NACCHO Aboriginal Health News: Unique funding enables First Nations-led COVID-19 research

feature tile - older Aboriginal man with Aboriginal flag sweatband & ceremonial paint on face waving to camera

First Nations-led COVID-19 research funding

A unique $2 million funding round has privileged First Nations voices and resulted in high-quality COVID-19 research projects that will result in better outcomes for First Nations communities. The 11 projects from across Australia were awarded funding from the Australian Partnership for Preparedness Research on Infectious Disease Emergencies (APPRISE) Centre of Research Excellence, based on a $2 million donation from the Paul Ramsay Foundation to support the development of effective responses to COVID-19 for First Nations communities. Townsville-based APPRISE investigator Professor Adrian Miller of the Jirrbal people of North Queensland and Director of the Centre for Indigenous Health Equity Research at CQ University says APPRISE gave the space for a First Nations-led process that began with the creation of the APPRISE First Nations Council to advise on all aspects of  the grant process from research priorities to evaluation criteria.

To view the APPRISE media release click here.

Two Aboriginal women & 3 Aboriginal children walking on Country away from the camera

Image source: Standford News, Standford University website.

Start evaluating for impact

How do you know if your programs are making a difference?

Interplay works with communities to design evaluations that measure the things that communities value. The Interplay Project is designed to bring the voice of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander community members into research and evaluation with a vision that all people are empowered to experience optimal wellbeing from the safety and strength of their own culture. Interplay work towards this by collaboratively building science around different ways of knowing and being. To view the Interplay Project’s new website click here.

The Interplay Project also recently launched a mobile app, Disability in the Bush on behalf of the NDIS. You can check out the mobile app, available in five different Aboriginal languages by clicking here.

Five Aboriginal women, two Aboriginal children & a terrier dog sitting on bare weathered red rocks

Image source: The Interplay Project website.

WA Connecting to Country grant program

The Connecting to Country grant program supports projects that enable Western Australian Aboriginal people and organisations to undertake on Country trips to renew links between community, Country and culture. Grants up to $25,000 are available for a wide range of activities that foster the transfer of knowledge between generations, preservation of culture and strengthening of communities. Activities may include those that improve understanding of Country, ancestry and kinship and promote positive mental health, wellbeing and resilience through community-led cultural healing projects.

For further information about the Connecting to Country grant program click here. Grant applications close on 10 November 2020.

Aboriginal elder of Nyikina country, John Watson show grandchildren his special lands in WA's Kimberley area

Aboriginal elder of Nyikina country, John Watson show grandchildren his special lands in WA’s Kimberley area. Image source: St Stephen’s School website.

Free palliative care online training program

The Australian Healthcare and Hospitals Association (AHHA) has developed a free online training program to help aged and community care workers, carers, volunteers, family members and health professionals who provide palliative care to aged persons in the community. Every person’s needs are unique and sorting your way through the emotional and social stresses faced by a dying person and their family can be difficult. The modules will help those involved in providing end of life care develop skills and confidence in that role.

To find out more about the AHHA palliative care training program and to register click here.

Aboriginal hand held within two other Aboriginal hands

Image source: Aged Care Guide website.

Fierce Girls wellbeing resources

An ABC podcast Fierce Girls tells the stories of Australian girls who dare to do things differently, adventurous girls, girls with guts and spirit. Among the inspiring tales of some of Australia’s most extraordinary women are those of Ash Barty and Nova Peris.

For more information about the ABC Fierce Girls podcast click here.

snapshot of cartoon drawing of Ash Barty from ABC Fierce Girls podcast webpage

Image source: ABC website.

University fee hikes put CtG targets at risk

The Federal Government’s “job-ready” university reforms will dramatically increase the cost of courses in the social sciences, a consistently popular discipline amongst Indigenous students. According to the latest national data, 33 per cent of Indigenous students chose to enrol in social science degrees compared to 19 per cent of the general cohort. Experts are concerned the changes will disproportionately disadvantage Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students, by lumping them with more debt or deterring them from study altogether — scenarios which both stand to jeopardise national higher education targets agreed to just months ago. Wiradjuri man Lachlan McDaniel believes his arts degree was “probably the best thing that ever happened” to him, but fears new laws passed this week will make it much tougher for other Indigenous students to get the same opportunities.

To view the full article click here.

Wiradjuri man Lachlan McDaniel graduating from arts/law degree

Wiradjuri man Lachlan McDaniel graduating from an Arts/Law degree. Image source: ABC website.

NSW – Casino – Bulgarr Ngaru Medical Aboriginal Corporation

FT/PT Practice Nurse

Bulgarr Ngaru Medical Aboriginal Corporation (BNMAC) Richmond Valley is looking for a motivated Practice Nurse to join our team in Casino NSW with part time and full time work options available. The Registered Nurse will take a proactive role to assist clients to address health issues in a holistic way at BNMAC’s Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Service. BNAMC endeavors to take a proactive approach working with local communities to raise awareness of health issues and to develop and implement intervention strategies in the treatment of chronic conditions.

To view the job description click here. Applications close Saturday 14 November 2020.Bulgarr Ngaru Medical Aboriginal Corporation logo

VIC – Shepparton – Rumbalara Aboriginal Co-operative Ltd.

FT Aboriginal Family Violence Practice Leader

Rumbalara Aboriginal Co-operative has a vacancy for a full-time Aboriginal Family Violence Practice Leader. This is a leadership position co-located in The Orange Door site and will have a significant role to work closely with services to lead high quality, culturally safe and effective responses to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people seeking support and safety. The Orange Door is a free service for adults, children and young people who are experiencing or have experienced family violence and families who need extra support with the care of children.

To view the position description click here. Applications close 4.00 pm Monday 2 November 2020.Rumbalara clinic & logo

Working from home, any location – Hearing Australia

FT Manager of Aboriginal Engagement and Awareness for HAPEE

Hearing Australia is currently recruiting for a Manager of Aboriginal Engagement and Awareness for the Hearing Assessment Program – Early Ears (HAPEE). This is a national team of 11 Community Engagement Officers that among many things establish and facilitate free hearing assessments primarily in Aboriginal Medical Services, Childcare Centres and CP clinics nationally. This role is responsible for: ensuring that the Community Engagement Officers can effectively engage with primary health and early education services in their locations; ensuring targets for number of locations that Hearing Assessment Program – Early Ears (HAPEE) operates in are met; working with marketing on the development and delivery of culturally appropriate awareness campaigns; expanding HAPEE so that families who use private medical services are aware of and can access the program; providing high quality advice and support to senior management of Australian Hearing.

To view the job description click here. Applications close as as soon as a pool of suitable applicants are identified.Hearing Australia logo - outline of Australia using soundwaves

Across Australia (except Vic & Tas) – Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS)

2021 Census Engagement Manager x 35 (25 in remote areas, 10 in urban/regional locations)

The ABS is recruiting Census Engagement Managers for the 2021 Census. Due to the close working relationship with the community, 35 Census Engagement Manager positions will be only open to Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander applicants. Census Engagement Managers are specialised roles requiring a high degree of community interaction. They will be working within communities telling people about the Census and ensuring everyone can take part and get the help they need. Where possible, Census Engagement Managers will be recruited locally. To view a recruitment poster click here.

For further information on the roles and to apply click here.

Applications for Census Engagement Manager roles are open now and close Thursday 5 November 2020. ABS 2021 Census Engagement Manager banner

NACCHO Aboriginal Health News: Aboriginal health funding boosted, but infrastructure overlooked

external view of medical clinic in slightly run down state

Aboriginal health funding boosted, but infrastructure overlooked

NACCHO has welcomed the increase in funding for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health in the Budget with the Chair of NACCHO, Donnella Mills, saying, “I am heartened by the additional investment in the Indigenous Australians Health Program with $33m for our hard-working services over the next three years. I am also pleased to hear of the regional-and-remote health funding that will assist many of our clinics and the communities they serve as well as assistance for training and workforce development. These are all very welcome.”

NACCHO Conference 2017
Photo: Geoff Bagnall

“While these measures are significant, NACCHO will continue to press the Government for targeted infrastructure investment in our clinics. If stimulus is the main objective of the Budget, we believe that there is no better way to do so than to invest in local communities. There was a valuable opportunity here to invest in our 550 local clinics across the country where our 410,000 clients reside. This was an opportunity missed.”

To view NACCHO’s media release on the Budget click here.

new Armajun Aborignal Health Service Inverell being built

Armajun Aboriginal Health Service, Inverell. Image source: Adam Marshall MP website.

