NACCHO Aboriginal Health #ACCHO Deadly Good News stories : #NSW @Galambila ACCHO Keynote at #NATSIHWAsym18 #QLD @Apunipima #NT @MiwatjHealth #VIC Wathaurong ACCHO

1.National : Australian Digital Health Agency has produced a My Health Record animation for ACCHOs that has been translated into 13 different languages

2. NSW : Keynote at #NATSIHWAsym2018 Creating Value at Galambila ACCHO Aboriginal Health Service

3. QLD : The Apunipima ACCHO Cape York Social Emotional Wellbeing Team Walk to Raise Awareness of Mental Health

4.NT : Miwatj ACCHO Tackling Indigenous Smoking  Team were invited by Yalu to join a camp out at Ŋayawili Outstation

5. VIC : Aboriginal Community Health and Fitness Challenge comes to Wathaurong ACCHO

6.WA : Not good news : As PM Scott Morrison abandons WA’s remote communities

 

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NACCHO 7 Page Conference Program 2018_v3

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1.National : Australian Digital Health Agency has produced a My Health Record animation for ACCHOs that has been translated into 13 different languages:

Watch Translation 

  • Yolngu matha (NT – Arnhem Land)
  • Pitjanytjatjarra  (NT, SA and WA – APY Lands)
  • Arrernte (NT – Central desert)
  • Warlpiri (NT – Central desert)
  • Gurindji Kriol (NT – North/central west region)
  • Roper River Kriol (NT – North/central east region)
  • Tiwi (NT – Tiwi Islands)
  • Murrinh Patha  (NT – Port Keats region)
  • Kunwinjku (NT – Arnhem Land)
  • Alyawarr (NT – Central desert)
  • Anindilyakwa (NT – Groote Eylandt)
  • Pintupi Luritja (NT, WA – APY Lands)
  • Burarra (NT – Arnhem Land)

You can check them out here 

2. NSW : Keynote at #NATSIHWAsym2018 Creating Value at Galambila ACCHO Aboriginal Health Service

 ” No matter where I worked, there were cultural clashes that caused division in workplaces especially in Aboriginal Affairs because of the risk factor politically and socially”

Kristine Garrett CEO Galambila ACCHO is from Central Queensland with ancestral ties to the Wulli Wulli and the Darumbal people of the region and was a keynote speaker for NATSIHWA Professional Development Symposium 2018, ‘Engaging our Workforce’, the focus was on upskilling  Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander Health Workers and Health Practitioners through a series of interactive workshops

Originally Published Indigenous X

For most of my career I have travelled up and down the east coast of Australia doing different jobs. At the age of 27 I was living and working on the Block in Redfern. I was there when the Eora Centre (back then it was the Visual and Performing College) was just being built. They were radical times – one Radio Redfern Tagline ‘The Station that make your Black Hearts Burn’. Nostalgic I know but, them were the days.

In 2013 I was fortunate to be offered the CEO Position at Galambila in Coffs Harbour New South Wales. As someone from off-country, and a Murrie to boot, you have to work hard on community and kinship protocols.

No matter what age you have to walk the culture path, be humble, pay respect to elders, ask where you can or cannot go and ask what community want to see at their organisation. Sometimes it is something very simple like offering a cup of tea.

Building rapport is sometimes based on unwritten codes – we are still oral people and so much is dependant on what we say and do; or we do what we say. Some family groups already knew me from the Redfern days or had ways of finding out about me. So my transition was slow and I really wanted to gain an insight into the community and the organisation.

No matter where I worked, there were cultural clashes that caused division in workplaces especially in Aboriginal Affairs because of the risk factor politically and socially. Sometimes subtle organisational norms, other times quite blatant practices bordering on racism, and sometimes we as Aboriginal people are too accepting of the racial overtones.

My observations at Galambila that initially bio-medical constructs dominated the culture of our organisation and it caused tension across into other areas. Our Aboriginal workforce are from the community so they faced the same social disadvantage, sometimes they are the only income of the extended family, at times they cannot pay bills, they face violence and as a CEO I too carry a cultural load..

What occurs when tensions are driven from multiple identities; bio-medical, political, social and individualised, it becomes unclear what we stand for as an organisation.

We face those tensions today especially relating to Traditional Medicine. Even today I continue with my debate about traditional medicine; we can place a bowl of Apples on the reception table and say ‘this is good for you’ and yet we can’t say the same for Wattle Tree Tea, Sarsprilla Vine or even my go to herb native Gumbi Gumbi.

Is it that they haven’t been studied? Or is it because they haven’t been grafted and commercialised? I am yet to find the answer so I continue to stimulate the conversation.

The World Health Organisation has established guidelines for alternative approaches, acupuncture etc and we are sometimes too slow to capitalise on our opportunities. It becomes a resourcing issue always doing the urgent rather than the important things.

