NACCHO Aboriginal Health Conferences and Events #Saveadate : This week @ShelleyWare #WomensHealthWeek @strokefdn and @QAIHC_QLD in partnership #strokeweek2019 Plus @SNAICC #SNAICC2019

Upcoming feature NACCHO SAVE A DATE events

This week

2 to 8 September 2019 National Stroke Week 

2 -8 September Women’s Health Week

2- 5 September 2019 SNAICC Conference

Next week

12 September R U OK Day

12 September 2019 QAIHC YOUTH HEALTH SUMMIT

15-19 September 50 year of PHAA Annual Conference Adelaide 17 – 19 September #AustPH2019

23 -25 September IAHA Conference Darwin

24 -26 September 2019 CATSINaM National Professional Development Conference

2- 4 October  AIDA Conference 2019

9-10 October 2019 NATSIHWA 10 Year Anniversary Conference

16 October Melbourne Uni: Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health and Wellbeing Conference

4 November NACCHO Youth Conference -Darwin NT

5 – 7 November NACCHO Conference and AGM  -Darwin NT

5-8 November The Lime Network Conference New Zealand

2 -8 September Women’s Health Week

 ” My family’s wellbeing is so important to me and, as an Indigenous woman, I am equally passionate about tackling the appalling health and life expectancy statistics of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people. As an ambassador for Jean Hailes and Women’s Health Week, I feel I can be part of the solution by encouraging Indigenous women to take the time to put their health first.

You can put your health first too by being part of this year’s Women’s Health Week  It’s fun and free.” 

Shelley Ware Womens Health Week Ambassador : Note Shelley shared the above from the AFL Footy Record 

Read over 350 Aboriginal Womens Health articles published by NACCHO over the past 7 years

Five years ago I was delighted to become one of the first ambassadors for Jean Hailes’ Women’s Health Week. I am still so proud to be involved, helping to promote the importance of good health.

Growing up, sport was a natural part of our family life.  I played netball, participated in little athletics, swimming – even touch footy.  My Dad was a professional runner and Mum played netball too so if we weren’t at sport, we were watching our parents play.

My childhood was pretty idyllic until the awful day when my beloved Dad suffered a heart attack and passed away at the age of 51.  A few years later, Mum was diagnosed with breast cancer at age 50 following a routine mammogram.  Thankfully she beat it and is still doing well today.

I have a lot to watch out for in my yearly health checks, so it’s important I stay fit and healthy.

I have suffered from endometriosis, which, as well as being extremely painful, made conceiving my beautiful son Taj that much harder for my husband Steven and I.

My family’s wellbeing is so important to me and, as an Indigenous woman, I am equally passionate about tackling the appalling health and life expectancy statistics of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people. As an ambassador for Jean Hailes and Women’s Health Week, I feel I can be part of the solution by encouraging Indigenous women to take the time to put their health first.

You can put your health first too by being part of this year’s Women’s Health Week

. It’s fun and free. Please sign up!

Follow @JeanHailes 

2. Welcome to the HealthInfoNet health topic on women.

This section provides information about Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women’s health and women’s business. Some of the content contained in this section is regarded as sensitive and private to Aboriginal and Torres Strait women. Information includes: cultural perspectives and practices, reproductive health, pregnancy, birth and midwifery, mothers and babies, and women’s cancers.

CHECK out WEBSITE 

2 to 8 September 2019 National Stroke Week 

Stroke Week is an annual opportunity to raise awareness of stroke and the Stroke Foundation in Australia. The theme for 2019 is F.A.S.T heroes, recognising the people who spotted the signs of stroke and called an ambulance straight away, potentially saving a life.

Read over 100 Aboriginal Health and Stroke articles published by NACCHO over past 7 years

The Stroke Foundation and the Queensland Aboriginal and Islander Health Council are working together to create a new information resource.

The new resource will be based on My Stroke Journey and will be delivered by hospital health professionals to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander stroke survivors and their families. It will also be available for Aboriginal health workers in the community to use.

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people are 1.5 times as likely to die from stroke as non-Indigenous Australians. They are younger too: their median age is 58 compared to 75 for non-Indigenous Australians. They also have poorer access to in-patient rehabilitation, secondary prevention to reduce risk of further stroke and community support to aid long-term recovery.

