NACCHO Affiliate and ACCHO Members Deadly Good News Stories : National watch Pat Turner #QANDA #NSW GWAMS @ahmrc #VIC @VACCHO_org #QLD @Apunipima @DeadlyChoices #WA Wirraka Maya #SA #NT @MiwatjHealth #ACT @WinnungaACCHO #TAS

1.1 National : Did you miss our CEO Pat Turner on Q and A this week ? Watch HERE

1.2 National :  Keynote speakers announced for NACCHO Ochre Day Men’s Health Conference 2019 in Melbourne next week Has your ACCHO Registered ?

1.3 National : ACCHO’s invited to attend Health Data Portal Co-design Workshops: September – October 2019

1.4 National iSISTAQUIT “implement Supporting Indigenous Smokers To Assist Quitting” program is starting now, and we need your help and ideas – so here is how you can help us.

2.I NSW : The ANFPP team at Greater Western Aboriginal Health Service hosted morning tea with the Aunties from Baabayn

2.2 NSW : AH&MRC launches new website 

3.VIC : VACCHO and the Aboriginal breast screening project in partnership with BreastScreen Victoria.

4.1 QLD : Apunipima ACCHO Cape York Baby One Program health worker training

4.2 QLD : AFL Brisbane Lions superstar leads Deadly Choices campaign to increase 715 Health Checks 

5. SA : The Commissioner for Aboriginal Engagement, Dr Roger Thomas, is commencing State-wide consultation to seek the views of Aboriginal communities to improve relations between government and Aboriginal people.

6.WA : Meet Alfred Barker. He’s a Traditional Owner and the Chairperson of Wirraka Maya, where he works to educate and support men about the role they can play in preventing FASD

7. NT : Check out what the awesome Miwatj Health AMS TIS team in Gapuwiyak have been up to over the recent school holiday break.

8. ACT : Ms Julie Tongs, CEO of Winnunga Nimmityjah Aboriginal Health and Community Service has calls on Ms Rosie Batty AO to assist with advocacy

9. TAS : Heather Sculthorpe NAIDOC Speech 2019

How to submit in 2019 a NACCHO Affiliate  or Members Good News Story ?

Email to Colin Cowell NACCHO Media 

Mobile 0401 331 251 

Wednesday by 4.30 pm for publication Thursday /Friday

1.1 National : Did you miss our CEO Pat Turner on Q and A this week ? Watch here

WATCH HERE

Panellists: Linda Burney, Shadow Minister for Indigenous Australians; Julian Leeser, Co-Chair of Joint Select Committee on Constitutional Recognition; Jacinta Price, Director of Indigenous Program, CIS; Patricia Turner, CEO of National Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation; and Sally Scales, Uluru Statement Delegate. (who replaced Noel Pearson at the last moment )

 From transcript panellist Pat Turner, a legendary figure in Indigenous affairs:

“We survived here for 60,000 years before the last 200 and we’ve been devastated more in the last 200-plus than the 60,000 years before that … we want to have the right to share the power and to make the decisions about the future of our people in our own country.”

Jacinta Price thought the debate “distracts us from what’s really going on” – issues such as violence and suicide in Indigenous communities.

Pat Turner shot back.

A distraction?

“It hasn’t distracted me because we’re working very hard to close the gap. And to ensure that Aboriginal voices are at the table in negotiations with government as equals.”

She concluded: “We’re waiting for no one. We’re getting on with the job.”

1.2 National :  Keynote speakers announced for NACCHO Ochre Day Men’s Health Conference 2019 in Melbourne next week Has your ACCHO Registered ?

We are very fortunate this year to have an illustrious line-up of speakers and are expecting to host around 200 male delegates from across the country.

 The conference aims to increase access for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander males to primary health care services, and participation in healthy lifestyle activities within the community.”

Mr John Paterson, CEO of Aboriginal Medical Services Alliance Northern Territory (AMSANT) and spokesperson for OCHRE DAY

The National Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation (NACCHO) will hold its seventh annual Ochre Day Men’s Health Conference on 29-30 August at Pullman On the Park, Melbourne.