Mental health support extended in NPY region

Ngaanyatjarra Pitjantjatjara Yankunytjatjara Women’s Council (NPYWC) and Smiling Mind have partnered to see crucial, prevention-focused mental health support extend even further into Australia’s Indigenous communities. Over the past two years, Smiling Mind has worked closely with NPYWC, translating its popular in-app mindfulness sessions into the region’s Indigenous languages, in order to support the communities’ youth with tools in their native language. To date, the programs have engaged more than 2,500 subscribers, and more than 5,000 meditations have been completed. Three remote schools in the central desert region have also benefited from mindfulness training, where educators were supported to foster positive mental health habits with their students and the wider school community. 

Envato Foundation, the philanthropic arm of leading technology business Envato, have donated $100,000 to give new life to the partnership, allowing for an extension to the tools and resources already created to infiltrate further across the NPY  region of Central Australia, a region spanning 28 remote communities in the tri state region of NT, SA and WA over an area covering 350,000 square kms.  

To view the full Mirage article click here.

Aboriginal woman on Country listening to podcast

Image source: NPYWC website.

Centre for Disease Control an urgent priority

‘The pandemic experience this year is a clear reason for the establishment of an Australian Centre for Disease Control,’ says Alison Verhoeven, Australian Healthcare and Hospitals Association (AHHA) Chief Executive. ‘The call for this has been long-standing, with a 2013 recommendation to the Government by the Standing Committee on Health and Ageing overlooked in favour of the development of a National Communicable Disease Framework. Such a Centre would position Australia well to demonstrate global leadership in communicable disease planning and response capabilities. ‘It would also support existing state and territory disease control measures through a cohesive approach to research, diagnosis, screening, reporting, case management, contract tracing, forecasting and trend monitoring.’

To read the AHHA media release click here.

scientist in laboratory with full PPE looking at a sample

Image source: The Conversation website.

Budget health response scale warranted

Federal AMA President Dr Omar Khorshid has commended the Federal Government’s $16 billion COVID-19 health response and further stimulus spending aimed at fending off a COVID-19 recession, saying ‘The health and economic impacts of COVID-19 warrant this scale of health response and stimulus spending directed toward restarting the economy. A safe, effective and widely available vaccine is not guaranteed for next year and if it doesn’t eventuate and a large outbreak occurs, economic recovery will be threatened, along with many Australian lives. Governments cannot drop the ball and must continue a broad range of strong policies to keep COVID-19 out of the community in order to ensure a sustained health and economic recovery.’

To view the AMA media release click here.

Aboriginal flat with stethoscope sitting on top

Image source: My South West Directory website.

Telehealth must be start of a health ‘revolution’

CEO of the Consumer Health Forum of Australia (CHF), Leanne Wells, says the use of telehealth during the pandemic shows transformative change is possible in healthcare. She went on to say ‘telehealth has been stimulated by the pandemic to trigger easier and safe access to doctors, we look forward to further developments after the six month extension to March 2021 expires and we hold great ambition for the scope of services that will be possible under the 10 Year Primary Health Care Plan currently in development.’

To view the CHF media release click here.

two Aboriginal men and health professional looking at monitor

Image source: The Fred Hollows Foundation website.

 

ACT – Canberra – National Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation (NACCHO)

Social Media Communications Coordinator

As the Social Media Communications Coordinator within the NACCHO Communications team, you will manage and maintain NACCHO’s social media presence and the daily blog. You will report to the Director, Communications and seek direction and approval on content delivery. You will work cohesively with the NACCHO Communications teams towards the creation and the delivery of social media campaigns and driving key Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health sector news content across channels.

This position will be offered as a fixed contract on a full time or part time basis depending on the candidate. 

To view the full position description click here. Applications close 9.00am Friday 16 October 2020.

NSW – Narooma – Katungul Aboriginal Corporation Regional Health and Community Services

FT Systems Analyst

Katungul Aboriginal Corporation Regional Health and Community Services has a vacancy for a Systems Analyst. The focus of the role is to oversee the implementation, maintenance and upgrading of information technology systems to support the delivery of Katungul’s range of services and for related research, analysis and performance reporting functions. The Systems Analyst will be an integral member of a collaborative team that works closely with Katungul’s service areas to deliver the best outcomes for the community.

To view the position description click here. Applications close 5.00 pm Friday 16 October 2020.Katungul Log

 

Aboriginal hand with cannula on edge of hospital bed

NACCHO Aboriginal Health News: AMA says COVID-19 shows a need to reset health spending

COVID-19 shows a need to reset health spending

According to AMA President, Dr Omar Khorshid, Australia needs to reset it attitude to health expenditure, with a fundamental reassessment of the priority put on real increases to health spending. “The COVID-19 pandemic has challenged us to rethink many of our assumptions about the functioning of society. Absolutely fundamental to this is our understanding of what a health system that is fit for purpose looks like,” Dr Khorshid said. “The pandemic has shown the strains on so many parts of our health system, particularly aged care, mental health, and protections for our frontline healthcare workers, as well as the need to keep this deadly virus out of our Indigenous communities. There can be no avoiding it. A serious investment in health with a substantial real increase in spending is required.”

To view the AMA’s media release click here.

Sunrise Health Service worker checking heart of patient

Barunga Healthcare worker Desleigh Shields. Image Source: ABC News website.

Diagnosing otitis media with telehealth

Each year 650,000 Australian children suffer from recurrent or chronic ear infections called otitis media (OM). OM can cause permanent hearing loss but is entirely preventable when treated early. Aboriginal children are disproportionately impacted by middle ear disease with OM affecting one in four children in Australia – but one in every two Aboriginal children. The current average wait time of two years for assessment is too long for children who are in crucial key stages of language, behavioural and educational development. Struggling to understand what is happening to them, many may face long-term social or mental health impacts.

Paediatric audiologist Dr Chris Brennan-Jones is committed to finding solutions for ear health – like changing assessment wait times from two years to 10 days. Dr Bennan-Jones is working with an ear health partnership in metro Perth called Djaalinj Waakinj – ‘Listening, Talking’ in Noongar language. In a program that is the first of its kind in Australia Djaalinj Waakinj fuses telehealth technology with support from local Aboriginal health workers to facilitate remote diagnosis of OM.

To view the full article click here.

Dr Chris Brennan-Jones sitting outside with laptop

Dr Chris Brennan-Jones. Image source: Particle website.

Puggy Hunter Memorial Health scholarships

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students studying, or intending to study, entry-level health courses could receive life changing financial assistance to follow their passion thanks to the Puggy Hunter Memorial Scholarship Scheme (PHMSS). The PHMSS is designed to encourage and assist undergraduate students in health-related disciplines to complete their studies and join the health workforce. The Australian Government established the Scheme as a tribute to the late Dr Arnold ‘Puggy’ Hunter’s outstanding contribution to Indigenous Australians’ health and his role and Chair of the NACCHO.

To read the full article about the PHMSS in the National Indigenous Times click here.

Applications for the PHMSS are now open and will close on Sunday 8 November 2020. For more information click here.

portrait of Ashleigh Ryan PHMSS recipient

PHMSS recipient Ashleigh Ryan. Image source: Australian College of Nursing website.

NCCRED Clinical Research Scholarship Program

The National Centre for Clinical Research on Emerging Drugs (NCCRED) has developed a Clinical Research Scholarship Program to build the scope and capacity of clinical research on emerging drugs across the drug and alcohol sector. This is a national program open to clinicians at all levels, anywhere in Australia. NCCRED is opening TWO new competitive rounds which will give financial and research support allowing recipients to conduct a new research project. The rounds will have a focus on the following areas:

  • Practicing Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health professionals (clinicians, nurses, allied health workers) in the AOD sector.
  • nursing and allied health professionals preferably practicing alcohol and other drugs nurses and allied health professionals, though applications are open to all clinicians working within the AOD sector.

For more information about the NCCRED scholarship program click here. 

Applications are now open and close on 6 November 2020.

Aboriginal health professional sitting in from of Aboriginal D&A banner

Image source: ABC News website.

National COVID-19 Clinical Evidence Taskforce Communique

You can read the full National COVID-19 Clinical Evidence Taskforce Communique #25 here.

National COVID-19 Clinical Evidence Taskforce logo

Image source: National COVID-19 Clinical Evidence Taskforce website.

COVID-19 transmission in educational settings

Since March 2020, the National Centre for Immunisation Research and Surveillance (NCIRS) has joined forces with the NSW Ministry of Health and NSW Department of Education to investigate COVID-19 cases in schools and early childhood education and care (ECEC) services.

You can view the webinar Learning together – Transmission of SARS-CoV-2 in NSW educational settings covering COVID-19 transmission in NSW educational settings, what the latest data show and how a multi-disciplinary approach has helped people learn together by clicking here.

Nawarddeken Academy school - 14 Aboriginal students sitting at a table

Nawarddeken Academy school. Image source: The Conversation website.

