NACCHO Aboriginal Health #AusVotesHealth #VoteACCHO : @RenBlackman CEO @GidgeeHealing #ACCHO Mt Isa : Highlights Inequality and climate change: the perfect storm threatening the health of our #Remote communities

 

“ Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Services have a long history of working holistically and innovatively to address the wider determinants of health, and Gidgee Healing incorporates legal services, knowing that legal concerns “cause a lot of worry for families”

However, many of the levers for addressing the determinants of health lie outside of the health sector’s control.

 What would help Gidgee Healing clients includes increases to Newstart and other social security payments, with a loading for remoteness.

We would also like to see better access to education and training for remote communities, many of which do not have high schools.

As well, Blackman would like a “whole of government” approach to addressing the social determinants of health, as was recommended in 2008 by the World Health Organisation commission on social determinants of health.

My job is challenging enough at the best of times. But climate change and extreme weather events, such as recent flooding that cut road access to many remote communities for several weeks, are making it ever-more difficult “

Renee Blackman runs Gidgee Health ACCHO health service covering a vast chunk of north-west Queensland – about 640,000 sq km, an area larger than Spain – that provides services to about 7,000 Aboriginal people in communities from Mount Isa to the Gulf.

Reporting in this series is supported by VivCourt through the Guardian Civic Journalism Trust

Written by Melissa Sweet for The Guardian

While the cultures and circumstances of these communities are diverse, Blackman says they share a common health threat: that the harmful impacts of poverty are magnified in remote locations.

Blackman, a Gubbi Gubbi woman and CEO of an Aboriginal community-controlled health service Gidgee Healing, sees poverty contributing to poor health in remote communities in many ways.

People cannot afford healthy foods, to access or maintain housing, to buy vital medications, or to travel to regional centres such as Cairns or Townsville for surgery that would help them or their children, she says.

But mostly, she says, poverty means people have more pressing priorities than whether their diabetes is being well controlled.

“None of that matters if the priority is to put food on the table first, or a roof over the table,” she says. “Worrying about medication or a specialist appointment or an allied health wraparound service isn’t a priority.”

Blackman says she gets really frustrated when health groups put out simplistic messages for people to eat more fresh fruit and vegetables. It reminds her that so much health debate is far removed from the realities of people living in poverty.

Renee Blackman interviewed by NACCHO TV in 2016

Likewise, there is also a disconnect between much of the mainstream debate about health, which tends to focus on funding of medical services and hospitals, and the evidence about what matters most for people’s health.

The Western Australian government’s recent Sustainable Health Review cites US research suggesting that only 16% of a person’s overall health and wellbeing relates to clinical care and the biggest gains, especially for those at greatest risk of poor health, come from action on the social determinants of health. These are “the conditions in which people are born, grow, live, work and age”, and are shaped by the distribution of money, power and resources.

In the case of Gidgee Healing’s clients, the determinants of health include the ongoing legacy of colonisation, such as poverty and racism, as well as protective factors such as connection to culture and country.

Tackling the social determinants of health is critical to address health inequities, which arise because people with the least social and economic power tend to have the worst health, live in unhealthier environments and have worse access to healthcare.

A study cited in the last two editions of Australia’s Health (in 2016 and 2018) estimates that if action were taken on the social determinants to close the health gap between the most and least disadvantaged Australians, half a million people could be spared chronic illness, $2.3bn in annual hospital costs saved and pharmaceutical benefits scheme prescriptions cut by 5.3 million.

In the absence of such action, she says Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Services have to work hard and be creative in the face of government silos in their efforts to provide holistic services.

Blackman’s job is challenging enough at the best of times. But climate change and extreme weather events, such as recent flooding that cut road access to many remote communities for several weeks, are making it ever-more difficult.

“You have got these massive weather events sweeping through our communities, decimating structures, infrastructure – which means health services,” she says. “If your health service is down, you can’t provide any type of healthcare; it’s almost like you are operating under war conditions sometimes, because things get totally obliterated and you have got to build back from scratch, yet you’ve got people who need your assistance.”

Blackman and many other health professionals are seeing the impact of a perfect storm threatening the health of some of Australia’s most disadvantaged communities. Climate change is exacerbating the social and economic inequalities that already contribute to profound health inequities.

Blackman describes elderly Aboriginal people with multiple health problems stuck in inadequate housing without air-conditioning during increasingly frequent extreme heatwaves. Sometimes it is so hot, she says, the bitumen melts, making it difficult for her health teams to reach communities in times of high need.

As well, patients are presenting to Gidgee Healing clinics with conditions such as dehydration that might be preventable if they could afford their power bills and had appropriate housing.

The mental health impacts are also huge, Blackman says, mentioning the deaths of hundreds of thousands of livestock during the floods. “This is devastation, this is loss, this is grief, we are already facing a suicide crisis in the north-west across all of the community, including the Aboriginal community,” she says. “You’re talking about a region that already has depleted access to mental health professionals.”

Welcome to our special NACCHO #Election2019 #VoteACCHO resource page for Affiliates, ACCHO members, stakeholders and supporters. The health of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples is not a partisan political issue and cannot be sidelined any longer.

NACCHO has developed a set of policy #Election2019 recommendations that if adopted, fully funded and implemented by the incoming Federal Government, will provide a pathway forward for improvements in our health outcomes.

We are calling on all political parties to include these recommendations in their election platforms and make a real commitment to improving the health of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples and help us Close the Gap.

With your action and support of our #VoteACCHO campaign we can make the incoming Federal Government accountable.

More info HERE 

NACCHO Acting Chair, Donnella Mills

A multiplier effect

Hurricane Katrina is often held up as a textbook example of how climate change hits poor people hardest, and not only because the poorest areas in New Orleans were worst affected by flooding. Much of the planning and emergency response catered to the better off – those with cars and the means to safely evacuate and arrange alternative accommodation.

As Sharon Friel, professor of health equity at the Australian National University, outlines in a new book, Climate Change and the People’s Health, most of those who died because of Hurricane Katrina came from disadvantaged populations. These were also the groups that suffered most in the aftermath, as a result of damage to infrastructure and loss of livelihoods.

“It was also lower-income groups, and in particular children and the elderly, who were at increased risk of developing severe mental health symptoms compared with their peers in higher income groups,” Friel writes.

It is not only the direct and indirect impacts of climate change that worsen health inequities; policies to address climate change can have unintended consequences. Friel cites international evidence that the distribution of green spaces in cities to promote urban cooling and health tends to benefit mainly white and affluent communities.

Friel’s book outlines myriad ways in which climate change interacts with other social determinants of health to create a multiplier effect that deepens and compounds health inequities. Yet policymakers have been slow to respond, although such concerns were clearly identified more than a decade ago, in the landmark WHO report on the social determinants of health, which said it was important to bring together “the two agendas of health equity and climate change”.

While Friel says the relationships between climate change and health inequity are “messy and complex”, she argues that understanding there are common determinants of both problems provides an opportunity to “kill two birds with one stone”.

Friel calls for intersectoral action, with a focus on equality, environmental sustainability and health equity, to tackle the underlying “consumptagenic system” that drives both problems. This system is “a network of policies, processes and modes of understanding and governance that fuels unhealthy, inequitable and environmentally destructive production and consumption”.

An unfair burden

In Victoria, a large community health service provider called Cohealth has had processes in place for at least five years to work with at-risk groups during extreme weather events, in recognition of the need to address climate change as a health threat, especially for disadvantaged populations. During heatwaves, the service checks on homeless people, public housing residents and people with mental illnesses to ensure they can take steps to stay safe.

“The growing frustration of people in the health sector is, this work is eating into our budgets, it’s occupying the time of our staff – and yet there is little or no policy recognition of the way health resources are being taken to address these problems,” says Cohealth chief executive, Lyn Morgain.

She adds that local governments and service providers have been left to carry an unfair burden due to inaction on climate and health by governments, especially the federal government.

Morgain, who is also chair of the Social Determinants of Health Alliance and a board member of the Australian Council of Social Service, notes that Acoss has been championing the need to apply an equity lens to climate policy, to assess whether new policy proposals across a range of portfolios advantage or disadvantage low-income households.

Kellie Caught, senior advisor on climate and energy at Acoss, is calling for the next federal government to invest in vulnerability mapping to identify communities most at risk from climate change, in order to support development of local climate adaptation and resilience plans.

Governments also need to invest in building the resilience of community organisations such as those providing disability, aged care, meals on wheels and services for homeless people, to ensure they have the capacity to undertake disaster management and resilience planning, and continue operating through extreme weather events, she says.

Acoss is advocating for mandatory energy-efficiency standards for all rental properties, for state and federal governments to invest in upgrading energy efficiency and production in all social and community housing, and for a fund to help low-income earners such as pensioners upgrade their homes’ energy efficiency, as well as programs for remote and Indigenous communities.

It is more than a decade since policymakers were presented with evidence showing that such measures bring concrete health benefits for low-income households.

A widely cited randomised trial, published in 2007 in the BMJ, found that insulating low-income households in New Zealand led to a significantly warmer, drier indoor environment, and resulted in significant improvements in health and comfort, a lower risk of children having time off school or adults having sick days off work, and a trend for fewer hospital admissions for respiratory conditions.

“Interventions of this kind, which focus on low-income communities and poorer quality housing, have the potential to reduce health inequalities,” found the researchers.

A big silent killer’

The health of people in Burnie in north-west Tasmania is shaped by rates of poverty, unemployment and poor educational outcomes that are worse than the state’s average.

At the public hospital, emergency physician Dr Melinda Venn is reminded every day how people who are poorer and sicker have difficulty accessing the services they need. She describes seeing patients who struggle to feed their families, or buy medications and who often can’t afford to put petrol in their cars to get to the doctor.

Her prescription for what would help her community’s health and wellbeing is similar to Renee Blackman’s in north-west Queensland. It includes wide-ranging action to address poverty, including through raising the Newstart allowance and more generally ensuring liveable incomes, as well as access to affordable fresh food, public transport and higher education.

