NACCHO Aboriginal Health Conferences and Events #SaveADate #NRW2019 : This weeks feature @ahmrc Twitter Festival 31 May #WorldNoTobaccoDay #CommunityControl #YourHealthYourFuture #Smoking Moderated by @amymcquire @timsenior @harleymcquire

This weeks featured NACCHO SAVE A DATE events

31 May AHMRC World No Tobacco Day Twitter Festival 

29th  – 30th  August 2019 NACCHO OCHRE DAY

4 November NACCHO Youth Conference -Darwin NT

5 – 7 November NACCHO Conference and AGM  -Darwin NT

Download the 2019 Health Awareness Days Calendar 

27 May to 5 June National Reconciliation Week #NRW2019

18 -20 June Lowitja Health Conference Darwin

2019 Dr Tracey Westerman’s Workshops 

5 July NAIDOC week Symposium

6 July National NAIDOC Awards Canberra

7 -14 July 2019 National NAIDOC Grant funding round opens

2-5 August Garma Festival 

29th  – 30th  August 2019 NACCHO OCHRE DAY

23 -25 September IAHA Conference Darwin

24 -26 September 2019 CATSINaM National Professional Development Conference

9-10 October 2019 NATSIHWA 10 Year Anniversary Conference

16 October Melbourne Uni: Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health and Wellbeing Conference

4 November NACCHO Youth Conference -Darwin NT

5 – 7 November NACCHO Conference and AGM  -Darwin NT

5-8 November The Lime Network Conference New Zealand 

This weeks featured NACCHO SAVE A DATE events

NACCHO and Croakey followers are invited to join Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Services in New South Wales in a Twitter Festival focused on tobacco control initiatives and successes across Australia.

Follow the discussions on Twitter and contribute your views by using the hashtags #CommunityControl and #YourHealthYourFuture.

Please encourage your networks and organisations to support the event by following the discussion and retweeting as much as possible.

Bookmark this Twitter list to follow guest tweeters and learn more from community leaders and organisations across the tobacco control space.


World No Tobacco Day program

Draft as at 28 May : Check Croakey for the latest program 

#CommunityControl #YourHealthYourFuture

(All times are AEST)

8am – 8:15am – Launch

#CommunityControl #YourHealthYourFuture moderators:

Amy McQuire (8am-1pm) @amymcquire

Tim Senior (8am-11am) @timsenior

Hayley McQuire (11am-1pm) @HayleyMcQuire


8.15-8:45am – Introductions

Aboriginal Health & Medical Research Council: Your health Your Future, the strengths of the Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Service sector

@ahmrc


8.45 -9.00 am – National Perspective

National Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation: Tobacco Control from the Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Service sector nationally

@NACCHOAustralia

Read over 130 NACCHO Aboriginal Health and Smoking articles HERE

9:00-9:15am – Dead or Deadly

Waminda South Coast Women’s Health and Welfare Aboriginal Corporation

@Deadordeadly1


9:15-9:30am – Ministry of Health

NSW Health: The role of the government in supporting tobacco control

@NSWHealth


9:30-9:45am – Linking Tobacco Control & Culture

Cancer Institute NSW & Aboriginal Quitline

@cancerNSW

@AQuitline


9:45-10:00am – Tackling Indigenous Smoking

Desley Thompson, Ninti One

@ninti_one


10:00-10:15am – Awabakal

Awabakal: Celebrating success in tobacco control initiatives in Newcastle and the Hunter Valley NSW

@AWABAKAL


10:15-10:30am – Riverina Medical and Dental Aboriginal Corporation

AH&MRC tweeting live from RivMed: Celebrating success in tobacco control initiatives in the Riverina region NSW

@ahmrc


10:30-10:45am – Creating and Leveraging Strategic Partnerships

Cancer Council NSW

@CCNewSouthWales


10:45-11:15am – Sharing Our Successes

Victorian Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation (VACCHO), Queensland Aboriginal and Islander Health Council (QAIHC), Aboriginal Medical Services Alliance Northern Territory (AMSANT)

@VACCHO_org

@QAIHC_QLD

@AMSANTaus


11.15 -11.30 am – Ready Mob

Galambila Aboriginal Medical Service

@ReadyMob


11:30-11:45am – International Perspective

IndigenousNCDs

@IndigenousNCDs


11:45-12:00pm – iSISTAQUIT

Dr Gillian Gould: Successes in reducing the incidence of smoking during pregnancy

@GillianSGould


12:00-12:15pm – Tobacco Control during Rehabilitation

The Glen Centre – Central Coast Drug and Alcohol Rehabilitation

@TheGlenCentre


12:15-12:30pm – A GP’s perspective

Dr Tim Senior

@timsenior


12:30-12:45pm – Walgett Aboriginal Medical Service

Walgett: Celebrating success in tobacco control initiatives in northern NSW

@Walgett_AMS


12:45-1:00pm – Wrapping It Up

Moderators:

Amy McQuire  @amymcquire

Hayley McQuire  @HayleyMcQuire


The Twitter festival is hosted by Croakey Professional Services on behalf of the AH&MRC. We thank the AH&MRC for organising the program. Bookmark this link to follow related stories

Download the NACCHO 2019 Calendar Health Awareness Days

For many years ACCHO organisations have said they wished they had a list of the many Indigenous “ Days “ and Aboriginal health or awareness days/weeks/events.

With thanks to our friends at ZockMelon here they both are!

It even has a handy list of the hashtags for the event.

Download the 53 Page 2019 Health days and events calendar HERE

naccho zockmelon 2019 health days and events calendar

We hope that this document helps you with your planning for the year ahead.

Every Tuesday we will update these listings with new events and What’s on for the week ahead

To submit your events or update your info

Contact: Colin Cowell www.nacchocommunique.com

NACCHO Social Media Editor Tel 0401 331 251

Email : nacchonews@naccho.org.au

 

27 May to 5 June National Reconciliation Week #NRW2019 

At the heart of reconciliation is the relationship between the broader Australian community and Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples. To foster positive race relations, our relationship must be grounded in a foundation of truth.

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples have long called for a comprehensive process of truth-telling about Australia’s colonial history. Our nation’s past is reflected in the present, and will continue to play out in future unless we heal historical wounds.

Today, 80 per cent of Australians believe it is important to undertake formal truth telling processes, according to the 2018 Australian Reconciliation Barometer. Australians are ready to come to terms with our history as a crucial step towards a unified future, in which we understand, value and respect each other.

Whether you’re engaging in challenging conversations or unlearning and relearning what you know, this journey requires all of us to walk together with courage. This National Reconciliation Week, we invite Australians from all backgrounds to contribute to our national movement towards a unified future.

What is National Reconciliation Week?

National Reconciliation Week (NRW) is a time for all Australians to learn about our shared histories, cultures, and achievements, and to explore how each of us can contribute to achieving reconciliation in Australia.

The dates for NRW remain the same each year; 27 May to 3 June. These dates commemorate two significant milestones in the reconciliation journey— the successful 1967 referendum, and the High Court Mabo decision respectively.

Reconciliation must live in the hearts, minds and actions of all Australians as we move forward, creating a nation strengthened by respectful relationships between the wider Australian community, and Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples.

Resources HERE

18 -20 June Lowitja Health Conference Darwin


At the Lowitja Institute International Indigenous Health and Wellbeing Conference 2019 delegates from around the world will discuss the role of First Nations in leading change and will showcase Indigenous solutions.

The conference program will highlight ways of thinking, speaking and being for the benefit of Indigenous peoples everywhere.

Join Indigenous leaders, researchers, health professionals, decision makers, community representatives, and our non-Indigenous colleagues in this important conversation.

More Info 

2019 Dr Tracey Westerman’s Workshops 

More info and dates

5 July NAIDOC week Symposium

Symposium: Our Voice, Our Truth
Kick off NAIDOC week in Canberra with a Symposium event with keynote speakers and expert panel on the topic of good governance through strong leadership. A daylong event, fully catered with morning and afternoon tea, lunch and post-event drinks and canapes with entertainment to conclude.
This is an exclusive ticketed event in a stunning lakeside venue with limited seats available. Save the date – July 5 – and follow https://www.facebook.com/ailcleaders/ on Facebook to be the first in line to book tickets
6 July National NAIDOC Awards Canberra

7 -14 July 2019 National NAIDOC Grant funding round opens

VOICE. TREATY. TRUTH.

We invite you to walk with us in a movement of the Australian people for a better future.

The Indigenous voice of this country is over 65,000 plus years old.

They are the first words spoken on this continent. Languages that passed down lore, culture and knowledge for over millennia. They are precious to our nation.

It’s that Indigenous voice that include know-how, practices, skills and innovations – found in a wide variety of contexts, such as agricultural, scientific, technical, ecological and medicinal fields, as well as biodiversity-related knowledge.  They are words connecting us to country, an understanding of country and of a people who are the oldest continuing culture on the planet.

And with 2019 being celebrated as the United Nations International Year of Indigenous Languages, it’s time for our knowledge to be heard through our voice.

For generations, we have sought recognition of our unique place in Australian history and society today. We need to be the architects of our lives and futures.

For generations, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples have looked for significant and lasting change.

Voice. Treaty. Truth. were three key elements to the reforms set out in the Uluru Statement from the Heart. These reforms represent the unified position of First Nations Australians.

However, the Uluru Statement built on generations of consultation and discussions among Indigenous people on a range of issues and grievances. Consultations about the further reforms necessary to secure and underpin our rights and to ensure they can be exercised and enjoyed by Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples.

It specifically sequenced a set of reforms: first, a First Nations Voice to Parliament enshrined in the Constitution and second, a Makarrata Commission to supervise treaty processes and truth-telling.

(Makarrata is a word from the language of the Yolngu people in Arnhem Land. The Yolngu concept of Makarrata captures the idea of two parties coming together after a struggle, healing the divisions of the past. It is about acknowledging that something has been done wrong, and it seeks to make things right.)

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people want their voice to be heard. First Nations were excluded from the Constitutional convention debates of the 1800’s when the Australian Constitution came into force.  Indigenous people were excluded from the bargaining table.

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples have always wanted an enhanced role in decision-making in Australia’s democracy.

In the European settlement of Australia, there were no treaties, no formal settlements, no compacts. Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people therefore did not cede sovereignty to our land. It was taken away from us. That will remain a continuing source of dispute.

Our sovereignty has never been ceded – not in 1788, not in 1967, not with the Native Title Act, not with the Uluru Statement from the Heart. It coexists with the sovereignty of the Crown and should never be extinguished.

Australia is one of the few liberal democracies around the world which still does not have a treaty or treaties or some other kind of formal acknowledgement or arrangement with its Indigenous minorities.

A substantive treaty has always been the primary aspiration of the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander movement.

Critically, treaties are inseparable from Truth.

Lasting and effective agreement cannot be achieved unless we have a shared, truthful understanding of the nature of the dispute, of the history, of how we got to where we stand.

