NACCHO Aboriginal Health #refreshtheCTGRefresh : @NACCHOchair Welcomes the release of the @AMAPresident 2018 Report Card on Indigenous Health and joins its call for rebuilding the #ClosingtheGap health strategy from the ground up

It’s been a decade since the Council of Australian Governments (COAG) launched the Closing the Gap Strategy, with a target of achieving life expectancy equality by 2031

But 10 years on, progress is limited, mixed, and disappointing. If anything, the gap is widening as Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health gains are outpaced by improvement in non-Indigenous health outcomes.

The Strategy has all but unravelled, and efforts underway now to refresh the Strategy run the risk of simply perpetuating the current implementation failures.

The Strategy needs to be rebuilt from the ground up, not simply refreshed without adequate funding and commitment from all governments to a national approach.”

The Closing the Gap Strategy is unravelling, and must be rebuilt from the ground up to have any chance of closing the life expectancy gap between Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australians, AMA President, Dr Tony Bartone said today at the launch of the AMA report at the ATSICHS ACCHO in Brisbane : Interview with The Guardian Part 3 Below 

Download the 24 Page AMA Report 

AMA Indigenous Health Report Card 2018 (2)

Dr Tony Bartone (left ) and Ms Donnella Mills ( Second left ) on tour of ATSICHS

We congratulate the AMA on their work to support closing the gap and endorse the recommendations in the report.”

The report highlights research which indicates the mortality gaps between Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples and non-Indigenous Australians are widening, not narrowing.

Urgent and systematic action is needed to reverse these failures and to have any prospect of meeting the Council of Australian Governments’ goal to Close the Gap in life expectancy by 2031

NACCHO calls for the immediate adoption of the Report Card’s recommendations.

We are seeking a formal partnership between Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples and governments to be included in the Closing the Gap Refresh policy , Aboriginal people need to be at the centre of Closing the Gap strategies; the gap won’t close without our full engagement and involvement.

The Chairperson of the peak body for Aboriginal controlled health services Ms Donnella Mills today welcomed the release of the AMA’s 2018 Report Card on Indigenous Health and joined its call for rebuilding the Closing the Gap from the ground up. See full NACCHO Press Release HERE 

It doesn’t mean that things aren’t improving, because health outcomes for our people are improving

The challenge is that we’re trying to actually improve the pace of that improvement faster than some of the healthiest people in the world, which is what Australians enjoy – one of the healthiest countries on the globe.

So you’re trying to actually close the gap between some of the sickest people in the world to some of the healthiest people in the world – it was always an ambitious target.”

Adrian Carson, CEO of the Urban Institute of Indigenous Health, said while national outcomes lagged behind, he had seen “significant” health improvements at a local level in south-east Queensland. see Part 3 below or in full here 

Busting the myth that Indigenous-led organisations ‘don’t deliver’

Dr Bartone today launched the AMA Indigenous Health Report Card 2018, the AMA’s annual analysis of an area of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health across the nation.

This year’s Report Card scrutinises the 10-year-old Closing the Gap Strategy, and recent efforts to “refresh” the Strategy.

“It’s been a decade since the Council of Australian Governments (COAG) launched the Closing the Gap Strategy, with a target of achieving life expectancy equality by 2031,” Dr Bartone said.

“But 10 years on, progress is limited, mixed, and disappointing. If anything, the gap is widening as Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health gains are outpaced by improvement in non-Indigenous health outcomes.

“The Strategy has all but unravelled, and efforts underway now to refresh the Strategy run the risk of simply perpetuating the current implementation failures.

“The Strategy needs to be rebuilt from the ground up, not simply refreshed without adequate funding and commitment from all governments to a national approach.”

The Report Card outlines six targets to rebuild the Strategy:

  • committing to equitable, needs-based expenditure;
  • systematically costing, funding, and implementing the Closing the Gap health and mental health plans;
  • identifying and filling primary health care service gaps;
  • addressing environmental health and housing;
  • addressing the social determinants of health inequality; and
  • placing Aboriginal health in Aboriginal hands.

“It is time to address the myth that it is some form of special treatment to provide additional health funding to address additional health needs in the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander population,” Dr Bartone said.

“Government spend proportionally more on the health of older Australians when compared to young Australians, simply because elderly people’s health needs are proportionally greater.

“The same principle should be applied when assessing what equitable Indigenous health spending is, relative to non-Indigenous health expenditure.