Melbourne workers of concern to Tennant Creek health groups 

Up to 10 gas pipeline workers from a coronavirus hotspot have begun quarantining in a Tennant Creek hotel under a Government-approved plan that Indigenous health groups are demanding be shared with them. The group from Melbourne has also been given permission to leave the hotel under an arrangement organised for maintenance work on Jemena’s Northern Gas Pipeline, which runs from Tennant Creek to Mt Isa. The vast majority of people arriving in the NT from coronavirus hotspots are ordered into a fortnight of supervised quarantine at designated facilities in Darwin or Alice Springs at a cost of $2,500.

Indigenous health groups are concerned the alternative arrangement risks coronavirus spreading to Tennant Creek’s majority Indigenous population and that of nearby communities. Barb Shaw from Anyinginyi Health, the region’s major Indigenous health service, said she had requested to see the company’s COVID-19 management plan early last week but never heard back.

To read the full ABC News story click here.

portrait of Anyinginyi Health CEO Barb Shaw

Anyinginyi Health CEO Barb Shaw. Image source: ABC News.

Keep Our Mob Safe from COVID-19

The latest update on COVID-19 for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander households, communities and organisations is available click here. Things can change quickly so it is important to stay up to date.

Keep Our Mob Safe, Stop The Spread banner

Image source: Australian Government Department of Health.

2021 seasonal influenza preparation required

During 2020 there was a significant demand for seasonal influenza vaccines in light of the evolving COVID-19 pandemic. It is anticipated that this demand is likely to continue and also be evident for future seasons. To this end, the Commonwealth Chief Medical Officer is encouraging key stakeholders to turn their minds to their preparations for next year’s season. To view the Commonwealth Chief Medical Officer’s letter to stakeholders click here.

text flu season syringe inserted in vial

Image source: 1011 Now News website.

PBS changes a win for palliative care

The Australian Medical Association (AMA) welcomes much needed improvements to the Pharmaceutical Benefits Scheme (PBS) listings for opioids, which will clarify their important role in alleviating suffering for palliative care patients. AMA President Dr Omar Khorshid said the Association supported important reforms to reduce the inappropriate use of opioids in Australia. Dr Khorshid said the original PBS changes implemented on 1 June 2020 caused significant confusion and concern from prescribers and their patients, unintentionally making prescriber access to opioids more difficult for palliative care patients with a legitimate clinical need. This was particularly difficult for non-cancer palliative care patients.

The AMA has been advocating to the Department of Health and the Therapeutic Goods Administration, providing feedback from AMA members on the 1 June 2020 changes. “The Pharmaceutical Benefits Advisory Committee (PBAC) has reflected this feedback in the 1 October 2020 PBS listing changes, so it’s pleasing that the vital advocacy work of the AMA has been heeded,” Dr Khorshid said. “Patients will be exempt from the 12-month pain management review by a second doctor or palliative care nurse practitioner if their clinical condition makes the review not possible. “This is an important change for palliative care patients who may be too unwell for this to occur.”

To view the AMS’s media release click here.

Aboriginal man with arms around Aboriginal woman looking out across river in Australian landscape

Image source: Palliative Care Victoria.

Social enterprise to tackle remote NT food inequities

An urgent food crisis is threatening remote Aboriginal communities across the country, with an estimated 1.2 million Australians unable to regularly access culturally appropriate, safe and nutritious food from a non-emergency source. Kere to Country, a new First Nations-led social enterprise, hopes they can make a difference, starting in Alice Springs/Mparntwe. Kere means ‘food from animals’ in Arrernte.

Three young Indigenous entrepreneurs—Jessica Wishart, 31, Jordan Wishart, 25, and Tommy Hicks, 24 (pictured below) —were inspired to do something about the crisis after visiting Alice Springs/Mparntwe. The trio saw Aboriginal communities couldn’t afford essential products that were necessary to keep their families healthy and safe. “It’s an urgent crisis—one that has been going on for a really long time, but it’s gotten worse since the pandemic,” CEO Jessica Wishart said.

The concept is simple: Kere to Country will provide remote communities with access to meat through bulk purchases or smaller packs. Aiming to eventually expand to all of central Australia, the team will distribute packs to Alice Springs/Mparntwe, both in and out of town, and the Tennant Creek region.

To visit the Kere to Country website click here.

Kere to Country entrepreneurs Jessica Wishart, Jordan Wishart, Tommy Hicks

Kere to Country entrepreneurs Jessica Wishart, Jordan Wishart, Tommy Hicks. Image source: National Indigenous Times.

Palkyu descendent 2020 Australia Mental Health prize finalist

Professor Helen Milroy is one of seven finalists in the running for the 2020 Australia Mental Health prize. The Prize, now in its fifth year, recognises Australians who have made outstanding contributions to the promotion of mental health or the prevention and treatment of mental illness.

Professor Milroy is recognised as the first Indigenous Australian to become a medical doctor, completing medical studies and specialist training in child and adolescent psychiatry. She is passionate about combining Aboriginal and western knowledge systems to improve outcomes. Her work and research in the areas of holistic medicine, child mental health, recovery from trauma and grief, application of Indigenous knowledge, and cultural models of care have made a significant difference to the lives of children and young people, particularly those with a trauma background. Her efforts in developing and supporting the Aboriginal medical workforce and cultural safety in health and mental health through curriculum development, education and training, implementation and evaluation, has had a lasting impact on Aboriginal health and mental health across Australia.

To view the full article about the 2020 Australia Mental Health prize finalists click here.

portrait of Professor Helen Milroy

Professor Helen Milroy. Image source: AusDoc website.

Breast cancer survivor fears many others won’t

Breast cancer is still the most commonly diagnosed cancer in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women, but what’s more concerning is that not a lot of these women survive. It’s a hidden disease that shows no symptoms until it has developed into a lump some time down the track.

Aunty Joy was diagnosed with stage 4 breast cancer at the age of 48. She had a single mastectomy and says “I am a survivor and still a sufferer. Around the time of my diagnosis, there were no radiographers where I was. But if I had waited, who knows what the end result would’ve been? I went through the experience alone and it was traumatic, something that I don’t want to see other Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander women go through. Every two weeks I would take myself to chemotherapy, the most grueling and horrible experience with side effects that were harrowing.”

portrait photo of Aunty Joy

Aunty Joy. Image source: MamaMia website.

To read the full article about Aunty Joy’s breast cancer journey click here.

ACT – Canberra

Social Media Communications Coordinator

NACCHO is seeking a Social Media Communication Coordinator to manage and maintain NACCHO’s social media presence and daily blog. The position requires working cohesively with the NACCHO Communications team towards the creation and delivery of social media campaigns and driving key Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health sector new content across channels. To view details of the position click here.

Applications close at 9.00 am Friday 16 October 2020.

AFL Indigenous All Stars coach Michael O'Loughlin with the “Aboriginal Health in Aboriginal Hands” app

AFL Indigenous All Stars coach Michael O’Loughlin with the “Aboriginal Health in Aboriginal Hands” app. Image source: Australian Government NIAA website.

feature tile elderly Aboriginal woman sitting on a chair in desert setting

NACCHO Aboriginal Health News – COVID-19 highlights health inequalities

feature tile elderly Aboriginal woman sitting on a chair in desert setting

COVID-19 highlights health inequalities

The COVID-19 crisis has turned a spotlight on existing health, social and economic inequities in Australia and internationally and been a stark reminder of the importance of the social determinants of health, and the need to prioritise support for marginalised individuals and groups in our community.

People with pre-existing health conditions, and those from lower-socioeconomic communities and marginalised groups are at greater risk of experiencing the worst effects of the pandemic compared with those from non-marginalised communities.

When people contract COVID-19 and have pre-existing conditions such as heart disease, obesity and asthma, they’re more likely to experience respiratory failure and death. Respiratory infections such as COVID-19 are more easily transmitted among lower-socioeconomic communities who typically live in more crowded conditions. COVID-19 pandemic recovery should include more funding for local community-led initiatives such as the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander community-led response which has successfully emphasised health equity through all stages of the pandemic to ensure low rates of infection.

To view the full Monash University LENS article click here.

Turning up for alcohol and drug education

Scott Wilson who works with the Aboriginal Drug and Alcohol Council (ADAC), SA has been profiled to give an insight into ‘what excellence in drug and alcohol care looks like’. Scott said, “I would love to see an ADAC all around the country because I think unless you’ve got a group that has that role of helping and coordinating, then you just have piecemeal attempts. Everyone’s just struggling in isolation.”

To view the full article click here.

large group of Aboriginal men on country undertaking ADAC training

ADAC alcohol and drug education. Image source: Croakey website.

