NACCHO Aboriginal Health #Redfernstatement Parliamentary Event @Congressmob Invite 14 February

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Background to the Redfern Statement

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55 leaders met today  9th of June 2016, in Redfern where in 1992 Prime Minister Paul Keating spoke truth about this nation – that the disadvantage faced by First Peoples affects and is the responsibility of all Australians.

Photo above NACCHO CEO Pat Turner addressing the national media

An urgent call for a more just approach to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Affairs

“Social justice is what faces you in the morning. It is awakening in a house with adequate water supply, cooking facilities and sanitation. It is the ability to nourish your children and send them to school where their education not only equips them for employment but reinforces their knowledge and understanding of their cultural inheritance. It is the prospect of genuine employment and good health: a life of choices and opportunity, free from discrimination.”

Mick Dodson, Annual Report of the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Social Justice Commissioner, 1993.

The Redfern Statement

Download the 18 Page document here

Redfern Statement June 2016 Elections 18 Pages

Redfern Statement

A call for urgent Government action

 

NACCHO Aboriginal Health and #Smoking : Pack warning labels help Aboriginal smokers butt out

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Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Services across 140 health settings are helping smokers in our communities to quit.

Pack warning labels are also an important element as smokers read, think about and discuss large, prominent and  graphic labels.

This comprehensive approach works to reduce Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander smoking and the harm it causes in our communities,’

Matthew Cooke from the National Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation (NACCHO).

Pack warning labels are motivating Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander smokers to quit smoking according to new research released by Menzies School of Health Research (Menzies) today.

The study has shown that graphic warning labels not only motivate quit attempts but increase Indigenous smokers’ awareness of the health issues caused by smoking.

Forming part of the national Talking About The Smokes study led by Menzies in partnership with Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Services, the 642 study participants completed baseline surveys and follow-up surveys a year later.

The study found that 30% of Indigenous smokers at baseline said that pack warning labels had stopped them having a smoke when they were about to smoke.

Study leader, Menzies’ Professor David Thomas said, ‘This reaction rose significantly among smokers who were exposed to plain packaging for the first time during the period of research. The introduction of new and enlarged warning labels on plain packs had a positive impact upon Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander smokers.’

Professor David Thomas, explained the significance of this finding, ‘Reacting to warning labels by forgoing a cigarette may not seem like much on its own. However, forgoing cigarettes due to warning labels was associated with becoming more concerned about the health consequences of smoking, developing an interest in quitting and attempting to quit. This is significant for our understanding of future tobacco control strategies.’

In addition, Indigenous smokers who said at baseline they often noticed warning labels on their packs were 80% more likely to identify the harms of smoking that have featured on warning labels.

Just under two in five (39%) Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people aged 15 and over smoke daily. Smoking is responsible for 23% of the health gap between Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people and other Australians.

In 2012, pack warning labels in Australia were increased in size to 75% on the front of all packs and 90% of the back at the same time as tobacco plain packaging was introduced.

The study was funded by the Australian Government Department of Health and published in the Nicotine & Tobacco Research journal and available at:

http://ntr.oxfordjournals.org/content/early/2017/01/08/ntr.ntw396.full.pdf+html.

Summary of findings
  • The research is part of the Talking About the Smokes study http://www.menzies.edu.au/page/Research/Projects/Smoking/Talking_About_the_Smokes/
  • A total of 642 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander smokers completed surveys at baseline (April 2012-October 2013) and follow-up (August 2013-August 2014)
  • At baseline, 66% of smokers reported they had often noticed warning labels in the past month, 30% said they had stopped smoking due to warning labels in the past month and 50% perceived that warning labels were somewhat or very effective to help them quit or stay quit
  • At follow-up, an increase in stopping smoking due to warning labels was found only those first surveyed before plain packaging was introduced (19% vs 34%, p=0.002), but not for those surveyed during the phase-in period (34% vs 37%, p=0.8) or after it was mandated (35% vs 36%, p=0.7). There were no other differences in reactions to warning labels according to time periods associated with plain packaging.
  • Smokers who reported they had stopped smoking due to warning labels in the month prior to baseline had 1.5 times the odds of quitting when compared with those who reported never doing so or never noticing labels (AOR: 1.45, 95% CI: 1.02-2.06, p=0.04), adjusting for other factors.
  • Smokers who reported they had often noticed warning labels on their packs at baseline had 1.8 times the odds of correctly responding to five questions about the health effects of smoking that had featured on packs (AOR: 1.84, 95% CI: 1.20-2.82, p=0.006), but not those that had not featured on packs (AOR: 1.03, 95%CI 0.73-1.45, p=0.9) when compared to smokers who did not often notice warning labels.

NACCHO Advertisement

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NACCHO has announced the publishing date for the 9 th edition of Australia’s first national health Aboriginal newspaper, the NACCHO Health News .

Publish date 6 April 2017

Working with Aboriginal community controlled and award-winning national newspaper the Koori Mail, NACCHO aims to bring relevant advertising and information on health services, policy and programs to key industry staff, decision makers and stakeholders at the grassroots level.

And who writes for and reads the NACCHO Newspaper ?

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While NACCHO’s websites ,social media and annual report have been valued sources of information for national and local Aboriginal health care issues for many years, the launch of NACCHO Health News creates a fresh, vitalised platform that will inevitably reach your targeted audiences beyond the boardrooms.

NACCHO will leverage the brand, coverage and award-winning production skills of the Koori Mail to produce a 24 page three times a year, to be distributed as a ‘lift-out’ in the 14,000 Koori Mail circulation, as well as an extra 1,500 copies to be sent directly to NACCHO member organisations across Australia.

Our audited readership (Audit Bureau of Circulations) is 100,000 readers

For more details rate card

Contact : Colin Cowell Editor

Mobile : 0401 331 251

Email  : nacchonews@naccho.org.au

 

 

NACCHO Aboriginal Health and Human Rights : Nomination open 2017 National Indigenous #HumanRights Awards

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 ” The National Indigenous Human Rights Awards recognises Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander persons who have made significant contribution to the advancement of human rights and social justice for their people.”

The awards were established in 2014, and will held annually. The inaugural awards were held at NSW Parliament House, and were welcomed by the Hon Linda Burney, MP and included key note speakers Dr Yalmay Yunupingu, Ms Gail Mabo, and Mr Anthony Mundine. A number of other distinguished guests such as political representatives, indigenous leaders and others in the fields of human rights and social justice also attended.

The Awards were presented by leading Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander elders, and leading Indigenous figures in Indigenous Social Justice and Human Rights. All recipients of the National Human Rights Award will be persons of Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander heritage.

