NACCHO Aboriginal Health #ACCHO Deadly Good News stories : Governor-General visits @WinnungaACCHO Plus #NSW #StrokeWeek2018 Events @Galambila @ReadyMob @awabakalltd #Tamworth #VIC #BDAC #BADAC #QLD @Apunipima #NT @AMSANTaus @CAACongress #WA @TheAHCWA

1.ACT: Governor-General visits Winnunga Nimmityjah ACCHO

2.QLD : Apunipima Cape York Health Council (Apunipima ) Doctor Mark Wenitong and daughter Naomi promotes Stroke Week 2018

3.1 NSW : Galambila ACCHO and Ready Mob staff take up challenge to promote stroke awareness and prevention in the Coffs Harbour region

3.2 NSW :  Tamworth Aboriginal stroke survivors tell their stories

3.3 NSW : Awabakal ACCHO wants the community to be aware of stroke 

4.WA: AHCWA staff members travelled to remote Warburton to deliver Family Wellbeing training at the CDP. #womenshealthweek 

5.1: NT : AMSANT celebrates the graduation of 10 future health leaders!

5.2 NT : Alukura Congress Alice Springs celebrate #WomensHealthWeek and prepare for next weeks #WomensVoices forums with June Oscar 

6. VIC : Karen Heap, CEO of Ballarat and District Aboriginal Cooperative (BADAC) was the winner of the Walda Blow Award.

6.2 VIC : The Robin Clark Award: Making a Difference category was awarded to the Aboriginal Children in Aboriginal Care (Section 18 Pilot) team at Bendigo and District Aboriginal Co-operative (BDAC

MORE INFO AND REGISTER FOR NACCHO AGM

How to submit a NACCHO Affiliate  or Members Good News Story ?

Email to Colin Cowell NACCHO Media 

Mobile 0401 331 251

Wednesday by 4.30 pm for publication each Thursday /Friday

1.ACT: Governor-General visits Winnunga Nimmityjah ACCHO

Winnunga Nimmityjah Aboriginal Health and Community Service was honoured and pleased by a visit on September 3 from his Excellency the Governor-General Sir Peter Cosgrove and Lady Cosgrove.

Winnunga Nimmityjah CEO Julie Tongs briefed their Excellency’s on the range of services which are provided to the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander community of Canberra and the region.

Sir Peter was particularly interested in the range and breadth of services which are provided to the community and learn that of the almost 7000 clients which Winnunga sees each year that almost 20% are non- Indigenous.

Sir Peter was also very interested to explore with Julie Tongs the rationale for the decision that has been taken in the ACT by the ACT Governmnet and Winnunga Nimmityjah to establish an autonomous Aboriginal managed and staffed health clinic within the Alexander Maconochie Centre to minister to the health needs of Aboriginal prisoners.

Following the briefing Sir Peter and Lady Cosgrove joined all staff for afternoon tea.

It was Chris Saddler an Aboriginal Health Practitioner at Winnunga and Lieutenant Nam’s birthday so the visitors sang happy birthday to both . Sir Peter  gave Chris and Julie a medal with the inscription Governor General of the Commonwealth of Australia with the Crown and a wattle tree.

2.1 QLD : Apunipima Cape York Health Council (Apunipima ) Doctor Mark Wenitong and daughter Naomi promotes Stroke Week 2018

The current guidelines recommend that a stroke risk screening be provided for Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander people over 35 years of age. However there is an argument to introduce that screening at a younger age.

Education is required to assist all Australians to understand what a stroke is, how to reduce the risk of stroke and the importance be fast acting at the first sign of stroke.”

Dr Mark Wenitong, Public Health Medical Advisor at Apunipima Cape York Health Council (Apunipima), says that strokes can be prevented through a healthy lifestyle and Health screening, and just as importantly, a healthy pregnancy and early childhood can reduce risk for the child in later life.

Naomi Wenitong  pictured above with her father Dr Mark Wenitong Public Health Officer at  Apunipima Cape York Health Council  in Cairns:

Share the stroke rap with your family and friends on social media and celebrate Stroke Week in your community.