Paramedic degree offered for first time in NT

Paramedics will soon be able to train in the NT thanks to a new partnership between Charles Darwin University (CDU) and St John NT. St John NT’s CEO Judith Barker said the NT was one of the country’s most interesting and diverse locations, giving paramedics the opportunity to develop skills and experience with complex medical cases, high speed trauma, and delivery of care in extreme and isolated conditions. CDU Vice-Chancellor Professor Simon Maddocks said that CDU was uniquely positioned to explore issues of national and regional importance such as tropical medicine, Indigenous health and mental health.

To view the full article click here.

four Aboriginal female paramedics standing in front on an ambulance

Image source: Queensland Ambulance Service (QAS) Facebook p

SA Eyre Peninsula child health initiative

Indigenous children have some of the highest levels of preventable diseases in the world. Eyre Peninsula communities will benefit from a new partnership between the Starlight Children’s Foundation and Masonic Charities SA/NT, which will help bridge the gap in health outcomes between Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australians living in rural and remote communities. Masonic Charities have committed $900,000 to the Starlight Children’s Foundation over the next three years, allowing them to roll out the Healthier Futures Initiative in SA on a permanent basis. As part of the program Starlight personnel will accompany health professionals, keep the children present and entertained, and aim to provide a positive overall experience.

To view the full article in the West Coast Sentinel News click here.

health worker checking Aboriginal child's throat

Image source: The Australian.

Barriers to hepatitis C treatment

Research on the hepatitis C treatment intentions of Aboriginal people in WA has been published in the October issue of the The Australian Health Review, a peer-reviewed journal of the Australian Healthcare and Hospitals Association. The study found there are substantial hurdles to achieving hepatitis C elimination in Aboriginal communities, including lack of knowledge and concerns about the stigma of seeking treatment. Stable housing was also an important pre-requisite to seeking treatment because Aboriginal people who were homeless were much more focused on day-to-day problems of living on the street, including lack of regular sleep, physical exhaustion and daily anxiety. 

To view the research paper click here.

4 Aboriginal people against graffitied wall with words HEP C is Everyone's Business

Image source: Nunkuwarrin Yunti of South Australia Inc. website.

Suicide Prevention white paper

Suicide rates in Australia have continued to rise over the last decade. The challenge to bend this curve is immense, especially in the context of COVID-19 and the recent bushfire season, which have disrupted lives and impacted the psychological health of Australians. The need for evidence-based solutions has never been more important. Black Dog Institute is pleased to present a white paper which shares critical insights from emerging research and Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander lived experience evidence that explores contemporary issues and offers innovative responses.

To view the white paper in full click here.

graffiti of Aboriginal man's face in red, yellow & black

Image source: Australian Human Rights Commission.

ITC Program helps health system navigation

The Integrated Team Care (ITC) Program is one of Northern Queensland Primary Health Network’s (NQPHN’s) funded initiatives under the Indigenous Australians’ Health Program to improve health outcomes for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people. Northern Australia Primary Health Limited (NAPHL) delivers the program throughout northern Queensland. Without the program, many Indigenous people would struggle to access the health care they need to manage their chronic or complex health conditions.

The ITC Program was established to help Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people with complex chronic diseases who are unable to effectively manage their conditions to access one-on-one assistance for the provision of coordinated, multidisciplinary care.

To view the article click here.

Aboriginal health worker taking blood pressure of Aboriginal man

Image source: PHN Northern Queensland website.

NSW/ACT GP in Training of the Year award

Dr Josephine Guyer has won the RACGP’s NSW/ACT General Practitioner in Training of the Year award.

Currently working at the Myhealth Liverpool clinic, Dr Guyer has completed terms at the Tharawal Aboriginal Corporation in Airds, the Primacare Medical Centre in Roselands and Schwarz Family in Elderslie. In 2017 she received the RACGP’s Growing Strong Award and has embraced that ethos in her GP training.

RACGP Acting President Associate Professor Ayman Shenouda congratulated Dr Guyer, saying “Dr Guyer brings extraordinary strength and resilience to her training and work as a GP. Her background as a registered nurse for almost 20 years, cultural experience as a proud Wiradjuri woman and the fact that she is the parent of three teenagers means that she comes to the role of general practice with valuable life experience that will help her care for patients from different walks of life. Providing responsive and culturally appropriate care is absolutely essential and Dr Guyer is perfectly placed to do just that.”

To view the full Hospital and Healthcare article click here.

Dr Josephine Guyer holding RACGP NSW/ACT GP in Training of the Year award

Dr Josephine Guyer. Image source: Hospital and Healthcare website.

Food security webinar

Access to sufficient, affordable nutritious food is important for the health of rural and remote communities. With the recent bush fires, floods and now the COVID-19 pandemic, traditional supply chains have been interrupted and rural and remote communities that are already at risk of food insecurity, are being impacted even further. Early this year the National Rural Health Alliance (NRHA) conducted a webinar covering a range of perspectives on current challenges in ensuring food security for households in rural and remote communities, including from an Indigenous health perspective and considered policy and practical solutions to address the issue well into the future.

The recording of the NRHA webinar called A virtual conversation: affordable and nourishing food for rural and remote communities during COVID-19 and beyond is available for free here.

four Aboriginal children with oranges

Image source: NPY Women’s Council website.

SA ACCHO funding to improve disability services

Four Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisations (ACCHOs) will share in $1 million of federal government funding to improve disability services across SA’s Eyre Peninsula and the Far West.

Ceduna’s Yadu Health Aboriginal Corporation, Tullawon Health Service at Yalata, Oak Valley Aboriginal Corporation and Nunyara Aboriginal Health Service at Whyalla were awarded the funding under the banner of the South Australian West Coast ACCHO Network. The funding will go towards a two-year ‘Aboriginal DisAbility Alliance’ project aimed at supporting Aboriginal communities to access culturally appropriate disability services.

To view the full article in the West Coast Sentinel click here.

painting re yellow black two stick figures & one stick figure in a wheelchair

Image source: NITY website.

Mental Health Month

October is Mental Health Month and as part of the 2020 World Mental Health Day campaign, Mental Health Australia is encouraging everyone to make a promise to “Look after your mental health, Australia.” It is a call to action for the one in five Australians affected by mental illness annually, and for the many more impacted by the current COVID-19 pandemic, and the increased uncertainty and anxiety that has ensued. The more individuals and organisations who commit to promoting mental health awareness this month and support the campaign, the more we reduce the stigma surrounding mental ill health and play our part in creating a mentally healthy community.

To view the media release click here.words Mental Health Month October in blue and red lettering logo

Image Source: Department of Health

 

Feature tile - Halls Creek 'Heart of Gold' town entry sign

NACCHO Aboriginal Health News: Halls Creek leaders recall day COVID-19 came to town

Feature tile - Halls Creek 'Heart of Gold' town entry sign

Halls Creek leaders recall day COVID-19 came to town

When coronavirus came to the small outback town of Halls Creek in WA it was “like a bomb went off”, according to Brenda Garstone, CEO of the Yura Yungi Aboriginal Medical Service. “We all had to run for cover,” she said. “We were scrambling. We didn’t know where to go, or what to do.” The WA Department of Health had warned that any community transmission in towns with remote communities would be devastating for the populations. When four healthcare workers at the local Halls Creek hospital returned positive tests, all at once, residents refused to attend the healthcare clinic for fear of picking up the virus, local shops emptied and Aboriginal men from the town’s night patrol went door to door, trying to communicate the seriousness of what was unfolding. While the outbreak was quickly contained, tensions in the small town have still not eased, with the community now fully aware of the threat COVID-19 poses.

To view the full article click here.

Halls Creek 'Heart of Gold' town entry sign

Image source: ABC News website.

Groundbreaking FASD diagnostic framework

Long wait times and centralised specialist doctors have left families in rural and remote areas waiting up to three years for a diagnosis of Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder (FASD). But now a group of doctors, academics and Indigenous elders have come together in north-west Queensland to create a unique diagnostic tier system for the disorder. Local Indigenous leaders and Mount Isa rural doctor Marjad Page, a Kalkadoon, Waanyi and Ganggalidda man, wrote a dreamtime story to explain not only the disorder but the medical process to local Indigenous families. “The program is run from the Aboriginal medical service here in Mount Isa called Gidgee Healing, so it’s run out of a culturally appropriate medical service for the region,” Dr Page said.

To read the full article click here.

Gidgee Healing Dr Marjad Page portrait photo & Gidgee Healing logo

Dr Marjad Page. Image source: ABC News – ABC North West Queensland.

