NACCHO Aboriginal #MentalHealth #Telehealth #CoronaVirus News Alert No 38 : With COVID 19 increasing our need for #telehealth , phone and video communications , how can you get the best communication outcomes. Plus @AipaAust

 ” COVID 19 has meant a huge increase in phone and video communications to replace face to face conversations not possible because of social distancing. 

Few providing essential health, education, welfare and other services have been trained in how to conduct this kind of communication.

This presentation describes how to get the best communication outcomes from phone conversations. “

Dr Damien Howard , Ms Jodey Barney and Ann Carmody 

Download the Presentation HERE or

Brief-outline-of-Phone-communication-strategies-4

“Telephone counselling lines and online counselling services are now available, which will increase awareness, and encourage help seeking by improving reach and access to professional practitioners.

However, the cultural capabilities of practitioners and culturally safe standards of service provision are critical to ensure therapeutic support delivered to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people is culturally appropriate to support healing.

These measures are to ensure clients are supported and not re-traumatised.”

Australian Indigenous Psychologists Association  ( AIPA )  Chair, Tania Dalton (Jones) see part 2 below

Part 1 : These strategies will make phone service provision better for most. However, they are especially important for certain groups who’re likely to have particular difficulties with phone conversations

These include;

• Those listening to an unfamiliar language

• Older people with age related hearing loss or auditory processing problems

• People from disadvantaged minorities who have experienced childhood ear disease

• Those who experience anxiety which can influence capacity to take in information

• Many who use counseling services who have a history of childhood ear disease and/or auditory processing problems

• Youth who have been involved with police who have found to have a high incidence of auditory processing problems

• Children and adults with attention problems which will influence their taking in information

• Children in care or that have had child protection reports made about them who have been found to have a high incidence of hearing loss and/or auditory processing problems

Part 2 : Australian Indigenous Psychologists Association (AIPA) welcomes the Government’s pledge to support mental health during COVID – 19. 

The commitment, totalling $74 million, will support mental health services during the COVID – 19 pandemic.  “We warmly welcome this commitment and thank the Australian Government for recognising the mental health needs of all Australians during these challenging times,” states AIPA founding Director Professor Pat Dudgeon.

With Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples more vulnerable to the impacts of COVID – 19, AIPA are conscious that this additional funding is not only necessary, but crucial in ensuring access to culturally safe supports for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities.

There are those in the AIPA membership who are providing psychological care to people impacted by COVID -19, ranging from working with frontline essential workers to families, and persons who have experienced family violence.

Professor Pat Dudgeon mentions, “Professionals who are working in mental health who are supporting Aboriginal people must be working within the framework of cultural safety.  Also, psychologists must have experience in working with people and families from culturally diverse backgrounds.”

AIPA Chair, Tania Dalton (Jones) says “Telephone counselling lines and online counselling services are now available, which will increase awareness, and encourage help seeking by improving reach and access to professional practitioners.

However, the cultural capabilities of practitioners and culturally safe standards of service provision are critical to ensure therapeutic support delivered to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people is culturally appropriate to support healing. These measures are to ensure clients are supported and not re-traumatised.”

Mental health services must understand the cultural context for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people if they are to deliver the best possible outcomes.

As the national body representing Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander psychologists, AIPA must have a seat at the table to ensure that mental health supports reflect the needs for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.

See how NACCHO protects our mob Corona Virus Home Page

Read all 38 NACCHO Aboriginal Health and Coronas Virus Alerts HERE

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