The true story of colonisation must be told, must be heard, must be acknowledged.

But hearing this history is necessary before we can come to some true reconciliation, some genuine healing for both sides.

And of course, this is not just the history of our First Peoples – it is the history of all of us, of all of Australia, and we need to own it.

Then we can move forward together.

Let’s work together for a shared future.

Download the National NAIDOC Logo and other social media resources.

2-5 August Garma Festival 

Garma Website

29th  – 30th  Aug 2019 NACCHO OCHRE DAY

Venue: Pullman Hotel – 192 Wellington Parade, East Melbourne Vic 3000

Website to be launched soon

23 -25 September IAHA Conference Darwin

24 September

A night of celebrating excellence and action – the Gala Dinner is the premier national networking event in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander allied health.

The purpose of the IAHA National Indigenous Allied Health Awards is to recognise the contribution of IAHA members to their profession and/or improving the health and wellbeing of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples.

The IAHA National Indigenous Allied Health Awards showcase the outstanding achievements in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander allied health and provides identifiable allied health role models to inspire all Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people to consider and pursue a career in allied health.

The awards this year will be known as “10 for 10” to honour the 10 Year Anniversary of IAHA. We will be announcing 4 new awards in addition to the 6 existing below.

Read about the categories HERE.

24 -26 September 2019 CATSINaM National Professional Development Conference

 

 

The 2019 CATSINaM National Professional Development Conference will be held in Sydney, 24th – 26th September 2019. Make sure you save the dates in your calendar.

Further information to follow soon.

Date: Tuesday the 24th to Thursday the 26th September 2019

Location: Sydney, Australia

Organiser: Chloe Peters

Phone: 02 6262 5761

Email: admin@catsinam.org.au

9-10 October 2019 NATSIHWA 10 Year Anniversary Conference

SAVE THE DATE for the 2019 NATSIHWA 10 Year Anniversary Conference!!!

We’re so excited to announce the date of our 10 Year Anniversary Conference –
A Decade of Footprints, Driving Recognition!!! 

NATSIHWA recognises that importance of members sharing and learning from each other, and our key partners within the Health Sector. We hold a biennial conference for all NATSIHWA members to attend. The conference content focusses on the professional support and development of the Health Workers and Health Practitioners, with key side events to support networking among attendees.  We seek feedback from our Membership to make the conferences relevant to their professional needs and expectations and ensure that they are offered in accessible formats and/or locations.The conference is a time to celebrate the important contribution of Health Workers and Health Practitioners, and the Services that support this important profession.

We hold the NATSIHWA Legends Award night at the conference Gala Dinner. Award categories include: Young Warrior, Health Worker Legend, Health Service Legend and Individual Champion.

Watch this space for the release of more dates for registrations, award nominations etc.

16 October Melbourne Uni: Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health and Wellbeing Conference

The University of Melbourne, Department of Rural Health are pleased to advise that abstract
submissions are now being invited that address Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health and
wellbeing.

The Aboriginal & Torres Strait Islander Health Conference is an opportunity for sharing information and connecting people that are committed to reforming the practice and research of Aboriginal & Torres Strait Islander health and celebrates Aboriginal knowledge systems and strength-based approaches to improving the health outcomes of Aboriginal communities.

This is an opportunity to present evidence-based approaches, Aboriginal methods and models of
practice, Aboriginal perspectives and contribution to health or community led solutions, underpinned by cultural theories to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health and wellbeing.
In 2018 the Aboriginal & Torres Strait Islander Health Conference attracted over 180 delegates from across the community and state.

We welcome submissions from collaborators whose expertise and interests are embedded in Aboriginal health and wellbeing, and particularly presented or co-presented by Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people and community members.

If you are interested in presenting, please complete the speaker registration link

closing date for abstract submission is Friday 3 rd May 2019.
As per speaker registration link request please email your professional photo for our program or any conference enquiries to E. aboriginal-health@unimelb.edu.au.

Kind regards
Leah Lindrea-Morrison
Aboriginal Partnerships and Community Engagement Officer
Department of Rural Health, University of Melbourne T. 03 5823 4554 E. leah.lindrea@unimelb.edu.au

4 November NACCHO Youth Conference -Darwin NT

Darwin Convention Centre

Website to be launched soon

Conference Co-Coordinator Ben Mitchell 02 6246 9309

ben.mitchell@naccho.org.au

5 – 7 November NACCHO Conference and AGM  -Darwin NT

Darwin Convention Centre

Website to be launched soon

Conference Co-Coordinator Ben Mitchell 02 6246 9309

ben.mitchell@naccho.org.au

5-8 November The Lime Network Conference New Zealand 

This years  whakatauki (theme for the conference) was developed by the Scientific Committee, along with Māori elder, Te Marino Lenihan & Tania Huria from .

To read about the conference & theme, check out the  website. 

NACCHO Aboriginal Health #NRW2019 Our CEO Pat Turner Interview : Could @KenWyattMP historic Ministerial appointment be truly transformational for our mob #ClosingTheGap #Refresh and the #Voice

“Closing the Gap and the Voice are the two big issues, they’re separate but complimentary, and they can run in parallel. We want both. We want a real say over our lives. We have to be at the negotiating table.”

The Aboriginal heath sector is the biggest employer of Aboriginal people in Australia.

By investing in Aboriginal community controlled health organisations, they are investing in communities but they’re also employing Aboriginal people in real jobs.

They need to remove the punitive welfare measures immediately. they make absolutely no sense. It’s accountability gone mad. We’ve offered him a briefing, we’re looking forward to a positive working partnership, and for the ministry to be properly funded.”

It was well past time to get moving on the voice to parliament.

We are more than ready to finalise the model with our own people, and get out in the broader Australian community and have the conversations with them about why it’s important.

The PM said he wouldn’t be rushed on the matter of the voice, but the PM has to take a leadership role. When has he got the best chance of getting things done? In the first term. There’s no reason why we have to wait.”

CEO the National Coalition of Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisations (NACCHO), Pat Turner said Wyatt had a big job ahead, facing “massive expectations” on all sides. Pat also co-chairs the joint council on Closing the Gap, a 10 year agreement between Australian governments and Aboriginal organisations to work together on solutions

Watch ABC TV News interview with Pat Turner

” When I saw Ken’s tweet about his appointment on Sunday, my heart grew big with pride. It was a welcome joy on a day that is always hard and sad – Sorry Day – the day we remember the pain and heartache of the stolen generations and all the histories and reverberations through families that came from this terrible period of pain, inflicted on First Australians by the government.

There is deep significance in Ken’s appointment being announced on Sorry Day, given his own family was directly affected by the then government’s actions.

Ken brings a depth of experience in Aboriginal education, health and policy, but of course the one thing he has that none of the previous office holders have ever had is that he is Indigenous. “

Dr Jessa Rogers is a Wiradjuri academic, consultant and board director based in Adelaide : see full article Part 2 Below

Part 1 from The Guardian 

Praise, hope and high expectation have followed the appointment of Noongar man Ken Wyatt as minister for Indigenous Australians in the new Morrison government.

Wyatt is the first Aboriginal person to hold the federal ministry, and the first Aboriginal person to sit in cabinet.

In a statement Wyatt said he was “incredibly honoured to be the first Aboriginal minister for Indigenous Australians, committed to working and walking together with our elders, families and communities, to ensure the greatness of our many nations is reflected in the greatness of the Australian nation, now and forever”.

The appointment, made on national Sorry Day and at the start of Reconciliation Week, has been welcomed by Aboriginal organisations and advocates, hopeful of progress on constitutional reform, a voice to parliamentClosing the Gap targets and long-standing welfare, health and justice issues.

Wyatt arrived in Canberra on Monday from his home state of Western Australia amid speculation about how he might consult Indigenous organisations and communities.

Scott Morrison said a new “national Indigenous Australians agency” would be established, but details are yet to be announced.

Nor would the prime minister give a timeframe for a referendum on constitutional reform and a voice to parliament.

The federal government has set aside $7.3m for co-design, and while Morrison said the work would start immediately, he would not set a deadline for a result.

“I’m committed to getting an outcome on recognition, but we need to work together across the aisle and across our communities to get an outcome that all Australians can get behind and we’ll take as long as is needed to achieve that,” Morrison said.

“My priorities for Indigenous Australians are to ensure Indigenous kids are in school and getting an education, that young Indigenous Australians are not taking their own lives and that there are real jobs for Indigenous Australians so they can plan for their future with confidence like any other Australian.

“Recognition must be achieved alongside these practical goals and we will continue to work together.”

Newly minted Labor leader Anthony Albanese said the ALP was ready to advance the agenda of the Uluru statement in a bipartisan manner.

“Our nation is diminished by not recognising first Australians in our constitution. And while Indigenous Australians are the most disadvantaged in our nation, Labor stands ready to cooperate on how we advance the agenda of the Uluru statement,” Albanese said.

The Greens also said a voice should happen without delay. Senator Rachel Siewert said Wyatt’s appointment was a “positive step towards self-determination”.

The social justice commissioner and fellow Western Australian, June Oscar, said Wyatt’s appointment was “truly historic”.

“Ken Wyatt carries the hopes and aspirations of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people across the country, and we look forward to working together,” Oscar said.

The co-chair of the National Congress of Australia’s First Peoples, Rod Little, said Wyatt’s appointment “heightens our hope that things will be different”.

“We have hope every time there’s an election. We hope there are people who can work with us, who we can trust, who know how our communities are feeling, and we need somebody who is trustworthy and honest who is going to take on the challenges to make our lives better.”

Chief executive of the National Coalition of Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisations (Naccho), Pat Turner said Wyatt had a big job ahead, facing “massive expectations” on all sides.

The first Indigenous member of the House of Representatives Ken Wyatt delivers his maiden speech to the House of Representatives in Canberra, 29 September 2010

Part 2 Ken Wyatt’s historic appointment could be truly transformational for Indigenous Australians : from Jessa Rogers

Also from The Guardian 

For the first time the final approval on policies and funding which affect our lives will be made by an Indigenous person

Ken Wyatt was announced the minister of Indigenous affairs on Sunday, which was also Sorry Day. Wyatt’s own family was part of the stolen generations. Photograph: Mick Tsikas/AAP

Scott Morrison has made an historic appointment early in his new term as prime minister that has the potential to radically alter the way Indigenous policy is made in Canberra.

One hundred and eighteen years after the commonwealth of Australia was formed we finally have our first ever minister of Indigenous affairs (now appropriately called minister for Indigenous Australians) who is actually Indigenous. Ken Wyatt, who in 2010 was the first Aboriginal man to be elected to the House of Representatives, has made history again. And while I do not know him well, I know he is a decent man with a heart for the people.

Some may argue that this appointment is merely symbolic given any major policy direction is likely to require the approval of the cabinet, but the minister for Indigenous Australians will have significant influence over major government programs and resources.

Ken brings a depth of experience in Aboriginal education, health and policy, but of course the one thing he has that none of the previous office holders have ever had is that he is Indigenous. And we now no longer have a non-Indigenous person with no experience in our world, making and influencing important decisions on our behalf.

