NACCHO Affiliate and ACCHO Members Deadly Good News Stories : National CEO Pat Turner speech #Voice #ClosingTheGap #QANDA #AMSANT25Conf Plus @QAIHC formally opens new building for Queensland peak ACCHO body

1.1 National : Our CEO Pat Turner keynote speech at AMSANT 25 Anniversary Conference in Alice Springs

1.2 Close the Gap Steering Committee meets at NACCHO office in Canberra

1.3 : National : How history can help shape the debate about an Indigenous voice to Parliament. Features Our NACCHO CEO Pat Turner

2.1  NSW : Yerin Eleanor Duncan Aboriginal Dental Clinic is the first of its kind on the Central Coast.

2.2 NSW : Katungul ACCHO : Otitis Media & Eye Health Manager Dean Haycox, has just returned from an upskill opportunity with Poche Centre for Indigenous Health.

3.Victorian Government Government investing $13.6 million over two years for all Traditional Owners in Victoria to prepare for treaty and to pave the path forwards for future treaty negotiations.

4.1 QLD : QAIHC formally opens new building for Queensland peak body

4.2 QAIHC Chairperson wins prestigious AMA award

5. WA : The South West Aboriginal Medical Services clinic on wheels visited Newton Moore Senior High School’s Clontarf Academy boys .

6. SA : Clifford Warrior from Port Lincoln ACCHO lives a fast life with active family 

7.1 AMSANT Our Health Our Way 25Yrs Anniversary Conference See Photo album of the event #AMSANT25Conf

7.2 : NT Aboriginal Peak Organisation’s condem the NT Government’s decision to ignore Royal Commission recommendations

How to submit in 2019 a NACCHO Affiliate  or Members Good News Story ?

Email to Colin Cowell NACCHO Media 

Mobile 0401 331 251 

Wednesday by 4.30 pm for publication Thursday /Friday

1.1 National : Our CEO Pat Turner keynote speech at AMSANT 25 Anniversary Conference in Alice Springs

  “We have started the task of determining priority reforms that we think are needed to accelerate the life outcomes of our peoples, and to be built into a new National Agreement on Closing the Gap for the next ten years.

We need a radical shift to the way governments work with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples at all levels of policy design and implementation.

The first priority reform area we have proposed to governments is to ensure the full involvement of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples in shared decision making at the national, state and local or regional level and embedding their ownership, responsibility and expertise to close the gap.

This will ensure that, over time, all of us have a seat at the table and responsibility for making decisions about what governments do in our areas and communities. “

Pat Turner CEO NACCHO at AMSANT Conference : Read full speech HERE

Please note Pat Turner will be on Q and A Monday 19 August 

Read June Oscars : Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Social Justice Commissioner

Read Barb Shaw 2 speeches AMSANT Chair

Read Donna Ah Chee Congress ACCHO CEO

1.2 Close the Gap Steering Committee meets at NACCHO office in Canberra

1.3 : National : How history can help shape the debate about an Indigenous voice to Parliament. Features Our NACCHO CEO Pat Turner

Dr Will Sanders:Senior fellow at the Australian National University’s Centre for Aboriginal Economic Policy Research.-

Pat Turner: Arrente Woman from Alice Springs. Pat was Commonwealth public service from the 1970’s onward. She was CEO of ATSIC for 4 years from 1994 to 1998 and is now the CEO of NACCHO, the National Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation.

Michael Dillon: Visiting fellow at the Centre for Aboriginal Economic Policy Research at the Australian National University.

Robert Tickner: Former Minister for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Affairs in the Hawke and Keating governments.

Alison Anderson: Former ATSIC Commissioner

Listen HERE

2.1  NSW : Yerin Eleanor Duncan Aboriginal Dental Clinic is the first of its kind on the Central Coast.

Yerin Eleanor Duncan Aboriginal Health Services has launched the first Aboriginal dental clinic on New South Wales’ Central Coast.

A special ceremony in Darkinjung country took place last Thursday, launching the new facility that will provide culturally appropriate dental treatment to First Nations people.

Although completed in October last year, industry and community leaders gathered for bush tucker, traditional dance and a didgeridoo performance to formally open the clinic.

The Wyong dental clinic was developed through a collaboration between Yerin and the Central Coast Local Health District.