Listen to the new rap song HERE  or Hear

The song, written by Cairns speech pathologist Rukmani Rusch and performed by leading Indigenous artist Naomi Wenitong, was created to boost low levels of stroke awareness in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities.

Stroke Foundation Chief Executive Officer Sharon McGowan said the rap packed a punch, delivering an important message, in a fun and accessible way.

“The Stroke Rap has a powerful message we all need to hear,’’ Ms McGowan said.

“Too many Australians continue to lose their lives to stroke each year when most strokes can be prevented.

“Music is a powerful tool for change and we hope that people will listen to the song, remember and act on its stroke awareness and prevention message – it could save their life.”

Ms McGowan said the song’s message was particularly important for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities who were over represented in stroke statistics.

Aboriginal and or Torres Strait Islanders are twice as likely to be hospitalised for stroke and are 1.4 times more likely to die from stroke than non-indigenous Australians. These alarming figures were revealed in a recent study conducted by the Australian National University.

There is one stroke every nine minutes in Australia and Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people are overrepresented in stroke statistics. Strokes are the third leading cause of death in Australia.

Apunipima delivers primary health care services, health screening, health promotion and education to Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander people across 11 Cape York communities. These health screens will help to make sure you aren’t at risk  .

We encourage you to speak to an Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander health Practitioner or visit one of Apunipima’s Health Centres to talk to them about getting a health screen.

What is a stroke?

A stroke occurs when the blood flow to the brain is interrupted, depriving an area of the brain of oxygen. This is usually caused by a clot (ischaemic stroke) or a bleed in the brain (haemorrhagic stroke).

Brief stroke-like episodes that resolve by themselves are called transient ischaemic attacks (TIAs). They are often a sign of an impending stroke, and need to be treated seriously.

Stroke is a time-critical medical emergency. The longer a stroke remains untreated, the greater the chance of stroke-related brain damage. After an ischaemic stroke, patients can lose up to 1.9 million neurons a minute until blood flow to the brain is restored.

What to do in case of stroke?

Stroke is a time-critical medical emergency. The longer a stroke remains untreated, the greater the chance of stroke-related brain damage. After an ischaemic stroke, patients can lose up to 1.9 million neurons a minute until blood flow to the brain is restored.

The Australian National Stroke Foundation promotes the FAST tool as a quick way for anyone to identify a possible stroke. FAST consists of the following simple steps:

Face – has their mouth has dropped on one side?

Arm – can they lift both arms?

Speech – Is their speech slurred? Do they understand you?

Time – is critical. Call an ambulance.

3.1 NSW : Galambila ACCHO and Ready Mob staff take up challenge to promote stroke awareness and prevention in the Coffs Harbour region

The @Galambila ACCHO and @ReadyMob staff  hosting #strokeweek2018 on Gumbaynggirr country ( Coffs Harbour ) : Special thanks to Carroll Towney, Leon Williams and Katrina Widders from the Health Promotion team #ourMob#ourHealth #ourGoal #fightstoke @strokefdn

Recently released Australian National University research, found around one-third to a half of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in their 40s, 50s and 60s were at high risk of future heart attack or stroke. It also found risk increased substantially with age and starts earlier than previously thought, with high levels of risk were occurring in people younger than 35.

The good news is more than 80 percent of strokes can be prevented,’’ said Colin Cowell NACCHO Social Media editor and himself a stroke survivor.

“This National Stroke Week, we are urging all Australians to take steps to reduce their stroke risk.

“As a first step, I encourage all the mob to visit to visit one of our 302 ACCHO clinics , their local GP or community health centre for a health check, or take advantage of a free digital health check at your local pharmacy to learn more about your stroke risk factors.

“Then make small changes and stay motivated to reduce your stroke risk. Every step counts towards a healthy life,” he said.

