NACCHO Aboriginal Health #ACCHO Deadly Good News stories : New @NACCHOChair Elected #QLD @DeadlyChoices @IUIH_ #VIC Njernda ACCHO #NSW Orange and Tharawal #SA @DeadlyChoices #ACT @WinnungaACCHO #WA Kimberley AMS

1.1 National : Donnella Mills Becomes Chairperson of the  National Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation Plus NACCHO Board changes 

1.2 National NACCHO AGM 2019 acknowledges years of ACCHO Service

1.3 National : Download NACCHO Annual Report 2017-2018

2.1 NSW : Tharawal Aboriginal Corporation nurse named 2018 Australian Mental Health Nurse of the Year.

2.2 NSW : Orange ACCHO Health Service continues efforts to improve Aboriginal health

3.Vic : Njernda ACCHO chronic care coordinator, Garry Giles is empowering Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people across the country to improve their health

4.1 QLD : IUIH and University of Queensland awarded Outstanding Collaboration in Higher Education and Training through Business Higher Education Round Table (BHERT).

4.2 QLD : Deadly Choices help celebrate 20th Anniversary of Cunnamulla Aboriginal Corporation for Health and the 150th Anniversary of the town itself.

5. NT : Katherine West Health Board’s  Healthy Harold yarned with the Kids at Timber Creek about how to stay safe and healthy

6. SA : Deadly Choices SA mob exercise and eating health promotion

7. ACT : Winnunga ACCHO Canberra download their October 2018 Newsletter

8. WA : NACCHO and Kimberley Aboriginal Medical Services Syphilis Test and Treat kits now available in the Kimberley region in Western Australia

How to submit a NACCHO Affiliate  or Members Good News Story ?

Email to Colin Cowell NACCHO Media 

Mobile 0401 331 251

Wednesday by 4.30 pm for publication each Thursday /Friday

1.1 National : Donnella Mills Becomes Chairperson of the  National Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation Plus NACCHO Board changes 

I am very honoured and excited to be taking up the role of Chairperson for NACCHO. I would like to acknowledge the excellent leaders NACCHO has had in the past, I am following in the footsteps of some amazing people to continue the essential national conversation on community led health initiatives.

I believe Community Control is the key model for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health care and will see us achieving greater autonomy and self-determination for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people,

Donnella Mills pictured at NACCHO AGM this month in Brisbane thanking Indigenous Health Minister Ken Wyatt 

Wuchopperen Health Service Limited (Wuchopperen) Chairperson, Donnella Mills has been recognised for her contribution to improving the health and wellbeing of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people, through her appointment as Chairperson of the National Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation (NACCHO).

Donnella has served as the Deputy Chairperson of the NACCHO Board for the past 12 months and takes on the role of Chairperson following the 1 November resignation of John Singer.

When the new Board met for the first time after the AGM on 2 November, it fully endorsed the Deputy Chair, Donnella Mills to act in the role of Chairperson as set out in the NACCHO constitution.

NACCHO is the peak body for the Aboriginal Community Controlled health sector and represents 145 services, and 302 health centres across the country.

Donnella will work with the NACCHO Board to drive the national health debate in Australia, particular in regards to self-determination and community led solutions for closing the gap in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health.

Ms Mills is a Torres Strait Islander woman with ancestral and family links to Masig and Nagir in the Torres Strait. She is a Cairns-based lawyer with LawRight, a Community Legal Centre which coordinates the provision of pro bono civil legal services to vulnerable members of our community, as well as the Chairperson for Wuchopperen. She will use her previous experience in the legal and health care systems to address the issues facing our community in both Cairns, and on a national level.

“Health and legal issues are intrinsically linked. It is no coincidence Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people – among the most incarcerated people in the world – also have some of the poorest health outcomes in the world. The provision of Community Controlled, holistic and culturally appropriate health care services really is a way to ensure a healthy future for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people,” says Donnella.

CEO Pat Turner and the Board of NACCHO welcome her to the role of Chairperson and look forward to working with her over the next 12 months.