To nominate someone for one of the three awards, please go to https://shaoquett.wufoo.com/forms/z4qw7zc1i3yvw6/
 
For further information, please also check out the Awards Guide at https://www.scribd.com/document/336434563/2017-National-Indigenous-Human-Rights-Awards-Guide

AWARD CATEGORIES:

 

DR YUNUPINGU AWARD – FOR HUMAN RIGHTS
 
To an Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander person who has made a significant contribution to the advancement of Human Rights for Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander peoples. Dr Yunupingu is the first Aboriginal from Arnhem Land to achieve a university degree. In 1986 Dr Yunupingu formed Yothu Yindi in 1986, combining Aboriginal (Yolngu) and non-Aboriginal (balanda) musicians and instrumentation.

In 1990 was appointed as Principal of Yirrkala Community School, Australia’s first Aboriginal Principal. Also in that year he established the Yothu Yindi Foundation to promote Yolngu cultural development, including Garma Festival of Traditional Cultures Dr Yumupingu was named 1992 Australian of the Year for his work in building bridges between Indigenous and non-Indigenous communities across Australia.

THE EDDIE MABO AWARD FOR ACHIEVEMENTS IN SOCIAL JUSTICE

In memory of Eddie Koiki Mabo (1936-1992), this award recognises an Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander person who has made a significant contribution to the advancement of Social Justice for Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander peoples.
Eddie Koiki Mabo was a Torres Straits Islander, most notable in Australian history for his role in campaigning for indigenous land rights.

From 1982 to 1991 Eddie campaigned for the rights of the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders to have their land rights recognised. Sadly, he died of cancer at the age of 56, five months before the High Court handed down its landmark land rights decision overturning Terra Nullius. He was 56 when he passed away.

THE ANTHONY MUNDINE AWARD FOR COURAGE

 

To an Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander person who has made a significant contribution to the advancement of sports among Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander peoples.

Anthony Mundine is an Australian professional boxer and former rugby league player. He is a former, two-time WBA Super Middleweight Champion, a IBO Middleweight Champion, and an interim WBA Light Middleweight Champion boxer and a New South Wales State of Origin representative footballer. Before his move to boxing he was the highest paid player in the NRL.

In 2000 Anthony was named the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Person of the Year in 2000. He has also won the Deadly Award as Male Sportsperson of the Year in 2003, 2006 and 2007 amongst others.

He has a proud history of standing up for Indigenous peoples, telling a journalist from the Canberra Times: “I’m an Aboriginal man that speaks out and if I see something, I speak the truth.”

NACCHO Press Release : NACCHO Chair welcomes new Health Minister Greg Hunt and Ken Wyatt as new Indigenous Health minister

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” We congratulate Mr Hunt on his appointment as Health Minister and look forward to meeting with the minister to discuss the importance of Aboriginal led medical services in developing and delivering health programs for more than 750,000 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people living in remote, regional and urban communities.

NACCHO has a very productive working relationship with Ken Wyatt in his role as Assistant Minister for Health and we’re very pleased it will continue now he is elevated to Minister for Indigenous Health and Aged Care –  the first Aboriginal Australian to hold the office of Commonwealth Minister.”

National Aboriginal Controlled Community Health Organisation (NACCHO) Chair, Matthew Cooke:

Photo above 2008 : On the back of mounting community calls for action Prime Minister Kevin Rudd and Opposition Leader Tony Abbott signed the Close the Gap Statement of Intent in March 2008. Key ministers and other state and territory leaders soon followed. Here, Aboriginal parliamentarian, Ken Wyatt, signs the Close the Gap Statement of Intent

Download the NACCHO press release

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NACCHO the peak body for Aboriginal health services is looking forward to working with newly appointed Health Minister Greg Hunt and Minister for Indigenous Health Ken Wyatt to close the gap in health for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.

” NACCHO is especially proud to see Minister Wyatt attain such a senior position in the Turnbull government. The historic promotion, one of many for this Member of Parliament, is an acknowledgment of the high regard he achieved working as an assistant minister, his attention to detail and how respected he is in the Aboriginal community and health sectors across Australia.

As a previous Director of Aboriginal Health in the public services of NSW and WA he brings a unique perspective to the role. NACCHO will assist him in meeting the expectations of the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander community to enjoy a quality of life through whole-of-community self-determination.

Minister Wyatt has many years of experience working in both Indigenous health and education, which is invaluable at a ministerial level and the understanding, needed to make progress towards Close the Gap targets” he said.

Mr. Cooke also thanked outgoing Health Minister Sussan Ley for her work in the portfolio and her support for NACCHO.

Last year 140 Aboriginal community controlled health organisations (ACCHOs) provided nearly 3 million episodes of care to over 340,000 clients.

” It is clear that putting Aboriginal health in Aboriginal hands is working ” Mr Cooke said

Ken Wyatt: new minister to tackle how Indigenous health funding used

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 ” In health, Wyatt said he wanted particular improvements for children below the age of eight and young people generally.

Improving social determinants of health would help extend lifespan and achieve parity with all Australians.

The incoming Indigenous health minister, Ken Wyatt, has said he wants to tackle the “industry” in Aboriginal affairs siphoning funds into administration rather than frontline services ”

Wyatt made the comments to ABC Radio National on Thursday in an interview about his appointment as aged care and Indigenous health minister, which will make him the first Indigenous person to hold a commonwealth ministry.

Paul Karp writing in the Guardian

Wyatt has also broken from his Coalition colleagues who criticise Labor for considering debate on treaties with Indigenous people at the same time as constitutional recognition, saying the two are not in conflict and a “dual conversation” is possible.

He agreed it was in a sense “unbelievable” that it had taken this long for an Indigenous person to reach the ministry.

He said he and the other Indigenous members of parliament held their positions on merit and that sent “a very strong message to young Aboriginal Australians that their hopes and aspirations can be achieved in many arenas”.

“The ministerial appointment, including colleagues on the other side who have shadow appointments, sends home a very strong message that we can stand as equals amongst our peers.”

Wyatt agreed his appointment meant the federal government could implement policies that affected Indigenous people in a less paternalistic way, citing his participation on a cabinet subcommittee for Indigenous affairs. “Since I’ve been in the parliament … we’ve had the opportunity of shaping people’s thinking to focus on Indigenous issues in a different way.”

The emphasis had shifted to “working with Aboriginal people rather than doing things with them”, and he said working alongside Indigenous people had helped others understand issues in Indigenous communities.

Wyatt said he would aim to achieve “an all round improvement in Indigenous affairs, including the industry that has evolved around Aboriginal affairs that sees money being siphoned off to administration rather than directly to frontline [services]”.

