Leilani Darwin, Head of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Lived Experience at the Black Dog Institute, says Australia needs to put suicide prevention on the agenda as a priority, as well as being a self-identified priority in communities, “Indigenous people are overrepresented in the worst ways.” 

To veiw the full article click here.

Aboriginal arms around child - torsos only set against wooden framed windows

Image source: NITV News website.

Latest COVID-19 update for Mob

The latest COVID-19 and other health updates for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities newsletter produced by the Australian Government Department of Health has been released and can be accessed here.

35 year-old Larrakia man Jonathan sitting cross-legged on carpeted floor surrounded by study/work papers

Image source: Australian Government Department of Health.

PHC worker engagement with screening programs

The University of Melbourne in the Department of General Practice is seeking primary healthcare workers to take part in a qualitative study they are undertaking to evaluate ways to engage with primary healthcare workers about national screening programs (bowel, breast and cervical). The evaluation has been commissioned by the Commonwealth Department of Health. Findings thus far from this study have led to the development of communication materials to assist in boosting participation, education and engagement.  

They researchers recognise the importance of the whole clinic in improving cancer screening and would like to invite GPs, practice managers and practice nurses to participate in a focus group discussion (via Zoom) to review and provide feedback on the developed communication materials. The focus group discussions will occur in early December, with all participants receiving a $50 gift card for their time. 

To view the advertisement for the focus group click here.

Aboriginal Health Worker at ATSICHS Brisbane sitting at her desk

Tereina Kimo, Aboriginal Health Worker at ATSICHS Brisbane. Image source: NATSIHWA.

Remote community COVID-19 vulnerability

COVID-19 doesn’t discriminate. It can infect and affect anyone, regardless of age, location, socioeconomic status or other health circumstances. Unfortunately though, it can be more devastating for some sections of the community than others. The situation in Victorian aged-care facilities has been a tragic reminder of the way in which this virus affects our most vulnerable in the community. That’s why, when COVID-19 first hit Australia, it was so important — and remains just as important — that strong measures are taken to protect remote Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities.

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples and people living in remote communities are at greater risk of COVID-19 due to higher rates of other health issues in these communities, difficulties accessing health care, people often being very mobile and travelling often, and in many cases relying more on outreach services. When COVID-19 hit, the message from many Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander organisations was clear: protecting these remote communities was of the utmost importance. On 20 March, Pat Turner — CEO of NACCHO told the ABC that it would be “catastrophic” if COVID-19 got into remote Indigenous communities, not only because of the potential loss of life, but also the loss of cultural heritage.

To view the full Hospital and Healthcare article click here.

WA remote community buildings against bald rock hills

Image source: ABC News website.

RACGP and ACRRM GP training collaboration

A joint statement from The Royal Australian College of General Practitioners (RACGP) and the Australian College of Rural and Remote Medicine (ACRRM) has outlined the cooperative approach they will take ahead of the transition to college-led training. The statement reaffirms that the Federal Government is also committed to reforming the Australian General Practice Training (AGPT) model, which will see the colleges become directly responsible for training registrars.
 
RACGP Acting President Associate Professor Ayman Shenouda said the colleges are committed to making general practice and rural generalist training the ‘career pathway of choice’ for prospective students. ‘The return of general practice training to the RACGP provides a unique opportunity to drive further excellence in general practice training, and align it to workforce-distribution strategies that satisfy the healthcare needs of the diverse communities we serve,’ he said as well as pointing out that ‘This is a complex and multifaceted set of reforms that will require extensive consultation and collaboration with all of our stakeholders.’

To view the GPNews article in full click here and to access the RACGP media release click here.Australian College of Rural and Remote Medicine world leaders in rural practice logo, vector of orange snake wound around windmill

New England health unit awarded for CtG Framework

To view the full article in the Newcastle Herald click here.

stethoscope on centre of Aboriginal flag

Image source: PHN Hunter New England and Central Coast website.