Major changes were introduced in 2014 at Galambila. The Aboriginal Workforce moved to front-line services, it didn’t matter whether the workers were drivers, facility maintenance workers, receptionist, admin, doctors, nurses, Aboriginal Health Workers, Board members, community members or other key stakeholders everybody could have a say.

The challenge was we were no closer to knowing what we stood for as an organisation. We needed a framework to bind all the differencing of opinions to identify our true essence of what we say and do.

Through a quality framework ‘Yiidagay Darundaygu’ (Gumbaynggir Language ‘Always becoming good for a Purpose’). The Cultural Integrity was formed and we are still working on it today.

Giinagay is hello in Gumbaynggir Language – our Board were the real drivers to the introduction of Gumbaynggir Language across the organisation as it provides a connection, automatically when you engage with Galambila you are part of something wonderful.

Galambila’s Image is paramount we are no longer known as Gamin-billa, our business is to care and sometimes that is as simple as a smile when you walk into the Clinic, offering a cup of tea.  Laughter is the sweet sound of success not forgetting Galambila is also a place where we can cry. Giinagay is hello in Gumbaynggir Language – our Board were the real drivers to the introduction of Gumbaynggir Language across the organisation as it provides a connection, automatically when you engage with Galambila you are part of something wonderful.

What has been an unexpected benefit to our approach, has been Galambila serving an active Aboriginal Clients demographic representing 87% of the Aboriginal population on the Coffs Coast.  Our medicare income has tripled over 4 years. To lead collectively is a willingness to dream for the same things. With a stable Board of Directors, fantastic management, solid staff and loyalty to our community anything is possible – but be warned it is a lot of hard bloody work.

Awesome address by Tyson Morris who started at Galambila Health Service with no qualifications. He now has a Cert 4 in Fitness and completed his clinical training. Galambila is all about up skilling and providing training and study for all their Health Workers.

 

3. QLD : The Apunipima ACCHO Cape York Social Emotional Wellbeing Team Walk to Raise Awareness of Mental Health

Conquer the Corrugations – Cape York Mental Health Awareness Walk, has just completed its fourth annual walk from Coen to Archer River in Cape York and Apunipima Cape York Health Council (Apunipima) were proud sponsors and participants in this year’s event.

Completed over two days, walkers and horse riders, complete the 42 kilometres from Coen to Archer River Roadhouse, camping overnight, just beyond the halfway point on a cattle station.

The 2018 event marks the third year that Maureen Liddy, Apunipima’s Social Emotional Wellbeing Team Leader in Coen has completed the challenge. This year she led a team of Apunipima staff from Coen and Cairns in their first Conquer the Corrugations walk.

“The walk is a good way to demonstrate that with determination we can overcome and achieve anything.” Maureen said.

“It’s important to raise the awareness of mental health in the Cape and this event does a great job getting the message out.” Said Maureen.

Maureen said that even though the event was both a physical and mental challenge, there was support each step of the way from fellow walkers and the organisers.

“People really come together to cheer each other on, give a hug if it’s needed or simply listen to your story while you walk. Often that is all you need to do to help someone whose mental health is suffering.” Maureen added.

Emma Jackson one of the organisers of Conquer the Corrugations, said that the walk was a way to demonstrate that life is a series of ups and downs, just like the corrugations in a dirt road.

“There may be down times, but there will also be up times and if we save one life, if we help one person get the help they need, the event is a success.” Emma said.

“The reason that I am so passionate about this event, is because I want my children to know that it is OK to not be OK all of the time, and to know that there is always someone you can talk to about how you are feeling.” Emma added.

Rachel McIvor and Randall Fyfe, from Apunipima Social Emotional Wellbeing (SEWB) Centre in Coen were the backbone of the team ensuring that the Apunipima walkers did not need to worry about a chair, or bed at the end of the long days over the long weekend. Rachel also participated on the second day by walking hand in hand with each member of the team across the line in true team spirit.

Maureen’s passion for the event and her determination to walk the entire distance this year, won her the people’s choice award “Spirit of the Walk.” The final 19 kilometres of the walk Maureen completed in socks and thongs, because of the large blisters she developed on day one. That is the spirit of the walk!

“I may be a bit stiff and sore, but I’ll be back next year.”

We have no doubt that Maureen will be one of the first to register for the 2019 Conquer the Corrugations and her infectious enthusiasm will ensure that Apunipima is well represented at next year’s event.

4.NT : Miwatj ACCHO Tackling Indigenous Smoking  Team were invited by Yalu to join a camp out at Ŋayawili Outstation.

Last week, Glen, Oscar and Tarlissa from the Miwatj TIS Team were invited by Yalu to join a camp out at Ŋayawili Outstation.

Our TIS team provided a lot of education on the harmful effects of smoking and the long-term consequences. #StartTheJourney #MiwatjHealth

 

5. VIC : Aboriginal Community Health and Fitness Challenge comes to Wathaurong ACCHO 

 Wathaurong Aboriginal Co-Operative is proud to be launching I Dare Ya!, a free Aboriginal Health and Wellbeing program for the Geelong Community.