In health, Wyatt said he wanted particular improvements for children below the age of eight and young people generally. Improving social determinants of health would help extend lifespan and achieve parity with all Australians.

On Wednesday night Wyatt told ABC’s 7.30 he still believed Australia was on track to achieve recognition of Indigenous Australians in the constitution.

He said aspirations among some Indigenous Australians for a treaty had not caused momentum for recognition to stall but had sparked a “dual conversation” on both concepts, which were not in conflict.

“I would certainly hope that we don’t abandon, nor set aside, our desire to have recognition within the foundation document of this country’s frameworks,” he said.

The comments are at odds with his Coalition colleagues who argue that Labor’s consideration of a treaty with Indigenous Australians puts at risk a “meaningful but modest” change in the form of constitutional recognition.

Wyatt did agree that recognition was the main priority, saying treaties are “a way forward but they’re not set in the … country’s [foundation] document and I’d rather see recognition first and then treaty”.

“I think the strength is in the constitution, because the constitution is the document that the high courts base their decisions around when challenges occur and in which legislation is framed against our founding document.”


NACCHO Advertisement

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NACCHO has announced the publishing date for the 9 th edition of Australia’s first national health Aboriginal newspaper, the NACCHO Health News .

Publish date 6 April 2017

Working with Aboriginal community controlled and award-winning national newspaper the Koori Mail, NACCHO aims to bring relevant advertising and information on health services, policy and programs to key industry staff, decision makers and stakeholders at the grassroots level.

And who writes for and reads the NACCHO Newspaper ?

km-kw

While NACCHO’s websites ,social media and annual report have been valued sources of information for national and local Aboriginal health care issues for many years, the launch of NACCHO Health News creates a fresh, vitalised platform that will inevitably reach your targeted audiences beyond the boardrooms.

NACCHO will leverage the brand, coverage and award-winning production skills of the Koori Mail to produce a 24 page three times a year, to be distributed as a ‘lift-out’ in the 14,000 Koori Mail circulation, as well as an extra 1,500 copies to be sent directly to NACCHO member organisations across Australia.

Our audited readership (Audit Bureau of Circulations) is 100,000 readers

For more details rate card

Contact : Colin Cowell Editor

Mobile : 0401 331 251

Email  : nacchonews@naccho.org.au

 

 

 

 

NACCHO Aboriginal Health scholarships: Puggy Hunter Memorial Scholarship Scheme close 15 January

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Puggy Hunter Memorial Scholarship Scheme

Applications open now; close 15 January 2017

The Puggy Hunter Memorial Scholarship Scheme (PHMSS) is available to Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander people who are studying a course in ATSI health work, allied health, dentistry/oral health, medicine, midwifery or nursing.

It is an Australian Government initiative designed to encourage and assist Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander undergraduate students in health-related disciplines to complete their studies and join the health workforce.

The scheme was established in recognition of Dr Arnold ‘Puggy’ Hunter’s significant contribution to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health and his role as Chair of the National Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation.

Dr Puggy Hunter – NACCHO Chairperson 1991-2001 BIO

Dr. Arnold “Puggy” Hunter was a pioneer in Australian Aboriginal health and recipient of the 2001 Australian Human Rights Medal.

Puggy was the elected chairperson of the National Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation, (NACCHO), which is the peak national advisory body on Aboriginal health. NACCHO has a membership of over 150 Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Services and is the representative body of these services. Puggy was the inaugural Chair of NACCHO from 1991 until his death.[1]

Puggy was the vice-chairperson of the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Council, the Federal Health Minister’s main advisory body on Aboriginal health established in 1996.

He was also Chair of the National Public Health Partnership Aboriginal and Islander Health Working Group which reports to the Partnership and to the Australian Health Ministers Advisory Council.

He was a member of the Australian Pharmaceutical Advisory Council (APAC), the General Practice Partnership Advisory Council, the Joint Advisory Group on Population Health and the National Health Priority Areas Action Council as well as a number of other key Aboriginal health policy and advisory groups on national issues.[1]

Puggy had a long and passionate role in the struggle for justice for Aboriginal people. He was born in Darwin in 1951, where his parents had fled Broome and Western Australian native welfare policies.[1]

Numerous Australian scholarships are named in his honour.

He was quoted in Australian Parliament as saying: “You white people have the hearing problems because you do not seem to hear us

Application form

Online application form 

Applications are open now; close on 15 January 2017.

Eligibility criteria

Applications will be considered from applicants who are:

  • of Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander descent
    Applicants must identify as and be able to confirm their Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander status.
  • enrolled or intending to enrol in an entry level or graduate entry level health related course.
    Courses must be provided by an Australian registered training organisation or university. Funding is not for postgraduate study.
  • intending to study in the academic year that the scholarship is offered.

ACN receives high volume of applications; meeting the eligibility criteria will not guarantee applicants a scholarship offer.

Eligible health areas

  • Aboriginal & Torres Strait Islander health work
  • Allied health (excluding pharmacy)
  • Dentistry/oral health (excluding dental assistants)
  • Direct entry midwifery
  • Medicine
  • Nursing; registered and enrolled

Value of scholarship

Funding is provided for the normal duration of the course. Full time scholarship awardees will receive up to $15,000 per year and part time recipients will receive up to $7,500 per year. The funding is paid in 24 fortnightly instalments throughout the study period of each year.

Selection criteria

These are competitive scholarships and will be awarded on the recommendation of the independent selection committee whose assessment will be based on how applicants address the following questions:

  • Describe what has been your driving influence/motivation in wanting to become a health professional in your chosen area.
  • Discuss what you hope to accomplish as a health professional in the next 5-10 years.
  • Discuss your commitment to study in your chosen course.
  • Outline your involvement in community activities, including promoting the health and well-being of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.

The Puggy Hunter Memorial Scholarship scheme is funded by the Australian Government Department of Health and administered by the Australian College of Nursing.

Important links

Links to Indigenous health professional associations

Contact ACN

e scholarships@acn.edu.au
t 1800 688 628

 

NACCHO wishing you a Happy Festive Season, #healthyfutures and a safe 2017 New Year

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To all our Affiliates, 140 #ACCHO Members, 302 Clinics and 7,000 approx. staff , stakeholders, NGO’s, Federal, State and Territory Government partners

The NACCHO mob wishes you a Happy Festive Season

#healthyfutures and a safe 2017 New Year

NACCHO Chair Matthew Cooke on behalf of the board

CEO Pat Turner on behalf of Team NACCHO

 

Please Note

NACCHO Office closed 21 December

Re-opens 4 January 2017

 

NACCHO Aboriginal Health News Alerts

With thanks for all your support 2016

Colin Cowell Editor

Mobile 0401 331 251

nacchonews@naccho.org.au

 

 

#NACCHOagm2016 Launch speech @KenWyattMP NACCHO #HealthyFutures Report Card

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  I have been invited to launch the second Healthy Futures Report Card that is produced by the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare.