This year’s conference will focus on three aspirational topics around Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander men being: in-control, innovative and influential.

The NACCHO Ochre Day Conference is an important event that draws attention to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander male health issues and their impact on their social and emotional health in a holistic way.  The enduring theme for the conference is – Men’s Health, Our Way. Let’s Own It!

The NACCHO Ochre Day Conference was established in 2012 to provide a strategic focus on Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander male health issues in a holistic way

Read or Download  full press release here

For further information on the conference and to register online, click here.

1.3 National : ACCHO’s invited to attend Health Data Portal Co-design Workshops: September – October 2019

A series of co-design workshops will be conducted around Australia during September and October 2019. The co-design workshops will allow health service representatives to:

  • Gather input for future nKPI, OSR, HCP and QLIK Interactive Report enhancements based on your July-August 2019 reporting experience; and
  • Discuss Stage 2 OSR requirements and how to effectively gather the required data.

Co-design workshop locations, dates and venue details are set out here :

How to register for a co-design workshop

An Eventbrite invitation was sent to all health services on 26 July 2019. If you would like an invitation sent to you please send us your name and email address to indigenousreporting@health.gov.au. Seats are strictly limited and fill up quickly so please register ASAP.

Cost:

Like all previous Portal co-design workshops conducted in 2017, 2018 and February-March 2019, travel, accommodation and expenses to attend a co-design workshop is at your health services’ expense.

Do you have other colleagues who want to attend?

This email invitation can only be used by you. If you want a colleague to attend, please email us their name and email address to indigenousreporting@health.gov.au

Please note that due to a high level of interest we request that no more than two people from your health service attend, where possible. This will ensure we have a wide representation from the sector attending the co-design workshops.

Not able to attend?

Consultation is an important part of developing the Portal. If you are unable to attend a co-design workshop, you can still contribute. Details of how to do this will be communicated to you soon.

More Information:

If would like more information about the co-design workshops, please contact us at indigenousreporting@health.gov.au

1.4 National iSISTAQUIT “implement Supporting Indigenous Smokers To Assist Quitting” program is starting now, and we need your help and ideas – so here is how you can help us.

Our focus is to improve health providers’ (HP) provision of smoking cessation care for pregnant Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women.

Download the full poster

Poster-iSISTAQUIT call for resources

We are currently developing our training materials into an on-line format, making social media resources, and exploring effective ways of recruiting services.

Register your interest: We invite Aboriginal Health Services, Tackling Indigenous Smoking Sites, and Mainstream Health Services to be Partner Services of the iSISTAQUIT team in implementing iSISTAQUIT, to take the iSISTAQUIT_survey or email iSISTAQUIT@newcastle.edu.au and we will arrange a call or zoom meeting

Become an Advisor: We are looking for Advisors to support us developing:

  1. a) The online training format for Health Professionals and /or
  2. b) The social media campaign.

Send us your resources: To develop the media campaign, we are looking for resources that are provided to pregnant women to support smoking cessation (print, digital, video or social media).

If you have developed resources or have examples that you give to pregnant women or ideas for messages for quitting in pregnancy, please contact us and/or send your resources iSISTAQUIT@newcastle.edu.au

2. I NSW : The ANFPP team at Greater Western Aboriginal Health Service AHS hosted morning tea with the Aunties from Baabayn

The Australian Nurse-Family Partnership Program (ANFPP) is a nurse-led home visiting program that supports women pregnant with an Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander child to help them become the best mum possible.

ANFPP mums are offered support and guidance during early pregnancy and on into their baby’s infancy and toddlerhood. The ANFPP is an important early investment in the future of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children in local communities.

We are part of the Australian Government’s commitment to improve the health of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people

It was a great morning yarning about the program and showing them around our new office.

2.2 NSW : AH&MRC launches new website 

The AH&MRC Board of Directors and staff are delighted to announce the launch of our new website. The website is the next phase of the AH&MRC rebrand, with the logo being announced in September 2018.

VIEW new website HERE

“We have gone through a transition period and we now have a clear direction of our organisation, with a website as the representation.” says Scott Monaghan, Chairperson of the Board of AH&MRC

The AH&MRC website has been created to promote success stories from the sector, job openings and local events, professional learning opportunities, accredited courses, research development and more.

