NACCHO Aboriginal Health News: Same disastrous results from same old, same old

feature tile, text "We can't afford to keep doing the same old, same old and achieve the same disastrous results year in, year out." AMSANT CEO - John Paterson, image of make shift outside bed town camp

Same disastrous results from same old, same old

Indigenous people living in remote NT communities want job opportunities and not welfare, Aboriginal advocates say. Participation in education is increasing but employment rates are falling due to a lack of available jobs, Aboriginal Peak Organisations NT says. Residents are living under immense economic stress – often paying three times the price for food and other essentials than in the city. Inadequate housing and poor health outcomes are also a challenge.

“The need for investment in jobs in remote communities remains large and unaddressed,” AMSANT CEO John Paterson told a federal parliamentary committee on Indigenous employment and business earlier this week. “We can’t afford to keep doing the same old, same old and achieve the same disastrous results year in, year out.” Unemployment has become systemic in many communities with an Aboriginal employment rate of 37% across the Territory.

Creating secure meaningful work leads to better outcomes than struggling to make ends meet on welfare payments, Mr Paterson said. “In the larger remote communities in the NT if every job was taken up by the jobseekers in that community, the employment rate would still be half the national average,” he said. APO NT called on the federal government to spend less on improving welfare programs – such as the cashless debit card – and invest in jobs.

To view the article in full click here.

dog sitting out the front of the Amata store, Amata

Front of Amata store, Amata, NT. Image source: The Australian Prevention Partnership Centre website.

Cracks in the ice feedback sought

Researchers from the University of Sydney are seeking feedback on a recently developed Cracks in the Ice resource for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people. They are looking for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people to give their feedback on the resources and website. If you, your mob or community has been impacted by ice, or if you are a health professional in this space, make your voice heard and help make sure this resource meets the needs of the community.

The survey will take approximately 15 to 30 minutes, with participants also having an option of providing further detailed feedback in a telephone interview. All participants will go into the draw to win a voucher valued at $50. To access the survey, please click here.

close up image of ICE pipe in Aboriginal hand

Crystal methamphetamine pipe. Image source: The Sydney Morning Herald.

Alleged attack not just physical

A statement from Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Social Justice Commissioner June Oscar AO: “My heart goes out to the First Nations woman and her daughter who were allegedly  attacked on Saturday by a man displaying white supremacist insignia in Perth. A racially-motivated attack is not only a physical assault, it is an attempt to terrorise people for who they are and an attempt to undermine the shared values that hold our democracy together. The trauma caused by attacks such as that which has been alleged can have acute and long-lasting impacts and I hope that this woman and her daughter are receiving all the support they need to heal and to help them feel safe in their community. It is imperative that urgent and serious attention is given to this issue. The Race Discrimination Commissioner Chin Tan has developed a proposed National Anti-Racism Framework and is in discussion with government about it.

To view the Australian Human Rights Commission media statement click here.

back of man at football with flag in Aboriginal colours, yellow centre with map of Australia & text ' no room for racism'

Image source: The Guardian.

Social distancing impacts those with hearing loss

Damien Howard, a consultant psychologist from Darwin, NT says social distancing can do unintentional harm. The many Aboriginal people with hearing loss often cope by using ‘social amplification’. Having family or friends help them understand what others say. It is especially important when talking to new people about unfamiliar topics. This means that social distancing can have a selective impact on them, if it prevents people using their usual communication support strategies. If communication is too stressful those with hearing loss often use avoidance as a way of coping. Increased avoidance of needed communication engagement will be the outcome if Aboriginal people with hearing loss are prevented from using ‘social amplification’ as a coping strategy.

painting of Aboriginal man & text about by social distancing discriminates

Rural health experts on bush vaccine rollout

Rural and Indigenous health experts are meeting regularly to ensure rural communities continue to be central to the phased rollout of Australia’s COVID-19 vaccine. The Remote Vaccine Working Group will provide advice to the Federal Government and identify issues as the rollout continues towards Phase 1B and beyond. Federal Regional Health Minister, Mark Coulton said the rollout of COVID-19 vaccines to every corner of the country was complex and that was why the Federal Government had a plan and was listening to expert advice from rural health stakeholders. “COVID-19 case numbers in rural and remote areas have been low, but the rollout of the COVID-19 vaccine into regional, rural and remote communities is a vital part of the Government’s vaccine strategy to ensure everyone in Australia is protected,” Minister Coulton said.

To view Minster Coulton’s media release click here.

gloved hands administering vaccine

Image source: ABC News website.

Katherine residents dying prematurely

Professor Glover said the association between a lower median age at death, socioeconomic disadvantage and the proportion of the population who are Indigenous is very strong across the NT, “The gap is widening because whatever policies we’re taking aren’t getting through.” Katherine Indigenous advocate and Gurindji man Kamahi-Djordon King said his own lived experience aligns with Professor Glover’s research. Mr King said these poor health outcomes are an ongoing symptom of colonialism and the gap between First Nation’s people and the rest of the population, and this new research is another reason to push for truth-telling about Australia’s history and Closing the Gap targets to be met by governments.