“The Australian Institute of Health and Welfare estimates that the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander burden of disease is 2.3 times greater than the non-Indigenous burden, meaning that the Indigenous population has 2.3 times the health needs of the non-Indigenous population.

“This means that for every $1 spent on health care for a non-Indigenous person, $2.30 should be spent on care for an Indigenous person.

“But this is not the case. For every $1 spent by the Commonwealth on primary health care, including Medicare, for a non-Indigenous person, only 90 cents is spent on an Indigenous person – a 61 per cent shortfall.

“For the Pharmaceutical Benefits Scheme, the gap is even greater – 63 cents for every dollar, or a 73 per cent shortfall from the equitable spend.

“Spending less per capita on those with worse health, and particularly on their primary health care services, is dysfunctional national policy. It leads to us spending six times more on hospital care for Indigenous Australians than we do on prevention-oriented care from GPs and other doctors.

“We will not close the gap until we provide equitable levels of health funding. We need our political leaders and commentators to tackle the irresponsible equating of equitable expenditure with ‘special treatment’ that has hindered efforts to secure the level of funding needed to close the health and life expectancy gap.”

AMA Media Coverage 

The AMA 2018 Indigenous Health Report Card is at https://ama.com.au/article/2018-ama-report-card-indigenous-health-rebuilding-closing-gap-health-strategy-and-review

Part 2 : The Chairperson of the peak body for Aboriginal controlled health services Ms Donnella Mills today welcomed the release of the AMA’s 2018 Report Card on Indigenous Health and joined its call for rebuilding the Closing the Gap from the ground up.

Download the full NACCHO Press Release HERE

National Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation (NACCHO) Chairperson, Ms Donnella Mills said, “We congratulate the AMA on their work to support closing the gap and endorse the recommendations in the report.”

The report highlights research which indicates the mortality gaps between Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples and non-Indigenous Australians are widening, not narrowing.

The AMA estimate that the Commonwealth government spend on Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health is only 53% of needs-based requirements. Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples have at least twice the per capita need of the rest of the population because of much higher levels of illness and burden of disease.

“This underspend represents a significant failure” Ms Mills said. “Genuine commitment by Australian governments to Closing the Gap requires equitable funding.”

The funding shortfall is particularly important for primary health care services where big gains could be made in improving health, keeping people out of hospital and preventing premature deaths. Funding for Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Services, which deliver accessible, culturally safe, comprehensive primary health care across Australia, is not keeping up with need.

Alongside the increased funding for Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Service there is an urgent need for government to address the environmental health, housing and other social determinants of health inequality.

NACCHO, its Affiliates and members will continue to work with the AMA to urge the adoption of the Report Card’s recommendations by Australian governments.

Part 3 Busting the myth that Indigenous-led organisations ‘don’t deliver’

From NITV

Adrian Carson, CEO of the Urban Institute of Indigenous Health, said while national outcomes lagged behind, he had seen “significant” health improvements at a local level in south-east Queensland.

He urged governments to place more trust in Indigenous-led organisations to deliver services.

“This country’s still got a crisis in terms of its relationship with the First People,” Mr Carson told NITV News.

“The narrative’s a negative one, it’s always deficit-based, but we turn around and look at what parts of our sector are doing… we’re actually coming up with improved health outcomes within our community – they’re actually solutions that could benefit the whole country.

So this whole idea that somehow our communities can’t be trusted, or that we don’t have the capacity to deliver, is a myth.”

Mr Carson said while he welcomed the AMA’s report, it was important to take a proactive approach rather than dwelling on negative statistics.

“It doesn’t mean that things aren’t improving, because health outcomes for our people are improving,” he said.

“The challenge is that we’re trying to actually improve the pace of that improvement faster than some of the healthiest people in the world, which is what Australians enjoy – one of the healthiest countries on the globe.

“So you’re trying to actually close the gap between some of the sickest people in the world to some of the healthiest people in the world – it was always an ambitious target.”

Part 4 The Guardian Interview

The Australian Medical Association says the Closing the Gap strategy has “all but unravelled” and insists that the policy needs to be rebuilt from the ground up, starting with boosting health expenditure on Indigenous Australians and putting Aboriginal healthcare in Aboriginal hands.

A refresh of the program is expected to be considered at the December meeting of the Council of Australian Governments, but the AMA president, Tony Bartone, says Closing the Gap needs root-and-branch reform, not changes “without adequate funding and commitment from all governments to a national approach”.

Read in full 

 

 

NACCHO welcomes feedback/comment:Leave a Reply

Please log in using one of these methods to post your comment:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s