Venn also stresses the importance of better funding for preventative health measures and primary healthcare. “Every day we see people come to the emergency department, either because they can’t afford to get into the GP or they can’t get into

Dr Nick Towle, a medical educator at the University of Tasmania who helped organise a recent Doctors for the Environment Australia conference in Hobart, where delegates declared a climate emergency, says that addressing the intertwined issues of health inequities and climate change will require massive transformation in how governments operate. They must move beyond the current siloed approaches whereby, for example, the housing portfolio can be reluctant to invest in improving housing if savings are to the health portfolio.

Towle says a systems approach would reimagine urban development so that communities are within cycling or walking distance of local food production, green spaces and infrastructure such as shops, primary healthcare and aged care centres, and with active and passive solar a requirement for all new developments.

Like Venn, Towle stresses the need to invest far more in primary healthcare and the prevention of chronic conditions such as obesity, diabetes, lung and cardiac disease, which are more common in poorer communities, and make people less resilient to the effects of heat, which he says “is emerging as a big silent killer”.

Back in Mount Isa, Renee Blackman stresses the importance of local action in responding to both health inequities and climate change. Local governments, especially Indigenous local governments, should be given more support for tackling these issues, she says.

“At least talk to the people it’s going to affect,” she says. “As an Aboriginal organisation, we would never tread on someone else’s Country, without first asking, what do you need?”

An assessment of the major parties’ track records and election promises shows Australia has a better chance of acting on poverty and climate change as critical health equity concerns if there is a change of government.

The Acoss’s election policy tracker suggests the Greens have the best policies for addressing poverty and climate change, while the Climate and Health Alliance scorecard gives the Greens top marks (8 out of 8), followed by Labor (4.5 out of 8) and the LNP (zero out of 8).

The Consumers Health Forum of Australia scorecard gives the Greens’ health policies the highest rating (21 out of a potential score of 37), followed by Labor (16/37) and the LNP (7/7). The Public Health Association of Australia has welcomed Labor’s and the Greens’ commitments on preventative health, while the Australian Health Care Reform Alliance has called on both major parties “to follow the lead of the Greens and commit to health policies that deliver both equity and efficiency”.

Like many, the Consumers Health Forum is disappointed in the lack of focus on primary healthcare, saying “the absence of a transformational agenda for primary care is a missed opportunity this election”. Meanwhile, the Australian Healthcare and Hospitals Association scorecard records the Liberal National party as having no explicit commitment to health equity and, days out from an election, the Rural Doctors Association of Australia says the Greens are the only party to have addressed rural health issues so far. Some health organisations have not yet released an election scorecard.

Reporting in this series is supported by VivCourt through the Guardian Civic Journalism Trust

NACCHO Aboriginal Health Conferences and Events #SaveADate #VoteACCHO : This weeks feature : Alwyn completes his 10 Million steps 8000 km Healing Walk on 18 May with a message for the new government

This weeks featured NACCHO SAVE A DATE events

18 -20 May Cape York to Canberra: Alwyn completes his 8000 km Healing Walk

29th  – 30th  August 2019 NACCHO OCHRE DAY

4 November NACCHO Youth Conference -Darwin NT

5 – 7 November NACCHO Conference and AGM  -Darwin NT

Download the 2019 Health Awareness Days Calendar 

18 May Federal Elections

20 – 26 May Family Matters Week of Action is 20-26 May

2May First Peoples Disability Network, Is hosting a Human Rights Literacy forum

24 May National Sorry Day Bridge Walk Canberra

24-26 May AMA NATIONAL CONFERENCE – #amanatcon

25 May The Long Walk Melbourne

18 -20 June Lowitja Health Conference Darwin

2019 Dr Tracey Westerman’s Workshops 

7 -14 July 2019 National NAIDOC Grant funding round opens

29th  – 30th  August 2019 NACCHO OCHRE DAY

23 -25 September IAHA Conference Darwin

24 -26 September 2019 CATSINaM National Professional Development Conference

9-10 October 2019 NATSIHWA 10 Year Anniversary Conference

16 October Melbourne Uni: Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health and Wellbeing Conference

4 November NACCHO Youth Conference -Darwin NT

5 – 7 November NACCHO Conference and AGM  -Darwin NT

5-8 November The Lime Network Conference New Zealand 

Featured Save a dates date

18 -20 May Cape York to Canberra: Alwyn completes his 8000 km Healing Walk

A First Nations man from Central Queensland, Alwyn Doolan, will have walked more than 7,000 km from Bamaga – at the tip of Cape York – to Canberra when he completes his journey this week

Alwyn is a Gooreng Gooreng and Wakka Wakka man who said he was walking to inspire and empower younger generations, and seek a better future for First Nations people.

The unprecedented 8,000-kilometre, 10-million step, solo journey has led him through four States and over 50 Aboriginal Sovereign Nations.

As he walks he carries three Message Sticks, each representing the three stages of this country’s journey: Pre-colonisation History, Colonisation and Healing: a new dreaming beyond colonisation.

It’s these sticks, along with a tribal lore notice,  that intends to deliver to the Australian Government in May.

Message sticks are a traditional and ancient form of communication which, for Alwyn, carry the hope of truth telling and healing.

“First Nations people in Australia are some of the most disadvantaged in the world, with shocking figures in terms of health and well-being,” he said.

He said there was a long way to go, but he sensed change. 

“There’s something in the air, I believe it’s the right time,” he said.

“I want to give my community hope and inspire them, I want to share the journey for people to be a part of something bigger than myself.

“I feel within my heart and soul a cycle of change must be brought about – a cycle that can be true to its core and one that can, most importantly, heal us.”

Alwyn’s progress can be tracked by regular video posts on Facebook on the Message Stick Walk page.

SEE HERE 

The Message Stick Walk aims to be an important movement where people from all parts of the country and all backgrounds can come together in support of finding a positive and healthy way forward.

Message Stick Walk can be supported by:

  • coming to Canberra on his expected arrival date 18 May, 2019;
  • helping to fund other First Nations people and groups to get there;
  • following and sharing Message Stick Walk on social media; and,
  • contributing to the Message Stick Walk directly (GoFundMe.com/mswalk4us).

Message Stick Walk arrives in Canberra  at Aboriginal Tent Embassy from Bamaga (Cape York)

The Message Stick into Sovereign Embassy on Saturday 18th, and to Parliament House, Monday 20th.

This is a peaceful, family friendly event.

May 18

If you would like to join on this day, the walk will be heading south along the Barton Highway from 9 am

People are invited to join along the way, including the following gathering points arriving into Canberra;

12 noon – ABC Building, Cnr of Wakefield and Northbourne Ave

1 pm – Canberra City Centre

2 pm – Arrive at Aboriginal Tent Embassy – Welcome to Country with gathering of people to support The Message Stick arrival after 1 year of walking.

This will be a day of celebrating an achievement of its first to ever walk the east coast of Australia over 50 Sovereign Nations, Cape York to Hobart and back to Canberra.

Sunday 19th May 2019 –

Gathering of Sovereign Nations, key note speakers, supporters, dancers, & musicians. A day of uniting ourselves around the fire with the unity of all coming together in hype for the Walk to Parliament House Canberra come the following day.

Monday 20th May 2019

9 am Cleansing Ceremony, Walk to Parliament

11 am Statement of Intention –
Australian Government is on Notice

12.30 – 1.30 pm – Public Seminar at ANU – How we move forward together to heal a nation – LJ Hume Centre

http://caepr.cass.anu.edu.au/events/treaty-together-how-we-move-forward-heal-nation

From Monday onwards in Canberra

Delivering The Message Sticks; Community are welcome to wait with me in anticipation of a newly formed government, where I will deliver the Message Sticks and tribal law notice.

Download the NACCHO 2019 Calendar Health Awareness Days

For many years ACCHO organisations have said they wished they had a list of the many Indigenous “ Days “ and Aboriginal health or awareness days/weeks/events.

With thanks to our friends at ZockMelon here they both are!

It even has a handy list of the hashtags for the event.

Download the 53 Page 2019 Health days and events calendar HERE

naccho zockmelon 2019 health days and events calendar

We hope that this document helps you with your planning for the year ahead.

Every Tuesday we will update these listings with new events and What’s on for the week ahead

To submit your events or update your info

Contact: Colin Cowell www.nacchocommunique.com

NACCHO Social Media Editor Tel 0401 331 251

Email : nacchonews@naccho.org.au

18 May Federal Elections 

Welcome to our special NACCHO #Election2019 #VoteACCHO resource page for Affiliates, ACCHO members, stakeholders and supporters. The health of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples is not a partisan political issue and cannot be sidelined any longer.

NACCHO has developed a set of policy #Election2019 recommendations that if adopted, fully funded and implemented by the incoming Federal Government, will provide a pathway forward for improvements in our health outcomes.

We are calling on all political parties to include these recommendations in their election platforms and make a real commitment to improving the health of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples and help us Close the Gap.

With your action and support of our #VoteACCHO campaign we can make the incoming Federal Government accountable.

More info HERE 

NACCHO Acting Chair, Donnella Mills

20 – 26 May Family Matters Week of Action is 20-26 May

The theme is ‘Because of them, we must’ – for the good of our kids, we must act right now. Will you hold an event in your organisation, company or community to raise awareness of this urgent issue? 

21 May First Peoples Disability Network, Is hosting a Human Rights Literacy forum. #FPDN #community#humanrights #Indigenous #culture

All welcome, Catering will be provided.
Location: Aboriginal Advancement League
THORNBURY, Tuesday 21 May 2019

 

24 May National Sorry Day Bridge Walk Canberra

24-26 May AMA NATIONAL CONFERENCE – #amanatcon

25 May The Long Walk Melbourne

Reconciliation Australia is proud to sponsor  again in 2019. Head down to  in Melbourne on 25 May for food, activities, and musical performances by , and more. Learn more: 

 

18 -20 June Lowitja Health Conference Darwin


At the Lowitja Institute International Indigenous Health and Wellbeing Conference 2019 delegates from around the world will discuss the role of First Nations in leading change and will showcase Indigenous solutions.

The conference program will highlight ways of thinking, speaking and being for the benefit of Indigenous peoples everywhere.

Join Indigenous leaders, researchers, health professionals, decision makers, community representatives, and our non-Indigenous colleagues in this important conversation.