Focus groups have been held in Cairns, Rockhampton, Toowoomba and Townsville. Speaking with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander survivors, family members and health workers, we found:

1. My Stroke Journey is seen a good resource but the content could be clearer and simpler.
2. We need to include more photos and stories from Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people as well as using culturally appropriate activity examples and Indigenous art and design.
3. Work and finances (dealing with employers and  Centrelink) is a significant issue and needs more focus.
4. We need to have a marketing strategy to ensure it reaches people – engaging  hospital Aboriginal Liaison Officers and promote connection to Aboriginal health services.

The new resource will be available later this year. After that we hope to secure funding to take the new resource to Aboriginal health organisations in other states to continue our engagement, in line with our national mission.

See Website for more info

I discovered powerlifting after my stroke

By Charlotte Porter

Sometimes life takes an unexpected twist and nothing could be truer than that for me.

In the lead up to Christmas last year, I was busy juggling a family and two jobs. Like many mums at that time of year, there was a lot to do and not enough hours in the day.

I woke up one morning with a really bad headache. I’ve had my fair share of headaches in recent years after having a pituitary gland tumour, but this one was intense. I remember telling my husband about it, but I couldn’t afford to take the day off work, so I pushed myself to get dressed and get out the door.

I work in disability services and spent the morning with two separate clients. When my shift finished at 12.30pm, I sat in my car and couldn’t move. After a few minutes, I somehow managed to drive to our local Aboriginal Medical Service where, thankfully, I got to see the doctor straight away.

I recall the doctor saying hello and asking me to come in her office, but I couldn’t lift myself out of my seat. The doctor walked towards me and asked if I was okay

“No, I can’t move. I’m so sorry. I feel awful and I have a huge headache,” I replied.

The doctor asked me to lift my arm, but I couldn’t and the left side of my face was slightly droopy. She told me I needed to get to hospital immediately.

I live in country New South Wales. I went to my local hospital, but I was rushed to a larger one within half an hour of arrival.

A brain scan showed a small aneurism in the back of my head, which had a leak. It was too small to be clamped, so I was given a drug to reduce the pressure in my head.

Two days later, I was discharged.

This is when my major challenges began – I lost all of my strength in my arm. I was slightly overweight, so had to change my diet. I had to let go of my stress and I was tired.

I had 16 weeks of bed rest before starting light gym work and physio.

At the beginning I struggled. I had to learn how to do everyday tasks again like holding a spoon and fork and lifting my arm. I didn’t want to be a burden on my family.

There were lots of tears, but there were plenty of laughs and accomplishments as well. Some days I was so lethargic, but others I felt good enough to go to the gym. I learnt to read my body much better.

I wanted to be a good role model for my children, so I set goals every day. At one stage it was to walk to the toilet by myself now it’s to deadlift 200 kilograms (equivalent to two fridges!) by the end of the year!

This brings me to powerlifting. I made a huge effort to go to the gym regularly to work on my fitness, coordination and strength. I kept pushing through the pain to regain the capacity in my arm. My doctor said I was bouncing back quicker than expected.

I always knew I was a strong person, but then I discovered powerlifting by chance on social media. I started following the account of a woman with mad skills and I was inspired. With the help of a personal trainer, I tried it myself and LOVED it!

Now, I train up to five times a week.

Together with my family, powerlifting has given me something positive to focus on after my stroke.

I am 32 and there is no looking back

The Stroke Foundation recommends the F.A.S.T. test as an easy way to remember the most common signs of stroke.

Using the F.A.S.T. test involves asking these simple questions:

Face Check their face. Has their mouth drooped?

Arms Can they lift both arms?

Speech Is their speech slurred? Do they understand you?

Time Is critical. If you see any of these signs call 000 straight away.

Think F.A.S.T., act FAST

A stroke is always a medical emergency. The longer a stroke remains untreated, the greater the chance of stroke-related brain damage.

Emergency medical treatment soon after symptoms begin improves the chance of survival and successful rehabilitation.

Facial weakness, arm weakness and difficulty with speech are the most common symptoms or signs of stroke, but they are not the only signs.