2021 GP Fellowship Training

The Remote Vocational Training Scheme Ltd (RVTS) is an established training provider with 20 years’ experience delivering GP Fellowship Training across Australia. Its AMS training stream, now in its 7th year, has positions available for doctors to train towards Fellowship qualifications of the RACGP and/or ACRRM. Training with RVTS allows registrars to stay in the one AMS location for the duration of training and offers structured distance education and remote supervision. Registrars receive comprehensive support from a dedicated Cultural Mentor, Medical Educator Mentor, and Training Coordinator throughout the duration of training and have access to Cultural Orientation Resources developed by the RVTS Cultural Educator and Cultural Mentor Team. The RVTS has a high fellowship achievement rate.

To check your eligibility for the AMS stream and to apply click here.

GP Fellowship Training applications are open now until 11 November 2020.

Dr Dharminder Singh who trained with RVTS at Mallee District Aboriginal Services

Dr Dharminder Singh who trained with RVTS at Mallee District Aboriginal Services (MDAS) and still works at MDAS.

Indigenous voice critical in government program evaluation

The Productivity Commission today released a proposed Indigenous Evaluation Strategy. The Strategy, which has been delivered to the Government, sets out a new approach to evaluating Australian Government policies and programs. Policies and programs affecting Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people are not working as well as they need to. Evaluation can play an important role filling this gap, but regrettably it is often an afterthought and of poor quality, Commissioner Romlie Mokak said. Importantly, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people are rarely asked about what, or how to evaluate, or what evaluation results mean, Mr Mokak said. The Strategy puts Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people at its centre.

To view the Australian Government Productivity Commission’s media release in full click here.

8 Aboriginal hands around quit smoking badges

Image source: Australian Government Department of Health.

NSW – Wyong – Yerin Aboriginal Health Services Limited

Executive Assistant to the CEO

Suicide Prevention Worker

To access the Yerin Eleanor Duncan Aboriginal Health Services website and the job descriptions for these positions click here.

Applications for the EA to the CEO position close at 5.00 pm on Wednesday 11 November 2020 and applications for the Suicide Prevention Worker position close at 5.00 pm on Tuesday 11 November 2020.


Yerin Eleanor Duncan AHS logo

ACT – Canberra – National Aboriginal & Torres Strait Islander Health Worker Association (NATSIHWA)

NATSIHWA is an association founded on the cultural and spiritual teachings of our past and present leaders, which best serves our members in their important role in achieving physical, social, cultural and emotional wellbeing for all Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples. They are currently seeking applications for the following senior level positions within the organisation:

Manager Executive Services

Teacher – Manager Professional Development

Manager – Policy, Projects and Research

For job descriptions click on the title of the job above. Applications for each position must be received by midnight Monday 2 November 2020.NATSIHWA logo

NSW – Sydney- Kirketon Road Centre

Senior Aboriginal Health Project Officer

The Kirketon Road Centre (KRC) is a primary health care facility located in Kings Cross, which is involved in the prevention, treatment and care of HIV/AIDS and other transmissible infections among ‘at-risk’ young people, sex workers and people who inject drugs. Working across KRC’s three clinical sites and extensive outreach program, this position is responsible for addressing the needs of Aboriginal people among KRC’s target populations, including ‘at risk young people, sex workers and people who inject drugs. The position also provides cultural expertise within KRC. 

For more information about the position and to apply click here.

Applications close Sunday 8 November 2020.Kirkton Road Centre logo, white letters KRC against green background

Across Australia – Remote Vocational Training Scheme Targeted Recruitment

General Practitioners – multiple positions

The Remote Vocational Training Scheme (RVTS) is assisting the recruitment of doctors to targeted remote communities with high medical workforce need by including the RVTS GP Vocational Training program as a component of the doctor recruitment package. In 2018-20 the RVTS Targeted Recruitment Strategy successfully secured the services of 11 full-time doctors to 13 rural and remote communities across Australia. RVTS Training is a four-year GP training program delivered by Distance Education and Remote Supervision leading to Fellowship of the ACRRM and/or RACGP. RVTS Training is fully funded by the Australian Government.