More Info 

2019 Dr Tracey Westerman’s Workshops 

More info and dates

7 -14 July 2019 National NAIDOC Grant funding round opens 

The opening of the 2019 National NAIDOC Grant funding round has been moved forward! The National NAIDOC Grants will now officially open on Thursday 24 January 2019.

Head to www.naidoc.org.au to join the National NAIDOC Mailing List and keep up with all things grants or check out the below links for more information now!

https://www.finance.gov.au/resource-management/grants/grantconnect/

https://www.pmc.gov.au/indigenous-affairs/grants-and-funding/naidoc-week-funding

29th  – 30th  Aug 2019 NACCHO OCHRE DAY

Venue: Pullman Hotel – 192 Wellington Parade, East Melbourne Vic 3000

Website to be launched soon

23 -25 September IAHA Conference Darwin

24 September

A night of celebrating excellence and action – the Gala Dinner is the premier national networking event in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander allied health.

The purpose of the IAHA National Indigenous Allied Health Awards is to recognise the contribution of IAHA members to their profession and/or improving the health and wellbeing of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples.

The IAHA National Indigenous Allied Health Awards showcase the outstanding achievements in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander allied health and provides identifiable allied health role models to inspire all Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people to consider and pursue a career in allied health.

The awards this year will be known as “10 for 10” to honour the 10 Year Anniversary of IAHA. We will be announcing 4 new awards in addition to the 6 existing below.

Read about the categories HERE.

24 -26 September 2019 CATSINaM National Professional Development Conference

 

 

The 2019 CATSINaM National Professional Development Conference will be held in Sydney, 24th – 26th September 2019. Make sure you save the dates in your calendar.

Further information to follow soon.

Date: Tuesday the 24th to Thursday the 26th September 2019

Location: Sydney, Australia

Organiser: Chloe Peters

Phone: 02 6262 5761

Email: admin@catsinam.org.au

9-10 October 2019 NATSIHWA 10 Year Anniversary Conference

SAVE THE DATE for the 2019 NATSIHWA 10 Year Anniversary Conference!!!

We’re so excited to announce the date of our 10 Year Anniversary Conference –
A Decade of Footprints, Driving Recognition!!! 

NATSIHWA recognises that importance of members sharing and learning from each other, and our key partners within the Health Sector. We hold a biennial conference for all NATSIHWA members to attend. The conference content focusses on the professional support and development of the Health Workers and Health Practitioners, with key side events to support networking among attendees.  We seek feedback from our Membership to make the conferences relevant to their professional needs and expectations and ensure that they are offered in accessible formats and/or locations.The conference is a time to celebrate the important contribution of Health Workers and Health Practitioners, and the Services that support this important profession.

We hold the NATSIHWA Legends Award night at the conference Gala Dinner. Award categories include: Young Warrior, Health Worker Legend, Health Service Legend and Individual Champion.

Watch this space for the release of more dates for registrations, award nominations etc.

16 October Melbourne Uni: Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health and Wellbeing Conference

The University of Melbourne, Department of Rural Health are pleased to advise that abstract
submissions are now being invited that address Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health and
wellbeing.

The Aboriginal & Torres Strait Islander Health Conference is an opportunity for sharing information and connecting people that are committed to reforming the practice and research of Aboriginal & Torres Strait Islander health and celebrates Aboriginal knowledge systems and strength-based approaches to improving the health outcomes of Aboriginal communities.

This is an opportunity to present evidence-based approaches, Aboriginal methods and models of
practice, Aboriginal perspectives and contribution to health or community led solutions, underpinned by cultural theories to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health and wellbeing.
In 2018 the Aboriginal & Torres Strait Islander Health Conference attracted over 180 delegates from across the community and state.

We welcome submissions from collaborators whose expertise and interests are embedded in Aboriginal health and wellbeing, and particularly presented or co-presented by Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people and community members.

If you are interested in presenting, please complete the speaker registration link

closing date for abstract submission is Friday 3 rd May 2019.
As per speaker registration link request please email your professional photo for our program or any conference enquiries to E. aboriginal-health@unimelb.edu.au.

Kind regards
Leah Lindrea-Morrison
Aboriginal Partnerships and Community Engagement Officer
Department of Rural Health, University of Melbourne T. 03 5823 4554 E. leah.lindrea@unimelb.edu.au

4 November NACCHO Youth Conference -Darwin NT

Darwin Convention Centre

Website to be launched soon

Conference Co-Coordinator Ben Mitchell 02 6246 9309

ben.mitchell@naccho.org.au

5 – 7 November NACCHO Conference and AGM  -Darwin NT

Darwin Convention Centre

Website to be launched soon

Conference Co-Coordinator Ben Mitchell 02 6246 9309

ben.mitchell@naccho.org.au

5-8 November The Lime Network Conference New Zealand 

This years  whakatauki (theme for the conference) was developed by the Scientific Committee, along with Māori elder, Te Marino Lenihan & Tania Huria from .

To read about the conference & theme, check out the  website. 

NACCHO Aboriginal Health #VoteACCHO #AusVotesHealth 1.Overview @ngarrakatye @OxfamAustralia 2. @ANTaR_Vic #Indigenous Affairs #Election19 Scorecard 3. #ACCHO policy position from #NSW @ahmrc and 4. #Election2019 resources/ video from QLD @QAIHC_QLD 

 

In this election campaign, the major parties have together pledged more than $100 billion in new spending commitments, yet their policies targeted at addressing the extreme disadvantage faced by many of Australia’s First Peoples seem to amount to small change.

While Indigenous leaders have gratefully acknowledged these commitments, they are fairly modest when compared with the poverty, poor health and record levels of imprisonment of First Peoples.

Significantly, neither party has pledged to reverse the savage cuts of $534 million to Aboriginal programs made in the 2014 budget.” 

Ngarra Murray is a Wamba Wamba and Yorta Yorta woman and the National Manager of Oxfam Australia’s First Peoples Program : See full report Part 4 below

Part 1 With the Federal Election on Saturday, AH&MRC have identified four priorities.

Read about them here >> https://bit.ly/2VuErx4

Part 2

Join us in calling on politicians to respect and resource the AICCHO sector

https://bit.ly/2D7CLyl

Watch Video Here

#QAIHCDelivers #AusVotesHealth

Part 3 In this 2019 Federal Election Scorecard, ANTaR has provided a guide to the policies of the Liberal-National Coalition, the Labor and Greens parties, in relation to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Affairs.

In early April 2019, ANTaR wrote to the Prime Minister, Minister of Indigenous Affairs, and the Minister for Indigenous Health; the Labor Opposition Leader and shadow Minister for Indigenous Affairs; and the Leader of The Greens seeking their parties’ policies and election commitments relating to:

  1. Closing the Gap in health outcomes and life-expectancy, and addressing the social determinants of health such as housing and systemic racism;
  2. Addressing the injustice of shameful, heavily disproportionate incarceration rates; and
  3. Constitutional Reform – including the implementation of the Uluru Statement from the Heart.

Only Labor and the Greens have responded to our request, and these responses are available on our website in full at ANTAR WEBSITE

If the Coalition write to us in the last week of the Campaign, we’ll be sure to also post their response on the website.

Download the Election Scorecard here

antar-2019-may-scorecard-v2_1 (1)

Part 4  : There been no response from either party to the proposal to invest $100 million to build the capacity of 145 Aboriginal medical services. Continued from opening 

Ngarra Murray is a Wamba Wamba and Yorta Yorta woman and the National Manager of Oxfam Australia’s First Peoples Program

For the record, Australia’s Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples are among the most poverty-stricken Indigenous peoples in the world, and the nation’s most disadvantaged group. In terms of health and economic status, our people are doing far worse than Indigenous peoples in countries with similar histories, such as New Zealand and the United States.

While Aboriginal people live at least 10 years less than other Australians, and our infants die at twice the national rate, the major parties don’t seem to be responding to the recent alarming data showing that these gaps are still not on track.

Both major parties have largely disregarded the policy platform of the Close the Gap campaign, a coalition of 48 organisations, of which Oxfam is a founding member. There has been no response to the core proposal to invest $100 million to build the capacity of 140 Aboriginal medical services.

In the Liberal Party agenda, Indigenous affairs doesn’t even warrant a category among the 20 policy areas covered by “Our Plan”, whereas broadband does.

Retiring Indigenous Affairs Minister Nigel Scullion has put health policy announcements on his website that are not specifically aimed at Indigenous people. He mentions the listing of a skin cancer drug on the PBS at a cost of $81.5 million; the Rural Health Strategy, which includes $84.1 million for the Royal Flying Doctor Service; and, the $50 million National Women’s Health Strategy. This follows the Coalition’s lack of new Indigenous health measures in the budget.

This week, Labor released its Indigenous policy platform, “A Fair Go for First Nations People”, which does include some good policy such as the Voice to Parliament, the Makarrata Commission For Agreement Making And Truth Telling, the Resting Place for remains of First Peoples, and Regional Assemblies.

But in terms of polices that will improve the health and wellbeing of First Peoples, Labor could have done a lot more.

Labor’s health policy amounted to several measures that will cost just $115 million over four years. While this includes funding to address youth suicide and rheumatic heart disease, Labor should be more ambitious. Expanding Aboriginal medical services would be a good place to start.

Labor pledged $107 million to address the extremely high rates of incarceration of First Peoples, which are around 10 times that of other Australians, and even higher for women and children.

While we welcome the significant commitment to justice reinvestment and funding for Aboriginal legal services, what’s needed most is a commitment to work with the states to achieve law reform that will reduce the flow of Aboriginal people into the prison system.

There are some other good policies. We applaud Labor’s expansion of the Indigenous ranger program, the funding for 8,000 new educational places for young women, and the funding for 1300 apprenticeships.

But Labor’s pledge to continue work on the “third iteration of the implementation plan for the National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Plan 2013-23” is ironic. This is the plan developed when Labor was last in government, which has never been funded, and there is no commitment to fund it into the future.

The lack of funding for the health plan, a core policy program that has absorbed a huge amount of effort on the part of Aboriginal leaders over many years, only reinforces perceptions that both sides of politics are lacking the bold vision needed to address our dire needs.