I applaud the National Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation for commissioning this annual report for the benefit of the entire sector.

This report is an invaluable resource because it provides a comprehensive picture of a point in time.

These report cards allow the sector to track progress, celebrate success, and see where improvements need to be made.

This is critical for the continuous improvement of the Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Sector as well as a way to maintain focus  and achieve goals.

We need to acknowledge the great system in place that comprises the network of Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisations, and recognise the role you play to build culturally responsive services in the mainstream system.

Our people need to feel culturally safe in the mainstream health system; the Aboriginal Community Controlled Health sector must continue to play a central role in helping the mainstream services and the sector to be culturally safe “

The Hon Ken Wyatt AM,MP Assistant Minister for Health and Aged care  : SPEECH NACCHO MEMBERS CONFERENCE 2016 Launch of the Healthy Futures Report Card 8 December 2016 Melbourne

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Download copy NACCHO Healthy Futures Report Card Here

Before I begin I want to acknowledge the traditional custodians of the land on which we meet – the Wurundjeri people – and pay my respects to Elders past, present and future. I also extend this respect to other Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people here today.

I want to thank my hosts Matthew Cooke, Chair, NACCHO; and Patricia Turner, CEO, NACCHO for inviting me to speak and acknowledge NACCHO Board members. Distinguished guests, ladies and gentlemen.

Today I also want to specifically acknowledge Naomi Mayer and Sol Bellear from the Redfern Aboriginal Medical Service. 2016 marks the 45th anniversary of the Redfern Aboriginal Medical Service, the first such service in Australia and spearheaded by Naomi and Sol.

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Thank you Naomi and Sol and congratulations on achieving such a significant and important milestone. Your work has improved the lives of countless Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians because of your leadership and compassionate care.

I have been invited to launch the second Healthy Futures Report Card that is produced by the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare. I applaud the National Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation for commissioning this annual report for the benefit of the entire sector. This report is an invaluable resource because it provides a comprehensive picture of a point in time.

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These report cards allow the sector to track progress, celebrate success, and see where improvements need to be made. This is critical for the continuous improvement of the Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Sector as well as a way to maintain focus  and achieve goals.

Crucially, this report card is about and for the Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Services sector. It is not something that is happening at and to the sector. It’s yours.

This report card includes information from around 140 Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Services which provide care to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians. The services you provide cover around two thirds of the services funded by the Australian Government for primary health care services specifically for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.

During 2014–15 these services saw about 275,000 of these clients who received almost 2.5 million episodes of care. More than 228,000 Australians were regular clients of the Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Services sector.

I’m pleased that there have been a number of improvements identified since the 2015 report. Improvements include:

  •  Increases in the number of clients and episodes of care for primary health care services provided by Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Services.
  •  A rise in the proportion of clients receiving appropriate processes of care for 10 of the 16 relevant indicators. This includes:
    •  antenatal visits before 13 weeks of pregnancy
    •  birth weight recorded
    •  smoking status or alcohol consumption recorded, and
    •  clients with type 2 diabetes who received a General Practice Management Plan or Team Care Arrangement.

 Improved outcomes in three out of the five National Key Performance Indicators. This includes:

  • improvements in blood pressure for clients with type 2 diabetes, and
  • reductions in the proportion of clients aged 15 or over who were recorded as current smokers.

These are commendable results from services in some of the most diverse and challenging environments in Australia.

I echo the report’s authors when they say that the findings in this Report Card will assist Services in their continuous quality improvement activities, in identifying areas where service delivery and accessibility issues need to be addressed, and in supporting the goals of the Implementation Plan for the National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Plan 2013–2023.

We are all united in our determination to close the gap in health outcomes for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people, so they live longer and have a better quality of life. A critical means to close the gap is the Implementation Plan for the National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Plan 2013-2023.

The Implementation Plan has seven domains that focus on both community-controlled and mainstream services.

It is a huge step forward to have racism recognised in the Implementation Plan – this is a critical issue for the social and emotional wellbeing of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians.

Domain seven of the Implementation Plan is about the social and cultural determinants of health. These determinants impact on everything that we do and contribute to at least 31 per cent of the gap in life expectancy between Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australians.

As we all know, health departments and health providers are only part of the solution. We need an integrated approach to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health.

To have strong healthy children and strong communities we need to have effective early childhood education, employment, housing and economic development where people live. These issues can only be addressed through whole-of-Government action. Whole-of-Government action across departments and across jurisdictions.

However, it is not only about governments coordinating their actions because governments alone cannot progress this agenda and action. This can only be done working with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.

The Implementation Plan Advisory Group, established to drive the next iteration of the Implementation Plan, comprises representatives from the Departments of Health, Prime Minister and Cabinet and the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare.

I’m pleased that this Advisory Group also includes respected and experienced members such as:

  •  Richard Weston from the National Health Leadership Forum and the Healing Foundation, who is Co-Chair.
  •  Pat Turner from the National Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation.
  •  Donna Ah Chee , Julie Tongs and Mark Wenitong who are experts on, among other things, Indigenous early childhood; comprehensive primary health care; and acute care.

See NACCHO TV Interviews

          Donna Ah Chee

           Julie Tongs

          Dr Mark Wenitong

The Group also includes jurisdictional members of the National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Standing Committee from South Australia and Western Australia.

I believe that the next iteration of the Implementation Plan, due in 2018, will be stronger because of these ongoing—and new—collaborations and partnerships.

It is clear that you all work extremely hard on behalf of the communities you serve. You are delivering excellence in primary health care and I congratulate you on the delivery of comprehensive, holistic models of care.

At the end of the day, we share the ultimate goal of Closing the Gap in health outcomes for our people so that they live longer and experience a better quality of life.

But we also have a health system under pressure. There are frontline pressures on the whole health system from our hospitals, to rural health to remote Indigenous communities. And the pressures are mounting. There is a growth in demand for services, increasing costs and growing expectations.

Expenditure on health services accounts for approximately one-sixth of the Australian Government’s total expenses—estimated at more than $71 billion for the current financial year. This figure is projected to increase to more than $79 billion by 2019-20.

There is enormous pressure on the health and aged care sectors to do more, with less. This is why there is a clear expectation that all Government-funded organisations provide the evidence basis for what they do, and show the difference their programs are making on the ground. All of us—governments and organisations—need to ask ourselves how can we do better and continue to reform within this tight fiscal environment.