Tor further information about the Targeted Recruitment positions click here.RVTS logo, vector of white sun rising or setting yellow sky, red earth

Across Australia (except Vic & Tas) – Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS)

2021 Census Engagement Manager x 35 (25 in remote areas, 10 in urban/regional locations)

The ABS is recruiting Census Engagement Managers for the 2021 Census. Due to the close working relationship with the community, 35 Census Engagement Manager positions will be only open to Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander applicants. Census Engagement Managers are specialised roles requiring a high degree of community interaction. They will be working within communities telling people about the Census and ensuring everyone can take part and get the help they need. Where possible, Census Engagement Managers will be recruited locally. To view a recruitment poster click here.

For further information on the roles and to apply click here.

Applications for Census Engagement Manager roles are open now and close Thursday 5 November 2020.

 

NACCHO Aboriginal Health News: world-first virtual healthcare technology will improve remote area training access

feature tiel - two nurses using virtual healthcare training goggles

World-first virtual healthcare training trial

Training for healthcare workers is about to go virtual for the first time as part of a new partnership between industry, TAFE and NSW Health. Learning how to take a blood test will no longer need to be done in a real health setting. Instead, trainees including doctors, nurses, laboratory technicians and Indigenous health workers will be able to learn the procedure while fully immersed in a virtual hospital, including sound effects such as blipping machines.

The NSW government said the virtual reality training technology was a world first that would be piloted in a yet-to-be named regional hospital. The virtual reality blood testing pilot was developed by TAFE NSW with NSW Health Pathology, CognitiveVR and diagnostic solutions company Werfen. Healthcare workers will use a virtual reality headset to learn “hands-on” blood testing. The simulation aims to provide healthcare professionals across the state, including in regional and remote areas, with greater access to hands-on training scenarios, ultimately increasing the quality of care while also reducing time away from clinical care.

To read the full article in The Sydney Morning Herald click here.

Werfen Australian NZ GM Sally Hickman demonstrates virtual reality blood testing - wears virtual reality goggles, hand is outstretched

Werfen Australian NZ General Manager Sally Hickman. Image source: The Sydney Morning Herald.

Purple House HESTA Excellence Award finalist

Purple House is one of six finalists in the Outstanding Organisation category of the HESTA 2020 community services awards. Purple House has been recognised for getting Indigenous dialysis patients home to country and providing a home away from home in Alice Springs. Purple House is an innovative Indigenous-owned and run health service operating from a base in Alice Springs. It runs dialysis units in 18 remote communities across the NT, WA and SA, and a mobile dialysis unit called the Purple Truck and has a focus on getting patients back home so families and culture remain strong.

Before Purple House, patients were forced to leave country and move far away for dialysis, leaving communities without elders to share knowledge and families disrupted. Many patients are now home but there are still communities without dialysis and patients who need to live short or long term in Alice Springs. Purple House’s base in Alice also offers primary health care, allied health, wellbeing, aged care, NDIS and a bush medicine social enterprise.

To view the full article click here.
Purple House CEO Sarah Brown with patient Rosie Patterson from Yuelamu

Purple House CEO Sarah Brown and patient Rosie Patterson. Image source: Hospital and Healthcare.

Homelessness affects children’s health

Seven new Flinders University research projects have been funded by the Channel 7 Children’s Research Foundation, including support for special studies to help homeless, at-risk, migrant and autistic children and Indigenous health. Nurse practitioners working with social service agencies is one way to help the estimated 22% of Australian children living in temporary or precarious living conditions, with families hit hard by unemployment and other problems created by the pandemic. These children – some skipping health checks, vaccinations and even nutritional meals – may not have regular doctor appointments, and poorer access to health services, leading to more physical and mental health issues and emergency department presentations.

To view the full article click here.

small Aboriginal child with tangled hair, scrapped knees sitting on concrete floor with head in knees, hands wrapped around legs

Image source: Flinders University website.

