National #NACCHOYouth19 Conference and Members’ Conference #NACCHOAgm2019 :Because of Them, We Must! Improving health outcomes for 0-to-29-year-olds

For thousands of years, our Elders have shown great resolve thriving on this vast continent and the youth delegates who attended the conference have instilled confidence in us for the continuation of this into the future.

The NACCHO Youth and Members Conference included engaging workshops and enlightening presentations from our members – the Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisations (ACCHOs), clinicians, academicians, medical experts and Aboriginal Health Practitioners.”

NACCHO has been commissioned by the Department of Health to produce a ‘Core Services and Outcomes Framework’ by May 2020.

An important project for our sector that will bring together a comprehensive set of core primary health care functions that apply to our services in remote, regional and metropolitan Australia “

NACCHO Acting Chair, Donnella Mills photo 2 above with Minister Greg Hunt  : Photo 1 above Darwin Larrakia-Belyen dancers for the welcome to country

“The biggest thing that we’re all getting from it is that even though they’re really doing some good things in their space, they can actually do more,

More that’s going to not only benefit their communities, but also make things a little bit easier on themselves. I think that’s what these events are all about – being able to come together and share what we’re doing and what we can all gain from it.”

Preston Campbell told NITV  see Part 2

More than 400 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people; youth, health service workers and policy makers gathered at the Darwin Convention Centre from 4 – 7 November to discuss initiatives to improve health outcomes of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people aged 0-to-29-year-old.

Delegates included Professor Tom Calma , Dr Mark Wenitong from Apunipima ACCHO Cape York and James Ward SAHMRI

The National Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation’s (NACCHO) annual Members’ Conference kicked off with the Youth Conference, attended by 60 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander emerging leaders from the health sector.

The delegates were inspired by a range of speakers in the areas of self-determination, mental health and wellbeing, resilience, and social media. They engaged in discussions around raising the voices of the youth, undertaking genuine leadership roles and getting a seat at the table in decision making and policy development.

Safe-sex superheroes Condoman and Lubelicious – part of the successful sexual health community education and engagement campaign by Queensland Aids Council with our deadly youth delegates.

The NACCHO Youth Conference set the tone for the Members’ Conference with 40 outstanding speakers and panellists.

Some of the key highlights included:

The Government in partnership with NACCHO and the Australian Medical Association (AMA) has developed a revised funding model for ACCHOs, investing an additional $90 million over three years under the Indigenous Australians’ Health Programme (IAHP). NACCHO welcomes this new funding that will further support the delivery of culturally appropriate, comprehensive primary healthcare.

See full Minister Greg Hunt Press Release HERE

Presentation by Dr Kelvin Kong, an Aboriginal ear, nose and throat (ENT) specialist with great insight around his research on ear issues affecting up to 70% of children in remote communities.

Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) between NACCHO and the Royal Australian College of GPs (RACGP) to a five-year program to champion community control and self-determination; improving cultural competency, eliminating racism in the healthcare system and further developing an Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health workforce.

CEO of NACCHO, Ms Pat Turner AM and Co-Chair of the END RHD alliance along with Professor Jonathan Carapetis AM, presented a sneak peek into the soon-to-be launched RHD Endgame Strategy aimed at eliminating rheumatic heart disease (RHD) in Australia by 2031.

They were accompanied by Raychelle and Noeletta McKenzie, who shared their personal experiences of RHD and their work to empower communities as part of RHDAustralia’s Champions4change program.

Hey you mob?! Did you hear that SA took out the Karaoke cup last night – back in its rightful home

Part 2 First Nations youth are at the forefront of this year’s National Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation (NACCHO) Conference

A stellar line-up of inspiring young speakers has focused on mental health at the 2019 National Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation (NACCHO) Youth Conference in Darwin this week.

Themed as ‘healthy youth, healthy future’, about 100 young people from across the country gathered on balmy Larrakia country on Monday to discuss issues important to each of their communities over the next three days.

See Full Report HERE 

Notable speakers included mental health youth worker Brooke Blurton (pictured above with NACCHO Staff Oliver Tye Left and Brendan Dunn Right ) and former NRL champion and mental health advocate Preston Campbell, who shared his own experiences with the young delegates.

“The biggest thing that we’re all getting from it is that even though they’re really doing some good things in their space, they can actually do more,” Mr Campbell told NITV News.

 

“More that’s going to not only benefit their communities, but also make things a little bit easier on themselves. I think that’s what these events are all about – being able to come together and share what we’re doing and what we can all gain from it.”

The attendees are now able to take home the skills, knowledge and inspiration of their peers to their communities to grow themselves and continue their important work

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