Yerin CEO Belinda Field said the establishment of this new clinic was a major milestone for the Central Coast First Nations community.

“We are so proud to open this new clinic for our mob to offer dental treatments and oral hygiene solutions that are performed in a culturally safe and responsive manner,” Ms Field said.

“Like in many other areas, there is a considerable gap between the dental health of Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal Australians.”

According to the NSW Government’s current Aboriginal Oral Health Plan, Indigenous communities are twice as likely to experience untreated dental decay.

“Yerin Eleanor Duncan is excited to be leading the way to level the playing field in this vital area,” Ms Field said.

This new dental clinic adds to Yerin’s 23 years of health services to Indigenous Australians across the Central Coast.

The organisation provides culturally appropriate and safe primary health care in areas such as dental, GP, mental health, early childhood, chronic disease, permanency support programs, and alcohol and other drugs.

2.2 NSW : Katungul ACCHO : Otitis Media & Eye Health Manager Dean Haycox, has just returned from an upskill opportunity with Poche Centre for Indigenous Health.

We caught up with Dean (Pictured left ) and asked him about the experience.

Why did Poche offer you the opportunity to attend the course?

I was a successful applicant for their scholarship program in 2017 and sp they offered me the the opportunity to up-skill cancer awareness skillset for AHW –AHP .
This skill set provided information on cancer, treatment stages, support services, screenings and early detection and prevention.

Prior to the course my knowledge was limited, but now I understand the importance of early detection and screening programs for breast screen, testicular, bowel, melanoma etc. A lot of Koori people are apprehensive about screening as they are worried about the outcome of the tests, but if cancer is detected early it can be treated.

What did you enjoy most about the course?
The skills we learnt were excellent but the highlight for me was visiting the Melanoma Institute and the Cancer Institute; the work these organisation are doing around
treatment and screening is amazing.

What’s one interesting take-away from the course?
I didn’t know about immunotherapy, which is a type of cancer treatment where the immune system is “switched back on” to help fight cancer in the later stages.

What message did you take with you that you would like the community to know?
I want people to understand that cancer screening programs are for detecting cancer early, the earlier the better. Too many people die from cancer because it is picked up too late- if it is picked up early it can be treated and monitored.

Images courtesy of Poche Centre for Indigenous Health.

3.Victorian Government Government investing $13.6 million over two years for all Traditional Owners in Victoria to prepare for treaty and to pave the path forwards for future treaty negotiations.

Jill Gallagher ( pictured right with Rachel Stephen-Smith) is a proud Gunditjmara woman and Victoria’s Treaty Advancement Commissioner. Working with community to progress treaty & establish an Aboriginal Representative Body.

Minister for Aboriginal Affairs Gavin Jennings today announced a treaty readiness funding package of $13.6 million over two years, which will give equitable and flexible support to Traditional Owners in formally and nonformally recognised areas.

Victoria is leading the nation in negotiating treaty with its First Peoples as part of its pledge to progress self determination.

From September 16, Aboriginal Victorians will vote in the historic election of the First Peoples’ Assembly of Victoria. The Assembly will be the voice of Aboriginal people in Victoria as it works with the State to design a framework for future treaty negotiations.

The treaty readiness funding package recognises the diverse circumstances and aspirations of Traditional Owners in Victoria on their journey towards treaty and the need to provide equitable support to enable all Traditional Owners to participate in negotiations.

The investment will support Traditional Owners in regions without formal recognition to undertake research and map family groups and Traditional Owner structures.

Engagement officers will be employed across Victoria to provide on-the-ground support to Traditional Owners.

The package includes investment in a significant partnership between nation-building service providers including the Federation of Victorian Traditional Owner Corporations, First Nations Legal and Research Services, and

Aboriginal Victoria’s Traditional Owner Programs. This partnership will ensure that Traditional Owners in formally and non-formally recognised areas can access core support and resources across three streams: foundational support, recognition support and treaty readiness support.

Traditional Owners will also be supported to pursue additional nation-building activities, as determined by them, to meet their specific needs and priorities. These activities could include healing and family reunification, cultural knowledge sharing, advice on formal recognition process, treaty education and policy development.