 

NACCHO Aboriginal Health #AusVotesHealth #VoteACCHO Debate 2 of 2 : With 22 #Indigenous candidates for #Election2019 more Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in Parliament does matter ! Here’s why #UluruStatementfromtheHeart

 ” Few First Nations candidates have succeeded in getting elected to parliament, but it is clear that when they do, they can make a substantial difference.

MP Pat Dodson could be the next minister for Indigenous Affairs if Labor wins the federal election, a first for a First Nations person.

The institutions of government remain predominantly white, and almost 60 years after being given the right to vote, very few Indigenous people have been elected to parliament in a system dominated by two major parties.

Candidates who do stand for election are subjected to racism and open discrimination.

The significance of the role played by these First Nations MPs in changing the policy agenda, even in opposition, cannot be overstated.

The Coalition government’s Indigenous Advancement Strategy, cashless welfare card and remote employment program have come under sustained and informed criticism by Indigenous members of the opposition and remain important issues in this campaign.

And importantly, despite the Turnbull government’s rejection of the demands of the Uluru Statement from the Heart, the issues of “voice, treaty, truth” remain on the agenda, thanks to the unstinting efforts of activists and supporters both outside and inside parliament.

Selected extracts from The Conversation

Diana Perche, Senior Lecturer and Academic Coordinator, Nura Gili Indigenous Programs Unit, UNSW

But things are beginning to change for the better. The 2016 election resulted in the highest-ever number of Indigenous members of parliament with Ken Wyatt (Liberal, Hasluck) and Linda Burney (Labor, Barton) elected to the House of Representatives, and Patrick Dodson (Labor, WA), Malarndirri McCarthy (Labor, NT) and Jacqui Lambie (Jacqui Lambie Network, Tasmania) in the Senate. (Lambie was later forced to resign under Section 44 of the constitution due to dual citizenship.)

The 2016 federal election campaign also saw a record number of First Nations candidates, with 17 standing for election, including 11 pre-selected for one of the major parties. For the upcoming election, that record has been broken, with at least 22 candidates counted on the IndigenousX website. However, only eight of these are running for the major parties, and even fewer in winnable seats.

Another sign of progress: Wyatt was appointed minister for Aged Care and Indigenous Health in 2017 – the first Indigenous MP to be promoted to the ministry – and Burney and Dodson currently serve on the frontbench of the opposition. If Labor is elected, Dodson will be named Indigenous Affairs minister, another first for First Nations people.

Indigenous candidates to watch

In the House of Representatives, Wyatt is recontesting the marginal seat of Hasluck in WA, and Burney, the ALP shadow minister for social services, is recontesting the safer NSW seat of Barton. In the Senate, McCarthy and Dodson will also likely be re-elected.

Other candidates to watch include Liberal Warren Mundine, who has been controversially “parachuted” in to contest the NSW seat of Gilmore. Mundine was national president of the ALP in 2006-7 and previously contested elections for Labor. In this election, he is running against a strong ALP candidate in Fiona Phillips, the Nationals’ Katrina Hodgkinson, and Grant Schultz, who lost his pre-selection to Mundine and

Want to know who the Indigenous candidates in the upcoming election? @1KarenWyld compiled a list for @IndigenousX to help. https://t.co/afMMFY0Kav #AUSVote2019 #AusPol #IndigenousX

— IndigenousX Pty Ltd (@IndigenousXLtd) May 5, 2019

In the NT, two First Nations candidates are competing against ALP member Warren Snowdon in Lingiari – Jacinta Price for the Country Liberal Party and George Hanna for the Greens. (Price has called for Hanna to be dropped by the Greens after he posted a racially insensitive meme about her on social media.)

Most other First Nations candidates face long odds to win their races.

In New South Wales, Susan Moylan-Coombs is running as an independent in Warringah against Tony Abbott, but is overshadowed in media coverage by independent Zali Steggall. In Wentworth, Dominic Wy Kanak is running again for the Greens against high-profile candidates Kerryn Phelps and David Sharma.

Likewise, Labor’s Jana Stewart has little chance of unseating Treasurer Josh Frydenberg in the safe Liberal seat of Kooyong.

At least eight more Indigenous candidates are standing for the Senate, but their chances of election are also not strong. Former Senator Jacqui Lambie is recontesting in Tasmania for her Jacqui Lambie Network. And former Senator Joanna Lindgren is standing for the Australian Conservatives in Queensland after losing her seat in the 2016 election as Coalition candidate against Pauline Hanson.

Respected Ngarrindjeri elder Major Moogy Sumner is on the Greens ticket in South Australia, but his chances are very slim. And Tania Major, who is well-known in Queensland for her work with Noel Pearson’s Cape York Institute and was Young Australian of the Year in 2007, is in Queensland. After a bitter pre-selection, though, she has been relegated to fourth on the ticket and is unlikely to be successful.

Candidates hoping to become the diversity they say parliament needs.#Indigenous #Aboriginalhttps://t.co/lsBshukMbn via @ABCNewspic.twitter.com/TVfa7idE4p

— ABC Indigenous (@ABCIndigenous) May 9, 2019

A balancing act for many

Research shows that First Peoples face “representational dilemmas” once in parliament, as they are forced to manage expectations of diverse First Nations communities, while also serving the needs of non-Indigenous constituents and supporting their party’s overall policies.

While the support of a major party is often critical to getting elected, the challenges of obeying party discipline once in parliament can be deeply frustrating. In 2014, Wyatt notably persuaded the Liberal Party room to reverse its decision to soften racial vilification laws by threatening to cross the floor of parliament. Two years later, he indicated he would be open to reviewing the language in the act.

Wyatt has also been unable to convince his party to move forward on constitutional recognition of Indigenous peoples and has been forced to defend the Coalition government’s lack of progress on Indigenous issues.

Read previous NACCHO post here

Why representation matters

In the same way that Julia Gillard’s rise to prime minister prompted more women to take an active interestin politics, the visible presence of First Nations MPs can encourage other Indigenous candidates to stand for election, recognising the power and everyday impact of the decisions made by parliamentarians. This may help lift the chronically low levels of Indigenous voter enrolment and turnout, and support efforts by the Australian Electoral Commission to increase participation, particularly in remote areas.

Another critical element of Indigenous representation in parliament is the diversity of viewpoints it brings to policy-making. First Nations MPs have frequently spoken of their own personal histories and life experiences in debates, especially in their first speeches.

Pat Dodson’s first speech to parliament.

Their connections with First Nations communities are also vital in holding the government accountable. McCarthy and Dodson have played a critical role in questioning Nigel Scullion, the current minister for Indigenous Affairs, in Senate estimates hearings about the impact of government policies on Indigenous communities. In 2016, for instance, Dodson said Scullion showed:

An appalling demonstration of ignorance about the criminal justice system and its interface with Indigenous peoples, about existing cultures in prisons, within police departments.

First Nations representation in parliament has also had a policy impact. Burney has observed that First Nations MPs actively work together across the party divide to raise issues of importance to Indigenous communities, including constitutional recognition.

Within the Labor Party, they have formed a First Nations caucus, which has played a significant role in developing policy. Dodson credited the caucus with the development of Labor’s “Fair Go for First Nations” platform, which includes enshrining an Indigenous voice to parliament in the constitution and creating regional assemblies to get First Nations input on policy-making. Dodson says the ALP wants to be the “party of choice” for First Nations people.

The significance of the role played by these First Nations MPs in changing the policy agenda, even in opposition, cannot be overstated. The Coalition government’s Indigenous Advancement Strategy, cashless welfare card and remote employment program have come under sustained and informed criticism by Indigenous members of the opposition and remain important issues in this campaign.

And importantly, despite the Turnbull government’s rejection of the demands of the Uluru Statement from the Heart, the issues of “voice, treaty, truth” remain on the agenda, thanks to the unstinting efforts of activists and supporters both outside and inside parliament.

Diana Perche, Senior Lecturer and Academic Coordinator, Nura Gili Indigenous Programs Unit, UNSW

This article is republished from The Conversation under a Creative Commons license. Read the original article.

NACCHO Aboriginal Health #AusVotesHealth #VoteACCHO Debate : Who will be the Minister for Indigenous Affairs and Minister for #Indigenous #Health for the incoming Government after 18 May ?

 

 ” Let us not forget that major policies that wreak havoc on communities — like the Northern Territory Intervention and the cashless welfare policies — were enacted with bipartisan support.

While Dodson is a strong voice against laws and policies that harm our people, we cannot ignore that he belongs to a party that has a long history of harming us and voting in favour of policies introduced by the other major party, which harmed us also, under the guise of “for our own good”.

It is disingenuous to lay the fault for oppressive policies solely at the feet of the Coalition, because Labor had their hand in supporting these policies and, in some instances, expanding their scope. Labor has a lot to answer for and only meaningful change can ever address the historical atrocities committed by this organisation.

Labor has not only been historically responsible for policies that oppressed our people but they have been complicit in contemporary oppressive policies “

On Pat Dodson, Labor’s paternalism and avoiding lip service NATALIE CROMB                

Gamilaraay woman and Indigenous affairs editor, Independent Australia. Crikey 

In the final week of the Election 2019 campaign this is the first of our series  “Who will be the Minister for Indigenous Affairs and Minister for Indigenous Health for incoming Government after 18 May ” We welcome your feedback in comments below 

“ Our Shadow Cabinet, guided by our First Nations’ Caucus Committee, has identified targeted and focused initiatives, launched today, that will bring the vision of justice and fairness to the lives of First nations’ peoples.

In education, we have many new and powerful initiatives that work directly to build bridges for the futures of our young people.

Our unprecedented investments in Indigenous health will be community designed and delivered, more than ever before.

Our new policies and programs in the environment will help visitors to understand the complex national cultural web from which our landscapes arise from.

It will be a challenge for us, to do all we have set out in our new policies and programs.

But we will work to achieve that.

We want to be the party of choice for First Nations Peoples “

Senator Patrick Dodson speaking at the Australian Labor Party national launch in Brisbane Sunday full speech HERE and Download policy Document

I have been asked by many about my thoughts on Pat Dodson potentially being minister for Indigenous affairs.

As an outspoken black woman, you best believe I have thoughts — many.

Do I think this is a good thing? Yes. Do I think this is the answer? Hard no on that one.