Top tips for National Stroke Week:

  • Stay active – Too much body fat can contribute to high blood pressure and high cholesterol.  Get moving and aim exercise at least 2.5 to 5 hours a week.
    •Eat well – Fuel your body with a balanced diet. Drop the salt and check the sodium content on packaged foods. Steer clear of sugary drinks and drink plenty of water.
    • Drink alcohol in moderation – Drinking large amounts of alcohol increases your risk of stroke through increased blood pressure, type 2 diabetes, obesity and irregular heart beat (atrial fibrillation). Stick to no more than two standard alcoholic drinks a day for men and one standard drink per day for women.
    • Quit smoking – Smokers have twice the risk of having a stroke than non-smokers. There are immediate health benefits from quitting.
    • Make time to see your doctor for a health check.  Ask for a blood pressure check because high blood pressure is the key risk factor for stroke. Type 2 diabetes, high cholesterol and atrial fibrillation are also stroke risks which can be managed with the help of a GP.National Stroke Week is the Stroke Foundation’s annual stroke awareness campaign.

3.2 NSW :  Tamworth Aboriginal stroke survivors tell their stories

WHEN Aboriginal elder Aunty Pam Smith first had a stroke she had no idea what was happening to her body.

On her way back to town from a traditional smoking ceremony, she became confused, her jaw slack and dribbling.

FROM HERE

Picture above : CARE: Coral and Bill Toomey at National Stroke Awareness Week.

“I started feeling headachey, when they opened up the car and the cool air hit me I didn’t know where I was – I was in LaLa Land,” she said.

A guest speaker at the Stroke Foundation National Stroke Awareness Week event in Tamworth, Ms Smith has created a cultural awareness book about strokes for other Aboriginal people.

Watch Aunty Pams Story

She hopes it will teach others what to expect and how to look out for signs of a stroke, Aboriginal people are 1.4 times more likely to die from stroke than non-Indigenous people.

But, most still don’t go to hospital for help.

“Every time we went to a hospital we were treated for one thing, alcoholism – a bad heart or kidneys because of alcohol,” Ms Smith said.

“We were past that years ago, we’re up to what we call white fella’s things now.”

Elders encouraged people to make small changes in their daily lives, to quit smoking, eat a balanced diet and drink less alcohol.

For Bill Toomey it was a chance to speak with people who understood what it was like to have a stroke. A trip to Sydney in 2010 ended in the Royal Prince Alfred Hospital when he was found unconscious.

Now in a wheelchair, Mr Toomey was once a football referee and an Aboriginal Health Education Officer.

“I wouldn’t wish a stroke on anyone,” Mr Toomey said.

“I didn’t have the signs, the face didn’t drop or speech.”

His wife Coral Toomey cares for him, she was in Narrabri when he was rushed to hospital.

“Sometimes you want to hide, sit down and cry because there’s nothing you can do to help them,” she said.

“You’re doing what you can but you feel inside that it’s not enough to help them.”

Stroke survivor Pam Smith had a message for her community.

“Please go and have a second opinion, it doesn’t matter where or who it is – go to the hospital,” she said.

“If you’re not satisfied with your doctor go to another one.”

3.3 NSW : Awabakal ACCHO wants the community to be aware of stroke 

Did you know that Aboriginal people are up to three times more likely to suffer a stroke than non-Indigenous Australians, and twice as likely to die from a stroke?

This week is National Stroke Week, so make sure you know the signs of a stroke and call 000 if you suspect someone is experiencing a stroke.

Common risk factors for stroke include:
– High blood pressure
– Increasing age
– High cholesterol
– Diabetes
– Smoking

4.WA: AHCWA staff members travelled to remote Warburton to deliver Family Wellbeing training at the CDP. #womenshealthweek 

Veronica and Meagan had the opportunity to work closely with a group of the women in town. The ladies got to work on their paintings whilst participating in the Family Wellbeing training which focused on dealing with conflict and recognising personal strengths.


The week ended with a delicious lunch out bush and lots of smiles!

5.1: NT : AMSANT celebrates the graduation of 10 future health leaders!

Chair of the Aboriginal Medical Services Alliance [AMSANT], Donna Ah Chee, said it wasn’t just the arrival of spring in the deserts of Central Australia to be welcomed today as the Aboriginal community-controlled health sector celebrated the graduation of 10 future leaders in receiving Diplomas in Leadership and Management.

“This is of course a wonderful achievement for each of the graduates who have put in a lot of hard work while still holding on to their full-time jobs,” said Ms Ah Chee.

“But just as important is what it means for the entire Aboriginal community controlled health sector—these women and men are the future, they are our future leaders in what are difficult, complex roles, they are role models for younger people, they are role models for their families and communities.