Other signs of stroke

The following signs of stroke may occur alone or in combination:

  • Weakness or numbness or paralysis of the face, arm or leg on either or both sides of the body
  • Difficulty speaking or understanding
  • Dizziness, loss of balance or an unexplained fall
  • Loss of vision, sudden blurring or decreased vision in one or both eyes
  • Headache, usually severe and abrupt onset or unexplained change in the pattern of headaches
  • Difficulty swallowing

Sometimes the signs disappear within a short time, such as a few minutes. When this happens, it may be a transient ischaemic attack (TIA).

If you or someone else experiences the signs of stroke, no matter how long they last, call 000 immediately.

2- 5 September 2019 SNAICC Conference

Preliminary program and registration information available to download now!

We are thrilled to have Dusty Feet Mob performing on Day 2 of the 8th SNAICC National Conference, 2-5 Sept. 2019

Visit  for more information.

12 September R U Ok Day

 

Regardless of where we live, or who our mob is, we can all go through tough times. Times when we don’t feel great about our lives or ourselves. That’s why it’s important to always be looking out for each other. Together, we’re stronger right?’

Download the full kit

Ask the question – R U OK?

If someone you know – a family member, someone from your community, a friend, neighbour or workmate – is doing it tough, they won’t always tell you. Sometimes it’s up to us to trust our gut instinct and ask someone who may be struggling, R U OK? By asking and listening, we can help those we care about feel more supported and connected, which can help stop them from feeling worse over time.

Help to start the conversation.

The Conversation Guide contains lots of valuable information on how to go about asking R U OK? as well as the importance of listening with an open mind, encouraging action, and checking in. Posters are available too, to put up in your workplace, school or community group as a reminder to ask people, R U OK?

Don’t forget! R U OK?Day – 12 September 2019

It’s important to ask the question every day. We need to trust the signs and your instinct if you feel someone might be struggling. R U OK?Day is a national reminder, to reach our to your mob. Learn more about the signs to watch our for that something might be up

A conversation can change a life. 

Watch these videos to hear personal stories from mob across the country, talking about how being asked R U OK? helped them through a tough time. Use the links below to view and share these stories with your friends and community.

Connect on social media #RUOKStrongerTogetherMake sure your mob know that they can talk to you if they need to. Share your support by posting our social media graphics on you social networks. These graphics promote the importance of checking in with people and asking R U OK? Sometimes we all need a reminder.

We’ve developed a range of resources to help you start the conversation.

Download the Digital Kit – link this to Stronger Together page , or you can order printed copies at merchandise@ruok.org.au

15-19 September 50 year of PHAA Annual Conference Adelaide 17 – 19 September 

The Australian Public Health Conference (formally the PHAA Annual Conference) is a national conference held by the Public Health Association of Australia (PHAA) which presents a national and multi-disciplinary perspective on public health issues. PHAA members and non-members are encouraged to contribute to discussions on the broad range of public health issues and challenges, and exchange ideas, knowledge and information on the latest developments in public health.

Through development of public health policies, advocacy, research and training, PHAA seeks better health outcomes for Australian’s and the Conference acts as a pathway for public health professionals to connect and share new and innovative ideas that can be applied to local settings and systems to help create and improve health systems for local communities.

In 2019 the Conference theme will be ‘Celebrating 50 years, poised to meet the challenges of the next 50’. The theme has been established to acknowledge and reflect on the many challenges and success that public health has faced over the last 50 years, as well as acknowledging and celebrating 50 years of PHAA, with the first official gathering of PHAA being held in Adelaide in 1969.

Conference Website 

12 September 2019 QAIHC YOUTH HEALTH SUMMIT

Expressions of interest closing soon!

Calm minds, Strong bodies, Resilient spirit

Are you an Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander aged between 18 and 25 who is passionate about improving the health of your community?

Join us at the 2019 QAIHC Youth Health Summit in Brisbane on 12 September 2019. We want to hear from you about what is needed to help Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander young people in your community thrive.

The Summit will be a powerful day of sharing and learning, and will cover a range of topics including:

  • Exercise
  • Healthy relationships
  • Support networks
  • Mental health
  • Nutrition
  • Sexual health
  • LGBTQI needs
  • Chronic disease.

All sessions will be facilitated in an environment of cultural safety to promote honest and free discussions between everyone in attendance.

This Summit will help us shape QAIHC’s Youth Health Strategy 2019-2022 which will support Queensland’s Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Community Controlled Health Organisations.

