NACCHO Aboriginal Health News: First Nations peoples’ COVID-19 response among the best in the world

feature tile First First Nations peoples' response among best in the world & image of Aboriginal man wearing face mask with Aboriginal flag

First Nations Peoples’ COVID-19 response among best

In a recent interview, Australia’s most respected paediatric epidemiologist, Professor Fiona Stanley, said that although Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people are the highest-risk people in our community, they have done exceptionally well in response to the COVID-19 pandemic. According to Professor Stanley this is because “Indigenous people took control. They lobbied the government to close remote communities, get personal protective equipment and get tested. They took their vulnerable, old Indigenous people off the streets and put them in good housing. They’re doing better than almost any population worldwide.”

To read a transcript of the full interview click here.

image of Aboriginal man wearing face mask with Aboriginal flag

Image source: NITV website.

First permanent LOV eye clinic in Kimberley

$4.7 million has been allocated towards the first permanent Lions Outback Vision (LOV) eye clinic in the Kimberley. This clinic, to be located in Broome, with outreach services to Derby, Fitzroy Crossing, Halls Creek, Kununurra, Wyndham and Warmun, will enable residents across the Kimberley to receive treatment and prevention services for serious eye diseases on country and close to home.

To read the related media release click here.

Lions Outback Image bus with door open & health professional checking someone's eyes

Image source: National Rural Health Alliance.

Aquarobics classes get results

row of Aboriginal women in a pool holding on to the side

Image source: Great Lakes Advocate.

Six month extension for COVID-19 health measures

Millions of Australians will continue to receive medical care and support in their own homes with the Commonwealth Government investing more than $2 billion to extend a range of COVID-19 health measures for a further six months, to 31 March 2021. Medicare-subsidised telehealth and pathology services, GP-led respiratory clinics, home medicines delivery, public and private hospital services will all be extended, as well as further investments in PPE. These health initiatives play a major role in detecting, preventing and treating COVID-19.

To view the media release regarding this funding click here.

health worker in mask, covid cell image superimposed

Image source: Hospital Management.

COVID-19 double standard for the Barkly

Anyinginyi Health Service has expressed concern and frustration at the granting of an exemption from compulsory supervised quarantine for workers from Melbourne brought to Tennant Creek to work outside the town. Anyinginyi General Manager, Barb Shaw, said “This breaches the NT Government’s own policy to not allow exemptions from compulsory quarantine for people coming from a hot spot” and “the government must urgently explain its decision and immediately work with the Aboriginal community, including Anyinginyi Health Service, to ensure the safety of our community”.

To view the Anyinginyi Health Service’s media release click here and click here to view a supporting media release from the Aboriginal Medical Services Alliance NT.text quote from Pat Turner 'I can't be any blunter...if COVID-19 gets into our communities, we are gone

WA grants for projects with COVID-19 focus

The first program to be funded under WA’s Future Health Research and Innovation (FHRI) Fund is now open and calling for projects with a COVID-19 focus. The FHRI Focus Grants: COVID-19 Program will initially provide up to $4 million for research and innovation that helps promote the health and wellbeing of Western Australians. The program is designed to fund research and innovation that addresses health and wellbeing challenges relevant to the COVID emergency. This could include projects related to infection prevention and control, surveillance, diagnostics and therapeutics as well as the direct or indirect impact of COVID-19 across a range of health conditions. Grants will be made available across three streams of funding – research, innovation and infrastructure.

To view the related media release click here.

COVID-109 virus cell

Image source: Medical Xpress.

Gynaecological cancer award nominations open

The rate of gynaecological cancers among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women is shocking. In the case of cervical cancer for example Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women are 2.5 times more likely to be diagnosed with, and 3.8 times more likely to die than non-Indigenous women.

Do you know someone who has made an exceptional contribution to improving the outcomes for women affected by gynaecological cancers?

You have only one week left to make a nomination for the 2021 Jeannie Ferris Cancer Australia Recognition Award.

Applications close at 5.00 pm (AEST) Wednesday 30 September 2020.

To view further details about the award and how to nominate someone click here.

Waminda senior regional manager Krissy Falzon at desk looking at her computer

Krissy Falzon, South Coast Womens Health & Welfare Aboriginal Corporation. Image source: South Coast Register.

Simon Says Ear Health Volume 2

Volume two of AHCWA’s Simon Says series has been released. The latest resources allow you to read along with Simon and his friends to learn about the flu and how you can keep yourself and your community safe. Physical copies are  available and you are welcome to print copies as you need them.

To view volume two of the Simon Says series click here.

cartoon of Aboriginal man with family standing behind him punching giant green flu virus

Image source: AHCWA Simon Says Volume 2.

Mental health wellbeing trial using horses

A group of Broome-based Indigenous health workers are helping develop a mental wellbeing trial that uses horses to help people to express themselves openly. Known as Yawardani Jan-ga — or horses helping — the trial capitalises on the ties between Aboriginal people and horses and rodeo culture in the Kimberley to enhance the social and emotional wellbeing of youngsters while building leadership skills. It is an adapted form of the global Equine Assisted Learning model, which uses horses to build emotional skills and personal development, and will be rolled out in the region.

To read The West Australian article about the trial click here.

young Aboriginal girl on horse & Aboriginal man trainer

Image source: ABC News.

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