Six steps to stopping germs video launch

Australia is the only developed country still with high levels of trachoma and almost all cases occur in  remote Aboriginal communities. The Ending Trachoma project, which is run out of the Public Health Advocacy Institute of WA at Curtin University, aims to reduce the incidence of trachoma and skin infections in ‘trachoma at risk’ Aboriginal communities in remote WA through implementing environmental health strategies. They have developed a short video (see below) showing the importance of personal hygiene using ‘Milpa’s Six Steps to Stop Germs’ message. The video features women from the Nollamarra Football Team together with their children. It was developed by the Indigenous Eye Health at the University of Melbourne, with extensive input from Aboriginal community members and services in WA, SA and the NT. The message aims to encourage everyone, particularly kids, to stay healthy and strong and eliminate trachoma and other infectious diseases through following six steps.

For more information about the project click here.

COVID-19 offers unexpected opportunity to quit smoking

Smokers are worried. A respiratory disease is running rampant across the globe and people with unhealthy lifestyle habits appear to be especially vulnerable. Smokers hospitalised with COVID-19 are more likely to become severely unwell and die than non-smokers with the disease. At any point in time, most smokers want to quit. But COVID-19 provides the impetus to do it sooner rather than later. A recent study has found the proportion intending to quit within the next two weeks almost tripled from around 10% of smokers before COVID-19 to almost 30% in April. This heightened interest in quitting in the face of COVID-19 represents a unique opportunity for governments and health agencies to help smokers quit, and stay off smoking for good.

To view the full article in The Conversation click here.

two hands breaking cigarette in half

Image source: The Conversation.

Adolescent “never smoked” rate rises

Using data from the Australian Secondary School Students’ Alcohol and Drug Survey, a Prevention Centre PhD project led by Christina Heris found that the proportion Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander adolescents who have never smoked rose from 49% in 2005 to 70% in 2017. Additionally, rates of low smoking intensity increased by 10% from 67% in 2005 to 77 % in 2017 meaning that, overall, the number of cigarettes smoked in a day has decreased amongst smokers in the 12–17 age group.

Prevention Centre investigator Professor Sandra Eades, a Noongar woman, who supervised Christina’s project said “It’s fantastic to see that tobacco control is working for all students, including driving down rates among Aboriginal young people. But we know that young Aboriginal people experience more of the risk factors for smoking such as stress, racism and disadvantage. There is a need for governments to address these broader determinants.”

To view the full article click here.

Aboriginal child holding & looking atan unlit cigarette

Image source: Deadly Vibe.

Original articles sought for inaugural HealthBulletin

The Australian Indigenous HealthInfoNet is welcoming submissions from researchers, practitioners and health workers of original articles (not published elsewhere) for inclusion in their inaugural edition of the next generation of the Australian Indigenous HealthBulletin. They are seeking submissions that provide examples of research on Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health, including policies, strategies and programs that have the potential to inform and support everyday practice.

For further information about how to submit papers click here.

Australian Indigenous HealthInforNet HealthBulletin Call for papers banner

Image source: Australian Indigenous HealthInfoNet website.

National COVID-19 healthcare worker guidelines

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people have a higher prevalence of respiratory conditions, many of which share symptoms with COVID-19. Healthcare workers examining a patient with respiratory symptoms are at risk of spreading infection between patients with the highest risk of transmission likely during throat and nose examination including when a swab is being collected.

Griffith University researchers have helped develop national guidelines to minimise healthcare workers’ risk of acquiring and spreading infection while examining Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander patients with respiratory symptoms. “These new guidelines aim to provide resources and support healthcare teams in prevention and management of COVID-19,’’ said Associate Professor Jing Sun from the School of Medicine who led the project.

For more information about the new national guidelines click here.

health professional in PPE removing swab from text tube

Image source: Flinders University website.

PPE innovation needed in remote health services

Clinicians, service providers and researchers have issued an urgent call for an Australian innovation in personal protective equipment (PPE) –  the ventilated hood – to be made available to remote health services, saying that without the hoods, the risk of coronavirus transmission within remote healthcare services and communities is grave.

To read the full article click here.

woman in hospitals bed under COVID-19 hood

Image source: Sydney Morning Herald.

JT Academy offers free employment advertising

Lendlease and JT Academy are encouraging all local employers to utilise the JT Academy FREE employment functions and resources. All you need to do is send the details of any job vacancies you have and let them help you find the best candidates – they will advertise your vacancy on their fully functioning job board for free!

This unique collaborative employment initiative, directed by Managing Director, Johnathan Thurston is fast becoming one the most ambitious employment initiatives Far North Queensland has ever seen. It harnesses the unique strengths of both Lendlease and JT Academy, who together are striving to provide direct job opportunities for local jobseekers.

For more information visit the JT Academy website here.

Jonathan Thurston in suit smiling, Job Board advertisement

Image source: Twitter #jtacademy.

Funding still required for rehab services

Weigelli Centre Aboriginal Corporation Inc Chairperson Ray Harris and CEO Daniel Jeffries have doubled down on the need for more funding to be made available for rehab services, saying revenue streams remained of concern with no additional recurrent funding available for rehab services. The Weigelli Centre and other services across the sector need additional funding to address the increasing need for drug and alcohol treatment services. The continuing challenges remain for services to provide support and assistance to Aboriginal individuals, families and their communities.

To read the full article in the Cowra Guardian click here.

Weigelli Centre Aboriginal Corporation metal sign

Image source: Aboriginal Health & Medical Research Council of NSW website.

CHF Big Ideas Competition

Do you have an idea which is going to change the way healthcare is delivered?

What about an idea which will transform how the health system works?

Consumers Health Forum (CHF) of Australia is invites you to send in videos of your ideas for innovation in health, to be part of the Big Ideas Forum at their Australian and NZ Shifting Gears Summit in March 2021. Your big idea could be something totally new, or it might be an example of something that has worked well in your community that could be expanded or tried in other places. You may like to base your idea on one or more of the key shifts highlighted in CHF’s 2018 White Paper Shifting Gears: Consumers Transforming Health. To view the White Paper click here.

For more information about the CHF Big Ideas Competition click here and for details about the CHF Summit 2021 click here.

4 people, each holding speech bubbles: Big Idea, Brain Storm, Think Different, Be Creative

Image source: Consumers Health Forum of Australia website.

NACCHO Aboriginal Health News: First Nations peoples’ COVID-19 response among the best in the world

feature tile First First Nations peoples' response among best in the world & image of Aboriginal man wearing face mask with Aboriginal flag

First Nations Peoples’ COVID-19 response among best

In a recent interview, Australia’s most respected paediatric epidemiologist, Professor Fiona Stanley, said that although Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people are the highest-risk people in our community, they have done exceptionally well in response to the COVID-19 pandemic. According to Professor Stanley this is because “Indigenous people took control. They lobbied the government to close remote communities, get personal protective equipment and get tested. They took their vulnerable, old Indigenous people off the streets and put them in good housing. They’re doing better than almost any population worldwide.”

To read a transcript of the full interview click here.

image of Aboriginal man wearing face mask with Aboriginal flag

Image source: NITV website.

First permanent LOV eye clinic in Kimberley

$4.7 million has been allocated towards the first permanent Lions Outback Vision (LOV) eye clinic in the Kimberley. This clinic, to be located in Broome, with outreach services to Derby, Fitzroy Crossing, Halls Creek, Kununurra, Wyndham and Warmun, will enable residents across the Kimberley to receive treatment and prevention services for serious eye diseases on country and close to home.

To read the related media release click here.

Lions Outback Image bus with door open & health professional checking someone's eyes

Image source: National Rural Health Alliance.

Aquarobics classes get results

row of Aboriginal women in a pool holding on to the side

Image source: Great Lakes Advocate.

Six month extension for COVID-19 health measures

Millions of Australians will continue to receive medical care and support in their own homes with the Commonwealth Government investing more than $2 billion to extend a range of COVID-19 health measures for a further six months, to 31 March 2021. Medicare-subsidised telehealth and pathology services, GP-led respiratory clinics, home medicines delivery, public and private hospital services will all be extended, as well as further investments in PPE. These health initiatives play a major role in detecting, preventing and treating COVID-19.

To view the media release regarding this funding click here.

health worker in mask, covid cell image superimposed

Image source: Hospital Management.

COVID-19 double standard for the Barkly

Anyinginyi Health Service has expressed concern and frustration at the granting of an exemption from compulsory supervised quarantine for workers from Melbourne brought to Tennant Creek to work outside the town. Anyinginyi General Manager, Barb Shaw, said “This breaches the NT Government’s own policy to not allow exemptions from compulsory quarantine for people coming from a hot spot” and “the government must urgently explain its decision and immediately work with the Aboriginal community, including Anyinginyi Health Service, to ensure the safety of our community”.