“We want members and the community to use the website to keep up to date.” concluded Mr Monaghan.

The August Edition of Message Stick is out now!

Read about the new AH&MRC website, the Closing the Gap on Indigenous Health Conference, the PHN and ACCHS Roundtable and opportunities to work with AH&MRC and our members.

Read more here >> http://bit.ly/33QDlw8

3.1 VIC : VACCHO and the Aboriginal breast screening project in partnership with BreastScreen Victoria.

Our COO Helen Kennedy and Susan Forrester are with Gina Bundle from The Womens at our ICAP Forum modeling one of the many breastscreening shawls currently being designed by so many of our incredible women around Victoria. this Aboriginal breastscreening project is done in partnership with BreastScreen Victoria.

Gunditj Corp staff members Charmaine Clarke and Sherry Johnstone with our Susan Forrester showing off the incredible artworks created by local Gunditjmara women that will be used in our Aboriginal breastscreening shawl project with BreastScreen Victoria

These beautiful shawls will be used to keep our women culturally safe and strong during screening sessions.

If you want to know more about this project contact us on 03 9411 9411.

4.1 QLD : Apunipima ACCHO Cape York Baby One Program health worker training

In a recent edition of Apunipima ACCHO Cape Capers there was mention of the training taking place at the Cairns office, with the Nutritionist Team providing workshops based around increasing knowledge on nutrition in the communities for pregnant women, mums and infants.

The Baby One Program and Bump 2 Bubba teams took on meaningful discussions, cooking sessions, team building exercises and workshops around ways to improve resources and processes in getting the ‘better health’ message across.

It was clear that the group provided valuable ideas for the future and gained more insights into what will be key messages for the Cape’s future health.

4.2 QLD : AFL Brisbane Lions superstar leads Deadly Choices campaign to increase 715 Health Checks 

5. SA : The Commissioner for Aboriginal Engagement, Dr Roger Thomas, is commencing State-wide consultation to seek the views of Aboriginal communities to improve relations between government and Aboriginal people.  

Dr Thomas has already undertaken some targeted consultation with Aboriginal stakeholders.

This has developed an engagement reform proposal for his State-wide consultation.

Premier Steven Marshall committed in his Aboriginal Affairs Action Plan released in December 2018 to develop a model to facilitate and enable better engagement between the Government and Aboriginal communities and for Aboriginal views to be more represented in government decision-making.

The Premier said it was critical that the views of Aboriginal peoples were heard across all levels of government.

“I am committed to ensuring Aboriginal South Australians are adequately represented in the decisions that affect them,” said the Premier.

Dr Thomas urged Aboriginal South Australians to get involved in the consultation process.

“I encourage all Aboriginal people, communities and organisations to share their views, by attending a consultation session, or to provide written feedback on the recommended model,” Dr Thomas said.

The Commissioner has developed eleven draft guiding principles as a reference point for the discussion and development of potential models of Aboriginal engagement:

Once the Commissioner has consulted with Aboriginal communities over the coming three months, a report will be presented to the Premier for Cabinet to consider.

Aboriginal South Australians are encouraged to have their say during the consultation process, and can do so via a number of channels:

1. Attend a consultation:

The Commissioner for Aboriginal Engagement will visit many sites across South Australia, and lead the consultation with Aboriginal people, organisations and representatives, over the next three months. To find out more information about the Commissioner’s visits across South Australia, arrange a meeting, or to request more information, contact the Office of the Commissioner for Aboriginal Engagement (OCAE) or visit dpc.sa.gov.au/aboriginal-engagement

2. Provide written feedback:

Feedback Forms will be provided at all the consultation meetings. Alternatively, you may submit your feedback online. Detailed written submissions are also welcome and can be emailed to the Office of the Commissioner for Aboriginal Engagement at AboriginalEngagement@sa.gov.au

3.Call

Office of the Commissioner for Aboriginal Engagement:

Free call: 1800 931 733

6.1 WA : Meet Alfred Barker. He’s a Traditional Owner and the Chairperson of Wirraka Maya, where he works to educate and support men about the role they can play in preventing FASD

Recently it was Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder Awareness Day, and we’re sharing the last story in our series profiling inspirational people leading the charge to make FASD history in the Pilbara in collaboration with Telethon Kids, BHP Western Australia and Wirraka Maya Health Service Aboriginal Corporation.