NT 2021 Australian of the Year Award nominees

Across Australia (except Vic & Tas) – Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS)

2021 Census Engagement Manager x 35 (25 in remote areas, 10 in urban/regional locations)

The ABS is recruiting Census Engagement Managers for the 2021 Census. Due to the close working relationship with the community, 35 Census Engagement Manager positions will be only open to Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander applicants. Census Engagement Managers are specialised roles requiring a high degree of community interaction. They will be working within communities telling people about the Census and ensuring everyone can take part and get the help they need. Where possible, Census Engagement Managers will be recruited locally. To view a recruitment poster click here.

For further information on the roles and to apply click here.

Applications for Census Engagement Manager roles are open now and close Thursday 5 November 2020.

NACCHO Aboriginal Health News: Unique funding enables First Nations-led COVID-19 research

feature tile - older Aboriginal man with Aboriginal flag sweatband & ceremonial paint on face waving to camera

First Nations-led COVID-19 research funding

A unique $2 million funding round has privileged First Nations voices and resulted in high-quality COVID-19 research projects that will result in better outcomes for First Nations communities. The 11 projects from across Australia were awarded funding from the Australian Partnership for Preparedness Research on Infectious Disease Emergencies (APPRISE) Centre of Research Excellence, based on a $2 million donation from the Paul Ramsay Foundation to support the development of effective responses to COVID-19 for First Nations communities. Townsville-based APPRISE investigator Professor Adrian Miller of the Jirrbal people of North Queensland and Director of the Centre for Indigenous Health Equity Research at CQ University says APPRISE gave the space for a First Nations-led process that began with the creation of the APPRISE First Nations Council to advise on all aspects of  the grant process from research priorities to evaluation criteria.

To view the APPRISE media release click here.

Two Aboriginal women & 3 Aboriginal children walking on Country away from the camera

Image source: Standford News, Standford University website.

Start evaluating for impact

How do you know if your programs are making a difference?

Interplay works with communities to design evaluations that measure the things that communities value. The Interplay Project is designed to bring the voice of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander community members into research and evaluation with a vision that all people are empowered to experience optimal wellbeing from the safety and strength of their own culture. Interplay work towards this by collaboratively building science around different ways of knowing and being. To view the Interplay Project’s new website click here.

The Interplay Project also recently launched a mobile app, Disability in the Bush on behalf of the NDIS. You can check out the mobile app, available in five different Aboriginal languages by clicking here.

Five Aboriginal women, two Aboriginal children & a terrier dog sitting on bare weathered red rocks

Image source: The Interplay Project website.

WA Connecting to Country grant program

The Connecting to Country grant program supports projects that enable Western Australian Aboriginal people and organisations to undertake on Country trips to renew links between community, Country and culture. Grants up to $25,000 are available for a wide range of activities that foster the transfer of knowledge between generations, preservation of culture and strengthening of communities. Activities may include those that improve understanding of Country, ancestry and kinship and promote positive mental health, wellbeing and resilience through community-led cultural healing projects.

For further information about the Connecting to Country grant program click here. Grant applications close on 10 November 2020.

Aboriginal elder of Nyikina country, John Watson show grandchildren his special lands in WA's Kimberley area

Aboriginal elder of Nyikina country, John Watson show grandchildren his special lands in WA’s Kimberley area. Image source: St Stephen’s School website.

Free palliative care online training program

The Australian Healthcare and Hospitals Association (AHHA) has developed a free online training program to help aged and community care workers, carers, volunteers, family members and health professionals who provide palliative care to aged persons in the community. Every person’s needs are unique and sorting your way through the emotional and social stresses faced by a dying person and their family can be difficult. The modules will help those involved in providing end of life care develop skills and confidence in that role.

To find out more about the AHHA palliative care training program and to register click here.

Aboriginal hand held within two other Aboriginal hands

Image source: Aged Care Guide website.

Fierce Girls wellbeing resources

An ABC podcast Fierce Girls tells the stories of Australian girls who dare to do things differently, adventurous girls, girls with guts and spirit. Among the inspiring tales of some of Australia’s most extraordinary women are those of Ash Barty and Nova Peris.