I am not here to rubbish Dodson, he has a lengthy track record of seeking change for our people. But he is part of the political machine.

He is part of a major party and is beholden to policies drafted about us without us, and because of that I view this announcement by Bill Shorten with the cynicism that is necessary for black fullas.

It is difficult not to be caught up in the exciting prospect of having an Indigenous person holding the role of Indigenous affairs minister after so many years dealing with the farce that has been Nigel Scullion and Tony Abbott but it is essential that we stow our celebrations and consider what this really means in politician speak.

Shorten’s promises

The clue in why we need to be reserved lies in the language of the announcement that Bill Shorten made. Shorten said that paternalism and top-down approaches had failed, which is correct. He also said that “we want to try something different if we get elected”, and stated further “we want to try the idea of Aboriginal-controlled organisations making decisions”.

We need to remember that the words used by politicians are very deliberate, considered and rehearsed. So when Shorten says we “want to try” it sends off alarm bells in my head — he is using this appointment and manner of policy roll-out as an experiment and we are the subjects of this experiment. You might think I am jumping at shadows and consider this rather innocuous but this language and approach is a maintenance of the deficit dynamic.

Bill Shorten does believe he is making a genuine and positive announcement but he doing this from a position of privilege and one where he has not considered change beyond policy roll-out. He has not considered that the issues affecting communities are not “problems” — they are consequences. He has not considered systemic reform to address the failure that is colonisation and the institutions resultant.

What Labor needs to do next

Consequently, it is essential that our support of this announcement be contingent upon it not being mere lip service and change goes beyond merely the manner of policy delivery.

If elected, Labor as a party and as a government needs to have their policies crafted by First Nations drafts people following community consultations with the very communities affected.

Policies should not be broad-brush either; they need to start seeing us for the diverse and vast communities we are. It is not unreasonable for a policy — at the request of the community — to apply solely to that community. Applying a “one size fits all” approach needs to go out the window, along with the viewpoint that we are a problem that needs to be solved.

This announcement does not change anything and we need to remember this and resist tokenism.

Shorten’s announcement is a good one and I do not want to diminish the pride we will all feel when we have one of our own heading up this portfolio. However, the appointment is merely tokenistic if it does not empower Dodson to make structural changes to the way this portfolio operates and to a Labor government should it be elected.

Unless Labor changes the way it operates as a party then this new approach will fail and that failure will be put at the feet of Dodson.

Make no mistake, unless there is change from within the institutions that “govern” this country, all that is happening here is paternalism repackaged. If the intent is to maintain the policies that oppress our people and communities but change the way in which the policies are rolled out, this is simply getting black bodies to do the work of white decision makers. Shorten is not suggesting systemic change here, he is suggesting a change in approach with the delivery of policies — not the policies themselves and herein lies the issue.

While I back Shorten’s announcement, I call upon him and his party for more. Think bigger, more than 200 communities bigger, and then you may grasp how utterly out of your depth you are and see the value in self-determination.

We are not homogenous and have resisted colonial assimilation for over 200 years, perhaps we might know a little something about survival under the worst conditions, and perhaps we could teach a thing or two about how to make this country thrive.

Let me tell you: what we have to teach has nothing to do with capitalism.

NACCHO has developed a set of policy  10 #Election2019 recommendations that if adopted, fully funded and implemented by the incoming Federal Government, will provide a pathway forward for improvements in our health outcomes.

The current health outcomes for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people are unacceptable. 65% of Indigenous people live in rural Australia.

We are calling on all political parties to include these 10 recommendations in their election platforms and make a real commitment to improving the health of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples and help us Close the Gap.

Our ACCHO TOP 10 key asks of a new Federal Government

Read all the 10 Recommendations HERE

 

NACCHO Aboriginal #Vote1RuralHealth #VoteACCHO #AusVotesHealth : Major health groups @NRHAlliance @amapresident @RuralDoctorsAus express concern over lack of #Election2019 focus on #RuralHealth #RemoteCommunities

“ We have a crisis in rural Australia – health outcomes have not improved and we continue to see measurable disparities in levels of access to health care and health outcomes.

I note that yesterday the Australian Medical Association and the Rural Doctors Association of Australia raised similar concerns. They’re concerned about the lack of a comprehensive plan to boost the rural medical workforce and staffing levels in hospitals and health services.”

Mark Diamond  CEO National Rural Health Alliance See full press release PART 1

“It is inconceivable that millions of Australians who experience higher incidence of the drivers of chronic disease could be overlooked.

People in rural, regional, and remote Australia face many obstacles when they require access to the full range of quality medical and health services.

There are shortages of doctors and other health professionals.

It is harder to access specialist services such as maternity and mental health.

And country people often have to travel to capital cities and large regional centres for vital services such as major surgery or cancer care.”

We need to see tailored and targeted policies to address these inequities.

Rural Australians deserve nothing less.”

AMA President, Dr Tony Bartone, said today that rural Australians are still waiting to hear major announcements from the major parties to address the serious and specific health needs of rural and remote communities. See Part 2 Below

“ With less than two weeks left to go until polling day, rural doctors are calling out the major parties on their absence of a comprehensive plan to boost the rural medical workforce.

This is a cone of silence that Maxwell Smart would be proud of

There continues to be a massive maldistribution of doctors and other health professionals between urban Australia and the bush, yet this critical issue remains largely overlooked. “

President of the Rural Doctors Association of Australia (RDAA), Dr Adam Coltzau

NACCHO has developed a set of policy  10 #Election2019 recommendations that if adopted, fully funded and implemented by the incoming Federal Government, will provide a pathway forward for improvements in our health outcomes.

The current health outcomes for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people are unacceptable. 65% of Indigenous people live in rural Australia.

We are calling on all political parties to include these 10 recommendations in their election platforms and make a real commitment to improving the health of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples and help us Close the Gap.

Our ACCHO TOP 10 key asks of a new Federal Government

Read all the 10 Recommendations HERE

Part 1

A chorus of concern over the major parties’ failure to focus on rural health issues in the election campaign is growing, the National Rural Health Alliance says.

The peak body for rural, regional and remote health says the 7 million people living in rural Australia have been unable to discern what the big health policy announcements mean for them.

“Nor has there been a specific focus by the Liberal-Nationals Coalition and Labor on how access to health and preventive health services will be improved for them,” CEO Mark Diamond said.

“We have a crisis in rural Australia – health outcomes have not improved and we continue to see measurable disparities in levels of access to health care and health outcomes.

“I note that yesterday the Australian Medical Association and the Rural Doctors Association of Australia raised similar concerns. They’re concerned about the lack of a comprehensive plan to boost the rural medical workforce and staffing levels in hospitals and health services.

“The Greens have acknowledged that they recognize the significance of health care in rural areas and have issued a specific rural health statement which I commend them for.

“And yesterday, the Independent candidate for Indi, Helen Haines, joined the call for a boost to the allied health professions taskforce.

“Getting more allied health professionals into rural Australia is vital to address the chronic inequality of access to health services.

“This is a key part of the National Rural Health Alliance’s 2019 Election Charter.” (See www.ruralhealth.org.au/election19)

The NRHA is calling for

  • An additional 3000 Aboriginal Health Workers and practitioners
  • Increased funding for Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisations (Labor has committed some funds for this)
  • An additional 3000 allied health positions
  • Trials created in 20 rural and remote sites to test for the best workforce models
  • A community grants program that communities can apply to for funds for better digital infrastructure so they can access healthcare online
  • Medicare rebates for online or telehealth consults to people in outer regional, remote and very remote areas
  • A special Mission for Rural Health created in the Medical Research Future Fund that is allocated a share of the fund proportionate to the population in rural Australia (28% = $360m)
  • A commitment to endorse the Uluru Statement and establish a Makarrata Commission for the sake of the nation’s wellbeing

Mr Diamond said parties must show they can govern for all of Australia, not just cities.

With 28% of the population and 7 million people, it’s important that all parties represent the interests of people in country areas. Rural health matters.

Part 2

AMA President, Dr Tony Bartone, said today that rural Australians are still waiting to hear major announcements from the major parties to address the serious and specific health needs of rural and remote communities.

Dr Bartone said it is surprising and disappointing that rural health remains largely neglected this far into the election campaign.

“It is inconceivable that millions of Australians who experience higher incidence of the drivers of chronic disease could be overlooked,” Dr Bartone said.

“People in rural, regional, and remote Australia face many obstacles when they require access to the full range of quality medical and health services.

“There are shortages of doctors and other health professionals.

“It is harder to access specialist services such as maternity and mental health.

“And country people often have to travel to capital cities and large regional centres for vital services such as major surgery or cancer care.

“We need to see tailored and targeted policies to address these inequities. Rural Australians deserve nothing less.”

Dr Bartone said that there will be some flow-on to rural Australia from the policies already announced by the major parties, including public hospital funding, new PBS drugs, the Government’s Rural Generalist Pathway medical training initiatives, and Labor’s cancer and seniors’ dental plans, but there are still major gaps.

“It is staggering that there was very little mention of rural health during last week’s Health Debate at the National Press Club,” Dr Bartone said.

“The situation is critical.

“Rural communities need real investment in medical infrastructure and incentives to attract more permanent doctors.

“Country towns are seeing medical services closed on them with no other options provided.

“Rural maternity services are deteriorating. Earlier this year, expectant mothers in Queensland were sent DIY birthing kits because their nearest birthing unit was too far to get to.

“Many communities are struggling with few or no doctors, and many doctors will be looking to retire in the coming years with no one there to take over for them.

“In a recent AMA poll, the top priority for our rural doctors was extra funding and resources for hospitals to support improved staffing levels, including core visiting medical officers, to allow workable rosters.

“The pressure on public hospital staff and resources is felt even more acutely in rural, regional, and remote areas.

“Training the next generation of rural doctors is a major priority. We need strategic policies that support students from rural backgrounds to study medicine.

“We want to see investment in programs that create positive training experiences for prevocational doctors in rural areas.

“We need to support these students to complete their training rurally so that they can choose to stay to live and work in rural areas and deliver the care these communities need.

“Rural Australian families need the confidence and comfort of being able to see a doctor or other health professional when they need care or advice, and to be able to get to hospital when they are sick or injured.