I am sure many of you will be aware of the Nous Review of the Roles and Functions of the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Peak Bodies and some of you, of course, participated in the Review consultations. I thank you.

The Government has not published a formal response to the Review because we recognise that what happens now is a discussion that we need to have together.

I know that NACCHO, as well as State and Territory Peak Bodies, are working with the Department of Health to chart a way forward that takes into consideration the findings of the Review.

The Nous Review provided a clear message: Peak Bodies need to play a role in supporting the Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Sector AND mainstream health care providers to deliver appropriate and responsive health care services.

Governance reform for the Peak Bodies is a central element of the way forward. I know this is being driven by NACCHO in close cooperation with affiliate organisations and I applaud your initiative and commitment. I understand that Bobbi Campbell spoke with you yesterday on this matter, so I will keep my remarks brief.

I do want to say that it is important to Government to see the sector positioned as a key component of the overall health system with a clear unified voice.

The Government looks at the health system as a whole and expects collaboration that delivers effectiveness, efficiency and quality. We need a truly linked up, integrated, affordable and sustainable system.

We need to acknowledge the great system in place that comprises the network of Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisations, and recognise the role you play to build culturally responsive services in the mainstream system.

Our people need to feel culturally safe in the mainstream health system; the Aboriginal Community Controlled Health sector must continue to play a central role in helping the mainstream services and the sector to be culturally safe.

Australia has come a long way in improving the health of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people but there is still a long, hard road ahead. I know that if we continue to work together, to collaborate and to talk about the issues and opportunities for the sector then the next Healthy Futures Report Card will have an even longer list of achievements.

I thank you for the work you do for the benefit of all Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people and wish you only the best now, and into the future.

Thank you.

For further reading

NACCHO November 16 Newspaper : Aboriginal Health and wellbeing is close to my heart says Ken Wyatt

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NACCHO #healthyfutures #nacchoAgm2016 Report: Aboriginal control key to closing the gap


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A new report released today reveals Aboriginal community controlled health services are making significant gains to close the gap in Aboriginal health, again demonstrating the model is the most effective way to turn the around the appalling difference in health between Aboriginal and other Australians.

The Australian Institute of Health and Welfare Healthy Futures Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Services Report Card 2016, launched today by the Federal Assistant Minister for Health and Aged Care, Ken Wyatt, shows Aboriginal community controlled health services are continuing to attract clients with 19% increase in episodes of care compared to last report.

Matthew Cooke, National Community Controlled Health Organisation Chairperson welcomed the report and called for a commitment to extend the reach of Aboriginal controlled health services.

“Again we see the work our services do has a dramatic effect on the lives of thousands of Aboriginal people every day – both in a direct way on improving their health and more broadly in the communities as a large employer of Aboriginal people.

“Almost 3 million episodes of care were provided to over 340,000 clients over the last 12 months. This includes an increase of 23% in number of episodes of care provided to Indigenous people and an increase of 8% of all clients.

“Our services employ 3,300 Indigenous staff across Australia which makes them the largest employer single employer on Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in the nation.

“We are seeing mums and babies in better health, less smokers and a small extension of Aboriginal life expectancy.

“These are incremental but important improvements.

“Putting Aboriginal health in Aboriginal hands is working. Now we need to see more Aboriginal people have access to our services in more areas around Australia.”

Aboriginal community controlled health clients also showed improvements for three out of the five nKPI outcome indicators including:

–      the proportion of clients with type 2 diabetes whose glycosylated haemoglobin (HbA1c) result was less than or equal to 7%

–      the proportion of clients aged 15 and over who were recorded as current smokers.

“We have a long way to go to achieve health equality but we are on the right path if we continue to support models that work and evidence continues to mount that the best investment is in Aboriginal community controlled health services,” Mr Cooke said.

DOWNLOAD REPORT HERE

This report card provides information from about 140 Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Services (ACCHS) providing care to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians. During 2014–15 these services saw about 275,000 Indigenous clients who received almost 2.5 million episodes of care.

About 228,700 Indigenous Australians were regular clients of ACCHSs, where they received maternal and child health services, chronic disease risk factor prevention, and management services. This report card shows rises in the proportion of clients receiving appropriate processes of care for 10 of the 16 relevant indicators.

#NACCHOagm2016 #ACCHO Members Conference starts in Melbourne this week : Strengthening our Future through Self Determination

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Welcome

 ” This week Melbourne will welcome over 300 delegates , ACCHO members and stakeholders to the 2016 NACCHO Annual Members’ Conference.

The theme is Aboriginal Community Controlled Health and  ” Strengthening our Future through Self Determination

You can follow our conference on social media using hashtag #NACCHOagm2016″

Matthew Cooke Chair NACCHO

See Conference website for more details

In this post we list of all speakers and exhibitors plus

Download the complete 48 pages NACCHO Conference Booklet

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NACCHO would like to acknowledge our sponsors /exhibitors

(see full list below)

The Fred Hollows Foundation as a Major Sponsor

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ACKNOWLEDGMENT OF COUNTRY

The National Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation would like to acknowledge this land that we gather on today as the traditional homes for the Wurundjeri tribe. We pay our respects to the Elders past, present and future and to the Wurundjeri people, custodians of this land and thank them for allowing us to conduct our business on this land.

speakers

 A list of all speakers in order of appearance

( see program for times and bio’s )

1.Strengthening our Future through Self Determination

Speaker: Mr Matthew Cooke, Chairperson, NACCHO

2.Keynote speakers: The Honourable Catherine King MP

Shadow Minister for Health and Medicare

3. Medicare Benefits Scheme review Overview

Speaker: Professor Bruce Robinson, Chair

4. Case study one

Speaker: Mrs Julie Tongs, Chief Executive Office, Winnunga Nimmityjah Aboriginal Health Service

5.Case study two

Speaker: Adrian Carson, Chief Executive Officer, Institute for Urban   Indigenous Health (IUIH)

6.Service Planning and Linking to Funding

Speaker: Olga Havnen, Chief Executive Officer, Daniba Dilba

Health Service

7.Heart Foundation – Lighthouse Hospital Project

Speakers : Daniel James and Annie Campbell

Kimberley Aboriginal Medical Services Limited Workforce

8.Workforce Innovation: a case study Kutjuka

Speakers : Julia McIntyre and Rohani Bin Haji Sahari

9.Kimberley Aboriginal Medical Services Limited Regional Model 30 years in the Making

Speakers: Rob McPhee and Vicki O’Donnell

10.Health Justice

Speaker: Dr Tessa Boyd-Caine, Chief Executive Officer

Health Justice Australia

Best Practice

11.Best Practice in Comprehensive Primary Health Care for clients with Chronic Disease