For more information about the ABC Fierce Girls podcast click here.

snapshot of cartoon drawing of Ash Barty from ABC Fierce Girls podcast webpage

Image source: ABC website.

University fee hikes put CtG targets at risk

The Federal Government’s “job-ready” university reforms will dramatically increase the cost of courses in the social sciences, a consistently popular discipline amongst Indigenous students. According to the latest national data, 33 per cent of Indigenous students chose to enrol in social science degrees compared to 19 per cent of the general cohort. Experts are concerned the changes will disproportionately disadvantage Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students, by lumping them with more debt or deterring them from study altogether — scenarios which both stand to jeopardise national higher education targets agreed to just months ago. Wiradjuri man Lachlan McDaniel believes his arts degree was “probably the best thing that ever happened” to him, but fears new laws passed this week will make it much tougher for other Indigenous students to get the same opportunities.

To view the full article click here.

Wiradjuri man Lachlan McDaniel graduating from arts/law degree

Wiradjuri man Lachlan McDaniel graduating from an Arts/Law degree. Image source: ABC website.

NSW – Casino – Bulgarr Ngaru Medical Aboriginal Corporation

FT/PT Practice Nurse

Bulgarr Ngaru Medical Aboriginal Corporation (BNMAC) Richmond Valley is looking for a motivated Practice Nurse to join our team in Casino NSW with part time and full time work options available. The Registered Nurse will take a proactive role to assist clients to address health issues in a holistic way at BNMAC’s Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Service. BNAMC endeavors to take a proactive approach working with local communities to raise awareness of health issues and to develop and implement intervention strategies in the treatment of chronic conditions.

To view the job description click here. Applications close Saturday 14 November 2020.Bulgarr Ngaru Medical Aboriginal Corporation logo

VIC – Shepparton – Rumbalara Aboriginal Co-operative Ltd.

FT Aboriginal Family Violence Practice Leader

Rumbalara Aboriginal Co-operative has a vacancy for a full-time Aboriginal Family Violence Practice Leader. This is a leadership position co-located in The Orange Door site and will have a significant role to work closely with services to lead high quality, culturally safe and effective responses to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people seeking support and safety. The Orange Door is a free service for adults, children and young people who are experiencing or have experienced family violence and families who need extra support with the care of children.

To view the position description click here. Applications close 4.00 pm Monday 2 November 2020.Rumbalara clinic & logo

Working from home, any location – Hearing Australia

FT Manager of Aboriginal Engagement and Awareness for HAPEE

Hearing Australia is currently recruiting for a Manager of Aboriginal Engagement and Awareness for the Hearing Assessment Program – Early Ears (HAPEE). This is a national team of 11 Community Engagement Officers that among many things establish and facilitate free hearing assessments primarily in Aboriginal Medical Services, Childcare Centres and CP clinics nationally. This role is responsible for: ensuring that the Community Engagement Officers can effectively engage with primary health and early education services in their locations; ensuring targets for number of locations that Hearing Assessment Program – Early Ears (HAPEE) operates in are met; working with marketing on the development and delivery of culturally appropriate awareness campaigns; expanding HAPEE so that families who use private medical services are aware of and can access the program; providing high quality advice and support to senior management of Australian Hearing.

To view the job description click here. Applications close as as soon as a pool of suitable applicants are identified.Hearing Australia logo - outline of Australia using soundwaves

Across Australia (except Vic & Tas) – Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS)

2021 Census Engagement Manager x 35 (25 in remote areas, 10 in urban/regional locations)

The ABS is recruiting Census Engagement Managers for the 2021 Census. Due to the close working relationship with the community, 35 Census Engagement Manager positions will be only open to Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander applicants. Census Engagement Managers are specialised roles requiring a high degree of community interaction. They will be working within communities telling people about the Census and ensuring everyone can take part and get the help they need. Where possible, Census Engagement Managers will be recruited locally. To view a recruitment poster click here.

For further information on the roles and to apply click here.