With six weeks, six ‘Deadly Dares’ and six fun workouts to challenge yourself and one grouse piece of merchandise up for grabs, I Dare Ya is the most fun you’ll ever have shaking up your health and wellbeing!

Wathaurong Aboriginal Co-Operative invites the Geelong Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Community to join in I Dare Ya. Learn from Health Professionals about how to create sustainable change, be inspired by motivational speakers who have turned their health around and meet new people on the journey to living their most deadly and healthy lives.

I Dare Ya is a localized and culturally based health promotion program that addresses the growing rates of physical inactivity, obesity and chronic disease in the Aboriginal Community but is the one behavior change program they can’t wait to be apart of!

“With over 50 registrations already, it is the whole of Community and after hours approach that is driving the successful uptake of I Dare Ya” says Laura Thompson, a Gunditjmara woman and managing director of Spark Health.

Each week we will take on a different topic to help us reach our goals before getting moving. We have something for every fitness level. It doesn’t matter if you’re just starting out or running marathons – we’ve got you covered!

Registrations are open for I Dare Ya and more information can be found at

https://sparkhealth.com.au/pages/i-dare-ya

Week One of I Dare Ya kicks off on Thursday 11th October at Wathaurong Aboriginal Co-Operative (62 Morgan Street, North Geelong VIC 3215).

The Wathaurong Aboriginal Co-Op are excited to be partnering with Spark Health to launch I Dare Ya in Geelong. “We are proud to offer innovative opportunities for our Community to come together to be healthy, strong and deadly role models. We can’t wait to see everyone there!

  • Free Six Week Health and Wellbeing Program at Wathaurong Aboriginal Co-Operative (62 Morgan Street, Geelong North)
  • Dates: Thursday 11th October to Thursday 15th November 2018.
  • Six Weeks, Six Deadly Dares, Six Fun Workouts, One piece of grouse merch!
  • Registrations now open: www.surveymonkey.com/r/iDareYa
  • Kids welcome, families encouraged to come together.

About Spark Health:

Spark Health is an Aboriginal-led health promotion, Aboriginal Community engagement and communications social enterprise who are experts in designing engaging and innovative Community based programs that add years to peoples’ lives.

At Spark, we are excited about health and believe in the change and ripple effect of a healthy lifestyle in closing the gap.

www.sparkhealth.com.au

About Wathaurong Aboriginal Co-Operative:

The Wathaurong Aboriginal Co-operative Ltd was formed by the community in 1978 to support the social, economic, and cultural development of Aboriginal people, particularly within the Geelong and surrounding areas.

The Co-operative provides a range of services including; family and community services, support to young people, justice support services; cultural heritage services, and health services.  The Co-operative expanded to include a Community Controlled Health Service, which contributes toward addressing the inequality in health status of Aboriginal people. The Wathaurong Health Service supports the general well-being of Aboriginal people by providing holistic health care with clinical and primary care services as well as health promoting activities. Wathaurong Aboriginal Co-operative Ltd is the largest employer of Aboriginal people within the Geelong region.

www.wathaurong.org.au

6.WA : Not good news : As PM Scott Morrison abandons WA’s remote communities

Prime Minister Scott Morrison’s obstinate defence of the Commonwealth Government’s axing of funding to support about 165 remote communities in Western Australia, illustrates his indifference for some of Australia’s most vulnerable people.

Housing Minister Peter Tinley was responding to the Prime Minister’s assertion today that support for remote housing is purely a State responsibility, following the expiration of a $1.2 billion, 10-year joint funding agreement between the Commonwealth and WA on June 30.

The Commonwealth has a 50-year history of supporting remote communities – many of which were established in WA as a result of Federal Government policy.

Under the terms of the former agreement, the Commonwealth contributed about $100 million annually to support the approximately 12,000 people living in 165 remote communities in WA.

The State Government’s annual contribution totals almost $90 million to support and maintain the nation’s most distributed population.

The WA Government has been trying to negotiate a new long-term funding agreement but the Commonwealth has consistently indicated it wants to walk away from any further involvement in funding WA’s remote communities.

Comments attributed to Housing Minister Peter Tinley:

“Premier Mark McGowan wrote to then PM Malcolm Turnbull in May this year to try to gain an agreed outcome to negotiations for a new long-term deal to support remote communities.

“He never got a reply. So last month he wrote to the new PM, Mr Morrison, reiterating the State’s position and asking for his personal intervention to resolve the issue. He is still to receive a reply to that letter.

“Yet today, we see the PM waltzing around Perth declaring that support for vulnerable Western Australians is no longer in the interests of the Commonwealth and that remote housing funding is purely a State responsibility.

“Walking away from a long-term funding agreement for remote communities will leave a $400 million hole in WA’s forward estimates and abandon thousands of Western Australians to further distress.”

 

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