Website 

ATTEND

Express an interest in attending the Youth Health Summit

23 -25 September IAHA Conference Darwin

24 September

A night of celebrating excellence and action – the Gala Dinner is the premier national networking event in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander allied health.

The purpose of the IAHA National Indigenous Allied Health Awards is to recognise the contribution of IAHA members to their profession and/or improving the health and wellbeing of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples.

The IAHA National Indigenous Allied Health Awards showcase the outstanding achievements in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander allied health and provides identifiable allied health role models to inspire all Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people to consider and pursue a career in allied health.

The awards this year will be known as “10 for 10” to honour the 10 Year Anniversary of IAHA. We will be announcing 4 new awards in addition to the 6 existing below.

Read about the categories HERE.

24 -26 September 2019 CATSINaM National Professional Development Conference

 

 

The 2019 CATSINaM National Professional Development Conference will be held in Sydney, 24th – 26th September 2019. Make sure you save the dates in your calendar.

Further information to follow soon.

Date: Tuesday the 24th to Thursday the 26th September 2019

Location: Sydney, Australia

Organiser: Chloe Peters

Phone: 02 6262 5761

Email: admin@catsinam.org.au

2- 4 October  AIDA Conference 2019

Print

Location:             Darwin Convention Centre, Darwin NT
Theme:                 Disruptive Innovations in Healthcare
Register:              Register Here
Web:                     www.aida.org.au/conference
Enquiries:           conference@aida.org.au

The AIDA 2019 Conference is a forum to share and build on knowledge that increasingly disrupts existing practice and policy to raise the standards of health care.

People with a passion for health care equity are invited to share their knowledges and expertise about how they have participated in or enabled a ‘disruptive innovation to achieve culturally safe and responsive practice or policy for Indigenous communities.

The 23rd annual AIDA Conference provides a platform for networking, mentoring, member engagement and the opportunity to celebrate the achievements of AIDA’S Indigenous doctor and students.

9-10 October 2019 NATSIHWA 10 Year Anniversary Conference

 

2019 Marks 10 years since the formation of NATSIHWA and registrations are now open!!!

During the 9 – 10 October 2019 NATSIHWA 10 Year Anniversary Conference will be celebrated at the Convention Centre in Alice Springs

Bursaries available for our Full Members

Not a member?!

Register here today to become a Full Member to gain all NATSIHWA Full Member benefits

Come and celebrate NATSIHWA’s 10 year Anniversary National Conference ‘A Decade of Footprints, Driving Recognition’ which is being held in Alice Springs. We aim to offer an insight into the Past, Present and Future of NATSIHWA and the overall importance of strengthening the primary health care sector’s unique workforce of Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander Health Workers and Health Practitioners throughout Australia.

During the 9-10 October 2019 delegates will be exposed to networking opportunities whilst immersing themselves with a combination of traditional and practical conference style delivery.

Our intention is to engage Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander Health Workers and Health Practitioners in the history and knowledge exchange of the past, todays evidence based best practice programs/services available and envisioning what the future has to offer for all Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander Health Workers and Health Practitioners.

Watch this space for the guest speaker line up, draft agenda and award nominations

15-17 October IUIH System of Care Conference

15 October IUIH 10 year anniversary

Building on the success of last year’s inaugural conference, the 2019 System of Care Conference will be focusing on further exploring and sharing the systems and processes that deliver this life changing way of looking at life-long health care for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders.

This year IUIH delivers 10 years of experience in improving health outcomes for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people with proven methods for closing the gap and impacting on the social determinants of health.

The IUIH System of Care is evidence-based and nationally recognised for delivering outcomes, and the conference will share the research behind the development and implementation of this system, with presentations by speakers across a range of specialisations including clinic set up, clinical governance, systems integration, wrap around services such as allied and social health, workforce development and research evidence.

If you are working in:

  • Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Community Controlled health services
  • Primary Health Networks
  • Health and Hospital Boards and Management
  • Government Departments
  • The University Sector
  • The NGO Sector

Watch this video for an insight into the IUIH System of Care Conference.

Download brochure HERE IUIH System of Care Conference 2019 WEB

This year, the IUIH System of Care Conference will be offering a number of half-day workshops on Thursday 17 October 2019, available to conference attendees only. The cost for these workshops is $150 per person, per workshop and your attendance to these can be selected during your single or group registration.