Applications for Census Engagement Manager roles are open now and close Thursday 5 November 2020. ABS 2021 Census Engagement Manager banner

NACCHO Aboriginal Health News: Whole-of-society mental health solutions needed

Whole-of-society mental health solutions needed

Australian Association of Social Workers (AASW) National President, Ms Christine Craik hopes World Mental Health Week (10–17 October) will highlight mental health solutions that go beyond short-term, crisis-oriented responses and encompass a whole of society approach to factors affecting mental health. “The COVID-19 crisis, along with the current recession, have underscored the importance and value of healthy communities which prevent ill-health and promote mental health and accessible early intervention services. We have an opportunity to re-build our mental health system by broadening our approach and addressing the social determinants of health. The pandemic has led to job losses, insecurity of income and housing and social restrictions. Many of us are trying to work from home at the same time as we care for children or family members whose formal care has been interrupted.”

To view the AASW media release click here.

New model to boost rural general practice

A new model, launched this week in Wagga Wagga, will give junior doctors, interested in working in rural general practice in the Murrumbidgee region, the experience, exposure and qualifications they need to become rural generalist doctors – GPs with additional skills such as obstetrics or emergency medicine. Federal Regional Health Minister, Martin Coultin said “This new locally-driven model is an important step in our commitment to delivering better healthcare for rural communities and ensuring rural practice is more appealing for doctors.”

The Murrumbidgee Model will see up to 20 new doctors trained over four years in the region, with sites including Cootamundra, Young, Deniliquin, Temora, Narrandera, Gundagai and an Aboriginal Medical Service in Wagga Wagga. The model will be evaluated, to assist the Government to roll out the National Rural Generalist Pathway and approaches that work to support Australians living in other rural, regional and remote areas.

To view the related media release click here.

country unsealed road

Image source: Australian Medical Association.

Critical kidney disease data to inform policy

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people have thrived in the traditional lands known as Australia for millennia, however, in the last 50 years, kidney disease has increased dramatically, and today, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people have a high need for health care for advanced chronic kidney disease. In parallel, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people have had limited opportunity to guide priorities in the health care system to improve kidney health.

Torres Strait Islander woman, Associate Professor Jaqui Hughes from the Menzies School of Health Research is leading a cohort study which will describe the long-term changes in kidney function of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people over 10 years and provide critical data to inform regional and national policy on identification and care of people with kidney disease. 

To view the full article on the research click here.

Associate Professor Jaqui Hughes standing at a lecturn

Associate Professor Jaqui Hughes, Menzies School of Health Research. Image source: NHMRC website.

Feet health important for overall health

The NT has exceptionally high rates of diabetes and, subsequently, diabetes-related foot disease with Aboriginal people are 4–6 times more likely to be admitted to hospital for a diabetes-related foot wound or complication than non-Aboriginal people. During Foot Health Week (12–18 October) Top End Health Service’s High Risk Foot Service Senior Podiatrist Sally Lamond said feet were often the first place to show diabetes-related symptoms. “It’s important to pay attention to any changes in your feet because a major symptom of diabetes is damage to the nerves in your feet,” she said. “The damaged nerve function is called neuropathy, and about half of all people with diabetes have some form of nerve damage.”

To view the NT Government’s Foot Health Week media release click here.

allied health professional treating patient's feet

Image source: CheckUP Australia website.

Forgotten after leaving out-of-home care

There are currently about 18,000 Indigenous children across Australia who are living in statutory out-of-home care (OOHC), having been removed from their families. This is one-third of Australian children in care, or 11 times the rate of non-Indigenous children in care. The trauma of removal is carried by the child, their family and community for life, and is often passed on knowingly or unknowingly to the next generation. Trauma and separation affect the development of the child, their feelings of self-worth and belonging, their sense of identity, and lifelong connections with family, community, culture and Country.

The first national study to explore what happens to Indigenous children removed from care, once they turn 18, was conducted by Monash University, in partnership with SNAICC, the peak body for Indigenous children and families. If, as a country, we’re serious about “closing the gap” and supporting healthy Indigenous communities, we need to recognise the significant issue of ongoing intergenerational trauma that’s created through the removal of Indigenous children into predominantly white service systems that fail to respond and care for them appropriately.