Meet Alfred Barker. He’s a Traditional Owner and the Chairperson of Wirraka Maya, where he works to educate and support men about the role they can play in preventing FASD, through supporting their partners not to drink during pregnancy.

After watching, please SHARE this video with your networks to help raise awareness of the role that men can play in the prevention of #FASD.

7.1 NT : Check out what the awesome Miwatj Health AMS TIS team in Gapuwiyak have been up to over the recent school holiday break.

Listen up! Come check out what our awesome TIS team in Gapuwiyak have been up to over the school holiday break. It’s great to see djamarrkuli have fun and learn about ngarali (tobacco) and healthy lifestyles.

And sports

Miwatj AMS TIS worker Thomas Guyula from Gapuwiyak, is passionate about educating and helping people understand the dangers of smoking!

8. ACT : Ms Julie Tongs, CEO of Winnunga Nimmityjah Aboriginal Health and Community Service has calls on Ms Rosie Batty AO to assist with advocacy

Ms Julie Tongs, CEO of Winnunga Nimmityjah Aboriginal Health and Community Service has called  on Ms Rosie Batty AO, to use her address at the annual EMILY’s List Oration to be held in Canberra on Wednesday 21 August to urge the ACT Government to reverse its decision to defund the ACT Legal Aid Commission’s specialist family violence service.

Julie Tongs noted that Aboriginal women are vastly over-represented as victims of crime including as victims of domestic violence. She said:

“The most recent data reveals an Aboriginal woman is 35 times more likely to be hospitalised due to domestic violence related assault than a non-Aboriginal woman.”

Julie Tongs further noted the Legal Aid Commission has assisted hundreds of women a year, including many Aboriginal women, who have been subjected to violence and abuse.

Download the full Press Release HERE

WNAHCS Media Release 2019 – Rosie Batty

9. TAS : Heather Sculthorpe NAIDOC Speech 2019

The national theme for NAIDOC this year is Voice, Treaty, Truth. This is a summary of the Aboriginal community demands in the Statement From The Heart developed at Uluru 2 years ago.

Achieving these goals, based on the recognition of Aboriginal people in the Australian Constitution, is regarded by some as the basis for reconciliation – as enabling Aborigines and non-Aborigines to move forward together towards a better future.

The proposal for a ‘Voice to Parliament’ is the most controversial of these demands. The former Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull immediately dismissed the idea calling it a third chamber of the federal Parliament: the Senate, the House of Representatives, and the Aboriginal Voice. In fact it would have only the power to advise and so would be less a decision making body than the former Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Commission which did have some power to determine policy and make financial decisions.

Instead of the risky business of trying to get changes agreed to the Australian Constitution, many are now advocating State level treaty making as a means of changing the power imbalance between Aboriginal people and the State. That would have to go very much further than the simple wording changes to State Constitutions made by the Tasmanian Parliament and others which simply state the obvious fact that Aborigines were the first people of this country.

A treaty would need to cover matters like the return of lands, a guaranteed income through a share of the gross domestic product of the country or a similar formula, and protections for Aboriginal language and culture. The benefits of a treaty were summed up by Michael Mansell in his book about treaty and statehood as follows:

Aboriginal communities need essential and fundamental tools to replicate what once was – an ordered, civilised, united Aboriginal society that took care of its own and managed its affairs – and restore it in a modern world. The fundamental tools needed include land ownership, empowerment, financial guarantees, cultural integrity and self-determination. The longer Aboriginals are denied these essential assets the longer we will see despair and frustration, and the more we will have to revisit the consequences of disadvantage.

We would expect these fundamental requirements to be additional to basic services provided to everyone in Australia like health, housing and education. These service areas are still failing Aboriginal people, starting from the significant gap in life expectancy.