Speaker: Professor Alex Brown, Program Leader,

Aboriginal research, South Australia Health & Medical research Institute

12.Definitions of Comprehensive/Integrated Primary Health Care

Speaker: Ms Donna Ah Chee, Chief Executive Officer, Central Australia Aboriginal Congress Aboriginal Corporation

13.Our Rights to Quality Health Care- Taking back control in Yarrabah

Speaker: Suzanne Andrews, Gurriny Yealamucka (Good Healing) Health Service Aboriginal Corporation

Two Sessions :

14. Healthy Utopia Mob, Brighter futures.Speakers: Linda Keating and Amanda Hand, Urapuntja Health ServiceAnnual Health Expo and Promotion of bush medicine

15.The Diabetes Story: A digital Diabetes InitiativeSpeaker: Ms Patricia Elarde, Diabetes Queensland

16 .Policy and Service Delivery for Ear & Hearing Health

Speaker : Queensland Aboriginal & Islander Health Council (QAIHC)

17 .“First 1000 Days” – Early Childhood, challenges and Progress

Speaker: Professor Kerry Arabena, Chair for Indigenous Health and Director of the Indigenous Health Equity Unit, the University of Melbourne

18. Overview of the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Suicide Prevention Evaluation Project (ATSIPEP)

Speaker: Ms Adele Cox, Senior Indigenous Community Research Consultant

19.Overview of NACCHO Strategic Directions and Priorities

Speaker: Ms Patricia Turner, Chief Executive Officer, NACCHO

20.Future Directions

Speaker: Ms Bobbi Campbell, First Assistant Secretary, Indigenous Health Division, Department of Health

21.Improving sexual health and blood borne virus outcomes for young Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander People

Speaker: Associate Professor James Ward, Head of Infectuous Diseases Research Aboriginal Health, South Australia Health & Medical Research Institute (SAHMRI)

22. The Redfern Statement and an overview of CATSINAM

Speaker: Ms Janine Mohamed, Chief Executive Officer And Mr Leonie Williamson, Senior Policy & research Officer, CATSINAM

23.LAUNCH 2016 Healthy Futures Report Card

Speaker: The Honourable Ken Wyatt AM, MP Minister for Health and Aged Care

24. Social determinants of Health

Speaker: Professor Fran Baum

Fran is a Matthew Flinders Distinguished Professor of Public Health and Director of the Southgate Institute of health, Society and Equity at Flinders University.

All Sponsors and Exhibitors

Dandenong and District Aborigines Health Service

Dandenong and District Aborigines Co-operative Ltd (DDACL) provides programs and services to meet the needs of local Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people. We provide a wide range of health care through our Bunurong Health Service as well as a variety of community programs to promote wellbeing and social engagement.

All of our services have a strong cultural component and we strive to provide a supportive, open and culturally safe environment for Aboriginal people.

Victoria Aboriginal Health Service (VAHS)

The Victorian Aboriginal Health Service (VAHS) was established in 1973 to address the specific medical needs of Victorian indigenous communities. The organisation has expanded steadily over past 40 years to provide a comprehensive range of medical, dental and social services for our community.

As well as providing a variety of medical services, VAHS is committed to supporting the well-being of the community through contributions to community events and activities. VAHS is also committed to assisting research into the ongoing needs of the community.

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KAMS (Kimberley Aboriginal Medical Services)

KAMS (Kimberley Aboriginal Medical Services) is a regional Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Service (ACCHS), providing a collective voice for a network of member ACCHS from towns and remote communities across the Kimberley region of Western Australia.

The Broome Regional Aboriginal Medical Service (BRAMS) was the first Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Service (ACCHS) established in the Kimberley in 1978, and was followed by the East Kimberley Aboriginal Medical Service (EKAMS, in Kununurra) in 1984. The vision for a unified voice, to provide centralised resources and collective advocacy for the sector, achieved reality in 1986 with the establishment of KAMS.

Today, the KAMS collective represents four independently incorporated ACCHS – BRAMS,  Ord Valley Aboriginal Health Service(OVAHS, previously EKAMS),  Derby Aboriginal Health Service (DAHS)Yura Yungi Medical Service (YYMS in Halls Creek), Nirrumbuk.

While its major role is in regional advocacy and support for member services, KAMS also provides comprehensive primary health care services in the remote communities of Beagle Bay, Bidyadanga and Kutjungka (Balgo, Mulan and Billiluna communities).

The KAMS regional collective of ACCHS is a major employer for in the Kimberley, with Aboriginal people representing more than 60% of its 400+ strong workforce.

KAMS is a member of the Aboriginal Health Council of WA (AHCWA – www.ahcwa.org) and of the National Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation (NACCHO – www.naccho.org.au) .

Contact:
Name: Julia McIntyre
Position: Executive Manager Workforce
Address: 12 Napier Terrace Broome
Telephone: 08 9194 3250
Email: jmcintyre@kamsc.org.au
Website: www.kamsc.org.au

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Kimberley Renal Service (KRS)

KRS is a wholly owned subsidiary of KAMS

In October 2002 the Kimberley Satellite dialysis Centre in Broome was opened to accommodate 40 residents of the Kimberley requiring haemodialysis. By April 2004 the unit reached capacity and once again Kimberley residents needing haemodialysis began mounting up in Perth.

As a result of this, a review of kidney disease in the Kimberley was performed jointly by WACHS and KAMSC. Figures in 2004 showed that the incidence of end stage kidney disease within the Aboriginal population greatly exceeded the national burden of disease. That dialysis prevalence for the region had more than tripled in the last decade and was increasing at a much faster rate than in the rest of Western Australia (WA).

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Derby Dialysis Unit

Derby Dialysis Unit

Kununurra Dialysis Unit

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ISA Healthcare Solutions

ISA Healthcare Solutions is part of the ISA Group, an organisation with an impeccable 25 year history of delivering ICT services to clients across Australia and Asia. Our focus is on the intersection of healthcare and technology, and this is underpinned by our team of experts across the two domains, including clinicians, health administrators, management consultants and technologists, that work together at the cutting edge of health technology. Headquartered in Perth, WA, we provide strategic clinical and commercial consulting services to healthcare providers across Australia, as well as a number of product offerings.

Core to our services is MMEx, a web-based e-Health platform that connects you to a diverse medical community. Our evidence-based care planning system provides market leading coordinated care capability. Underpinned by decision support tools that form the basis for effective clinical governance, MMEx takes a patient-centric approach informing superior clinical management and practice administration.