Immediate work is underway to build nation-building support capacity and recruit Engagement Officers. Funding will be available for Traditional Owners to access shortly. For further information visit aboriginalvictoria.vic.gov.au or for more information on the First Peoples’ Assembly of Victoria election, visit firstpeoplesvic.org.

4.1 QLD : QAIHC formally opens new building for Queensland peak body

The Queensland Aboriginal and Islander Health Council (QAIHC) yesterday officially opened its new building in Russell Street, South Brisbane.

Cover photo Building opening QAIHC Hall of Famers Uncle Jeff Timor and Aunty Mary Martin with QAIHC CEO Neil Willmett

Photo above  Previous Chairpersons of QAIHC (L-R) Sheryl Lawton, Aunty Gail Wason, Lizzie Adams, and Kieron Chilcott

Last year QAIHC moved into new offices, to meet the growing needs of the Sector. Today the building will be officially opened by community leaders, and a smoking ceremony held to cleanse the building and promote the wellbeing of those who work in and visit it.

“The building opening celebrates QAIHC’s journey fighting for health equality for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples”, said CEO Neil Willmett.

“The need for a bigger building is indicative of our growing workforce – one that allows us to better service our members, and the Sector.

“The building also makes a statement. Externally, vibrant colours announce your arrival and serve as a reminder to all that QAIHC is here, providing leadership to the Sector and acting as a conduit for information to and from stakeholders.

“Internally, a history of the organisation and key people involved in its establishment can be found, reminding staff and visitors of those who came before us, and those for whom we’re working.”

QAIHC is a peak organisation that is focused on strengthening the capability and capacity of our membership and improving the health status of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Queenslanders.

Established in 1990, QAIHC is a vital player in ensuring that an Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander perspective is embedded into health service delivery. Find out more at www.qaihc.com.au

4.2 QAIHC Chairperson wins prestigious AMA award

Chairperson of the Queensland Aboriginal and Islander Health Council (QAIHC), Aunty Gail Wason, was recently awarded the prestigious Australian Medical Association Queensland’s (AMAQ) Excellence in Health Care Medal. Pictured above Centre with QAIHC CEO Neil Willmet on right

The award recognises Aunty Gail’s unwavering commitment to improving the health and wellbeing of her community. She is the Chief Executive Officer of Mulungu Aboriginal Corporation Primary Health Care Service and has more than 25 years’ experience in Aboriginal affairs and health.

Aunty Gail strives to ensure that the community has access to the full range of high quality, culturally appropriate primary health care services that empower clients to fully participate in the management of their own health.

On winning the award, Aunty Gail said, “I’m surprised and humbled to receive this award when there are so many people in our Sector doing good work. I’m thankful for the acknowledgement bestowed upon me by the AMAQ”.

“This award is a team effort. Between the team at QAIHC and at Mulungu, I have so many people who help me succeed and I’m grateful for all those I work with, particularly those who don’t get recognition for the arduous and meaningful work they do.

“Previous Chairs and CEOs of QAIHC have done some pioneering and innovative work for the Sector and their work shouldn’t go unrecognised. The Sector is where we are today, in part, because of them.”

QAIHC CEO Neil Willmett “It’s great to see a humble leader getting recognition and a mainstream award for her dedication to improving the health and wellbeing of Queenslanders”, he said.

“Aunty Gail has experienced first-hand how important it is for clients to be appropriately cared for when attending an Aboriginal Medical Service. The thoroughness and diligence these services show is an important factor in closing the gap, and these are two of Aunty Gail’s strong points”, said Mr Willmett.

5.1 WA : The South West Aboriginal Medical Services clinic on wheels visited Newton Moore Senior High School’s Clontarf Academy boys .

Hosting the clinic on wheels at South-West schools, the clinic enables students to have their health check during school hours.

The clinic also provides the opportunity for students to discuss any health-related issues in a safe, confidential space.

The Clontarf Foundation exists to improve the education, discipline, self-esteem, life skills and employment prospects of young Aboriginal men.

The foundation works by using the existing passion that Aboriginal boys have for football to attract the boys to school and keep them there.

Any Aboriginal boy enrolled at the Newton Moore Senior High School can apply to be part of the program.

“Health and well-being is an important part of our program. Our boys all enjoy a good feed and their footy, but learning how to make good choices with what they eat and drink is crucial,” Newton Moore SHS Clontarf Academy director Boyd Davey said.