“It is not too late for the major parties to provide rural Australians with that security.”

The AMA’s Key Health Issues for the 2019 Federal Election calls on the major parties to:

  • provide funding and resources to support improved staffing levels and workable rosters for rural doctors, including better access to locum relief and investment in hospital facilities, equipment, and practice infrastructure;
  • expand the successful Specialist Training Program to 1,400 places by 2021, with higher priority being given to training places in regional and rural areas, generalist training, and specialties that are undersupplied;
  • fund a further 425 rural GP infrastructure grants of up to $500,000 each;
  • provide additional funding/grants to individual GPs and practices to support nonvocationally registered doctors to attain fellowship through the More Doctors for Rural Australia Program; and
  • support further reforms to medical school selection criteria for Commonwealth supported students; and introduce changes to the structure of courses so that the targeted intake of medical students from a rural background is lifted from 25 per cent of all new enrolments to one-third of all new enrolments, and the proportion of medical students required to undertake at least one year of clinical training in a rural area is lifted from 25 per cent to one-third.

The AMA’s health policy wish list – Key Health Issues for the 2019 Federal Election – is available at https://ama.com.au/article/keyhealthissues2019federalelection

 

Part 3 Rural doctors urge parties to “Get Smart”  on rural health workforce plan

With less than two weeks left to go until polling day, rural doctors are calling out the major parties on their absence of a comprehensive plan to boost the rural medical workforce.

“This is a cone of silence that Maxwell Smart would be proud of”

President of the Rural Doctors Association of Australia (RDAA), Dr Adam Coltzau, said.

“There continues to be a massive maldistribution of doctors and other health professionals between urban Australia and the bush, yet this critical issue remains largely overlooked.

“Yes, there has been funding committed by both the Coalition and Labor to kick-start a National Rural Generalist Pathway, and this is very welcome – but if the major parties think that the Pathway will be the panacea for the shortage of doctors and other health professionals in the bush, they are sadly mistaken.

“The Pathway needs to be just one component of a much wider rural health workforce strategy – one that not only delivers more Rural Generalist doctors to the bush, but also more GPs, specialists, nurses, midwives and allied health professionals.

“The challenges of accessing health services in rural areas have not been resolved, and will require the incoming government to ‘get smart’ in improving this.

“It will require a practical, big picture strategy, not just tinkering at the edges.

“It will require the incoming government to invest in more training places in the bush, so newly-minted doctors are able to access the training they need in their intern and junior doctor years.

“There is real opportunity for rural hospitals, rural general practices and other rural health settings to meet the growing demand for junior doctor training, and to keep these doctors in the bush – but the right supports will be needed to make this happen.

“More also needs to be done to increase the capacity for regional training opportunities in non-GP Specialist training and Advanced Skills posts.

“These places are largely controlled by the specialist colleges, and it is virtually impossible for young doctors to access this training outside metropolitan areas or very large regional centres.

“This makes it very difficult for those doctors who want a career as a non-GP specialist in rural Australia to follow that path.

“The lack of commitment from the major parties to fix the rural health workforce crisis is a major black hole in the election campaign – and it needs urgent attention before polling day.”

 

 

NACCHO Aboriginal Health and #CommunityPharmacy #AusVotesHealth #VoteACCHO @PharmGuildAus Pharmacy Guild and NACCHO seek commitment to Indigenous Pharmacy Programs reform

“NACCHO member services continue to provide feedback on the urgent need to reform these programs.  There are still patients who are not serviced effectively by these programs and some who are falling through the gaps.

Medicines access for Aboriginal people is still below that of the overall Australian population and access is not commensurate with the burden of disease that Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people suffer.

Through our members’ feedback and the Indigenous Pharmacy Programs review, we know how the system needs to be improved.

Now it is time for political leaders to act.”

NACCHO Acting Chairperson Ms Donnella Mills said that while the Indigenous Pharmacy Programs have improved medicines access and use for Aboriginal people across Australia, more needs to be done

Read all previous Aboriginal Health and Community Pharmacy Articles HERE

Read all 10 NACCHO Election Recommendations in full HERE

Polices and strategies to help ensure equity of access for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander patients to culturally safe primary healthcare services in rural, regional and remote areas must be a priority for any Federal Government following the May election.

The Pharmacy Guild of Australia and the National Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation (NACCHO) are seeking a clear and timely commitment from the major political parties to reform the Indigenous Pharmacy Programs to provide better healthcare access and services for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander patients in these regions.

To achieve this, following reforms to improve Indigenous Pharmacy Programs must be regarded as mandatory by any incoming government.

  • Expand the authority to write Close the Gap scripts for all prescribers.
  • Make the Close the Gap client registration process more straightforward and accessible.
  • Link medicines subsidy to individual clients and not practices through a national identifier.
  • Improve how remote clients can receive fully subsidised medicines in non-remote areas.
  • Increase and better target funding for Quality
  • Use of Medicines for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people and health services

See NACCHO Pharmacy and Medicines web page

National President of the Pharmacy Guild George Tambassis said community pharmacies are a key component of primary healthcare for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples.

“To date significant gains have been achieved through the current Indigenous Pharmacy Programs and successful and sustainable partnerships between Indigenous health services and community pharmacies have helped to provide services for Aboriginal people that improve health outcomes and assist in Closing the Gap,” Mr Tambassis said.

“But we need to do more and we need to reform the Indigenous Pharmacy Programs to move with the changing needs of these patients and the changing health environment of their communities.”

Integrated, comprehensive pharmaceutical care is the requisite standard that should be delivered to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people living in urban, regional and remote Australia. Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples should have equitable access to medicines, pharmacy programs and QUM services regardless of where they live.

 

 

NACCHO Aboriginal Health #VoteACCHO #AusVotesHealth : @VACCHO_CEO  calls on the incoming government after #Election2019 to change the #remote focus to Close the Gap as a majority of Aboriginal peoples live in #urban and #regional Australia

The reality is we will never Close the Gap if we focus on 26 per cent of Aboriginal peoples.”

Addressing the workforce shortages and infrastructure issues faced by Aboriginal Controlled Community Organisations (ACCOs), an Infrastructure and Workforce Plan was needed.

Significant transformation of a sector requires a carefully planned and considered approach, we need to get this right

ACCOs provide comprehensive, culturally-responsive and holistic support, but we depend on sustainable investment into our infrastructure and workforce. Short-term, proscriptive funding cycles inhibit long-term gains needed to improve Aboriginal health and wellbeing across Australia.

We call on all parties to recognise the important role played by ACCOs in Closing the Gap and to ensure that whoever forms the next Federal Government ensures they are funded effectively to achieve good outcomes for all Aboriginal peoples, regardless of where they live “

Victorian Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation (VACCHO) Acting CEO Trevor Pearce

Sustainability, Prevention Accountability to & for us.
Download HERE

Whoever Australia decides to back on 18 May, they need to remember that when it comes to the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities “it’s not just a northern or remote problem”.

The fact is that the majority of Aboriginal peoples live in urban and regional Australia, not remote areas, Victorian Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation (VACCHO) Acting CEO Trevor Pearce says.

“Governments need to take this fact into account”, he said.“The only images that the vast majority of Australians are permitted to see of Indigenous Australia is often remote. When in fact, the majority of us live in cities and regional country towns.

“Just like the rest of Australia, we hug the eastern seaboard.”

Based on the 2016 ABS 74 per cent of Aboriginal and Torre Strait Islander people live in Queensland, NSW, ACT, Victoria and Tasmania.

“The focus on remote areas means there is reduced funding and opportunities available for the 74 per cent of First Nations peoples who live in urban and regional Australia, Mr Pearce said.

“As part of our Federal Election Platform we are seeking a national review of current funding models that have geographically-based funding limitations. “These models fail to account for the complex range of health and wellbeing issues experienced by Aboriginal peoples living in urban and regional locations.

“What is of most concern is that the chronic conditions affecting Aboriginal people in Melbourne, Mount Druitt and Maningrida are very similar. How can this be? The fact is that many Aboriginal peoples living in urban and regional areas have the same poor health and wellbeing issues  as communities living in remote areas, sometimes even worse. There is a misrepresentation that we have infrastructure and services coming out of our ears, when in truth we still experience high rates of chronic health issues. The health gap exists in urban areas, just as much as it does in rural and remote areas. Mr Pearce said.

“Homelessness and rates of children (kids) in out-of-home care is highest in Victoria. Yet the gap around rheumatic heart disease is almost closed here.

“The impact of colonisation manifests in different ways across the country, but it can be seen everywhere. Our rights have to be upheld, and systemic inequality has to be addressed. “This isn’t about reducing funding for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples in remote areas. Funding must meet need, everywhere, full stop.“We need the Federal Government to stop using Indigenous disadvantage in remote communities to prop up a misguided view that they are addressing Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health problems.”

Under the Indigenous Advancement Strategy (IAS) the vast majority of Victoria is excluded from the Remote Australia Strategies program, due to the State’s geographical make-up. Without the opportunity to tender for all five IAS funding programs, “Aboriginal peoples in Victoria are automatically disadvantaged, Mr Pearce said.

 

NACCHO Aboriginal Health #VoteACCHO 40 health advocates will be tweeting via #AusVotesHealth today 8 May to profile important health issues ahead of the Federal election.

NACCHO and Croakey followers are invited to join a Twitter festival on Wednesday 8 May, where more than 40 health advocates will be tweeting to profile important health issues ahead of the Federal election.

Follow the discussions on Twitter and contribute your views by using the hashtag #AusVotesHealth.

Please encourage your networks and organisations to follow the discussions and to retweet as much as possible.

Bookmark this Twitter list to follow the guest tweeters.

The #AusVotesHealth Twitter festival will be timely, setting the scene for the third leaders debate, to be held during prime time at the National Press Club in Canberra on Wednesday moderated by ABC journalist and National Press Club President Sabra Lane.

Download a press release about this event here.