To view the Anyinginyi Health Service’s media release click here and click here to view a supporting media release from the Aboriginal Medical Services Alliance NT.text quote from Pat Turner 'I can't be any blunter...if COVID-19 gets into our communities, we are gone

WA grants for projects with COVID-19 focus

The first program to be funded under WA’s Future Health Research and Innovation (FHRI) Fund is now open and calling for projects with a COVID-19 focus. The FHRI Focus Grants: COVID-19 Program will initially provide up to $4 million for research and innovation that helps promote the health and wellbeing of Western Australians. The program is designed to fund research and innovation that addresses health and wellbeing challenges relevant to the COVID emergency. This could include projects related to infection prevention and control, surveillance, diagnostics and therapeutics as well as the direct or indirect impact of COVID-19 across a range of health conditions. Grants will be made available across three streams of funding – research, innovation and infrastructure.

To view the related media release click here.

COVID-109 virus cell

Image source: Medical Xpress.

Gynaecological cancer award nominations open

The rate of gynaecological cancers among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women is shocking. In the case of cervical cancer for example Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women are 2.5 times more likely to be diagnosed with, and 3.8 times more likely to die than non-Indigenous women.

Do you know someone who has made an exceptional contribution to improving the outcomes for women affected by gynaecological cancers?

You have only one week left to make a nomination for the 2021 Jeannie Ferris Cancer Australia Recognition Award.

Applications close at 5.00 pm (AEST) Wednesday 30 September 2020.

To view further details about the award and how to nominate someone click here.

Waminda senior regional manager Krissy Falzon at desk looking at her computer

Krissy Falzon, South Coast Womens Health & Welfare Aboriginal Corporation. Image source: South Coast Register.

Simon Says Ear Health Volume 2

Volume two of AHCWA’s Simon Says series has been released. The latest resources allow you to read along with Simon and his friends to learn about the flu and how you can keep yourself and your community safe. Physical copies are  available and you are welcome to print copies as you need them.

To view volume two of the Simon Says series click here.

cartoon of Aboriginal man with family standing behind him punching giant green flu virus

Image source: AHCWA Simon Says Volume 2.

Mental health wellbeing trial using horses

A group of Broome-based Indigenous health workers are helping develop a mental wellbeing trial that uses horses to help people to express themselves openly. Known as Yawardani Jan-ga — or horses helping — the trial capitalises on the ties between Aboriginal people and horses and rodeo culture in the Kimberley to enhance the social and emotional wellbeing of youngsters while building leadership skills. It is an adapted form of the global Equine Assisted Learning model, which uses horses to build emotional skills and personal development, and will be rolled out in the region.

To read The West Australian article about the trial click here.

young Aboriginal girl on horse & Aboriginal man trainer

Image source: ABC News.

Feature tile - First Nations-lead pandemic reponse a triumph - two Aboriginal boys holding a sign 'too dangerous to stop in Wilcannia'

NACCHO Aboriginal Health News: First Nations-led pandemic response a triumph

Feature Story

Telethon Kids representatives, including Dr Fiona Stanley, have written to The Lancet, describing Australia’s First Nations-led response to COVID-19 as ‘nothing short of a triumph’. Since the beginning of the pandemic in Australia, there have been only 60 First Nations cases nationwide. This represents only 0.7% of all cases, a considerable under-representation, as First Nations people make up 3% of the total population. Only 13% of First Nations cases have needed hospital treatment, none have been in intensive care, and there have been no deaths.

These results have shown how effective (and extremely cost-effective) giving power and capacity to Indigenous leaders is. The response has avoided major illness and deaths and avoided costly care and anguish.

To read the letter published in The Lancet click here.

Wiradjuri man appointed as a Professor

The Royal Australian College of General Practitioners (RACGP) has welcomed the appointment of Peter O’Mara as a Professor of Newcastle University. The Chair of the RACGP Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Faculty, Professor O’Mara is Director of the University’s Thurru Indigenous Health Unit and a practicing GP in an Aboriginal community controlled health organisation, Tobwabba Aboriginal Medical Service. Professor O’Mara said becoming a GP was not something he grew up believing was possible, “I always had a strong interest in science, but in my early years I believed in the stereotypical view that studying and practicing medicine was for other people – doctors’ children and wealthy families.”

To view the full article about Professor O’Mara click click here.

Professor Peter O'Mara speaking into a microphone at a lecturn

Image source: GP News.

Face masks for our mob

The Australian Government Department of Health has developed an information sheet called How to keep our mob safe using face masks.

To access the editorial click here.

Aaron Simon standing against wall painted with Aboriginal art, wearing an Aboriginal art design face mask

Image source: Australian Government Department of Health.

Racial Violence in the Australian health system

The statistical story of Indigenous health and death, despite how stark, fails to do justice to the violence of racialised health inequities that Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples continue to experience. The Australian health system’s Black Lives Matter moment is best characterised as indifferent; a “business as usual” approach that we know from experience betokens failure. In an article published in The Medical Journal of Australia a range of strategies have been offered, ‘not as a solution, but as some small steps towards a radical reimagining of the Black body within the Australian health system; one which demonstrates a more genuine commitment to the cries of “Black Lives Matter” from Blackfullas in this place right now.’

To read the full article click here.

back of BLM protester holding sign of face of Kevin Yow Yeh who dies in custody at 34 years

Image sourced Twitter @KevinYowYeh.

Water fluoridation required

Poor oral health profoundly affects a person’s ability to eat, speak, socialise, work and learn. It has an impact on social and emotional wellbeing, productivity in the workplace, and quality of life. A higher proportion of Australians who are socially disadvantaged have dental caries. Community water fluoridation is one of the most effective public health interventions of the 20th century. Its success has been attributed to wide population coverage with no concurrent behaviour change required. The authors of a recent article in The Medical Journal of Australia have said the denial of access to fluoridated drinking water for Indigenous Australians is of great concern and have urged the Commonwealth government to mandate that all states and territories maintain a minimum standard of 90% population access to fluoridated water.

To view the full article click here.

close up photo of three Aboriginal children smiling

Image source: University of Melbourne website.

Torres Strait communities taking back control of own healing

Torres Strait Island communities are leading their own healing by addressing the trauma, distress and long-term impacts caused by colonisation. The island communities of Kerriri, Dauan and Saibai will host a series of healing forums coordinated by The Healing Foundation, in conjunction with Mura Kosker Sorority Incorporated; the leading family and community wellbeing service provider in the Torres Strait. Identifying the need for healing in the Torres Strait, Mura Kosker Sorority Incorporated Board President Mrs Regina Turner said: “We believe that the forums will provide Torres Strait communities a voice for creating their own healing solutions.”

To view the Healing Foundation’s media release click ere.

Wabunau Geth dance group from Kaurareg Nation

Wabunau Geth dance group from Kaurareg Nation. Image source: The Healing Foundation.

New tool to manage healthcare trial

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples can trial a new tool to help them manage their healthcare with the launch of a pilot program in Perth of the GoShare digital platform which has supported over 1,000 patients so far. Launched by the Minister for Indigenous Australians, the Hon Ken Wyatt AM MP, the pilot program enables doctors, nurses and other clinicians at St John of God Midland Public Hospital in Perth to prescribe a tailored information pack for patients. The electronic packs may include video-based patient stories, fact sheets, apps and tools on a range of health and wellness topics. They are prepared and adapted according to the patient’s health literacy levels and are being sent by email or text to improve their integrated care and chronic disease self-management.

To view the Australian Digital Health Agency’s media release click here.

GoShare Healthcare digital platform logo - clip art hand or hand

Image source: Healthily website.

Feature title - Aboriginal hand holding stethoscope painted on brick wall in Aboriginal flag colours

NACCHO Aboriginal Health News: Wider health system much to learn from the ACCHO sector

Wider health system much to learn from the ACCHO sector

In her recent article Indigenous health leadership and the pandemic, Lowitja Institute CEO, Dr Janine Mohamed says one of the lessons from the COVID-19 pandemic is that the wider health system has much to learn from the successes of the Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisations (ACCHO) sector and Indigenous health leadership.

You can view the full article here.

6 minute Strep A test suitable for remote settings

Found in the throat and on the skin, Strep A infections are often responsible for sore throats and painful skin infections, which can lead to irreversible and potentially deadly heart and kidney damage if left untreated. Researchers from Perth’s Telethon Kids Institute have demonstrated that rapid, molecular point-of-care tests can be used in remote settings to accurately detect the presence of Strep A bacterium in just six minutes. Children at risk of potentially life-threatening Strep A infections no longer have to wait five days for treatment.

For further information on the new Strep A test click here.

2 small Aboriginal children

Source image: Hospital and Healthcare website.