This is the first time senior officials in the Department of Prime Minister and Cabinet (where Indigenous Affairs is currently based) will have to answer to an Indigenous person. This will be the first time the final approval on policies and hundreds of millions of dollars will be made by an Indigenous person.

Having spent over a decade working in schools and universities where the people who hold the power to make the key decisions that affect Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students and staff are almost always non-Indigenous, I am encouraged to think that this decision by Scott Morrison is more than just symbolic. It has the potential to be truly transformational.

The first Indigenous member of the House of Representatives, Ken Wyatt, delivers his maiden speech on 29 September 2010. On Sunday Wyatt was appointed the first ever minister of Indigenous affairs.

For many years now, I have had an image board of inspirational people, moments and quotes in my office. Ken Wyatt has been on that board, his image taken in September 2010, when he took his seat as member for Hasluck wearing a kangaroo skin.

That image made me proud then, as I know it did for many people. That symbol of leadership, presented by Elders, showed so much of what it means to be an Aboriginal person who also represents a wide and diverse group of Australians in his home electorate.

The picture I had of Ken delivering his first speech always reminded me of the important points he made that day, in particular his recollection of the apology. It brought tears to my eyes, and something burned inside me when he said that the standing orders at that point prevented an Indigenous response.

So during that speech, cloaked in kangaroo skin, Ken said: “On behalf of my mother, her siblings and all Indigenous Australians, I, as an Aboriginal voice in this chamber, say thank you for the apology delivered in the federal parliament.” That voice in the chamber was so important, just as his voice as minister for Indigenous Australians will be now.

‘I feel like Labor was the only hope for our mob’: Indigenous people cannot feel defeated

I have raised my children to believe that we as Aboriginal people cannot let negative opinions, low expectations or stereotypes hold us back from achieving our goals. We have the power to shape our futures, even though we still have a long road ahead of us

As Ken has said, the decisions we make determine our destiny, and the choices we make shape our future. We need to work hard towards a world where Indigenous people can determine our own destinies, but also take time to celebrate the wins, when we have them.

So, today I am celebrating Ken’s appointment as a step in the right direction for the newly elected government, and for us as Indigenous peoples in Australia.

I am hoping this appointment will bring about more than just symbolic change, because we need more than that to improve our lives as Indigenous Australians.

NACCHO Aboriginal Women’s Health and How to #quitsmoking during #pregnancy with @sistaquit Plus #WorldNoTobaccoDay2019 May31 #WNTD2019 #WNTD

” Every year, on 31 May, the World Health Organization (WHO) and global partners celebrate World No Tobacco Day (WNTD). The annual campaign is an opportunity to raise awareness on the harmful and deadly effects of tobacco use and second-hand smoke exposure, and to discourage the use of tobacco in any form.

The focus of World No Tobacco Day 2019 is on “tobacco and lung health.” The campaign will increase awareness on:

  • the negative impact that tobacco has on people’s lung health, from cancer to chronic respiratory disease,
  • the fundamental role lungs play for the health and well-being of all people.

The campaign also serves as a call to action, advocating for effective policies to reduce tobacco consumption and engaging stakeholders across multiple sectors in the fight for tobacco control. ”

See full detail of World No Tobacco Day Part 2 Below

” In 2014 it was reported 45 per cent of surveyed Indigenous mothers smoked during pregnancy, compared to 13 per cent of non-Indigenous pregnant women.

Those figures have spurred University of Newcastle associate professor Gillian Gould to study what can be done to help reduce rates of Indigenous women smoking while pregnant.

It’s not only that they may be born with low birth rate, or have risks of premature birth, but it can set them up for things like obesity, diabetes, a higher risk of heart disease, and lots of respiratory illnesses.”

Smoking rates among pregnant Indigenous women tackled in major research project 

“ It’s imperative that Indigenous women have good access to smoking cessation services as 43 per cent of Indigenous women smoke. Essentially, we’re trying to ensure that Indigenous people have the same health outcomes as non-Indigenous people and we need to start before they’re born. 

Nothing like this is currently available and there are many systematic barriers that prevent women from accessing medical or antenatal care, which is a problem as it means women may present later than usual during their pregnancy,” Associate Professor Gould said.

We want to start the conversation about smoking as early as possible and found that many general practitioners and obstetricians lack the confidence or skills to provide this specialised type of knowledge.

Some women also receive mixed messages about the safety of quitting smoking or using nicotine replacement therapy during their pregnancy, so this initiative will bring health providers up to speed with the latest evidence-based treatment methods.”

Associate Professor Gould see full Press Release Part 1

Read over 130  + NACCHO Aboriginal health and Smoking articles HERE

Part 1

Health professionals and organisations will receive additional training and resources to help support Indigenous women quit smoking during pregnancy under a new multi-million dollar initiative being funded by the Australian Government Department of Health.

Led by renowned smoking cessation expert, Associate Professor Gillian Gould, the initiative will enable health practitioners who treat a pregnant woman in any medical capacity to complete an online training module and access a range of tailored treatment materials.

With smoking in pregnancy having a major impact on the lifelong health of mother and child, including birth complications and low birth weight, Associate Professor Gould said quitting smoking early in pregnancy would help to close the gap on Indigenous health.

As a general practitioner and researcher with the University of Newcastle and Hunter Medical Research Institute (HMRI)*, Associate Professor Gould said the iSISTAQUIT (Supporting Indigenous Smokers to Assist Quitting) initiative would help to provide a culturally sensitive and consistent approach to delivering better care across the country.

Building on lessons and findings from a separate pilot program, also led by Associate Professor Gould, iSISTAQUIT will feature online training via webinars that are self-paced, along with hard copy material such as a treatment manual and patient booklet.

“Many of the resources were developed during the pilot program and trialled across six states, so we’ve adapted them slightly and made them suitable for online delivery,” Associate Professor Gould said.

“Our pilot study revealed that 41 per cent of participants made quit attempts and the resources resulted in a quit rate of 14 per cent and increased engagement between Indigenous women and services.

“Ideally we want these resources to be available to all health practitioners and will look to disseminate them through our existing networks across Aboriginal services, professional colleges and bodies, primary health networks, obstetricians, hospital departments and other medical services throughout Australia when they become available.”

On April 4, 2019 the Department of Health awarded $3,891,801 to the initiative, from the Tackling Indigenous Smoking program. The national development of iSISTAQUIT will commence in the next few months from a newly-established centre in Coffs Harbour.

HMRI is a partnership between the University of Newcastle, Hunter New England Health and the community.

 Part 2 How tobacco endangers the lung health of people worldwide

World No Tobacco Day 2019 will focus on the multiple ways that exposure to tobacco affects the health of people’s lungs worldwide.

These include:

Lung cancer. Tobacco smoking is the primary cause for lung cancer, responsible for over two thirds of lung cancer deaths globally. Second-hand smoke exposure at home or in the work place also increases risk of lung cancer. Quitting smoking can reduce the risk of lung cancer: after 10 years of quitting smoking, risk of lung cancer falls to about half that of a smoker.

Chronic respiratory disease. Tobacco smoking is the leading cause of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), a condition where the build-up of pus-filled mucus in the lungs results in a painful cough and agonising breathing difficulties. The risk of developing COPD is particularly high among individuals who start smoking at a young age, as tobacco smoke significantly slows lung development. Tobacco also  exacerbates asthma, which restricts activity and contributes to disability. Early smoking cessation is the most effective treatment for slowing the progression of COPD and improving asthma symptoms.

Across the life-course. Infants exposed in-utero to tobacco smoke toxins, through maternal smoking or maternal exposure to second-hand smoke, frequently experience reduced lung growth and function. Young children exposed to second-hand smoke are at risk of the onset and exacerbation of asthma, pneumonia and bronchitis, and frequent lower respiratory infections.

Globally, an estimated 165 000 children die before the age of 5 of lower respiratory infections caused by second-hand smoke. Those who live on into adulthood continue to suffer the health consequences of second-hand smoke exposure, as frequent lower respiratory infections in early childhood significantly increase risk of developing COPD in adulthood.

Tuberculosis. Tuberculosis (TB) damages the lungs and reduces lung function, which is further exacerbated by tobacco smoking. About one quarter of the world’s population has latent TB, placing them at risk of developing the active disease. People who smoke are twice as likely to fall ill with TB. Active TB, compounded by the damaging lung health effects of tobacco smoking, substantially increases risk of disability and death from respiratory failure.

Air pollution. Tobacco smoke is a very dangerous form of indoor air pollution: it contains over 7 000 chemicals, 69 of which are known to cause cancer. Though smoke may be invisible and odourless, it can linger in the air for up to five hours, putting those exposed at risk of lung cancer, chronic respiratory diseases, and reduced lung function.

Goals of the World No Tobacco Day 2019 campaign

The most effective measure to improve lung health is to reduce tobacco use and second-hand smoke exposure. But knowledge among large sections of the general public, and particularly among smokers, on the implications for the health of people’s lungs from tobacco smoking and second-hand smoke exposure is low in some countries. Despite strong evidence of the harms of tobacco on lung health, the potential of tobacco control for improving lung health remains underestimated.

The World No Tobacco Day 2019 campaign will raise awareness on the:

  • risks posed by tobacco smoking and second-hand smoke exposure;
  • awareness on the particular dangers of tobacco smoking to lung health;
  • magnitude of death and illness globally from lung diseases caused by tobacco, including chronic respiratory diseases and lung cancer;
  • emerging evidence on the link between tobacco smoking and tuberculosis deaths;
  • implications of second-hand exposure for lung health of people across age groups;
  • importance of lung health to achieving overall health and well-being;
  • feasible actions and measures that key audiences, including the public and governments, can take to reduce the risks to lung health posed by tobacco.

The cross-cutting theme of tobacco and lung health has implications for other global processes, such as international efforts to control noncommunicable diseases (NCDs), TB and air pollution for promoting health. It serves as an opportunity to engage stakeholders across sectors and empower countries to strengthen the implementation of the proven MPOWER tobacco control measures contained in the WHO Framework Convention for Tobacco Control (WHO FCTC).


Call to action

Lung health is not achieved merely through the absence of disease, and tobacco smoke has major implications for the lung health of smokers and non-smokers globally.

In order to achieve the Sustainable Development Goal (SDG) target of a one-third reduction in NCD premature mortality by 2030, tobacco control must be a priority for governments and communities worldwide. Currently, the world is not on track to meeting this target.

Countries should respond to the tobacco epidemic through full implementation of the WHO FCTC and by adopting the MPOWER measures at the highest level of achievement, which involves developing, implementing, and enforcing the most effective tobacco control policies aimed at reducing the demand for tobacco.

Parents and other members of the community should also take measures to promote their own health, and that of their children, by protecting them from the harms caused by tobacco.