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AMSANT

AMSANT is the peak body for Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Services (ACCHSs) in the Northern Territory. Approximately one third of the population of the NT are Aboriginal, mostly living in very remote areas. AMSANT and the ACCHSs sector have an impressive record in delivering health outcomes for our communities:

  • The first ACCHSs was established over 40 years ago and the sector has grown to be the largest provider of primary health care services to Aboriginal people in the NT, delivering over half of all episodes of care.
  • Our sector has led the development of the model of Aboriginal comprehensive PHC, and provides effective health advocacy as well as leadership in areas such as clinical governance and the use of eHealth technologies.
  • AMSANT works in formal partnership with the NT and Australian governments through the NT Aboriginal Health Forum on system-wide health planning. ACCHS are recognised as the preferred model for delivering Aboriginal and regional PHC, and there is an active process of transitioning government services to Aboriginal community control.

 

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Telstra Health

The way healthcare is delivered is changing.

Telstra Health is embracing that change by developing solutions designed to build a better connected health system. Regardless of the role you play – patient or practitioner, provider or government – our goal is the same; we want to make health care easier for you. We want to increase convenience, lower costs, provide new choices and deliver a better experience. We want to make healthcare simpler. That’s why we’ve invested in digital health solutions across the health system- including for GPs, aged and residential care, hospitals, radiology, pharmacy, indigenous care, health analytics and telemedicine. And we’re connecting those services to empower patients in their own health, free healthcare professionals from paperwork and make all that medical data meaningful.

Contact:
Name: Elizabeth Ellis
Position: Communicare Business and Account Manager
Telephone: 08 6212 6900
Email: enquiries@telstrahealth.com
Website: https://www.telstrahealth.com/communicare

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Westpac

We Recognising the past – Investing in the future

Westpac Weave is Westpac Group’s ‘living’ reconciliation action plan. It is where you’ll find details about our commitments to support Indigenous customers, communities and employees to prosper and grow.

Westpac has made solid progress during 2016 towards the commitments of its 2015-2017 Reconciliation Action Plan (RAP).

As part of Westpac’s broader annual reporting suite, the RAP update demonstrated some 2017 targets had been met ahead of schedule, such as the number of Indigenous Australian businesses included in Westpac’s supply chain, while others were proving challenging.

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Hesta

HESTA is the industry super fund for health and community services. Since 1987, HESTA has grown to become the largest super fund dedicated to this industry. Today we have more than 820,000 members and $36 billion in assets. Those who work in the health and community services industry support Australians when they need it most. We’re proud to play a key role in helping you create the future you want. HESTA’s Reconciliation Action Plan (RAP) — endorsed by Reconciliation Australia — sets out the steps we will take to demonstrate our strong commitment to reconciliation with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples and organisations. This RAP demonstrates our desire to achieve lasting change internally, in our sphere of influence in the super movement and in the wider health and community services sector.

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Blackawear

Blacka Wear Pty Ltd is a 100% Indigenous owned and operated promotional items and apparel company that provides innovative promotional products to promote your brand, organisation, business – to get your message and presence known out in the community you support.

With customer satisfaction of key importance to us, we work with and listen to our clients to ensure that the products suit their needs and are of excellent quality standard and delivered in a timely fashion at competitive prices.

Our vision is to develop and sustain an Indigenous owned supply chain of office wear, incentive and promotional products to Indigenous & Government departments, educational sectors and sporting groups. We seek to offer employment and training opportunities to our community within Blacka Wear Pty Ltd. We also aim to create partnerships with Indigenous organisations and Government Departments to boost our training capacity over the next 5 years.

Find us on Supply Nation and SEQICC’s Indigenous Business Directory.

Contact:
Name: Warwick Go Sam
Position: Manager
Address: Office located at 3/16 Randall Street, Slacks Creek, Brisbane 4127
Telephone: 07 3462 9043
Email: sales@blackawear.com.au
Website: www.blackawear.com.au

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QUMAX

Quality Use of Medicines Maximised for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples

QUMAX is a collaboration between the National Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation (NACCHO) and the Pharmacy Guild of Australia (PGoA), and funded by the Commonwealth Department of Health under the Community Pharmacy Agreement.

The QUMAX Program is delivered by Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisations (ACCHOs) and Community Pharmacies. This is a mature, proven beneficial program that aims to improve quality use of medicines and contribute to positive health outcomes of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples, of any age, who present at participating Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisations (ACCHOs).

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NATSIHWA

The National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Worker Association (NATSIHWA)

The National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Worker Association (NATSIHWA) is the professional body for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Workers and Health Practitioners in Australia.

NATSIHWA focuses on supporting the specialist health workers and health practitioners who work tirelessly to maximise health outcomes and close the gap for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people. These valuable, frontline primary health workers and health practitioners are a vital part of Australia’s health care system.

We are one of a handful of associations in Australia dedicated entirely to developing a strong, professional Indigenous health workforce. NATSIHWA is the only one focused on Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health workers and health practitioners.

Contact:

Name: Renae Kilmister
Position: Membership Officer
Address: Unit 2 31-37 Townshend St, Phillip, ACT, 2606
Telephone: (02) 6221 9230
Email: membership@natsihwa.org.au
Website: www.natsihwa.org.au

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Australian Red Cross

Australian Red Cross was formed in 1914 by a group of women determined to provide humanitarian relief at the outbreak of another conflict – the First World War.  For over a century, people in Australia have found support and solace in Red Cross – during emergencies, in personal crises, and through ongoing hardship.

We build partnerships with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities, help the elderly and marginalised make life-changing social connections, and support vulnerable migrants to find their feet.

Insurance House

Care, professionalism, imagination and leadership are at the crux of what shapes us and what drives us towards wanting to close the gap between the opportunities that exists for Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australians and organisations alike. Insurance House is well placed to assist NACCHO members with providing the best possible insurance and risk management solutions. Leading this charge is the in-house expertise of our broking staff; in particular our local Queensland branch that is headed up by Ian Dobbs, State Manager Broking, QLD. Ian has extensive experience within the Health and Not-For-Profit Organisations throughout Australia. Ian’s passion is not just to provide financial risk solutions but to assist in the growth and development of your business by providing a bespoke, economical, risk solution that is aligned with your organisational long term objectives.

Contact:
Name:  Ian Dobbs
Position: State Manager, Brisbane
Address: Suite 14, 36 Agnes Street
Fortitude Valley QLD 4006
Phone 1300 305 834
Email: ian.dobbs@ihgroup.com.au
Website: www.insurancehouse.com.au

Autism Queensland

The Early Intervention Indigenous Liaison Officer (EI ILO) Program aims to increase awareness of childhood disability in Indigenous families and communities, assist access to diagnosis, education and funding, and to provide links to culturally relevant services to enable a better understanding of each other and the roles they play in their child’s wellbeing.