Past has role to play in suicide rates

The ongoing impacts of inter generational trauma, disempowerment and disengagement cannot be overlooked if Indigenous suicide rates are to be reduced according to University of Southern Queensland Associate Professor Raelene Ward. A registered nurse, Dr Ward is a Senior Lecturer at USQ’s College for Indigenous Studies Education and Research School of Nursing, and recently completed her PhD in suicide prevention, specifically exploring Aboriginal understandings of suicides from a social and emotional wellbeing point of view. “It is well known that suicides among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders are much more frequent in comparison to other Queenslanders, and I really wanted to get a more comprehensive understanding of suicides from an Aboriginal perspective,” Professor Ward said.

You can view the University of Southern Queensland’s media release here.

back view of teenage girl at dusk sitting on a swing looking out to sea

Image source: The Queensland Times.

NSW Building on Resilience suicide prevention initiative

Suicide is the fourth leading cause of death for Indigenous Australians living in NSW, compared to the seventeenth for non-Indigenous Australians in NSW. In response the NSW government launched the Building on Resilience in Aboriginal Communities initiative earlier this month. The initiative,designed to increase access to culturally responsive suicide prevention activities for Aboriginal communities, will be community-run by 12 NSW Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisations (ACCHOs) across eight local health districts, with participation and input from Elders and local communities.

For further information on the initiative click here.

girl leaning on desk with her head in her hands

Image source: Tweed Daily News.

Regular health checks vital during COVID-19

The Healing Foundation is supporting calls from Health Ministers and health organisations for people to maintain their regular health checks during the COVID-19 pandemic. The Healing Foundation CEO Fiona Petersen said that regular health checks are vital for the most vulnerable in the community, which includes Stolen Generations survivors. “Stolen Generations survivors endured trauma and grief as a result of their forced removal from family, community, and culture,” Ms Petersen said. 

You can view the Healing Foundation’s media release here.

Aboriginal teenager having heart check in mobile health truck

Image source: Rural Workforce Agency Victoria.

Mental health support available for rural frontline nurses

Health professionals in drought and bushfire-affected rural communities have access to extra resources to help them deal with the mental health fallout from these events. CRANAplus, the peak professional body for Australia’s remote and isolated health workforce, has received Commonwealth funding to provide a suite of webinars, podcasts, and tailor-made workshops for those working on the frontline, to keep themselves and their communities resilient. Federal Regional Health Minister, Mark Coulton said nurses are the lifeblood of rural areas, responding to complex health needs away from major hospitals and needed support to carry out this vital role. “We cannot overstate the important role our remote nursing workforce has in helping their local communities get through these tough times,” Minister Coulton said.

The media release can be viewed here.

Aboriginal lady on dialysis and Aboriginal nurse

Image source: Queensland Health.

COVID-19 telehealth extended by six months

The temporary Medicare rebates for COVID-19 telehealth consultations, originally due to expire on 30 September, are to be extended for a further six months. The AMA proposed the introduction of telehealth items earlier this year as part of a comprehensive strategy to tackle COVID-19, and has worked behind the scenes for them to extended.

To read the AMA’s media release regarding the extension click here.

health professional looking computer screen engaging in teleconference

Image source: National Rural Health Alliance online magazine Partyline.

COVID-19 impact on community sector

A new survey has found the community service sector is approaching crisis point due to COVID-19 with more than a million people excluded from income support and expected cuts to income support for over two million others. The sector is also dealing with the doubling of unemployment and a rise in serious mental health issues, as well as drops in fundraising, drops in JobKeeper amounts, and future funding uncertainty.

To view the Australian Community Sector Survey 2020 report click here.

two Aboriginal hands holding

Image source: AbSec website.

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander-specific primary health care data

Information on organisations funded by the Australian Government under its Indigenous Australians’ Health Programme (IAHP) to deliver culturally appropriate primary health care services to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians is available through two data collections—the Online Services Report (OSR); and the national Key Performance Indicators (nKPIs). The latest results from these collections can be found here.

AIHW Aboriginal access to health services map of Australia

Image source: Australian Institute of Health and Welfare.

WA water to be tested for COVID-19

Health Minister Roger Cook, says WA’s wastewater will soon be tested for the COVID-19 virus, with an evaluation program to expand PCR testing to the state’s sewerage network. “The Collaboration on Sewage Surveillance of SARS-CoV-2 (ColoSSoS) Project will track and monitor for traces of the COVID-19 virus in WA’s sewerage network. It will be led by the WA Health system – with testing undertaken by PathWest – to provide an opportunity for robust evaluation and review of the role of wastewater surveillance for COVID-19 in WA. The Water Corporation and Water Research Australia are also project partners.”

To read the media release click here.

Aboriginal toddler drinking from the water fountain in the summertime

Image source: Agrifood Technology website.

NT – Alice Springs

Executive Director – Central Australian Aboriginal Congress

Central Australian Aboriginal Congress has a vacancy on their Executive team for an Executive Director (ED) of Central Australian Academic Health Science Network (CA AHSN). The ED will provide direct strategic and governance support to the board of the CA AHSN and manage the day to day operations of CA AHSN.

To view the position description click here. Applications close Friday, 25 September 2020.

close up image of two Aboriginal hands holding & CAAC logo

Image source: CAAC website.

NSW – Narooma

Manager People and Culture (Identified) – Katungul

Katungul Aboriginal Corporation Regional Health and Community Services has a vacancy for a Manager People and Culture. The focus of the role is to provide advice, support and expertise in providing a culturally safe workplace that is HR and WHS compliant.

To view the position description click here. Application close 5.00pm Tuesday, 6 October 2020.Katungul logo duck over silhouette of two adults two children

National Press Club of Australia – ‘Australia and the World’ annual lecture – Pat Turner AM

Wednesday, 30 September 2020

The ANU 2020  ‘Australia and the World’ annual lecture aims to promote a broader conversation about Australia’s place in the world. This year Pat Turner AM will discuss the call of Indigenous Peoples across the globe to be heard on matters that have a significant impact on them as Indigenous Peoples and what ‘being heard’ means in the Australian context. Pat will explain why the struggle of Indigenous peoples in Australia to be heard is at a defining moment for the nation.

To view details of the event, which will be live streamed click here.

portrait image of Pat Turner AM & National Press Club logo

NACCHO Aboriginal News: A free COVID-19 vaccine will be available throughout 2021, if promising trials prove successful

Prime Minister’s announcement on COVID-19 vaccines

Last week the Prime Minister announced Australia has secured onshore manufacturing agreements for two COVID-19 vaccines. This could mean a free vaccine for all Australians as early as January 2021 if proven safe and effective for use.

Advising the Australian Government on potential vaccines is the Australian Technical Advisory Group on Immunisation and the COVID-19 Vaccine and Treatments for Australia – Science and Industry Technical Advisory Group.

Remember to keep up to date with changing state, territory and border restrictions.

There are now 147 GP led respiratory clinics in operation across Australia, providing assessment of people with fever and respiratory symptoms and COVID-19 testing. You can find testing locations on the Health Direct website.

Cancer patients to be ‘wrapped in culture’ as they undergo treatment

Yorta Yorta woman Leah Lindrea-Morrison knows all too well the experience of undergoing cancer treatment, both as a patient and as someone watching a loved one go through it.

As a survivor of breast cancer, Ms Lindrea-Morrison counts herself lucky, and she has started a project to revive a local Aboriginal tradition to bring comfort to other patients.

  • The project will create a possum skin cloak to be used by Indigenous cancer patients
  • It will be made during a workshop bringing together local people touched by cancer
  • A film will also be made to show the value of adding a cultural healing element to the medical process.

Read the full story here.

Image source: ABC

Victoria continues to move towards a Treaty with First Nations people

The Victorian Government is helping Traditional Owners build stronger nations and to ensure every voice is heard on the path to Treaty. Minister for Aboriginal Affairs Gabrielle Williams today announced more than $4.3 million will be made available as part of the Traditional Owner Nation-Building Support Package to make communities stronger.

Funding will be used to support specific outcomes, such as improving governance arrangements, boosting youth engagement or building projects that will deliver economic and cultural benefits. Under the principles of the Nation-Building fund, it’s important Traditional Owners are engaged with their communities and are self-determining with strong identities, governance and knowledge, as well as economically sustainable and independent.

For further information click here.

Image source: Shutterstock

Government announces $13 million in funding for community nursing

Nurses are set to be recognised for their immense contributions in keeping Australians safe as a part of Nursing in the Community Week.

Starting on Monday, the week is about recognising the important role nurses have played during the pandemic and ensuring the most vulnerable are kept safe and healthy.

The federal government is planning to highlight the important role nurses have played for remote and regional communities, particularly in Indigenous and Defence Force health services.

Read the full story here.