NACCHO Aboriginal Health #VoteACCHO Post #Election2019 Wrap : @abcnews Pat Turner congratulates @ScottMorrisonMP Plus 5 key questions for incoming  government  incl: Future of #UluruStatement and #ClosingThe Gap

“ No one saw it coming. Polling had the election as a win for Labor. Internal polling from the parties had it this way and external polling also had it so.

Exit polls had a 13 seat majority for Labor on Saturday night. They were all wrong. As we saw with Trump and Brexit, polls don’t always know best. On the weekend the Coalition held on.

It secured an election comeback that would have been unbelievable a month ago. 

So based on the Coalitions current Indigenous Policy document what can we expect in the next 3 years

Pat Turner NACCHO CEO was asked this question on ABC New yesterday (19 May ) the day after the “miracle win by Scott Morrison    

We have also compiled from Social media 5 key questions for the PM and his incoming government 

1.Who is going to be the new Indigenous Affairs Minister with the retirement of Nigel Scullion ?

2. Who is going to be the new Indigenous Health Minister ?

3.What is the future of of our Closing the gap Partnership ? 

” The Morrison Government is working with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians to provide the same opportunities as for every other Australian.

We know and believe that, to deliver real outcomes, we need to work in partnership.

We’ve drawn a line in the sand in regard to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander policies and programs.

We need to refresh what we’re doing because, while the 2019 Closing the Gap report highlighted successes across the country, only two of the seven targets are on track to be met.

The original targets were well-intentioned but developed without the collaboration and accountability of the states and territories or input from Indigenous Australians.

Under the Morrison Government, Australia’s Closing the Gap targets will be redeveloped in partnership with Indigenous Australians for the first time. ”

From the Liberal Party Website 

CLOSING THE GAP – A REFRESH

The Closing the Gap process that began in 2008 was born of good heart.

Despite this, it did not truly seek to partner with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.

The driving belief was that a top-down approach could achieve the change that was rightly desired, through lofty goals and bureaucratic targets.

The Morrison Government has turned a new page.

We are committed to working together and deciding together how future policies are developed – especially at a regional and local level.

We have listened to what Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities have told us is important.

At COAG in December last year, all governments committed to share ownership of, and responsibility for, frameworks, targets and ongoing monitoring of a refreshed Closing the Gap Agenda with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people at its heart.

And under the leadership of Prime Minister Morrison, the Commonwealth, state and territory and local governments in partnership with the National Coalition of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peak Organisations signed an Agreement to change the way government and Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians work together on Closing the Gap.

We are providing $4.6 million to the National Coalition of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peak Organisations to ensure an equal partnership with governments in designing and monitoring Closing the Gap.

4. How much money the new Morrison incoming government is going to invest in Closing the Gap Refresh

NACCHO CEO Pat Turner says at least $5bn and a commitment to work with communities is needed to get anywhere in Closing the Gap.

About 40 peak bodies from all avenues of Indigenous affairs came together last week ( May 13 )  to discuss a new Closing the Gap agreement.

The Peaks were the negotiators of the Partnership Agreement on Closing the Gap last year, and have not sat face to face since.

They met to discuss what they want to achieve in a new Closing the Gap agreement, with NACCHO CEO Pat Turner calling for a bigger commitment from the government, whoever that may be following the election.

“Neither side of politics, either the Liberals, or the Nationals, or the ALP [have announced] the commitment they will make over the next 10 years to Close the Gap,” Ms Turner told NITV News.

“We need both sides of politics to come out in the last week and give us a very clear indication of how much money they’re going to invest in Closing the Gap, and that they’re going to continue to work in partnership with us.

“And that Aboriginal people are central to the co-design, the monitoring and the evaluation, but also making sure that government changes the way it works with our people.”

Ms Turner said that the partnership between Aboriginal people and the government needs to be at every level, and hopes this is implemented in a Close the Gap ‘refresh’.

“From the community level, to the regional level, to the state level, to the national level. If it doesn’t work in partnership with us, then it will be doomed to failure,” she said.

“They can start with $5 billion. That would be a good start, and a lot of that money needs to be invested directly into Aboriginal communities through our organisations and in terms of fixing up the infrastructure in our communities.”

They hope for a new agreement to be signed by the Coalition of Peaks and the Council of Australian Governments, and for it to be implemented later this year.

https://www.sbs.com.au/…/doomed-failure-close-gap-peak-bodi…

5. What is the future of the #UluruStatement and a Voice to Parliament

Updated Monday 20 May from ABC News report

Going into the election campaign, federal Labor had committed to a plan for a referendum on constitutional recognition for Indigenous people.

Senator Dodson said this, and the Indigenous voice to Parliament, seemed to be lost.

“Now we’ve gone back to potentially not having a voice to Parliament for First Nations people, no referendum on that matter.

“The removal of the Makarrata Commission, so no real interest in truth telling and agreement making.

“And certainly no regional assemblies to enable First Nations people to have a greater say in their own affairs.

“So, a real rolling back, and more of the draconian activities that have underpinned the CDEP program with penalties applying to people and treating First Nations people as mendicants and a drain on the public sector.”

Senator Dodson said he believed a reforming, visionary agenda had been destroyed with lies and creating fear, and a “misperception” of what Labor stood for.

Wyatt says Coalition win still gives Indigenous voice to Parliament

Ken Wyatt, who has been serving as Minister for Aged Care, and Australia’s first Minister for Indigenous Health, has rejected Senator Dodson’s claims.

Mr Wyatt said he considered Mr Dodson to be a friend, and said he would’ve made a great minister.

“I have no doubt about that,” he said.

“He and I and Linda [Burney] and Malarndirri [McCarthy] talk frequently, we set aside the political differences.

“We talk about the philosophical things we are aiming to achieve but at the same time we recognise our party positions are different.”

Mr Wyatt said Labor’s loss didn’t mean the end of an Indigenous voice to Parliament.

“It doesn’t set back the causes for a voice to Parliament of some form, certainly a better way of engaging with Aboriginal people.

“I know that in Aboriginal health we were establishing strong partnerships so I can’t see that diminishing.

“I have every faith in the Prime Minister to continue the work that we were proposing in the Aboriginal Affairs reform agenda.”

Mr Wyatt said he wanted a structure to which Indigenous people could bring their concerns, and then that body could work with relevant ministers, including the Prime Minister.

“If we do that, then that provides an avenue for people having a say in their future, but we’ve got to get it right at the community level,” he said.

Mr Wyatt said if he was offered the Aboriginal Affairs portfolio, he would “do it with great pride”, but said it was up to the Prime Minister and he wouldn’t seek to “circumvent” any decision.

“Any position you’re given in cabinet is an honour to serve in,” he said.

From previous NACCHO Post

Since 2013, the Liberal and Nationals Government has maintained the multi-partisan commitment to recognising Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians in the Constitution.

We are listening to the recommendations of the bi-partisan Joint Select Committee on Constitutional Recognition Relating to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples (chaired by Julian Leeser MP and Senator Patrick Dodson).

The Joint Select Committee recommended that further work was needed to clarify a model for constitutional recognition and how it could best suit the needs and aspirations of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians.

See Policy Here

Coalition Policy Reviewed 

After the Uluru Statement from the Heart in 2017 there have been mounting talks about enshrining an Indigenous Voice to Parliament within the Australian Constitution.

Establishing a Voice to Parliament is not as visible in either the Liberal’s or the Nationals’ policies, however the Coalition did mention some support for the idea in this year’s Federal Budget.

If the Coalition is re-elected, the process for Voice to Parliament is likely to be a lengthy one.

The report 

“There is a national convergence between the aspirations of First Nations people, as reflected in the Uluru Statement, and the views of non-Indigenous Australians who overwhelmingly back a constitutionally enshrined First Nations voice in Parliament and a comprehensive process of truth telling.

This presents the next federal parliament with a rare mandate and opportunity to advance the national reconciliation agenda.

Read final report HERE 

“The Uluru Statement From the Heart encapsulates all of these policy aspirations of the Indigenous world, and I fail to see how it is not being fully supported across the political and administrative spectrum,”

“We need to be empowered to lift ourselves out of the state-imposed tangle of policies, programs and bureaucracy that excludes us and removes our agency. Only we can overcome, but you can help.”

NACCHO Aboriginal Health and #SuicidePrevention Recommendation 4 of 10 : Why does an Aboriginal ACCHO Health Service in one of Australia’s worst suicide regions have to self-fund #MentalHealth roles

“I think it’s appalling that we have to raise Medicare funds to subsidise services when the need is clearly demonstrated in umpteen coroner’s reports.

There are many gaps in the services that are currently available across Australia.

We welcome Labor policies to move SEWB funding into the federal health department, as well as its proposed multi-disciplinary teams of paediatricians, social workers, psychologists and Aboriginal counsellors.

But I criticize the “piecemeal approach” of the major parties. What governments don’t get is that the overall needs based funding required for Aboriginal community controlled health organisations (ACCHOs) to deliver fully on comprehensive primary healthcare hasn’t been built in to our model of care funding.”

As a result, the sector has had to seek additional funding for services like SEWB, instead of receiving a sufficient level as the base

We call for money to go to ACCHOs instead of mainstream services for Aboriginal healthcare.

We have a much better understanding of the issues [Aboriginal communities] deal with day in and day out. I also believe there should be workers engaged in the communities who are available out of hours, because most people don’t suicide between 9 and 5.”

Pat Turner AM  CEO of the National Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation, told BuzzFeed News it was unacceptable, given the situation in the Kimberley

“We need those two positions given everything that’s happening in the community. People know them, they trust them, they will work with them. And it takes a long time to build up that trust with Aboriginal people.

Derby Aboriginal Health Service ( DAHS CEO )  Lynette Henderson-Yates said she is unsure how much longer DAHS will be able to find the $330,000 funding

Recommendation 4.Address Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander youth suicide rates

  • Provide $50 million over four years to ACCHOs to address the national crisis in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander youth suicide in vulnerable communities
  • Fund new Aboriginal support staff to provide immediate assistance to children and young people at risk of self-harm and improved case management
  • Fund regionally based multi-disciplinary teams, comprising paediatricians, child psychologists, social workers, mental health nurses and Aboriginal health practitioners who are culturally safe and respectful, to ensure ready access to professional assistance; and
  • Provide accredited training to ACCHOs to upskill in areas of mental health, childhood development, youth services, environment health, health and wellbeing screening and service delivery.

More info https://www.naccho.org.au/media/voteaccho/

 Part 1 This is what it’s actually like to work on the frontline of Australia’s youth suicide Crisis

 “Alongside its beauty and isolation, the Kimberley is also known for its suicide rate. Last year, Indigenous health minister Ken Wyatt told the World Indigenous Suicide Prevention Conference: “If [the Kimberley] was a nation, it would have the highest suicide rate in the world.”

About eight years ago, Derby was at the epicentre of this ongoing catastrophe. In 2011 three young people died by suicide in as many weeks. The following year, the Aboriginal community of Mowanjum, 10km out of town, was rocked by the suicides of six people within six months.