“In conjunction with the Federal Government Department of Health and Ageing and SWAMS, we are able to deliver annual health assessments.

“Firstly this gives our boys access to quality medical care, secondly establishes relationship with a medical practice to break down future barriers and thirdly, allows us to learn more about the healthy state of our academy and where we need to focus our attention to improve outcomes.”

The clinic will return to the school in Semester Two to follow up with the students.

“Building a strong relationship with students whilst they are in their school years will hopefully enable them to continue prioritising their health as they grow into adults and start having families of their own. This continuity will help to close the gap for future generations.” SWAMS chief executive Lesley Nelson said.

The clinic’s mobile facility travels with a qualified nurse, doctor and aboriginal health worker.

6. SA : Clifford Warrior from Port Lincoln ACCHO lives a fast life with active family 

I was born in Ceduna, started school in Port Lincoln, completed primary school in Coober Pedy and finished high school back in Port Lincoln. I am the youngest of three with two older sisters. The smell of freshly cut grass and overcast mornings is how I remember my days at Lincoln South Primary School (Lincoln Gardens).

Originally published HERE 

I remember my first football game for Mallee Park and still have the trophy from that season. My first goal was at the town primary school oval. I stood about five metres from goal when the ball landed in my arms and the umpire blew his whistle yelling “mark!” One of the older boys put his arm around me and told me to kick it through the middle.

I went back, started walking forward into a slow jog and kicked it as hard as I could and it went straight for the middle…then curved left for a point. Soon the ball came back as I was on the goal line when I picked it up for a quick little sledge-hammer kick over the line so I had just done a seven-point play (fist pump).

We moved to Coober Pedy when I was about 10. Growing up in a multicultural town was quite an experience. My first job there was with some other boys, putting price tags on basketball cards for $5. I shot my first kangaroo (malu) with Dad when I was 11 and now I take my boys hunting with me. Returning to Port Lincoln was something I put off for as long as possible so Mum let me finish the school year off first. I returned in 2000 for summer. The weather was not as hot as Coober Pedy and I was often asked why was I wearing jeans and a jumper when it was “hot”. It took me a week or so to adjust.

I started at Port Lincoln High School that year, where I met Antoinette then fell in love around 2001. We completed year 12, then had our first child Shauna when we were 18. We moved around for a bit including to Western Australia when Anti got a job in sport and rec and I worked in the local abattoir. When we decided to go back to Port Lincoln we had little Cliffy; two years later Leo was born. After buying our home I thought we needed a dog – we didn’t, I know that now so lesson learnt. Anyway his name is Snowy, he’s a husky and likes to trash our yard.

I want to play sport for as long as I can so health and fitness are important. With huge support from Anti I recently finished second in an eight-week challenge at F45 so shout out to the team for a life-changing experience. I had the privilege of playing football with my dad when he was in his 50s so I hope to do the same with my boys. I now coach under 11s, which little Cliffy plays in. He’s already better than me and also plays under 9s with Leo. He always tries to kick the ball to him. Shauna plays netball and has had a pretty good career and will no doubt continue to excel.

For the past nine years I have worked at the Port Lincoln Aboriginal Health Service in the social and emotional wellbeing team. I have a Graduate Diploma in Substance Use through Sydney Uni so I also provide drug and alcohol support. With an active family that plays multiple sports life is pretty fast and full on but I would not change it. Anti makes life easy. With the talent these kids have I suspect life will get a lot faster. Talent definitely skipped a generation in my case. I love watching my children play sport so I will try to stay in one piece hoping one day I can play alongside them.

7.1 AMSANT Our Health Our Way 25Yrs Anniversary Conference See Photo album of the event #AMSANT25Conf

View the Album HERE 

See Album 2

Our Health, Our Way! Conference last week…!

7.2 : NT Aboriginal Peak Organisation’s condem the NT Government’s decision to ignore Royal Commission recommendations

We support the NT Aboriginal Peak Organisation’s statement released today, condemning the NT Government’s decision to ignore Royal Commission recommendations in announcing a new youth detention facility site beside the Darwin adult prison.

The APO is asking the NT Government to reconsider its decision and to work collaboratively with the community to help our young people transform their lives.#YouthJustice

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