Recent updates to Australian Immunisation Register

Improving the health of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples is a national priority. The National Immunisation Program (NIP) for all Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people provides additional vaccines to help improve the health of Indigenous people, and close the gap between Indigenous and non- Indigenous people in health and life expectancy.

Until recently, the AIR used information from Medicare to record whether a person identified as Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander.

Read the full article here.

Aboriginal child receiving an injection.vaccination

Image source: Deadly Vibe website.

Winnunga Nimmityjah Aboriginal Health Service August Newsletter

Winnunga AHCS August Newsletter is out! To read the newsletter click here.

New COVID-19 mental health clinics in Victoria

Minster for Health, Greg Hunt, says from Monday 14 September 2020, Victorians will have access to additional mental health support with 15 new dedicated mental health clinics opening to the public.

“The clinics, announced on 17 August as part of a $31.9 million federal government mental health package to support Victorians during the COVID-19 pandemic, have been rapidly rolled out across the state at a cost of $26.9 million.

Image Source: Department of Health

“There will be nine HeadtoHelp clinics located in Greater Melbourne and six in regional Victoria. The locations are: Greater Melbourne: Berwick, Frankston, Officer, Hawthorn, Yarra Junction, West Heidelberg, Broadmeadows, Wyndham Vale, Brunswick East and Regional Victoria: Warragul, Sale, Bendigo, Wodonga, Sebastopol and Norlane.”

To read the full press release click here.

Image source: Department of Health

Adverse Childhood Experience Coordinator – Yerin, NSW Central Coast

Yerin is seeking an experienced Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander Case Coordinator to work with children, young people and their families on the NSW Central Coast, Darkinjung country wo are experiencing multiple vulnerabilities and whose children are at risk or have experienced an adverse childhood trauma. Through screening children and families, you will provide appropriate intervention care by arranging the required services to address the Adverse Childhood Trauma.

Read the full position description here.

To apply and know about other job vacancies at Yerin click here.

2021 National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Eye Health Conference

Indigenous Eye Health has announced the dates for the 2021 National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Eye Health Conference (previously the ‘Close the Gap for Vision by 2020 National Conference’). The conference will take place virtually from 20 April – 22 April 2021.

The full conference announcement can be read on the IEH website, here.

NACCHO Aboriginal News: Input Required to Renew Indigenous Suicide Prevention Strategy

 

Input required to renew Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Suicide Prevention Strategy

Marking World Suicide Prevention Day, Gayaa Dhuwi (Proud Spirit) Australia (GDPSA) announced the renewal of the 2013 National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Suicide Prevention Strategy (NATSISPS) and called for stakeholders to make sure their voices are heard during the process.

GDPSA CEO Mr Tom Brideson explained, “The NATSISPS was released in May 2013. It was developed by Indigenous experts and leaders in mental health and suicide prevention and remains a sound evidence-based strategic response to Indigenous suicide. However, it also responded to a set of circumstances that have changed since 2013 and that require it to be renewed.

“GDPSA would like to hear from you to inform the NATSISPS renewal process. To that end, between now and the end of 2020, we will be hosting a number of targeted subject matter roundtables and Zoom consultations with particular groups, but there is also the opportunity to participate through our website and to make submissions against a Discussion Paper we have developed.”

Professor Pat Dudgeon, GDPSA director and National Director of the Centre of Best Practice in Indigenous Suicide Prevention (CBPATSISP) continued, Australian governments announced the renewal of the NATSISPS, alongside the development of a new mainstream national suicide prevention plan, in the 2017 Fifth National Mental Health and Suicide Prevention Plan. GDPDSA has been asked by the Australian Government to renew the NATSISPS and will work closely with CBPATSISP and the Prime Minister’s National Suicide Prevention Taskforce to that end. We also want to hear from a range of stakeholders and – on behalf of both GDPSA and CBPATSISP – I strongly encourage you to participate – including Indigenous and non-Indigenous stakeholders.”

GDPSA Chair Professor Helen Milroy said, “Preliminary advice we have provided to the Taskforce are that there are two priority areas for consideration in NATSISPS renewal. The first is establishing Indigenous governance of Indigenous suicide prevention including at the national, regional and community levels. The second is establishing what is important to include in integrated approaches to Indigenous suicide prevention in our communities. In particular, with reference to ATSISPEP’s Solutions That Work report, and the to-be-released learnings from the Indigenous-specific suicide prevention trial sites. This includes consideration of clinical and cultural support elements of mental health and suicide prevention service provision.

To find out more or to make a submission please visit: https://www.gayaadhuwi.org.au/sp-strategy-renewal/

NACCHO highlights ACCHO work on World Suicide Prevention Day

National Indigenous Times (NIT) feature:

Currently, suicide is the fifth leading cause of death for Indigenous people in Australia, with rates twice as high as that for non-Indigenous Australians. ACCHOs are delivering place-based, community-led strategies and solutions to decrease suicide rates.

“For NACCHO and our communities, reducing suicide rates and improving the mental health of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people has always been a priority,” said NACCHO Chair, Donnella Mills.

“We know our Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisations are best placed to deliver these essential services because they understand the issues our people go through.”

Kimberley Aboriginal Medical Services (KAMS) in WA are working tirelessly to ensure suicide prevention is a top priority in their region.

“Every loss of life due to suicide is tragic because it is preventable. What we are trying to do in the Kimberley is trying to better understand the reasons why the rates are so much higher, they are twice that of other Aboriginal people in Australia and three times the rate of non-Aboriginal Australians,” said Rob McPhee, KAMS Chief Operating Officer.

“It is really about getting to the root cause of that over representation and being able to work with communities to be able to address the issues associated with them.”

KAMS has been heavily involved with the Kimberley Aboriginal Suicide Prevention Trial which is currently in its fifth and final year.

To read the full article click here.

Empowered Young Leaders Forum 2019’ in Broome WA

Health and safety for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people

Three recent reports and a new book share some critical messages for addressing systemic failures that are harming Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people, reports Associate Professor Megan Williams, a Wiradjuri scholar from the University of Sydney.

Her article is published on what would have been the 58th birthday of Tanya Day, whose death in custody in December 2017 is the subject of one of these reports. Across social media today, supporters shared photographs of themselves wearing pink to pay their respects, using the hashtag #PinkforTanya, in response to a request by her family.

Commission recommendations, Inquest findings and Ombudsman reports about Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people’s health and wellbeing are frequently quoted in attempts to improve systems and prevent further harms and deaths occurring. Their pages often include recommendations for mainstream, non-Indigenous workforce development, ranging from disciplinary actions to supervision and training.

To read the full story published in Croakey click here.

 

Stronger Together, There’s More to Say After #RUOK? 

Steven Satour, Stronger Together Campaign Manager, R U OK? says looking out for your mob is more important than ever in 2020, as it has been a challenging year for everyone and circumstances have made it even more important for us to stay connected.

“We know as a community we are Stronger Together. We know knowledge is culture and emotional wellness can be learned from our family members, so sharing resources, educating each other and providing guidance on what to say if someone answers they are not okay amongst our families is vital,” says Mr Satour.

Learn what to say next at www.ruok.org.au

Johnathan Thurston opens doors for Logan youth with ‘deadly’ new program

A new Deadly Choices jersey will be launched at Marsden State High School on September 11 by JT Academy Managing Director Johnathan Thurston – a key part of the JTConnect program that encourages the youth of Logan to believe in yourself and have the courage and confidence and pursue employment.

The JTConnect program is an initiative of the Johnathan Thurston Academy, sponsored by the Deadly Choices’ Indigenous health campaign, and is designed to empower young people to believe in themselves and be the difference. Students who complete the JTConnect program and are up to date with their 715 Health Check through their participating community controlled health service will receive a JTConnect Deadly Choices jersey.

“I’m excited about the new Deadly Choices jersey collaboration with the JT Academy and JTConnect – the program has already visited a number of high schools around Cairns and Logan,” Thurston said.  “We truly believe that by instilling a strong sense of self belief, confidence and courage will empower young people to pursue a career or a job for a better life.

“In everything we do, we aim to inspire our youth to feel proud and strong with their identity and who they are as individuals and this program will go a long way towards this goal.”

IAHA call for the long-term retention of temporary MBS telehealth items

Indigenous Allied Health Australia (IAHA), the peak organisation for the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander allied health workforce, calls on the government to extend access to Medicare Benefits Schedule (MBS) telehealth items for allied health professionals.

Introduced in March 2020 in response to the impacts of COVID-19 on the ability of people to access in person care, 36 new telehealth allied health items were included on the MBS, replicating existing MBS allied health items traditionally provided face-to-face. Scheduled to expire at the end of September 2020, IAHA joins calls from other stakeholders for the longerterm retention of these telehealth items on the MBS.

Read the full IAHA press release here.