Trent Ozies, 27, is a Djugun man from the Broome area who grew up in Derby. Ozies also has Filipino, Chinese and European heritage, as well as a gentle manner and a thoroughly infectious laugh. But he is grave as he recalls this terrible period.

“It was almost as if we went full circle,” he says. “Someone passed. Had their funeral, had the wake, someone passed. Had the funeral, had the wake, someone passed.

Read article in full HERE

Part 2

An Aboriginal health service in one of Australia’s worst suicide affected regions faces losing its psychologist and Aboriginal mental health worker, after money for the positions was cut in a state funding restructure last year.

The community controlled Derby Aboriginal Health Service (DAHS), located 220km east of Broome in Western Australia’s Kimberley region, delivers social and emotional wellbeing (SEWB) services in Derby.

The region has long struggled with the issue of Indigenous youth suicide. Coroner Ros Fogliani’s recent report into the deaths of 13 Aboriginal children and young people who died in the Kimberley found that 12 had died by suicide, the tragedies prompted by widespread poverty and intergenerational trauma.

The five person SEWB team in Derby is considered a model for how community mental health outreach should work in remote towns, according to Rob McPhee, the deputy CEO of Kimberley Aboriginal Medical Services.

But in a state funding restructure last year, DAHS lost funding for psychologist Maureen Robertson and mental health worker Ash Bin Omar and is now covering the $330,000 per year with money raised through Medicare consultations. SEWB services are generally funded by the Commonwealth.

Omar, who works with young Aboriginal men and boys, is also running a new project aimed at families with a low to medium risk of having their children removed to try and improve the situation and keep families together.

“For us not to have a psychologist and an Aboriginal mental health worker is really crazy,” Henderson-Yates said. “To my mind, there’s no debate about whether you have them or not have them.”

Senator Pat Dodson, who will become Indigenous affairs minister if Labor wins the election on May 18, told BuzzFeed News a Labor government would look to provide Commonwealth funding for two positions in Derby.

Labor has pledged $30 million over three years to support Aboriginal mental health and SEWB services in three high-need regions, including the Kimberley.

“If you don’t have these people being employed through the community health services, it just makes the effort to try and assist young people from taking these extreme measures totally impossible,” Dodson said.

Indigenous health minister Ken Wyatt told BuzzFeed News in a statement that the $19.6 million for suicide prevention pledged by the Coalition “builds on existing funding” provided through the Indigenous Advancement Strategy (IAS) in the department of prime minister and cabinet.

The sum includes $15 million for the rollout of mental health first aid training in 12 Indigenous communities and for youth, as well as continuing training for frontline workers. Another $4.6 million will go towards community-led programs — designed to complement existing services — in areas such as leadership, sports and culture.

The IAS currently funds about $55 million per year for SEWB, Wyatt said.

If you or someone you know needs help, you can visit your nearest ACCHO or call Lifeline Australia on 13 11 14 or Beyond Blue Australia on 1300 22 4636.

 

NACCHO Aboriginal Health and #CommunityPharmacy #AusVotesHealth #VoteACCHO @PharmGuildAus Pharmacy Guild and NACCHO seek commitment to Indigenous Pharmacy Programs reform

“NACCHO member services continue to provide feedback on the urgent need to reform these programs.  There are still patients who are not serviced effectively by these programs and some who are falling through the gaps.

Medicines access for Aboriginal people is still below that of the overall Australian population and access is not commensurate with the burden of disease that Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people suffer.

Through our members’ feedback and the Indigenous Pharmacy Programs review, we know how the system needs to be improved.

Now it is time for political leaders to act.”

NACCHO Acting Chairperson Ms Donnella Mills said that while the Indigenous Pharmacy Programs have improved medicines access and use for Aboriginal people across Australia, more needs to be done

Read all previous Aboriginal Health and Community Pharmacy Articles HERE

Read all 10 NACCHO Election Recommendations in full HERE

Polices and strategies to help ensure equity of access for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander patients to culturally safe primary healthcare services in rural, regional and remote areas must be a priority for any Federal Government following the May election.

The Pharmacy Guild of Australia and the National Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation (NACCHO) are seeking a clear and timely commitment from the major political parties to reform the Indigenous Pharmacy Programs to provide better healthcare access and services for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander patients in these regions.

To achieve this, following reforms to improve Indigenous Pharmacy Programs must be regarded as mandatory by any incoming government.

  • Expand the authority to write Close the Gap scripts for all prescribers.
  • Make the Close the Gap client registration process more straightforward and accessible.
  • Link medicines subsidy to individual clients and not practices through a national identifier.
  • Improve how remote clients can receive fully subsidised medicines in non-remote areas.
  • Increase and better target funding for Quality
  • Use of Medicines for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people and health services

See NACCHO Pharmacy and Medicines web page

National President of the Pharmacy Guild George Tambassis said community pharmacies are a key component of primary healthcare for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples.

“To date significant gains have been achieved through the current Indigenous Pharmacy Programs and successful and sustainable partnerships between Indigenous health services and community pharmacies have helped to provide services for Aboriginal people that improve health outcomes and assist in Closing the Gap,” Mr Tambassis said.

“But we need to do more and we need to reform the Indigenous Pharmacy Programs to move with the changing needs of these patients and the changing health environment of their communities.”

Integrated, comprehensive pharmaceutical care is the requisite standard that should be delivered to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people living in urban, regional and remote Australia. Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples should have equitable access to medicines, pharmacy programs and QUM services regardless of where they live.

 

 

NACCHO Aboriginal Health #VoteACCHO #AusVotesHealth : @VACCHO_CEO  calls on the incoming government after #Election2019 to change the #remote focus to Close the Gap as a majority of Aboriginal peoples live in #urban and #regional Australia

The reality is we will never Close the Gap if we focus on 26 per cent of Aboriginal peoples.”

Addressing the workforce shortages and infrastructure issues faced by Aboriginal Controlled Community Organisations (ACCOs), an Infrastructure and Workforce Plan was needed.

Significant transformation of a sector requires a carefully planned and considered approach, we need to get this right

ACCOs provide comprehensive, culturally-responsive and holistic support, but we depend on sustainable investment into our infrastructure and workforce. Short-term, proscriptive funding cycles inhibit long-term gains needed to improve Aboriginal health and wellbeing across Australia.

We call on all parties to recognise the important role played by ACCOs in Closing the Gap and to ensure that whoever forms the next Federal Government ensures they are funded effectively to achieve good outcomes for all Aboriginal peoples, regardless of where they live “

Victorian Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation (VACCHO) Acting CEO Trevor Pearce

Sustainability, Prevention Accountability to & for us.
Download HERE

Whoever Australia decides to back on 18 May, they need to remember that when it comes to the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities “it’s not just a northern or remote problem”.

The fact is that the majority of Aboriginal peoples live in urban and regional Australia, not remote areas, Victorian Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation (VACCHO) Acting CEO Trevor Pearce says.

“Governments need to take this fact into account”, he said.“The only images that the vast majority of Australians are permitted to see of Indigenous Australia is often remote. When in fact, the majority of us live in cities and regional country towns.

“Just like the rest of Australia, we hug the eastern seaboard.”

Based on the 2016 ABS 74 per cent of Aboriginal and Torre Strait Islander people live in Queensland, NSW, ACT, Victoria and Tasmania.

“The focus on remote areas means there is reduced funding and opportunities available for the 74 per cent of First Nations peoples who live in urban and regional Australia, Mr Pearce said.

“As part of our Federal Election Platform we are seeking a national review of current funding models that have geographically-based funding limitations. “These models fail to account for the complex range of health and wellbeing issues experienced by Aboriginal peoples living in urban and regional locations.

“What is of most concern is that the chronic conditions affecting Aboriginal people in Melbourne, Mount Druitt and Maningrida are very similar. How can this be? The fact is that many Aboriginal peoples living in urban and regional areas have the same poor health and wellbeing issues  as communities living in remote areas, sometimes even worse. There is a misrepresentation that we have infrastructure and services coming out of our ears, when in truth we still experience high rates of chronic health issues. The health gap exists in urban areas, just as much as it does in rural and remote areas. Mr Pearce said.

“Homelessness and rates of children (kids) in out-of-home care is highest in Victoria. Yet the gap around rheumatic heart disease is almost closed here.

“The impact of colonisation manifests in different ways across the country, but it can be seen everywhere. Our rights have to be upheld, and systemic inequality has to be addressed. “This isn’t about reducing funding for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples in remote areas. Funding must meet need, everywhere, full stop.“We need the Federal Government to stop using Indigenous disadvantage in remote communities to prop up a misguided view that they are addressing Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health problems.”

Under the Indigenous Advancement Strategy (IAS) the vast majority of Victoria is excluded from the Remote Australia Strategies program, due to the State’s geographical make-up. Without the opportunity to tender for all five IAS funding programs, “Aboriginal peoples in Victoria are automatically disadvantaged, Mr Pearce said.

 

NACCHO Aboriginal Health #VoteACCHO 40 health advocates will be tweeting via #AusVotesHealth today 8 May to profile important health issues ahead of the Federal election.

NACCHO and Croakey followers are invited to join a Twitter festival on Wednesday 8 May, where more than 40 health advocates will be tweeting to profile important health issues ahead of the Federal election.

Follow the discussions on Twitter and contribute your views by using the hashtag #AusVotesHealth.

Please encourage your networks and organisations to follow the discussions and to retweet as much as possible.

Bookmark this Twitter list to follow the guest tweeters.

The #AusVotesHealth Twitter festival will be timely, setting the scene for the third leaders debate, to be held during prime time at the National Press Club in Canberra on Wednesday moderated by ABC journalist and National Press Club President Sabra Lane.

Download a press release about this event here.

Published from Croakey

 


#AusVotesHealth program

8-8.30am – Launch

Mrs Janine Mohamed, chair of Croakey Health Media and CEO of Lowitja Institute
@JanineMilera


8.30-9am – Introductions

#AusVotesHealth moderators

• Melissa Sweet, @croakeyblogOur house is on fire, where is the emergency response?
• Marie McInerney, @mariemcinerneyFantasyland – a place I want to be
• Jennifer Doggett, @JenniferDoggettHighlights and holes – what do we already know about the major parties’ policies and what else do we want from them over the next 2 weeks to inform our decision on May 18th?


9-9.15am – Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health matters

The Congress of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Nurses and Midwives
@CATSINaM


 

9.15-9.45am – #VoteACCHO

Donnella Mills, acting chair of the National Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation: 10 great reasons why you should #VoteACCHO for Aboriginal Health in Aboriginal Hands
@NACCHOChair ‏ 

@NACCHOAustralia 

 

 


9.45-10am – Worth two in the bush

Amy Coopes, editor at Croakey News
@coopesdetat


10-10.15am – #ClimateHealthEmergency

The Climate and Health Alliance
@Health_Climate


10.15-10.30am – Public health policy

Malcolm Baalman, Public Health Association of Australia
@_PHAA_


10.30-10.50am – Getting us active?