IUIH are also hosting a 10 years of service celebration dinner on Tuesday 15 October – from 6.30-10pm. Tickets for this are $150 per person and are not included in the cost of registration.

All conference information is available here https://www.ivvy.com.au/event/IUIH19/

15 October IUIH 10 year anniversary

16 October Melbourne Uni: Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health and Wellbeing Conference

The University of Melbourne, Department of Rural Health are pleased to advise that abstract
submissions are now being invited that address Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health and
wellbeing.

The Aboriginal & Torres Strait Islander Health Conference is an opportunity for sharing information and connecting people that are committed to reforming the practice and research of Aboriginal & Torres Strait Islander health and celebrates Aboriginal knowledge systems and strength-based approaches to improving the health outcomes of Aboriginal communities.

This is an opportunity to present evidence-based approaches, Aboriginal methods and models of
practice, Aboriginal perspectives and contribution to health or community led solutions, underpinned by cultural theories to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health and wellbeing.
In 2018 the Aboriginal & Torres Strait Islander Health Conference attracted over 180 delegates from across the community and state.

We welcome submissions from collaborators whose expertise and interests are embedded in Aboriginal health and wellbeing, and particularly presented or co-presented by Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people and community members.

If you are interested in presenting, please complete the speaker registration link

closing date for abstract submission is Friday 3 rd May 2019.
As per speaker registration link request please email your professional photo for our program or any conference enquiries to E. aboriginal-health@unimelb.edu.au.

Kind regards
Leah Lindrea-Morrison
Aboriginal Partnerships and Community Engagement Officer
Department of Rural Health, University of Melbourne T. 03 5823 4554 E. leah.lindrea@unimelb.edu.au

4 November NACCHO Youth Conference -Darwin NT

The NACCHO Youth Conference will again take place the day before the Members Conference on Monday 4 November at the Darwin Convention Centre.

The conference theme is Healthy Youth – Healthy Futures and it is a day of learning, sharing, and connecting on health issues affecting young Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.

This year we aim to have around 80 youth delegates attend to hear from guest speakers, voice their ideas and solutions and connect with the other future leaders in the sector.

Registrations will open in early September 2019, so please encourage the young people from your community who you think will benefit attending.

I strongly encourage those who can afford it to arrange for your youth delegates to remain for the Members Conference and AGM so they can increase their understanding of the Sector as a whole and learn how to network and build useful contacts.

Darwin Convention Centre

Website to be launched soon

Conference Co-Coordinators Ros Daley and Jen Toohey 02 6246 9309

conference@naccho.org.au

5 – 7 November NACCHO Conference and AGM  -Darwin NT

As you may be aware, this year’s conference is being held in Darwin on Tuesday 5 and Wednesday 6 of November at the Darwin Convention Centre.

The theme for our conference is Because of Them We Must: Improving Health Outcomes for 0 to 29 Year Olds and will focus on how our Sector is working to improve the health and wellbeing outcomes for children, youth and young adults.

Clearly those in the 0 – 29 year age bracket are a significant proportion of our total population. If we can get their health and wellbeing outcomes right, we should hopefully overtime reduce the comorbidity levels which are so debilitating for so many of our older people.

There are many amazing examples in our sector of how we work with young people. I would like to see us share them at the conference.

Please let us know if you have an idea for a presentation that will highlight innovative and successful work that you do in this area.

To make a submission please complete this online form.

If you have any questions or would like further information contact Ros Daley and Jen Toohey on 02 6246 9309 or via email conference@naccho.org.au

Darwin Convention Centre

Website to be launched soon

Conference Co-Coordinators Ros Daley and Jen Toohey 02 6246 9309

conference@naccho.org.au

7 November

On Thursday 7 November, following the NACCHO National Members Conference, we will hold the 2019 AGM. In addition to the general business, there will be an election for the NACCHO Chair and a vote on a special resolution to adopt a new constitution for NACCHO.

Once again, I thank all those members who sent delegates to the recent national members’ workshop on a new constitution at Sydney in July. It was a great success thanks to your involvement and feedback.

5-8 November The Lime Network Conference New Zealand 

This years  whakatauki (theme for the conference) was developed by the Scientific Committee, along with Māori elder, Te Marino Lenihan & Tania Huria from .

To read about the conference & theme, check out the  website. 

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