At the AGM, four new members were appointed to the new NACCHO Board. From Queensland, we are joined by Gail Wason, CEO of Mulungu Primary Health Care Service in Mareeba and Gary White, Chairman of Goondir Health Service in Dalby. From Victoria, we welcome Michael Graham, CEO of the Victorian Aboriginal Health Service and Karen Heap, CEO of Ballarat and District Aboriginal Cooperative.

The retiring members are: Adrian Carson and Kieran Chilcott from Queensland; and John Mitchell and Rod Jackson from Victoria. The Board thanks them all for their contribution to NACCHO over the years.

1.2 National NACCHO AGM 2019 acknowledges years of ACCHO Service

Congratulations on up to 40 years of service and the outstanding contribution by ACCHO Members .

On behalf of the NACCHO Board and 145 Members we also honour the community members and staff who were all seriously concerned about the availability of health care service to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples living there regions many years ago

1.Presented to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Community Health Service Mackay for 40 years of service WEBSITE 

2.Presented to Broome Regional Aboriginal Medical Service 40 years of service WEBSITE 

3.Presented to Winnunga Nimmityjah Aboriginal Health and Community Services 30 years of service WEBSITE 

4. Presented to Katungul Aboriginal Corporation Regional Health and Community Services 25 years of service WEBSITE 

Download a copy of all certificates

 J3291 – Member Services Anniversary certificates_v1

1.3 National : Download NACCHO Annual Report 2017-2018

Download from the NACCHO website 

2.1 NSW : Tharawal Aboriginal Corporation nurse named 2018 Australian Mental Health Nurse of the Year.

Matthew James knows all too well about the challenges that mental health can bring.

Mr James has assisted Macarthur’s Indigenous population as a mental health practisioner at the Tharawal Aboriginal Corporation for the past year.

The nurse leads Tharawal’s Byala team, which supports people struggling with mental health issues, or drug and alcohol-related problems.

Originally published Here 

Byala means “Let’s talk” in the local Dharawal Aboriginal language.

Mr James was rewarded for his dedication to the cause when he was named 2018 Australian Mental Health Nurse of the Year award late last month.

The Orangeville resident said he was nominated for the award by a Thawaral colleague.

“I’m stoked, it was really nice to get recognition at a national level,” he said.

Matthew always makes people feel comfortable… he is amazing.

Tharawal Aboriginal Corporation team manager Tina Taylor

He received the honour at an Australian College of Mental Health Nurses seminar in Cairns.

Mr James, who has more than 20 years of industry experience, joined the Tharawal team in October 2017.

He said his role included providing counselling, diagnosis reviews and medication for Indigenous people

“There is a huge amount of disadvantage here in Macarthur and there are challenges, such as helping people with trauma issues,” he said.

Tharawal Aboriginal Corporation was formed in 1983 to provide medical and community health services to Indigenous people.

Mr James said Tharawal did a great job supporting Macarthur’s Indigenous community.

“Tharawal offers the leading Aboriginal health service in Australia,” he said.

“I am very proud of our work.”

Tharawal’s social and emotional well-being team manager Tina Taylor said Mr James was a great leader and compassionate with his clients.

“Matthew has brought a whole new dynamic to the team,” Ms Taylor said.

“He always makes people feel comfortable… he is amazing.”

For more information about these services, visit the Tharawal Aboriginal Corporation Airds Facebook page.

2.2 NSW : Orange ACCHO Health Service continues efforts to improve Aboriginal health

IMPROVING the health of one of the region’s most vulnerable populations has been the focus for Orange Health Service during NAIDOC Week.

The hospital held its ceremony on Thursday, including a flag raising, acknowledgement of country, dancing and a barbecue lunch complete with cake, with more than 60 people in attendance.

Originally Published HERE

But general manager Catherine Nowlan said the full appreciation of the theme, ‘Because of her, we can’, came via a sustained effort for the entire week.

Health professionals shared stories about their own Aboriginal heritage and how the strong women in their lives inspired them to succeed in their adult careers, as well as about the Aboriginal patients they treated.