Professor William Bellew
@billbellew


10.50-11.15am – Fixing health inequalities makes everyone healthier

Cassandra Goldie, CEO of ACOSS
@cassandragoldie@ACOSS.


11-11.15am – Oral health, on the agenda

Dr Chris Bourke, National Oral Health Alliance
@chrisbourke

(Concurrent session)


11.15 – 11.30am – Mental health supports and NDIS: when two policies collide…

Dave Peters
@Dpeters1977

Dave is an early career researcher with the Brotherhood of St Laurence and has been active in advocacy, research and service design within Neami National for a number of years as a service user of that organisation.  In recent times, Dave has become heavily involved as Co-Chair of the Equally Well Committee, which is working to address the physical health of people living with Mental Illness.  Dave is passionate about social justice and ensuring appropriate access to supports for people in need, with a particular interest in Mental Health and NDIS.


11.30-11.45  – Self-determination matters

The Centre of Best Practice in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Suicide Prevention (CBPATSISP) 
@cbatsispep


11.45-12 noon – What do election promises mean for consumers’ health?

Leanne Wells, CEO of the Consumers Health Forum of Australia
@LeanneWells63@CHFofAustralia


11.45-12 noon – Training the public service

Sally Fitzpatrick
@blinkandumissme

(Concurrent session)


12-12.30 – What about policies for the social determinants of health?

Lyn Morgain, SDOH Alliance, cohealth
@MsLynM@SDOHAlliance, @cohealth_au


12.15-12.30 – Healing for the future

Richard Weston
@RichJWeston

(Concurrent session)


12.30- 12.45 – For a healthy Australia, vote #1 health

Alison Verhoeven, CEO of the Australian Healthcare and Hospitals Association
@AlisonVerhoeven@aushealthcare


12.45-1pm – Addressing poverty as a critical but under-recognised health issue

Lou Walsh
@laqwalsh

Lou is a PhD student at the Centre for Health Communication and Participation at LaTrobe University, examining how social media can be used as a tool to facilitate consumer involvement in health service design and quality improvement.


1-1.15pm – Walk with us

Victorian Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation (VACCHO) – see election statement.
@VACCHO_org


1.15-1.30pm – Active transport and other health policies

Dr Arnagretta Hunter, consultant physician and cardiologist, Doctors for the Environment Australia member
@cbr_heartdoc,  @DocsEnvAus


1.30-1.45 -What do election promises hold for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people?

Summer May Finlay, Yorta Yorta woman, public health practitioner and researcher, and contributing editor at Croakey
@SummerMayFinlay


1.45-2pm – Coal seam gas and the climate emergency

Dr John Van Der Kallen, rheumatologist, member Doctors for the Environment Australia
@johnvanderkall1, @DocsEnvAus


2-2.15pm – Looking outside the health sector for better health

Dr Belinda Townsend, Research Fellow, NHMRC Centre for Research Excellence in the Social Determinants of Health, ANU.
@BelTownsend


2.15-2.30pm – Research Matters

The Lowitja Institute
@LowitjaInstitut


2.30-2.45pm – Justice health

Dr Megan Williams, Senior Lecturer and Head of the Girra Maa Indigenous Health Discipline at the Graduate School of Health, University of Technology
@MegBastard


2.45-3pm – Where is the focus for rural and remote health?

National Rural Health Alliance
@NRHAlliance


3-3.15 pm – What we’re asking for this federal election

El Gibbs, People with Disability Australia
@bluntshovels, 


3.15-3.30pm – Health for all, or high quality health care for some

Dr Tim Woodruff, Doctors Reform Society
@woodruff_tim@drsreform


3.30pm – 3.45pm – Cultural safety and health workforce

Australian Indigenous Doctors Association
@AIDAAustralia


3.45-4pm – Prioritise prevention to reduce chronic disease risk factors

Australian Chronic Disease Prevention Alliance
@ACDPAlliance


4pm – 4.15pm – Transport for health

Dr Graeme McLeay, member, Doctors for the Environment Australia

@Gmac45Graeme,DocsEnvAus


4.15-4.30pm – Back to Bilo

The Home to Bilo campaign and better health for asylum seekers and refugees
@HometoBilo


4.30-4.45pm – Show me the equity!

Australian Health Care Reform Alliance (Jennifer Doggett)
@AusHealthReform


4.45-5pm – Governing for Health

Professor Fran Baum AO,  Matthew Flinders Distinguished Professor of Public Health and Director of the Southgate Institute of Health, Society and Equity at Flinders University.
@baumfran@crehealthequity


5-5.15pm – What are the major policies promising on health this election?

Professor Stephen Duckett, the Grattan Institute @stephenjduckett@grattaninst.
Read more.


5.15-5.30pm – Social justice – it’s a health issue

Dr Simon Judkins, Australasian College for Emergency Medicine
@JudkinsSimon@acemonline


5.30-5.45 pm – “Consumptagenic” threats to health

Professor Sharon FrielDirector, School of Regulation and Global Governance (RegNet) and Professor of Health Equity, ANU College of Asia and the Pacific
@SharonFrielOz


5.30pm-6pm – What do we want, when do we want it by? The first 100 days

Associate Professor James Ward, SAHMRI
@researchjames

(Concurrent session)


6-6.15pm – Wrapping the election health news

Dr Lesley Russell, health policy analyst, contributing editor at Croakey News
@LRussellWolpe


6-6.15 – Everybody’s Home

Kate Colvin, Spokesperson for the Everybody’s Home campaign, and Manager – Policy and Communications, Council to Homeless Persons
@ColvinKate@CHPVic

(Concurrent session)


6.15-6.30pm – Talking Teeth

Professor Marc Tennant, UWA
@MarcTennant


6.30-6.45 pm – Rural and remote health perspectives

Dr Ewen McPhee, President of the Australian College of Rural and Remote Medicine, and Past President of the Rural Doctors Association of Australia 
@Fly_texan


6.45-7pm – Climate crisis: our future is now

Professor Melissa Haswell, QUT
@im4empowerment


7pm – Wrapping it up

Throughout the day, Paul Dutton will tweet election health commentary – follow @PaulDutton1968.

NACCHO Members #VoteACCHO #Election2019 #Aboriginal Health Deadly Good News Stories : #NSW @ahmrc @Galambila #Armajun ACCHO #VIC @VACCHO_org @VAHS1972 #NT @CAACongress #KatherineWest #QLD @DeadlyChoices #Gidgee #Mamu #SA #ACT

Feature Article this week from Apunipima ACCHO Cape York leading the way vaccinating the mob against the flu at no cost to the patient

1.1 National :  Report from the recent Close the Gap for Vision by 2020: Strengthen & Sustain National Conference 2019 hosted by AMSANT released

1.2 National : Survey Yarning with New Media Technology:
Mediatisation and the emergence of the First Australians’ cyber-corroboree.

1.3 NACCHO calls on all political parties to include these 10 recommendations in their election platforms

2.1 NSW : AHMRC April Edition of Message Stick is out now!

2.2 Brand new Ready Mob team and Galambila ACCHO Coffs Harbour CEO Reuben Robinson participate in Team Planning & Meet n’ Greet day.

2.3 NSW : Adam Marshall MP  catches up with the team from Inverell-based Armajun Health Service Aboriginal Corporation to discuss their exciting $5.7 million expansion plans

3.1 VIC : VACCHO Launches its #Election 2019 Platform

3.2 VIC : VAHS ACCHO launches new new 2019 Deadly Choices Health Check Shirts

4.1 NT : Katherine West Health Board ACCHO prepare healthy lunches for the kids at Kalkarindji School everyday.

4.2 NT Congress farewells and thanks Sarah Gallagher from our Utju Health Service after 22 years of exceptional service as an Aboriginal Health Practitioner.

5.1 QLD : Gidgee Healing ACCHO Mt Isa Comms & Marketing team were up in Doomadgee this week attending the ‘Get Set for School 2020 & Career Expo

5.2 QLD : MAMU Health Service Innisfail celebrates 29 Years of Service to community 

5.3 QLD : Deadly Choices Patrick Johnson say winter is coming!! Book into your local Aboriginal Medical Service ASAP for your flu shot and health check.

6.1 SA : Morrison Government is providing almost $250,000 to three South Australian Aboriginal medical services to replace outdated patient information systems.

7.1 ACT : Download the April edition of our Winnunga ACCHO Newsletter.

8.1 WA: KAMS ACCHO as an Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation, Kimberley Aboriginal Medical Services encourages the use of traditional bush medicines

How to submit in 2019 a NACCHO Affiliate  or Members Good News Story ?

Email to Colin Cowell NACCHO Media 

Mobile 0401 331 251 

Wednesday by 4.30 pm for publication Thursday /Friday

Feature Article this week from Apunipima ACCHO Cape York leading the way vaccinating the mob against the flu at no cost to the patient

The Federal Government has recently announced a program that will ensure almost 170,000 Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander children and adolescents are vaccinated against the flu at no cost to the patient, with an additional provision of $12 million provided to boost a national immunisation education campaign.

Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander children aged between 6 months and 14 years will have access to the influenza vaccine. Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander experience a higher burden from influenza infection and are more likely to be hospitalised with the disease. This funding is a welcomed initiative.

The ‘Get the Facts about Immunisation’ campaign will be delivered over the next three years and will include a national television campaign, to help raise awareness around the benefits and importance of immunisation.

FOR MORE INFO about immunisation

1.1 National :  Report from the recent Close the Gap for Vision by 2020: Strengthen & Sustain National Conference 2019 hosted by AMSANT released

The conference report from the recent Close the Gap for Vision by 2020: Strengthen & Sustain National Conference 2019 held by Indigenous Eye Health (IEH) and co-hosted by Aboriginal Medical Services Alliance Northern Territory (AMSANT) in Alice Springs on 14 and 15 March 2019.

We also include for your interest and information a two-page conference summary report and an A3 poster to celebrate activities at the Conference.

Over two days of the Conference, more than 220 delegates and over 60 speakers from all state and territories and including representation from community, local and regional services, state organisations, national peak and non-government agencies, and government came together to share, learn, and be inspired.

Conference attendance has grown significantly year to year since the first conference (+83%) held in Melbourne in 2017. This increase also reflects over 50 regions, covering more than 80% of the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander population, that are now engaged in activities to close the gap for vision.

IEH would like to thank everyone that attended and contributed to the Conference and especially the speakers for sharing their stories, thoughts and learnings. Congratulations again to our deserved 2019 Leaky Pipe Award winners.

The feedback IEH has received from delegates and speakers has been very positive and supports the joint commitment to close the gap for vision by 2020.

The Conference reports, presentations, photo gallery, and other supplementary materials can be accessed here on IEH website. Please feel free to forward this email and information to your colleagues and networks and we also continue to welcome your further feedback, input and commentary.

We will look forward to welcoming you to the next national conference planned in March 2020 and in the year ahead let’s keeping working together to close the gap for vision.