Published from Croakey

 


#AusVotesHealth program

8-8.30am – Launch

Mrs Janine Mohamed, chair of Croakey Health Media and CEO of Lowitja Institute
@JanineMilera


8.30-9am – Introductions

#AusVotesHealth moderators

• Melissa Sweet, @croakeyblogOur house is on fire, where is the emergency response?
• Marie McInerney, @mariemcinerneyFantasyland – a place I want to be
• Jennifer Doggett, @JenniferDoggettHighlights and holes – what do we already know about the major parties’ policies and what else do we want from them over the next 2 weeks to inform our decision on May 18th?


9-9.15am – Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health matters

The Congress of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Nurses and Midwives
@CATSINaM


 

9.15-9.45am – #VoteACCHO

Donnella Mills, acting chair of the National Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation: 10 great reasons why you should #VoteACCHO for Aboriginal Health in Aboriginal Hands
@NACCHOChair ‏ 

@NACCHOAustralia 

 

 


9.45-10am – Worth two in the bush

Amy Coopes, editor at Croakey News
@coopesdetat


10-10.15am – #ClimateHealthEmergency

The Climate and Health Alliance
@Health_Climate


10.15-10.30am – Public health policy

Malcolm Baalman, Public Health Association of Australia
@_PHAA_


10.30-10.50am – Getting us active?

Professor William Bellew
@billbellew


10.50-11.15am – Fixing health inequalities makes everyone healthier

Cassandra Goldie, CEO of ACOSS
@cassandragoldie@ACOSS.


11-11.15am – Oral health, on the agenda

Dr Chris Bourke, National Oral Health Alliance
@chrisbourke

(Concurrent session)


11.15 – 11.30am – Mental health supports and NDIS: when two policies collide…

Dave Peters
@Dpeters1977

Dave is an early career researcher with the Brotherhood of St Laurence and has been active in advocacy, research and service design within Neami National for a number of years as a service user of that organisation.  In recent times, Dave has become heavily involved as Co-Chair of the Equally Well Committee, which is working to address the physical health of people living with Mental Illness.  Dave is passionate about social justice and ensuring appropriate access to supports for people in need, with a particular interest in Mental Health and NDIS.


11.30-11.45  – Self-determination matters

The Centre of Best Practice in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Suicide Prevention (CBPATSISP) 
@cbatsispep


11.45-12 noon – What do election promises mean for consumers’ health?

Leanne Wells, CEO of the Consumers Health Forum of Australia
@LeanneWells63@CHFofAustralia


11.45-12 noon – Training the public service

Sally Fitzpatrick
@blinkandumissme

(Concurrent session)


12-12.30 – What about policies for the social determinants of health?

Lyn Morgain, SDOH Alliance, cohealth
@MsLynM@SDOHAlliance, @cohealth_au


12.15-12.30 – Healing for the future

Richard Weston
@RichJWeston

(Concurrent session)


12.30- 12.45 – For a healthy Australia, vote #1 health

Alison Verhoeven, CEO of the Australian Healthcare and Hospitals Association
@AlisonVerhoeven@aushealthcare


12.45-1pm – Addressing poverty as a critical but under-recognised health issue

Lou Walsh
@laqwalsh

Lou is a PhD student at the Centre for Health Communication and Participation at LaTrobe University, examining how social media can be used as a tool to facilitate consumer involvement in health service design and quality improvement.


1-1.15pm – Walk with us

Victorian Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation (VACCHO) – see election statement.
@VACCHO_org


1.15-1.30pm – Active transport and other health policies

Dr Arnagretta Hunter, consultant physician and cardiologist, Doctors for the Environment Australia member
@cbr_heartdoc,  @DocsEnvAus


1.30-1.45 -What do election promises hold for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people?

Summer May Finlay, Yorta Yorta woman, public health practitioner and researcher, and contributing editor at Croakey
@SummerMayFinlay


1.45-2pm – Coal seam gas and the climate emergency

Dr John Van Der Kallen, rheumatologist, member Doctors for the Environment Australia
@johnvanderkall1, @DocsEnvAus


2-2.15pm – Looking outside the health sector for better health

Dr Belinda Townsend, Research Fellow, NHMRC Centre for Research Excellence in the Social Determinants of Health, ANU.
@BelTownsend


2.15-2.30pm – Research Matters

The Lowitja Institute
@LowitjaInstitut


2.30-2.45pm – Justice health

Dr Megan Williams, Senior Lecturer and Head of the Girra Maa Indigenous Health Discipline at the Graduate School of Health, University of Technology
@MegBastard


2.45-3pm – Where is the focus for rural and remote health?

National Rural Health Alliance
@NRHAlliance


3-3.15 pm – What we’re asking for this federal election

El Gibbs, People with Disability Australia
@bluntshovels, 


3.15-3.30pm – Health for all, or high quality health care for some

Dr Tim Woodruff, Doctors Reform Society
@woodruff_tim@drsreform


3.30pm – 3.45pm – Cultural safety and health workforce

Australian Indigenous Doctors Association
@AIDAAustralia


3.45-4pm – Prioritise prevention to reduce chronic disease risk factors

Australian Chronic Disease Prevention Alliance
@ACDPAlliance


4pm – 4.15pm – Transport for health

Dr Graeme McLeay, member, Doctors for the Environment Australia

@Gmac45Graeme,DocsEnvAus


4.15-4.30pm – Back to Bilo

The Home to Bilo campaign and better health for asylum seekers and refugees
@HometoBilo


4.30-4.45pm – Show me the equity!

Australian Health Care Reform Alliance (Jennifer Doggett)
@AusHealthReform


4.45-5pm – Governing for Health

Professor Fran Baum AO,  Matthew Flinders Distinguished Professor of Public Health and Director of the Southgate Institute of Health, Society and Equity at Flinders University.
@baumfran@crehealthequity


5-5.15pm – What are the major policies promising on health this election?

Professor Stephen Duckett, the Grattan Institute @stephenjduckett@grattaninst.
Read more.


5.15-5.30pm – Social justice – it’s a health issue

Dr Simon Judkins, Australasian College for Emergency Medicine
@JudkinsSimon@acemonline


5.30-5.45 pm – “Consumptagenic” threats to health

Professor Sharon FrielDirector, School of Regulation and Global Governance (RegNet) and Professor of Health Equity, ANU College of Asia and the Pacific
@SharonFrielOz


5.30pm-6pm – What do we want, when do we want it by? The first 100 days

Associate Professor James Ward, SAHMRI
@researchjames

(Concurrent session)


6-6.15pm – Wrapping the election health news

Dr Lesley Russell, health policy analyst, contributing editor at Croakey News
@LRussellWolpe


6-6.15 – Everybody’s Home

Kate Colvin, Spokesperson for the Everybody’s Home campaign, and Manager – Policy and Communications, Council to Homeless Persons
@ColvinKate@CHPVic

(Concurrent session)


6.15-6.30pm – Talking Teeth

Professor Marc Tennant, UWA
@MarcTennant


6.30-6.45 pm – Rural and remote health perspectives

Dr Ewen McPhee, President of the Australian College of Rural and Remote Medicine, and Past President of the Rural Doctors Association of Australia 
@Fly_texan


6.45-7pm – Climate crisis: our future is now

Professor Melissa Haswell, QUT
@im4empowerment


7pm – Wrapping it up

Throughout the day, Paul Dutton will tweet election health commentary – follow @PaulDutton1968.

NACCHO Aboriginal Health #SaveADate : This weeks feature the 8 May #AusVotesHealth #VoteACCHO Twitter Festival from 8.00 Am till late

This weeks featured NACCHO SAVE A DATE events

May 8 Please join an election health discussion at #AusVotesHealth  From 8am until late on Wednesday

4 November NACCHO Youth Conference -Darwin NT

5 – 7 November NACCHO Conference and AGM  -Darwin NT

Download the 2019 Health Awareness Days Calendar 

15 May Cultural Safety Consultation closes

20 – 26 May Family Matters Week of Action is 20-26 May

2May First Peoples Disability Network, Is hosting a Human Rights Literacy forum

20 -24 May 2019 Please note the  World Indigenous Housing Conference. Gold Coast has been postponed to later in the year Updated 7 May 

24 May National Sorry Day Bridge Walk Canberra

25 May The Long Walk Melbourne

18 -20 June Lowitja Health Conference Darwin

2019 Dr Tracey Westerman’s Workshops 

7 -14 July 2019 National NAIDOC Grant funding round opens

23 -25 September IAHA Conference Darwin

24 -26 September 2019 CATSINaM National Professional Development Conference

9-10 October 2019 NATSIHWA 10 Year Anniversary Conference

16 October Melbourne Uni: Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health and Wellbeing Conference

5-8 November The Lime Network Conference New Zealand 

Featured Save a dates date

Please join an election health discussion at #AusVotesHealth

From 8am until late on Wednesday, 8 May

NACCHO News readers and followers are invited to join a Twitter festival on Wednesday 8 May to profile important health issues ahead of the Federal election.

You can follow the discussions on Twitter and contribute your views by using the hashtag #AusVotesHealth.

Please encourage your networks and organisations to follow the discussions during the day and to retweet as much as possible.

Leading Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health organisations and experts will contribute to the discussions and policy analysis, including NACCHO chair Donella Mills (guest tweeter from 9.15-9.45am AEST).

NACCHO has developed a set of policy  10 #Election2019 recommendations that if adopted, fully funded and implemented by the incoming Federal Government, will provide a pathway forward for improvements in our health outcomes.

We are calling on all political parties to include these 10 recommendations in their election platforms and make a real commitment to improving the health of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples and help us Close the Gap.

Our ACCHO TOP 10 key asks of a new Federal Government

Read all the 10 Recommendations HERE

Mrs Janine Mohamed, CEO of the Lowitja Institute and chair of Croakey Health Media, will launch the discussions at 8am AEST.

You can also follow the guest tweeters at this Twitter list :

https://twitter.com/croakeyblog/lists/ausvoteshealth?lang=en

The #AusVotesHealth Twitter festival will be timely, setting the scene for the third leaders debate, to be held during prime time at the National Press Club in Canberra on Wednesday moderated by ABC journalist and National Press Club President Sabra Lane.

The #AusVotesHealth discussions will be moderated by Croakey editors Melissa Sweet (@Croakeyblog), Marie McInerney (@mariemcinerney) and Jennifer Doggett (@JenniferDoggett).