For further information about the study click here.

6 Aboriginal children walking across a foot bridge in rural Australia

Image source: Monash University website.

Opportunity for pharmacists to do more

One in five Australians are affected by mental illness annually with many more impacted by the recent bushfire crisis and current COVID-19 pandemic. During World Mental Health Week (10–17 October) the Pharmaceutical Society of Australia (PSA) is taking stock to recognise the important relationship between a person affected by mental illness, their pharmacist and health care team. Acting PSA President Michelle Lynch acknowledged the Government’s $5.7 billion investment into mental health during this week’s budget, which paves the way for pharmacists to play a greater role in the delivery of mental health care in Australia. “A majority of Australians visit their pharmacist around 14 times a year and as trusted and accessible health professionals pharmacists often come in contact with patients suffering mental ill-health,” she said.

To view the Pharmaceutical Society of Australia’s media release click here.

Pharmacist talking over counter to customer

Image source: AJP website.

NT health student award nominations open

Nominations are open for outstanding health students as part of the NT Aboriginal and Torres Strati Islander Health Worker and Practitioner Excellence Awards. The awards are an opportunity to recognise and acknowledge students who are currently studying qualifications from the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Primary Health Care training package and the significant contribution they make to their families, communities and the NT healthcare system.

To view details about the award categories and the nomination process click here.

5 Mala'la Health Service AC staff

Image source: HK Training and Consultancy website.

Poverty, housing and health links webinar

Secure and affordable housing is critical to overcoming many of the economic, social and chronic disease challenges facing rural and remote Australians, particularly chronic diseases closely related to housing such as rheumatic heart disease. People in rural and remote Australia have lower incomes, lower net household worth, higher instances of risk factors for poor health, higher levels of chronic disease, accidents and injury, and reduced life expectancy.

Two-thirds of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians live outside major cities. A critical factor in improving health outcomes for Indigenous Australians is the provision and maintenance of appropriate housing. As part of Anti-Poverty Week National Rural Health Alliance is hosting a webinar on 12.30–1.30 pm (AEDT) Thursday 15 October 2020. To register click here.anti-poverty week webinar banner

Free wellbeing webinars

The Black Dog Institute under the national eMHPrac program are preparing two webinars and an associated podcast on supporting Indigenous wellbeing through digital resources. The focus of the webinars will be to hear a range of panelists’ yarn about how healthcare workers can use digital wellbeing tools to help keep our mob strong in mind, body and culture. The webinars will showcase the WellMob website launched in July this year by the Australian Indigenous HealthInfoNet.

WEBINAR 1: Supporting Indigenous wellbeing through digital resources: an introduction for clinicians

  • Who’s it for? GPs & allied health practitioners 
  • Times & Date: 1.00 pm and 8.00 pm Thursday 22 October
  • What’s it about: a webinar that shares tips on using digital wellbeing resources with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people
  • Register at: click here

WEBINAR 2: Supporting Indigenous wellbeing through digital resources: an introduction for frontline wellbeing workers

  • Who’s it for: frontline wellbeing & community workers
  • Time & Date: 1.00 pm Thursday 29 October
  • What’s it about: a webinar yarning about digital wellbeing resources for our mob and tips to use them with your clients and community
  • Register at: click here

QLD – Innisfail – Mamu Health Service Limited

Chief Financial Officer  Advertisement , Position Description, General Employment Information

Clinic ManagerAdvertisement,  Position Description, General Employment Information

Public Health NurseAdvertisement, Position Description, General Employment Information

Mamu Health Service Limited, an Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation owned and managed by Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people to provide culturally appropriate and comprehensive primary health care for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people and communities of Innisfail, Tully, Ravenshoe, Mt Garnet and Babinda, has vacancies for a Chief Financial Officer, a Clinic Manager and a Public Health Nurse.

To view the advertisement, position description and general employment information for each vacancy, click on the links above.

Applications for all positions close Friday 20 October 2020.