“One of our health leaders said she had the opportunity to meet the most wonderful Aboriginal lady and her family embraced her because she was part of the care team,” Ms Nowlan said.

“She said it was the simple things we do every day that make the difference.

“It’s all about creating a world worth living in and a responsibility to understand each other’s cultures.”

Orange Health Service has an Aboriginal component in its staff inductions on the need to involve the whole family in a patient’s treatment, as well as social conventions.

 “If you haven’t asked the question, how do you know? So it’s about giving the right and appropriate care.”

Orange Health Service general manager Catherine Nowlan

However, Ms Nowlan said there had also been extra training in July to help 370 staff members be more comfortable in asking patients when they arrived at the hospital as to whether they identified as Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander.

“By asking the question, it helps us improve the identification of patients,” she said.

3.Vic : Njernda ACCHO chronic care coordinator, Garry Giles is empowering Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people across the country to improve their health

AS A Yorta Yorta man, Garry Giles knows family comes first.

Followed by housing, food, safety.

And finally, lingering right at the bottom, health.

It’s an unspoken yet age-old hierarchy not just for his mob, but Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander (ATSI) people across the country.

Originally Published HERE 

And while it’s seen him raised in a tight-knit community where aunties, uncles, cousins and siblings (blood-related or not) always had his back, it’s also a hierarchy that has caused endless heartache.

Because, as Njernda chronic care coordinator, Garry has seen how neglected health can lead to tragic outcomes, with clients, friends and family members taken too soon.

Currently, indigenous Australians are two to three times more likely to develop a chronic disease than non-indigenous people.

These include cardiovascular disease, diabetes, and chronic kidney disease.

And not only are Indigenous Australians more likely to have each of these conditions individually.

They are also more likely to have all three, and die from them.

But Garry is dreaming of a (hopefully not too distant) day when this gap is closed.

‘‘There is a huge need, our community is very sick,’’ he said.

‘‘And so many of our people seem to put their health on the backburner and don’t realise these diseases can be managed, they can be controlled.’’

Garry started working in his community when he was just 15 as a farmhand on an Indigenous farm.

He then cleaned for Berrimba Childcare Centre for five years before moving into home and community care for another five years.

From there he moved into health, completing a certificate III in ATSI health, and two years later he was an Aboriginal health worker with Njernda.

At that point, it wasn’t really a dream come true — a career in health had never been on Garry’s radar previously.

‘‘One of my aunties encouraged me to do it,’’ he said.

‘‘She said I had the compassion and the heart for it. If it weren’t for her, I probably wouldn’t have gone down this path.’’

Garry has now been chronic care coordinator for 12 months — but even in this specialised role, he still needs to keep a range of talents up to scratch.

‘‘I can be a counsellor one day, a driver or support worker the next,’’ he said.

‘‘But my main focus is chronic care. I book clients in and liaise with all allied health services.

‘‘This is a one-stop shop as a lot of our mob don’t tend to go through mainstream health services for their care — they prefer to come here.’’

Allied health staff connected to Njernda include podiatrists, dentists, endocrinologists, optometrists and child and maternal health practitioners.

As well as mental health, diabetes and drug and alcohol services.

It can sometimes feel like a 24-hour job for Garry.

‘‘Everyone is linked in some way, we’re all like family,’’ he said.

‘‘So you might run into someone in the supermarket and have a consultation there, because they just need that reassurance.

‘‘A lot of people don’t have any family, so we become that family. And while we try not to work outside our opening hours, if people have no one and are a bit scared, we’re more than happy to help.’’

Garry said education was key to better health for ATSI people.

And through his role at Njernda, he’s seen how proper support and guidance can lead to life-changing outcomes.

‘‘One of the best things is seeing people take more control of their lives,’’ he said.

‘‘A lot of our mob have low self esteem after facing so many barriers in life and a chronic illness is just another burden.

‘‘But we want to empower them to take steps to improve their health.

‘‘Because if they’re not well, they can’t help anybody — they won’t be there for their grandchildren. They won’t be there for their family.’’