Download the NACCHO 2019 Calendar Health Awareness Days

For many years ACCHO organisations have said they wished they had a list of the many Indigenous “ Days “ and Aboriginal health or awareness days/weeks/events.

With thanks to our friends at ZockMelon here they both are!

It even has a handy list of the hashtags for the event.

Download the 53 Page 2019 Health days and events calendar HERE

naccho zockmelon 2019 health days and events calendar

We hope that this document helps you with your planning for the year ahead.

Every Tuesday we will update these listings with new events and What’s on for the week ahead

To submit your events or update your info

Contact: Colin Cowell www.nacchocommunique.com

NACCHO Social Media Editor Tel 0401 331 251

Email : nacchonews@naccho.org.au

15 May Cultural Safety Consultation closes 

This engagement process is important to ensure the definition is co-designed with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people, health professionals and organisations across Australia.

Cultural safety is essential to improving health and wellbeing outcomes for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples and we are committed to a genuine partnership approach to develop a clear definition “

NHLF Chair, Pat Turner said the forum’s partnership with the Strategy Group meant that the definition is being led by Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health experts, which is an important value when developing policies or definitions that affect Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples.

The NHLF has been operating since 2011 and is national representative committee for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health peak bodies who provide advice on all aspects of health and well-being.

Help define this important term for the scheme that regulates health practitioners across Australia.

AHPRA, the National Boards and Accreditation Authorities in the National Registration and Accreditation Scheme which regulates registered health practitioners in Australia have partnered with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health leaders and the National Health Leadership Forum (NHLF) to release a public consultation.

Together, they are seeking feedback on a proposed definition of ‘cultural safety’ to develop an agreed, national baseline definition that can be used as a foundation for embedding cultural safety across all functions in the National Registration and Accreditation Scheme and for use by the National Health Leadership Forum.

In total, there are 44 organisations represented in this consultation, which is being coordinated by the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Strategy Group (Strategy Group), which is convened by AHPRA, and the NHLF (a list of representatives is available below).

Strategy Group Co-Chair, Professor Gregory Phillips said the consultation is a vital step for achieving health equity for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples. (see Picture below )

‘Patient safety for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples is inextricably linked with cultural safety. We need a baseline definition of ‘cultural safety’ that can be used across the National Scheme so that we can help registered health practitioners understand what cultural safety is and how it can help achieve health equity for all Australians’, said Prof Phillips.

The NHLF has been operating since 2011 and is national representative committee for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health peak bodies who provide advice on all aspects of health and well-being.

The consultation is a continuation of the work by the National Scheme’s Strategy Group that has achieving health equity for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples as its overall goal. Members of the Group include Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health leaders and members from AHPRA, National Boards, Accreditation Authorities and NSW Councils.

AHPRA’s Agency Management Committee Chair, Mr Michael Gorton AM, said the far reach of this work is outlined in the Strategy Group’s Statement of intent, which was published last year.

‘The approach to this consultation is embodied in the Strategy Group’s Statement of intent, which has commitment, accountability, shared priorities, collaboration and high-level participation as its values. As a scheme, we are learning from our engagement with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander leaders, who are the appropriate leaders in this work. I thank these leaders, and the experts who have shared their knowledge and expertise with us, for their generosity and leadership which will lead to better health outcomes’, said Mr Gorton.

The six-week consultation is open to the public. Everyone interested in helping to shape the definition of ‘cultural safety’ that will be used in the National Scheme and by NHLF members is warmly invited to share their views.The consultation is open until 5:00pm, Wednesday 15 May 2019.

For more information:

18 May Federal Elections 

Welcome to our special NACCHO #Election2019 #VoteACCHO resource page for Affiliates, ACCHO members, stakeholders and supporters. The health of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples is not a partisan political issue and cannot be sidelined any longer.

NACCHO has developed a set of policy #Election2019 recommendations that if adopted, fully funded and implemented by the incoming Federal Government, will provide a pathway forward for improvements in our health outcomes.

We are calling on all political parties to include these recommendations in their election platforms and make a real commitment to improving the health of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples and help us Close the Gap.

With your action and support of our #VoteACCHO campaign we can make the incoming Federal Government accountable.

More info HERE 

NACCHO Acting Chair, Donnella Mills

20 – 26 May Family Matters Week of Action is 20-26 May

The theme is ‘Because of them, we must’ – for the good of our kids, we must act right now. Will you hold an event in your organisation, company or community to raise awareness of this urgent issue?

21 May First Peoples Disability Network, Is hosting a Human Rights Literacy forum. #FPDN #community#humanrights #Indigenous #culture

All welcome, Catering will be provided.
Location: Aboriginal Advancement League
THORNBURY, Tuesday 21 May 2019

20 -24 May  Please note on May 7 the 2019 World Indigenous Housing Conference. Gold Coast was postponed by the National Congress 

 

24 May National Sorry Day Bridge Walk Canberra

25 May The Long Walk Melbourne

Reconciliation Australia is proud to sponsor again in 2019. Head down to in Melbourne on 25 May for food, activities, and musical performances by , , and more. Learn more:

 

18 -20 June Lowitja Health Conference Darwin


At the Lowitja Institute International Indigenous Health and Wellbeing Conference 2019 delegates from around the world will discuss the role of First Nations in leading change and will showcase Indigenous solutions.

The conference program will highlight ways of thinking, speaking and being for the benefit of Indigenous peoples everywhere.

Join Indigenous leaders, researchers, health professionals, decision makers, community representatives, and our non-Indigenous colleagues in this important conversation.

More Info 

2019 Dr Tracey Westerman’s Workshops 

More info and dates

7 -14 July 2019 National NAIDOC Grant funding round opens 

The opening of the 2019 National NAIDOC Grant funding round has been moved forward! The National NAIDOC Grants will now officially open on Thursday 24 January 2019.

Head to www.naidoc.org.au to join the National NAIDOC Mailing List and keep up with all things grants or check out the below links for more information now!

https://www.finance.gov.au/resource-management/grants/grantconnect/

https://www.pmc.gov.au/indigenous-affairs/grants-and-funding/naidoc-week-funding

23 -25 September IAHA Conference Darwin

24 September

A night of celebrating excellence and action – the Gala Dinner is the premier national networking event in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander allied health.

The purpose of the IAHA National Indigenous Allied Health Awards is to recognise the contribution of IAHA members to their profession and/or improving the health and wellbeing of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples.

The IAHA National Indigenous Allied Health Awards showcase the outstanding achievements in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander allied health and provides identifiable allied health role models to inspire all Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people to consider and pursue a career in allied health.

The awards this year will be known as “10 for 10” to honour the 10 Year Anniversary of IAHA. We will be announcing 4 new awards in addition to the 6 existing below.

Read about the categories HERE.

24 -26 September 2019 CATSINaM National Professional Development Conference

 

 

The 2019 CATSINaM National Professional Development Conference will be held in Sydney, 24th – 26th September 2019. Make sure you save the dates in your calendar.

Further information to follow soon.

Date: Tuesday the 24th to Thursday the 26th September 2019

Location: Sydney, Australia

Organiser: Chloe Peters

Phone: 02 6262 5761

Email: admin@catsinam.org.au

9-10 October 2019 NATSIHWA 10 Year Anniversary Conference

SAVE THE DATE for the 2019 NATSIHWA 10 Year Anniversary Conference!!!

We’re so excited to announce the date of our 10 Year Anniversary Conference –
A Decade of Footprints, Driving Recognition!!! 

NATSIHWA recognises that importance of members sharing and learning from each other, and our key partners within the Health Sector. We hold a biennial conference for all NATSIHWA members to attend. The conference content focusses on the professional support and development of the Health Workers and Health Practitioners, with key side events to support networking among attendees.  We seek feedback from our Membership to make the conferences relevant to their professional needs and expectations and ensure that they are offered in accessible formats and/or locations.The conference is a time to celebrate the important contribution of Health Workers and Health Practitioners, and the Services that support this important profession.

We hold the NATSIHWA Legends Award night at the conference Gala Dinner. Award categories include: Young Warrior, Health Worker Legend, Health Service Legend and Individual Champion.

Watch this space for the release of more dates for registrations, award nominations etc.

16 October Melbourne Uni: Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health and Wellbeing Conference

The University of Melbourne, Department of Rural Health are pleased to advise that abstract
submissions are now being invited that address Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health and
wellbeing.

The Aboriginal & Torres Strait Islander Health Conference is an opportunity for sharing information and connecting people that are committed to reforming the practice and research of Aboriginal & Torres Strait Islander health and celebrates Aboriginal knowledge systems and strength-based approaches to improving the health outcomes of Aboriginal communities.

This is an opportunity to present evidence-based approaches, Aboriginal methods and models of
practice, Aboriginal perspectives and contribution to health or community led solutions, underpinned by cultural theories to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health and wellbeing.
In 2018 the Aboriginal & Torres Strait Islander Health Conference attracted over 180 delegates from across the community and state.

We welcome submissions from collaborators whose expertise and interests are embedded in Aboriginal health and wellbeing, and particularly presented or co-presented by Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people and community members.

If you are interested in presenting, please complete the speaker registration link

closing date for abstract submission is Friday 3 rd May 2019.
As per speaker registration link request please email your professional photo for our program or any conference enquiries to E. aboriginal-health@unimelb.edu.au.

Kind regards
Leah Lindrea-Morrison
Aboriginal Partnerships and Community Engagement Officer
Department of Rural Health, University of Melbourne T. 03 5823 4554 E. leah.lindrea@unimelb.edu.au

4 November NACCHO Youth Conference -Darwin NT

Darwin Convention Centre

Website to be launched soon

Conference Co-Coordinator Ben Mitchell 02 6246 9309

ben.mitchell@naccho.org.au

5 – 7 November NACCHO Conference and AGM  -Darwin NT

Darwin Convention Centre

Website to be launched soon

Conference Co-Coordinator Ben Mitchell 02 6246 9309

ben.mitchell@naccho.org.au

5-8 November The Lime Network Conference New Zealand 

This years  whakatauki (theme for the conference) was developed by the Scientific Committee, along with Māori elder, Te Marino Lenihan & Tania Huria from .

To read about the conference & theme, check out the  website.