Contact:
Name: Florence Williams
Position: National Indigenous Liaison Officer
Address: 437 Hellawell Road, SUNNYBANK QLD 4109
Telephone: 07 3273 0000
Email: info@eiilo.com.au
Website: www.eiilo.com.au

 

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Heart Foundation

The Heart Foundation is a charity dedicated to fighting the single biggest killer of Australians – heart disease. For over 50 years, we’ve led the battle to save lives and improve the heart health of all Australians. Our sights are set on a world where people don’t suffer or die prematurely because of heart disease. Heart disease is the leading cause of death for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people. The Heart Foundation is a co-signatory to the national Close the Gap campaign and we are committed to improving the life expectancy and quality of life of Indigenous Australians.

Contact:
Name: Daniel James
Position: National Aboriginal Health Unit Manager
Address: Level 12, 500 Collins St, Melbourne
Telephone: 03 9090 2038
Email: daniel.james@heartfoundation.org.au
Website: https://heartfoundation.org.au/

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CATSINaM

The Congress of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Nurses and Midwives (CATSINaM) is the sole representative body for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander nurses and midwives in Australia. CATSINaM’s primary function is to implement strategies to increase the recruitment and retention of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples into nursing and midwifery professions.

NACCHO

NACCHO’s vision is:

Aboriginal people enjoy quality of life through whole-of-community self-determination and individual spiritual, cultural, physical, social and emotional wellbeing. Aboriginal health in Aboriginal hands.

Our members continue to demonstrate that they are the leading provider of culturally appropriate, comprehensive, primary health care to Aboriginal people across the nation, exceeding Government or private providers. The definition of “health” adopted by NACCHO and members is in accordance with that described in the 1989 National Aboriginal Health Strategy.

Aboriginal Health means not just the physical wellbeing of an individual, but refers to the social, emotional and cultural wellbeing of the whole community in which each individual is able to achieve their full potential as a human being, thereby bringing about the total wellbeing of their community. It is a whole of life view and includes the cyclical concept of life-death-life.

Contact:
Name: NACCHO Secretariat
Position: National Aboriginal Health Unit Manager
Address: Level 3, 221 London Circuit, Canberra City ACT 2601
Telephone: 02 6246 9301
Email: Reception@naccho.org.au
Website: www.naccho.org.au

NACCHO Racism and Aboriginal Health #RDA #18C : URGENT: make your submission – don’t let the Racial Discrimination Act be weakened

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Stand up for protections against race hate speech:

Make your submission to the Parliamentary Inquiry into Freedom of Speech

Submissions close 9 December 2016

Use the Templates under the heading “Attachments” at the bottom of this page by clicking on the relevant Attachment template to download the Word document.

Info supplied Australian Lawyers for Human Rights

ALHR has prepared templates (scroll to Attachments at the bottom of this page) to assist organisations and individuals who wish to make a submission to the current Parliamentary inquiry into freedom of speech.

The HRLC is in the process of putting together a submission for the JPCHR inquiry.

In general, the submission will include the following points:

·         Racism is a serious and escalating problem, as demonstrated by recent research, including by the Scanlon Foundation. Racism and racial vilification causes harm to individuals, to groups and society as a whole.

·         The law has an important role to play in addressing the harm caused by racial discrimination and racial vilification. By setting standards of conduct, the laws constrain the spread of racism and racial hatred and encourages people to speak out against racism, complementing broader education strategies.

·         An objective analysis of Part IIA of the RDA shows that the laws are being interpreted sensibly by the courts.
·         The laws generally strike an appropriate balance between the right to freedom of expression and the right to freedom from racial discrimination and vilification.
·         There should be no change to Part IIA of the RDA.
·         The AHRC process provides important access to remedies for victims of racial vilification with most complaints resolved through an accessible mediation process.

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NACCHO has published over 50 articles in the past 4 years like

NACCHO Aboriginal Health and Racism

Parliamentary Joint Committee on Human Rights

On 8 November 2016, pursuant to the section 7(c) of the Human Rights (Parliamentary Scrutiny) Act 2011, the Attorney-General referred various matters to the Parliamentary Joint Committee on Human Rights for inquiry and report which can be summarised as follows:

  • whether the operation of Part IIA of the Racial Discrimination Act 1975 (Cth) (‘RDA’) (including ss 18C and 18D) impose unreasonable restrictions on freedom of speech; and
  • whether the complaints-handling procedures of the Australian Human Rights Commission should be reformed.

ALHR does not support the terms of reference of the Joint Committee Inquiry.  Australians made their support for legislation against racial vilification very clear two years ago in response to the proposed Freedom of Speech (Repeal of s. 18C) Bill 2014 which proposed major changes to section 18C of the RDA.

Moreover, we find the terms of reference extraordinary in that they appear to oppose the proper enforcement of the RDA and thereby appear to seek to undermine the rule of law and the statutory role of the Australian Human Rights Commission.

If you would like to make your individual voice or the voice of your organisation or community heard, but feel you need some drafting assistance, please feel free to use the short form letter or longer form submission templates attached below at the bottom of this page as your starting point.   Click on an Attachment to download the relevant PDF (Terms of Reference) or Word document (templates).

The templates are designed to assist you in addressing the terms of reference and legal issues but we strongly encourage you to add your own concerns, fears and lived experiences to increase the impact of your submission (see Making a Submission).

It is now more important than ever that those who believe in the right of all people to live their lives free from intimidation, discrimination and harassment on the basis of race, make their voices heard.

If you require further assistance please contact vicepresident@alhr.org.au

The closing date for submissions is Friday, 9 December 2016.

Click here for the full terms of reference or find them attached below.

Please send your submissions to the Committee Secretariat by fax, post or email or by uploading to the Inquiry Website (see Inquiry Home Page) to arrive no later than Friday, 9 December 2016:

Committee Secretary,  Parliamentary Joint Committee on Human Rights

PO Box 6100,  Parliament House, Canberra ACT 2600

Phone: 02 6277 3823

Fax: 02 6277 5767

Email: 18Cinquiry@aph.gov.au

You may also find the articles and resources below helpful:

S.18C and 18D of the Racial Discrimination Act 1975

At a glance: Racial vilification under sections 18C and 18D of the Racial Discrimination Act 1975 (Cth)

Examples of other more concerning attacks on freedom of speech in Australia are contained in this Guardian article  Beyond 18C: six barriers to freedom of speech in Australia

Change Section 18C? Critics should do this crash course first

Research reveals what racism can do to a child’s body: Racism can get under the skin and do lifelong damage. BY  UNICEF Australia

DOWNLOADSTEMPLATES

Or Download from here if any technical issues

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