How do we reach equivalent life outcomes for our people without becoming just like white people, without becoming assimilated into the values and lifestyle of those who invaded our lands and nearly destroyed our people?

We start by the truth-telling referred to in the Uluru Statement. We’ve seen the beginning of that process in the massacre mapping of the continent by Dr Lyndall Ryan and others, decades after the first version of Lyndall’s book on Aboriginal Tasmania was published. We see it increasingly in the story telling of Aboriginal writers, play wrights and song writers like puralia meenamatta/Jim Everett, Cheryl Mundy, Nathan Maynard, and Dewayne Everett-Smith. And in the art works and photographs of Ricky Maynard, Janice Ross Lowery Maynard, Rodney Gardner and many others. And now in the curriculum materials in Tasmanian schools through the highly praised ORB multi-media package.

Truth telling must start with being clear that this country and this State were not settled peacefully but through violence and treachery. In our case, the treachery occurred when our Old People were persuaded to give up their guerrilla war against the invaders and board the boats bound for Flinders Island. They were persuaded that this was the only way to prevent the rest of their people being slaughtered and that they would soon return to their home lands. Instead most of them died on Flinders Island.

This is how Walter George Arthur described the treachery in 1846, writing from Wybalena on Flinders to Queen Victoria in London, England:

The humble petition of the free Aborigines Inhabitants of Van Diemen’s Land now living upon Flinders Island …That we are your free children that we were not taken prisoners but freely gave up our country to Colonel Arthur then the Governor after defending ourselves, Your petitioners humbly state to your Majesty that Mr Robinson [George Augustus] made for us and with Colonel Arthur an agreement that we have not lost from our minds since and we have made our part of it good. Your petitioners humbly tell Your Majesty that when we left our own place we were plenty of people, we are now but a little one.

In any normal human understanding, this must surely be an undertaking to make a peaceful settlement with a treaty. Lutruwita/Tasmania is well over due to make good on this promise. And not just any promise: an undertaking between equal sovereigns.

What the Education Department’s ORB lacks is Aboriginal decision making and control, things that the national Coalition of Peak Close the Gap organisations has stressed to be every bit as important as targets and indicators. As recognised by the Royal Commission into Aboriginal Deaths in Custody nearly 3 decades ago, it is the lack of Aboriginal control and decision making that has resulted in the disparities in life outcomes so prevalent today. Let’s keep in mind that this is the main area that needs to improve if we are to get anywhere near reconciliation in this country.

We are very pleased that so many people keeping coming back year after year to help us mark the start of NAIDOC week. In the future we may be able to use this occasion to celebrate together but for now at least we must use the occasion as a reminder that we still have a long way to go.

Nayri nina-tu.

Heather Sculthorpe

 

 

One comment on “NACCHO Affiliate and ACCHO Members Deadly Good News Stories : National watch Pat Turner #QANDA #NSW GWAMS @ahmrc #VIC @VACCHO_org #QLD @Apunipima @DeadlyChoices #WA Wirraka Maya #SA #NT @MiwatjHealth #ACT @WinnungaACCHO #TAS

  1. Hi

    I would really like to listen to Alfred Barker speak but I couldn’t find the link. Please could you help?

    6.1 WA : Meet Alfred Barker. He’s a Traditional Owner and the Chairperson of Wirraka Maya, where he works to educate and support men about the role they can play in preventing FASD

    Recently it was Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder Awareness Day, and we’re sharing the last story in our series profiling inspirational people leading the charge to make FASD history in the Pilbara in collaboration with Telethon Kids, BHP Western Australia and Wirraka Maya Health Service Aboriginal Corporation.

    Meet Alfred Barker. He’s a Traditional Owner and the Chairperson of Wirraka Maya, where he works to educate and support men about the role they can play in preventing FASD, through supporting their partners not to drink during pregnancy.

    After watching, please SHARE this video with your networks to help raise awareness of the role that men can play in the prevention of #FASD.
    Many thanks

    Warm regards,

    Sophie Harrington
    National Community Educator
    NOFASD Australia
    sophie.harrington@nofasd.org.au
    0410 865 098
    Helpline: 1800 860 613

    [cid:image001.png@01D559A8.C64A3EF0]

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