4.1 QLD : IUIH and University of Queensland awarded Outstanding Collaboration in Higher Education and Training through Business Higher Education Round Table (BHERT).

Congratulations to IUIH and University of Queensland for receiving an Award last night for Outstanding Collaboration in Higher Education and Training through Business Higher Education Round Table (BHERT).

Receiving the award here is IUIH CEO Adrian Carson, Chair of the IUIH Board Aunty Lyn Shipway, UQ representative Leanne Coombe, and IUIH Director of Workforce Development Alison Nelson.

IUIH is the largest Aboriginal community-controlled, health organisation in Australia, and the largest employer of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in South East Queensland.

The partnership with UQ was designed to address indigenous health disadvantage by developing a generation of health professionals familiar with the special challenges within Indigenous health offering placements within a community controlled clinical setting.

The program has grown from providing placements to 30 students across 3 disciplines in 2010 to more than 350 students across 20 disciplines in 2017.

Congratulations to the team involved and thanks to all the students and team who have completed placements and contributed to this partnership.

4.2 QLD : Deadly Choices help celebrate 20th Anniversary of Cunnamulla Aboriginal Corporation for Health and the 150th Anniversary of the town itself.

The DC team were on the road last week, in Cunnamulla for the 20th Anniversary of Cunnamulla Aboriginal Corporation for Health and the 150th Anniversary of the town itself. They also launched Deadly Choices at Cunnamulla.

While in the region, they visited Charleville and Western Areas Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders Community Health Limited and helped launch the Charleville Men’s Group, and joined them for a morning tea.

DC Ambassador Petero Civoniceva was a big hit with the locals and he can’t wait to get back out there again!

Too deadly everyone!

5. NT : Katherine West Health Board’s  Healthy Harold yarned with the Kids at Timber Creek about how to stay safe and healthy

Healthy Harold yarned with the Kids at Timber Creek about how to stay safe and healthy. One of the best ways to stay safe is to say no to drink driving.

The kids tried a driving game with beer goggles on to feel what it is like when a drunk person drives a car and everyone crashed 😱

It is dangerous to be driving a car, or be in the car with someone who is drunk.
If you are drinking give a sober person the keys to the car and always have a sober person to drive.

Keep your family and community safe
Drink Safe, Be Safe, Have a Deadly Time

#oneshieldforall
Life Education NT

6. SA : Deadly Choices SA mob exercise and eating health promotion

Having a workout buddy is a great advantage. Your workout partner could inspire and motivate you to reach your goal. Make that connection today!

#DeadlyChoicesSA #workout #friendship
📷 Power .aboriginal.programs

If you eat with other people you are more likely to eat regularly and healthy than those who eat alone or in front of the TV or computer.

#DeadlyChoicesSA #Eatinghealthyfact #healthytip

📷 Power .aboriginal.programs

7. ACT : Winnunga ACCHO Canberra download their October 2018 Newsletter

 Download the Newsletter

Winnunga AHCS Newsletter October 2018 (3)

8. WA : NACCHO and Kimberley Aboriginal Medical Services Syphilis Test and Treat kits now available in the Kimberley region in Western Australia

 
NACCHO and the Australian Government Department of Health are working together to coordinate an $8.8 million response to address the syphilis outbreak in Northern Australia. 

Kimberley Aboriginal Medical Services is the latest ACCHS to participate in training conducted by Flinders University and the roll out of the Test and Treat kits.  

Results from traditional blood tests can take up to two weeks to be processed, which cause issues with people moving on before receiving treatment and potentially spreading the disease.  The Test and Treat kits allow instant diagnosis and if needed, immediate treatment.
Kimberley Aboriginal Medical Services staff completing accredited training
Left to right
Tori Jamieson, KAMSC Sexual Health and Wellbeing Officer
Jarlyn Spinks, KAMSC Peer Education Support Officer
 
Tracey Kitaura, DAHS Aboriginal Health Worker (EN) Chronic Disease/STI/RHD
For further information please visit the NACCHO website https://www.naccho.org.au/programmes/esr/
 

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