NACCHO Aboriginal Health News: Whole-of-society mental health solutions needed

Whole-of-society mental health solutions needed

Australian Association of Social Workers (AASW) National President, Ms Christine Craik hopes World Mental Health Week (10–17 October) will highlight mental health solutions that go beyond short-term, crisis-oriented responses and encompass a whole of society approach to factors affecting mental health. “The COVID-19 crisis, along with the current recession, have underscored the importance and value of healthy communities which prevent ill-health and promote mental health and accessible early intervention services. We have an opportunity to re-build our mental health system by broadening our approach and addressing the social determinants of health. The pandemic has led to job losses, insecurity of income and housing and social restrictions. Many of us are trying to work from home at the same time as we care for children or family members whose formal care has been interrupted.”

To view the AASW media release click here.

New model to boost rural general practice

A new model, launched this week in Wagga Wagga, will give junior doctors, interested in working in rural general practice in the Murrumbidgee region, the experience, exposure and qualifications they need to become rural generalist doctors – GPs with additional skills such as obstetrics or emergency medicine. Federal Regional Health Minister, Martin Coultin said “This new locally-driven model is an important step in our commitment to delivering better healthcare for rural communities and ensuring rural practice is more appealing for doctors.”

The Murrumbidgee Model will see up to 20 new doctors trained over four years in the region, with sites including Cootamundra, Young, Deniliquin, Temora, Narrandera, Gundagai and an Aboriginal Medical Service in Wagga Wagga. The model will be evaluated, to assist the Government to roll out the National Rural Generalist Pathway and approaches that work to support Australians living in other rural, regional and remote areas.

To view the related media release click here.

country unsealed road

Image source: Australian Medical Association.

Critical kidney disease data to inform policy

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people have thrived in the traditional lands known as Australia for millennia, however, in the last 50 years, kidney disease has increased dramatically, and today, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people have a high need for health care for advanced chronic kidney disease. In parallel, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people have had limited opportunity to guide priorities in the health care system to improve kidney health.

Torres Strait Islander woman, Associate Professor Jaqui Hughes from the Menzies School of Health Research is leading a cohort study which will describe the long-term changes in kidney function of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people over 10 years and provide critical data to inform regional and national policy on identification and care of people with kidney disease. 

To view the full article on the research click here.

Associate Professor Jaqui Hughes standing at a lecturn

Associate Professor Jaqui Hughes, Menzies School of Health Research. Image source: NHMRC website.

Feet health important for overall health

The NT has exceptionally high rates of diabetes and, subsequently, diabetes-related foot disease with Aboriginal people are 4–6 times more likely to be admitted to hospital for a diabetes-related foot wound or complication than non-Aboriginal people. During Foot Health Week (12–18 October) Top End Health Service’s High Risk Foot Service Senior Podiatrist Sally Lamond said feet were often the first place to show diabetes-related symptoms. “It’s important to pay attention to any changes in your feet because a major symptom of diabetes is damage to the nerves in your feet,” she said. “The damaged nerve function is called neuropathy, and about half of all people with diabetes have some form of nerve damage.”

To view the NT Government’s Foot Health Week media release click here.

allied health professional treating patient's feet

Image source: CheckUP Australia website.

Forgotten after leaving out-of-home care

There are currently about 18,000 Indigenous children across Australia who are living in statutory out-of-home care (OOHC), having been removed from their families. This is one-third of Australian children in care, or 11 times the rate of non-Indigenous children in care. The trauma of removal is carried by the child, their family and community for life, and is often passed on knowingly or unknowingly to the next generation. Trauma and separation affect the development of the child, their feelings of self-worth and belonging, their sense of identity, and lifelong connections with family, community, culture and Country.

The first national study to explore what happens to Indigenous children removed from care, once they turn 18, was conducted by Monash University, in partnership with SNAICC, the peak body for Indigenous children and families. If, as a country, we’re serious about “closing the gap” and supporting healthy Indigenous communities, we need to recognise the significant issue of ongoing intergenerational trauma that’s created through the removal of Indigenous children into predominantly white service systems that fail to respond and care for them appropriately.