To view the article in full click here.

Katherine Indigenous advocate & Gurindji man Kamahi-Djordon King in white t-shirt standing in bushland with head height green grasses, armed folded

Katherine Indigenous advocate & Gurindji man Kamahi-Djordon King, Photo by Tom Robinson. Image source: Katherine Times.

AHW helps QLD Close the Gap

Growing up, visiting the doctors made Dani Beezley uncomfortable. The Wulli Wulli and Wakka Wakka woman was raised in the rural town of Theodore in central Queensland. While the 32-year-old has fond memories of visiting her local GP, she remembers sharing uneasy feelings with family when they had to approach others. “I didn’t really feel that comfortable, and I know that my parents didn’t as well,” she said. “I think that might’ve been because there weren’t as many things put in place to make Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people feel safe and comfortable.”

Perhaps, that’s why Ms Beezley’s career path has led her back to helping her community access better health services. Ms Beezley is one of about 150 qualified Aboriginal Health Practitioners in Queensland. The nationally registered professionals usually work in hospitals or dedicated Aboriginal health services, but Ms Beezley works at a private practice. “[We] are there for the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander patients and not a lot even like to go to the doctor at all, and it can be a challenge to get them in,” she said.

To view the ABC News article click here.

AHW Dani Beezley Theodore Medical Centre

Aboriginal Health Worker Dani Beezley. Image source: ABC News website.

Parenting helpline & resources

The Government of South Australia Parenting SA has a helpline and a host of resources for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander families with children 0 to 12. Via the Parenting SA website here you can get advice on baby and child health and parenting. There is a 10 Parent Easy Guides for Aboriginal Parents that cover topics such as: being a dad; raising strong children; children living with grandparents and now you are a parent.

young Aboriginal girl with huge smile looking to the camera, wearing blue aqua purple Aboriginal dot painting polo, two Aboriginal women in the background making baskets from raffia

Image source: Meerilinga Children and Family Centres website.

Homeless teen to PhD in medicine

To describe Lisa Jackson Pulver as an “inspiration” seems overly simplistic, a trite and lacklustre attempt at neatly containing her and her many triumphs to a neat box. Some people cannot be so easily contained – and it is difficult to find one word that truly encapsulates all that she is. So here are a few: Resilient domestic abuse survivor. Ambitious nurse. Social justice warrior. Progressive epidemiologist. Committed professor. Resolute activist.

A Jewish and Wiradjuri Koori woman. In fact, Lisa Jackson Pulver is the first known Aboriginal person to have received a PhD in medicine. And with a Member of the Order of Australia in tow, she holds the position of Deputy Vice-Chancellor, Indigenous Strategy and Services, at the University of Sydney.

To view the full article click here.

portrait of Professor Lisa Jackson Pulver AM, University of Sydney

Professor Lisa Jackson Pulver AM. Image source: The University of Sydney website.

World’s first stroke air ambulance

Australia is set to save lives and lead the way internationally with the latest innovation in stroke treatment and care – a stroke air ambulance. Stroke Foundation is thrilled to be a primary partner in The Stroke Golden Hour research project awarded $40 million under Stage Two of the Frontier Health and Medical Research Initiative. The Stroke Golden Hour project is developing lightweight brain scanners that are more portable, meaning they can be put into ambulances on the roads and in the air. This will allow rapid diagnosis and treatment to those who have a stroke, saving lives and reducing disability.

Stroke Foundation CEO Sharon McGowan said the project had the potential to revolutionise treatment of stroke nationally and internationally. “For too long Australians living in our regional and rural areas have been denied the high-quality stroke treatment provided to their metropolitan based counterparts.Our country’s broad geography will no longer be a barrier to time-critical stroke treatment.”

Currently regional and rural Australians are overrepresented in stroke statistics. More than 27,000 Australians will experience a stroke for the first time this year. Rural and regional Australians are 17% more likely to have a stroke and are more likely to have a poorer outcome due to limited access to stroke specialists, treatments, and care.

For more information and to view a short video about the stoke air ambulance click here.

Wiradjuri woman Charlotte Porter & her husband James & their 4 children standing in front of their home

Parents of four kids, Wiradjuri woman Charlotte Porter and her husband James have each experienced a stroke. Both are advocates for community education on the signs of stroke and the need for urgent care. Image source: Stroke Foundation website.

World Hearing Day – Wednesday 3 March 2021

Ear disease and associated hearing loss are highly prevalent among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children. Poor ear and hearing health is a serious problem, which can profoundly affect a child’s life.

World Hearing Day is held on 3 March each year to raise awareness on how to prevent deafness and hearing loss and promote ear and hearing care across the world. It marks the launch of the first-ever World Report on Hearing, presenting a global call for action to address hearing loss and ear diseases across the life course. The theme in 2021 is Hearing Care for ALL! Screen, Rehabilitate, Communicate

World Hearing Day coincides with Hearing Awareness Week in Australia (1 to 7 March).

For further information click here.

close up photo of an Aboriginal man's ear

Image source: Ear infections plague 9 in 10 kids article, Katherine Times.