Hugh R Taylor AC
Harold Mitchell Chair of Indigenous Eye Health
Melbourne School of Population and Global Health
The University of Melbourne

1.2 : National : Survey Yarning with New Media Technology:
Mediatisation and the emergence of the First Australians’ cyber-corroboree.

Throughout this study, we use the terms ‘First Australian’ or ‘Indigenous Australian’ when referring to people of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander heritage, and ‘Peoples’ when referring to the collective group of Aboriginal nations.

We acknowledge the inadequacy of these homogenising Western terms used to describe such a diverse range of Peoples, languages and cultures.  However, we hope this terminology is sufficient for the purposes of this survey in describing the multi-dimensional relationship that this survey covers. We offer an unreserved apology in lieu of our inadequate terminology causing any undue annoyance or umbrage; this was not our intention.

Take the survey HERE

https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/FVPD3K6

Any questions or concerns should be addressed to:- keith.robinson2@griffithuni.edu.au

1.3 NACCHO calls on all political parties to include these 10 recommendations in their election platforms

NACCHO has developed a set of policy #Election2019 recommendations that if adopted, fully funded and implemented by the incoming Federal Government, will provide a pathway forward for improvements in our health outcomes.

We are calling on all political parties to include these recommendations in their election platforms and make a real commitment to improving the health of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples and help us Close the Gap.

With your action and support of our #VoteACCHO campaign we can make the incoming Federal Government accountable.

See NACCHO Election 2019 Website

2.1 NSW : AHMRC April Edition of Message Stick is out now!

Welcome to the April edition of the Message Stick!

Yaama from me, Dr Merilyn Childs! I recently joined AH&MRC in the role of Senior Research Advisor. This means that I help researchers improve the quality of research applications before they are sent to the AH&MRC Ethics Committee. I’ll be providing Professional Learning Opportunities and resources for researchers, and feedback on applications where appropriate.

While I’m with AH&MRC 3 days a week, I have other roles. For example, I’m Honorary Associate Professor at Macquarie University, and I’m on Academic Board for the newly proposed College of Health Sciences at the Education Centre of Australia.

As I write this, I think of my mother Helen. When I was a child in the 1960s, Helen taught me about racism, stolen land, and stolen Aboriginal lives and languages. She was a passionate advocate of land rights. With her, and my two-year-old toddler, I marched as an ally of First Nations people on January 26th, 1988 in Sydney.

Two decades later at Charles Sturt University I was fortunate enough to work for some years with the amazing team embedding Indigenous Cultural Competence into curriculum. Because of them I continued the journey I began with my mother as I tried respectfully to develop ‘yindiamarra winhanga-nha’ – the wisdom of respectfully knowing how to live well in a world worth living in, from the voices of the Wiradjuri people’. In 2015 I joined Macquarie University and collaborated with Walanga Muru colleagues to amplify Aboriginal voices in Higher Degree Research training.

I feel privileged to continue my journey working at AH&MRC with warm and amazing colleagues and with those of you I meet in the future, to improve the quality of research applications that are submitted to the AH&MRC Ethics Committee.

Read View HERE

2.2 Brand new Ready Mob team and Galambila ACCHO Coffs Harbour CEO Reuben Robinson participate in Team Planning & Meet n’ Greet day.

Galambila ACCHO Coffs Harbour CEO Reuben Robinson joined in the interactive activities and shared his vision for Ready Mob and Galambila  in moving forward in service of our communities. SEE FACEBOOK PAGE

2.3 NSW : Adam Marshall MP  catches up with the team from Inverell-based Armajun Health Service Aboriginal Corporation to discuss their exciting $5.7 million expansion plans

Adam Marshall MP  catches up with the team from Inverell-based Armajun Health Service Aboriginal Corporation to discuss their exciting $5.7 million expansion plans last week.

Armajun is planning to build a new and expanded health service centre next door to its current premises in River Street to cater for for patients and offer more health services to the community.

Part of this will be a $400,000 expanded dental clinic, which Adam will be approaching the State Government to fund.

Armajun provides services to many communities across the Northern Tablelands and do a wonderful job!

3.1 VIC : VACCHO Launches its #Election 2019 Platform

It’s out! We’ve just published our #auspol  #AusVotes2019  Election Platform.
Read all about what Aboriginal Communities need from the Federal Government to improve our health and wellbeing, to not just Close the Gap, but eliminate it all together.
Sustainability, Prevention Accountability to & for us.
Download HERE

3.2 : VAHS ACCHO launches new new 2019 Deadly Choices Health Check Shirts

VAHS, Essendon Football Club and The Long Walk have continued to work collaboratively that empowers our community to be more aware of their personal and family health by completing an annual health assessment.

An annual Health Assessment is a deadly way to monitor your own health and identify or prevent a chronic disease. Plus its 100% free if you complete this health assessment at VAHS. Anyone can complete an Health Check.

We have plenty of shirts for our mob all year, so don’t stress if you have completed an Health Check recently. You only allowed an annual Health Check every 9 months. Ring VAHS on 9419-3000 if you’re due for a health check.

Also we have another exciting news to announce very soon. Stay tune

4.1 NT : Katherine West Health Board ACCHO prepare healthy lunches for the kids at Kalkarindji School everyday.

This is Gabrielle and Mary they help prepare healthy lunches for the kids at Kalkarindji School everyday.  They are both great cooks and are working with myself to make their meals high iron and vitamin C so kids can have strong blood to learn and play.
#oneshieldforall

4.2 NT Congress farewells and thanks Sarah Gallagher from our Utju Health Service after 22 years of exceptional service as an Aboriginal Health Practitioner.

For 22 years with us, Sarah has been delivering culturally safe and responsive health care and programs to her people in the Utju community.

Born and raised in Utju, Sarah commenced her training as an AHP in the Utju Clinic, received her Certificate IV in AHP and progressed her career as a senior health practitioner and clinic manager.

In 2014 Sarah was a finalist at the ATSIHP Awards in the excellence in remote service delivery category. Sarah remains committed to the health and wellbeing of her people as elected Chairperson of the Utju Health Services board.

5.1 QLD : Gidgee Healing ACCHO Mt Isa Comms & Marketing team were up in Doomadgee this week attending the ‘Get Set for School 2020 & Career Expo’

Was lovely to see so many people and services attend this event. If you pop down to the Gidgee Healing stall Guy Douglas our new Practice Manager at Doomadgee Clinic, Andrew, Trish or Gavin would be happy to help you fill in birth registration forms. There are a few goodies also so please go check them out and say hello.

5.2 QLD : MAMU Health Service Innisfail celebrates 29 Years of Service to community 

5.3 QLD : Deadly Choices Patrick Johnson say winter is coming!! Book into your local Aboriginal Medical Service ASAP for your flu shot and health check.

Make a Deadly Choices a healthy choice and get your DC beanie.

I’m sporting my North Queensland Toyota Cowboysbeanie what DC beanie are you sporting? Institute of Urban Indigenous Health (IUIH)

6.1 SA : Morrison Government is providing almost $250,000 to three South Australian Aboriginal medical services to replace outdated patient information systems.

Picture Above Minister Ken Wyatt visit earlier this year 

Ensuring high quality primary health care, delivered in a culturally competent way, is a key to improving the health and wellbeing of First Australians.

Federal Member for Grey Rowan Ramsey said it was important that all medical services across Australia were provided with the right tool kit to do their work.

“As a result of this announcement three Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Services in Grey, Nunyara in Whyalla, Pika Wiya in Port Augusta and and the Ceduna Kooniba Health Service will receive assistance to install new “state-of-the-art” patient record keeping systems”, Mr Ramsey said. “The efficiency of any good health system is dependent on good record-keeping and accurate, easy-to-access patient information.

“Streamlined modern information systems will enable healthcare professionals to gain instant, secure, and efficient access to the medical and treatment histories of patients. This can be especially valuable where we have transingent populations as is particularly the case with some indigenous families.”

This funding through the Morrison Government’s Indigenous Australians’ Health Programme will contribute to new systems to provide better patient care.

Under the Indigenous Australians’ Health Programme, the Morrison Government funds around 140 Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Services across Australia to provide culturally appropriate comprehensive primary health care services to First Australians.

The Minister for Indigenous Health, the Hon Ken Wyatt said the Federal Government is committed to working with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people and communities to develop practical, evidence-based policy and deliver programs that will make a real difference to the lives of First Australians.

”It is part of our focus on closing the gap and supporting culturally appropriate primary health care and programs,” Mr Wyatt said.

“Good health is a key enabler in supporting children to go to school, adults to lead productive working lives, and in building strong and resilient communities.”

The Morrison Government is providing $4.1 billion to improve the health of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people over the next four years.

7.1 ACT : Download the April edition of our Winnunga ACCHO Newsletter.

 

April edition of our Winnunga Newsletter.

Read or Download Winnunga AHCS Newsletter April 2019 (1)

Please also note that the details for Winnunga’s National Sorry Day Bridge Walk for 2019 is included in this newsletter, so please Save the Date and join us.

8.1 WA: KAMS ACCHO as an Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation, Kimberley Aboriginal Medical Services encourages the use of traditional bush medicines

 ” Back in 2017 when I found some funding ($3,000) to start the idea of making some Bush medicine with a couple of ex- AHW’s at Balgo, was a very exciting time for us and them.

 The Bush medicines an integral part of Aboriginal culture and traditional customs.

Jamilah Bin Omar Acting SEWB Manager Kimberley Aboriginal Medical Services Ltd.

 As an Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation, Kimberley Aboriginal Medical Services encourages the use of traditional bush medicines and talk up the bush medicine information through the Certificate III and Cert. IV Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Primary Health Care Program under the competency units;

  • Support the safe use of medicines
  • Administer medicines

Myself and Joanna Martin (Pharmacist) from the KAMS Pharmacy Support team spent one week in Balgo working with the community Women Elders to make three different types of bush medicines.  These were;

  • Piltji (used on all parts of the body to heal internal injuries, organs, arthritis and many other problems)
  • Ngurnu Ngurnu (used for cold and flu and rubbed on the chest and head)
  • Yapilynpa (used as a rub on the chest and head for the relief of colds and headaches)

At the completion, bush medicines became available in the Balgo Health Centre, for patients to select and use individually or in conjunction with western medicine.

The Bush Medicines program is an opportunity for KAMS staff to collaborate with community members.  It will provide a forum for traditional practices to be used and passed onto future generations.

 

NACCHO Aboriginal #AusVotesHealth and Housing : #2019WIHC #VoteACCHO #Election2019 Labor promises to address overcrowding and create jobs in remote Indigenous communities in #NT #QLD #SA #WA with a $1.5 billion, 10-year investment

“ Labor will address overcrowding and create jobs in remote Indigenous communities with a $1.5 billion, 10-year investment.

Housing shortages and chronic overcrowding contribute to poor outcomes in health, education, employment and community safety for residents living in remote communities.