For further information about the study click here.

6 Aboriginal children walking across a foot bridge in rural Australia

Image source: Monash University website.

Opportunity for pharmacists to do more

One in five Australians are affected by mental illness annually with many more impacted by the recent bushfire crisis and current COVID-19 pandemic. During World Mental Health Week (10–17 October) the Pharmaceutical Society of Australia (PSA) is taking stock to recognise the important relationship between a person affected by mental illness, their pharmacist and health care team. Acting PSA President Michelle Lynch acknowledged the Government’s $5.7 billion investment into mental health during this week’s budget, which paves the way for pharmacists to play a greater role in the delivery of mental health care in Australia. “A majority of Australians visit their pharmacist around 14 times a year and as trusted and accessible health professionals pharmacists often come in contact with patients suffering mental ill-health,” she said.

To view the Pharmaceutical Society of Australia’s media release click here.

Pharmacist talking over counter to customer

Image source: AJP website.

NT health student award nominations open

Nominations are open for outstanding health students as part of the NT Aboriginal and Torres Strati Islander Health Worker and Practitioner Excellence Awards. The awards are an opportunity to recognise and acknowledge students who are currently studying qualifications from the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Primary Health Care training package and the significant contribution they make to their families, communities and the NT healthcare system.

To view details about the award categories and the nomination process click here.

5 Mala'la Health Service AC staff

Image source: HK Training and Consultancy website.

Poverty, housing and health links webinar

Secure and affordable housing is critical to overcoming many of the economic, social and chronic disease challenges facing rural and remote Australians, particularly chronic diseases closely related to housing such as rheumatic heart disease. People in rural and remote Australia have lower incomes, lower net household worth, higher instances of risk factors for poor health, higher levels of chronic disease, accidents and injury, and reduced life expectancy.

Two-thirds of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians live outside major cities. A critical factor in improving health outcomes for Indigenous Australians is the provision and maintenance of appropriate housing. As part of Anti-Poverty Week National Rural Health Alliance is hosting a webinar on 12.30–1.30 pm (AEDT) Thursday 15 October 2020. To register click here.anti-poverty week webinar banner

Free wellbeing webinars

The Black Dog Institute under the national eMHPrac program are preparing two webinars and an associated podcast on supporting Indigenous wellbeing through digital resources. The focus of the webinars will be to hear a range of panelists’ yarn about how healthcare workers can use digital wellbeing tools to help keep our mob strong in mind, body and culture. The webinars will showcase the WellMob website launched in July this year by the Australian Indigenous HealthInfoNet.

WEBINAR 1: Supporting Indigenous wellbeing through digital resources: an introduction for clinicians

  • Who’s it for? GPs & allied health practitioners 
  • Times & Date: 1.00 pm and 8.00 pm Thursday 22 October
  • What’s it about: a webinar that shares tips on using digital wellbeing resources with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people
  • Register at: click here

WEBINAR 2: Supporting Indigenous wellbeing through digital resources: an introduction for frontline wellbeing workers

  • Who’s it for: frontline wellbeing & community workers
  • Time & Date: 1.00 pm Thursday 29 October
  • What’s it about: a webinar yarning about digital wellbeing resources for our mob and tips to use them with your clients and community
  • Register at: click here

QLD – Innisfail – Mamu Health Service Limited

Chief Financial Officer  Advertisement , Position Description, General Employment Information

Clinic ManagerAdvertisement,  Position Description, General Employment Information

Public Health NurseAdvertisement, Position Description, General Employment Information

Mamu Health Service Limited, an Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation owned and managed by Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people to provide culturally appropriate and comprehensive primary health care for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people and communities of Innisfail, Tully, Ravenshoe, Mt Garnet and Babinda, has vacancies for a Chief Financial Officer, a Clinic Manager and a Public Health Nurse.

To view the advertisement, position description and general employment information for each vacancy, click on the links above.

Applications for all positions close Friday 20 October 2020.

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