Labor’s Warren Snowdon (MHR) and Senator Malarndirri McCarthy

Download Press Release Here

Labor $1.5 billion, ten-year Housing investment.

 ” The Torres Strait Island Regional Council put it best in its statement outlining its federal election initiatives:

Homelessness and housing stress can profoundly affect the mental and physical health of individuals and families, as well as impact on their education and employment opportunities, and their ability to participate fully in the community “

See Housing: the first building block to better Indigenous health article Part 3

“ The Queensland Government remains committed to providing quality housing across our State’s remote communities under our 1.08 billion commitment over 10 years,

Federal Labor’s commitment will only strengthen the work we are already doing to assist those living in communities such as across Leichardt

“For 50 years, Australian governments have joined with us to provide homes in remote Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities,” 

Deputy QLD Premier and Minister for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Partnerships Jackie Trad said quality of living simply can’t be achieved if people don’t have a roof over their heads. Part 4

“WA has consistently argued that the Commonwealth has historic and moral obligations to provide ongoing funding support for remote communities that, in WA, are home to an estimated 12,000-14,000 of the country’s most disadvantaged people.

“It is gratifying to see that a Federal Labor Government will recognise and honour that responsibility – something the Morrison Government has flatly refused.”

McGowan Government welcomes Federal Labor pledge to support remote housing in WA ” See Part 5 Below 

NACCHO Recommendation 5.Improve Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander housing and community infrastructure

  • Expand the funding and timeframe of the current National Partnership on Remote Housing to match at least that of the former National Partnership Agreement on Remote Indigenous Housing.
  • Establish and fund a program that supports low cost social housing and healthy living environments in urban, regional and remote Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities.

Read all NACCHO Housing Posts 

 See all 10 NACCHO #VotesACCHO Recommendations HERE

In 2014-15, more than half of Indigenous Australians in very remote areas lived in overcrowded households, and overcrowding is the leading contributor to Indigenous homelessness.

They said a Labor Government would:

  • Provide a decade of funding certainty to the Northern Territory, by committing an additional $550 million over 5 years from 2023-24, double the commitment by the Liberals.
  • Provide $251 million in funding to Queensland, Western Australia and South Australia in 2019-20.

Following these interim arrangements, Labor will work with the States and Territories to develop a genuine, ongoing partnership to tackle the issue of overcrowding, as part of the Closing the Gap Refresh.

When last in office, Labor initiated the National Partnership Agreement for Remote Indigenous Housing (NPARIH), which saw a record $5.4 billion invested over 10 years to reduce overcrowding and address chronic housing shortages.

An independent review of NPARIH in 2017 found it had built or refurbished 11,500 homes in remote areas, successfully decreasing the proportion of overcrowded households in remote and very remote areas.

The review also found that a further 5500 houses are needed to meet the existing shortfall of housing and accommodate future population growth by 2028.

Part 2 2019 World Indigenous Housing Conference.

The 2019 World Indigenous Housing Conference will bring together Indigenous leaders, government, industry and academia representing Housing, health, and education from around the world including:

  • National and International Indigenous Organisation leadership
  • Senior housing, health, and education government officials Industry CEOs, executives and senior managers from public and private sectors
  • Housing, Healthcare, and Education professionals and regulators
  • Consumer associations
  • Academics in Housing, Healthcare, and Education.

The 2019 World Indigenous Housing Conference #2019WIHC is the principal conference to provide a platform for leaders in housing, health, education and related services from around the world to come together. Up to 2000 delegates will share experiences, explore opportunities and innovative solutions, work to improve access to adequate housing and related services for the world’s Indigenous people.

Event Information:

Key event details as follows:
Venue: Gold Coast Convention and Exhibition Centre
Address: 2684-2690 Gold Coast Hwy, Broadbeach QLD 4218
Dates: Monday 20th – Thursday 23rd May, 2019 (24th May)

Registration Costs

PLEASE NOTE: The Trade Exhibition is open Tuesday 21st May – Thursday 23rd May 2019

Please visit www.2019wihc.com for further information on transport and accommodation options, conference, exhibition and speaker updates.

 

Part 3 Housing: the first building block to better Indigenous health April 24 

Craig Johnstone Media Executive at Local Government Association of Queensland

Both Prime Minister Scott Morrison and Labor leader Bill Shorten were in northern Australia recently  (Darwin and Townsville respectively).

Both have brought their chequebooks, but there is one pressing policy issue that impacts many people in north Queensland and the NT but has received scant attention, not only during this campaign, but for many months.

So far in this campaign, there have been many announcements on indigenous policy: promises of better funding for mental health services, hospital upgrades, a plan to address rheumatic heart disease and a range of other public health initiatives.

Bill Shorten has said that West Australian Senator and long-time Aboriginal advocate Pat Dodson would become indigenous affairs minister under a federal Labor government.

Scott Morrison, too, has zeroed in on the scourge of suicide in indigenous communities, promising millions of dollars to address mental health.

The Guardian last week published a rundown of the pronouncements of Labor, the LNP and The Greens propose on indigenous policy.

But missing from the raft of promises by both sides of politics is an acknowledgment that the simple provision of proper shelter has a powerful impact on the physical and mental health of everyone, including indigenous communities.

Overcrowding, homelessness and generally inadequate housing are among the most persistent problems indigenous communities confront. There was a program to tackle this. The National Partnership Agreement on Remote Indigenous Housing provided billions of dollars of investment in building new homes and maintaining existing homes in these communities.

The Government’s own review of the program showed it was making progress but that more work needed to be done to achieve lasting success.

On 30 June last year, it ceased. And neither of the major parties has gone anywhere near promising to revive it.

Maslow’s famous hierarchy of needs counts shelter as among the most basic of human physiological needs. Unless this need is met, people are not motivated to achieve higher level needs, like financial and emotional security, health and well-being.

The Torres Strait Island Regional Council put it best in its statement outlining its federal election initiatives: Homelessness and housing stress can profoundly affect the mental and physical health of individuals and families, as well as impact on their education and employment opportunities, and their ability to participate fully in the community.

The latest Closing the Gap report stated that indigenous Australians are three times more likely to experience overcrowding than non-indigenous Australians. This despite the report and all sides of politics acknowledging that Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people need to secure appropriate, affordable housing as a pathway to better lives.

Yes, the investment proposed is significant _ $5.5 billion nationally over the next 10 years. But what price better health and education outcomes for indigenous communities?

Part 4 : The Palaszczuk Government has welcomed Federal Labor’s commitment to address overcrowding in remote communities.

The $1.5 billion, ten-year investment will go a long way towards closing the gap in remote housing disadvantage across Queensland.

Deputy Premier and Minister for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Partnerships Jackie Trad said quality of living simply can’t be achieved if people don’t have a roof over their heads.

“The Queensland Government remains committed to providing quality housing across our State’s remote communities under our 1.08 billion commitment over 10 years,” Ms Trad said.

“Federal Labor’s commitment will only strengthen the work we are already doing to assist those living in communities such as across Leichardt

“For 50 years, Australian governments have joined with us to provide homes in remote Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities,” she said.

Housing Minister Mick de Brenni said that all ended last year under the Federal LNP.

“Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander leaders have said it was profoundly disappointing to see the Morrison Coalition turn its back from a shared responsibility to Queensland’s remote communities.

“Queensland Labor has joined calls to the Federal Government to continue to fund remote indigenous housing and I wrote and met repeatedly with the outgoing Federal Minister for Indigenous Affairs Nigel Scullion over the past 12 months. All he showed Queensland’s First Nations people was contempt.

“It’s pretty clear that Prime Minister Scott Morrison seems comfortable being the first PM in half a century to turn his back on Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Queenslanders.

“And what’s just as bad is that Deb Frecklington’s Queensland LNP has continually refused to reach out to their colleagues in Canberra and ask them not to turn their backs on Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Queenslanders.

“Further, the Queensland LNP has stood by and done absolutely nothing while their Morrison Coalition in Canberra stripped $1.6 billion from housing funding for Queenslanders – a plan designed to wipe out remote communities.

Member for Cook Cynthia Lui said only a Shorten Labor Government has a plan for all Queenslanders.

“The Palaszczuk Government will provide pathways to secure better futures, to help close the gap between Indigenous and non-Indigenous Queenslanders.

“Had Queensland been given our fair share from the Morrison LNP Government, we could have built 189 3-bedroom homes in remote communities in just one year,” Ms Lui said.

Mayor of Palm Island Shire Council Alf Lacey said an investment of $112 million in the 2019-20 Budget from the

Commonwealth coupled with the existing spend is all that would have been needed to address overcrowding – and save the 600 jobs in remote communities.

“It will change and save lives – this funding will help to address overcrowding, protect jobs and allow further economic investment in the region, while a longer-term agreement is negotiated,” Mr Lacey said.

Part 5. WA McGowan Government welcomes Federal Labor pledge to support remote housing in WA

  • Offer would double Coalition’s commitment and offer long-term stability
  • State continues unyielding position to hold Commonwealth accountable
  • Housing is key to achieving Closing the Gap targets for Aboriginal people The McGowan Government’s fight for a better Commonwealth funding deal for remote communities across Western Australia has seen Federal Labor commit to deliver a national 10year, $1.5 billion agreement if it wins government on May 18.

The pledge was welcomed by Housing Minister Peter Tinley and Treasurer Ben Wyatt who have led the State’s fight for a better deal.

Federal Labor’s vow to provide additional funding contrasts starkly with the Federal Coalition which walked away from the previous 10-year, $1.1 billion funding deal when it expired on June 30 last year, claiming responsibility for remote communities rested solely with the State.

Federal Labor leader Bill Shorten confirmed today that a Federal Government led by him would address overcrowding and create jobs in remote indigenous communities with a $1.5 billion, 10year investment.

At least $120 million of that package would flow to WA in the coming financial year (2019-20), doubling the amount supplied by the Coalition Government as a one-off exit payment from the previous long-term agreement in December last year.

That $120 million offer only came after WA rejected the previous offer of $60 million payable over three years and launched a public campaign urging a new long-term agreement to help support some of Australia’s most disadvantaged people.

Tellingly, Mr Morrison and his Aboriginal Affairs Minister Nigel Scullion refused to negotiate a new long-term deal and provide financial certainty for the provision of housing in remote communities.

Poor outcomes in health, education, employment and community safety for those living in remote communities can be largely attributed to housing shortages and chronic overcrowding.

The McGowan Government currently spends about $90 million annually supporting housing and essential services such as power, water and waste management in about 165 remote communities across the State.

Comments attributed to Housing Minister Peter Tinley:

“If we are to have any chance of achieving the aspirational targets of Closing the Gap Refresh then we need to put roofs over people’s heads.

“This is not something the State can do, or indeed should do, on its own – it requires a working, collaborative, sustainable and enduring partnership with the Commonwealth.

“It’s great to see that Bill Shorten is stepping up and is willing to open doors, rather than walk away from this challenge the way Scott Morrison has.”