“Already organisations are moving graduates into managerial and team leader roles, and we are looking towards future intakes of students across a range of training opportunities in the sector— in management, administration, cultural leadership, community engagement and research.”

John Paterson, CEO of AMSANT reflected at the graduation ceremony in Alice Springs that while the work in the sector was very challenging, it was extraordinarily fulfilling.

“It really is the best sector to work in, no two ways about it.

“These new graduates are at the heart of what Aboriginal community control in comprehensive primary health care is about, it’s about people with lived experience in their own communities and families and having the strength and tenacity to take on the challenges we face in Aboriginal primary health care here in the Northern Territory.”

The graduates were drawn from the Katherine West Health Board, Anyinginyi Health, Miwatj Health and the Central Australian Aboriginal Congress (Congress).

Anyinginyi graduate, Nova Pomare, said that it hadn’t always been easy to get through the course.

“It was pretty hard working full time, studying and having to leave home away from family to attend the face-to-face course work in Darwin,” she said.

“But we were supported by our work places who have shown faith in our abilities and committed to our futures.”

Graduates of Diploma in Leadership and Management:

Anita Maynard Congress Velda Winunguj Miwatj Health

Carlissa Broome Congress Stan Stokes Anyinginyi Health

Glenn Clarke Congress Mahalia Hippi Anyinginyi Health

Samarra Schwarz Congress Nova Pomare Anyinginyi Health

John Liddle Congress Lorraine Johns Katherine West Health Board

5.2 NT : Alukura Congress Alice Springs celebrate #WomensHealthWeek and prepare for next weeks #WomensVoices forums with June Oscar 

 

 

6. VIC : Karen Heap, CEO of Ballarat and District Aboriginal Cooperative (BADAC) was the winner of the Walda Blow Award.

6.2 VIC : The Robin Clark Award: Making a Difference category was awarded to the Aboriginal Children in Aboriginal Care (Section 18 Pilot) team at Bendigo and District Aboriginal Co-operative (BDAC).

National Child Protection week began for VACCHO and the Victorian Aboriginal Children and Young People’s Alliance (Alliance) at the 2018 Victorian Protecting Children Awards on Monday 3 September 2018.

The Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS) annual awards recognise dedicated teams and individuals working within government and community services who make protecting children their business.

We are pleased to announce that two of the 13 award winners were Aboriginal Community Controlled Organisations and Members of VACCHO and the Alliance.

Karen Heap, CEO of Ballarat and District Aboriginal Cooperative (BADAC) was the winner of the Walda Blow Award.

This award was established by DHHS in partnership with the Victorian Commissioner for Aboriginal Children and Young People, in memory of Aunty Walda Blow – a proud Yorta

Yorta and Wemba Wemba Elder who lived her life in the pursuit of equality.

Aunty Walda was an early founder of the Dandenong and District Aboriginal Cooperative and worked for over 40 years improving the lives of the Aboriginal community. This award recognises contributions of an Aboriginal person in Victoria to the safety and wellbeing of Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander children and young people.

Karen ensures the safety and wellbeing of Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander children and young people are always front and centre.

Karen has personally committed her support to the Ballarat Community through establishing and continuously advocating for innovative prevention, intervention and reunification programs.

As the inaugural Chairperson of the Alliance, Karen contributions to establishing the identity and achieving multiple outcomes in the Alliance Strategic Plan is celebrated by her peers and recognised by the community service sector and DHHS.

Karen’s leadership in community but particularly for BADAC, has seen new ways of delivering cultural models of care to Aboriginal children, carers and their families, ensuring a holistic service is provided to best meet the needs of each individual and in turn benefit the community.

The Robin Clark Award: Making a Difference category was awarded to the Aboriginal Children in Aboriginal Care (Section 18 Pilot) team at Bendigo and District Aboriginal Co-operative (BDAC).

This award is for a team within the child and family services sector who has made an exceptional contribution to directly improve the lives of children, young people and families,

BDAC have lead the way, showing the Alliance member organisations what it takes to run the Aboriginal Children in Aboriginal Care (Section 18) program. BDAC have adapted a child protection model to incorporate holistic assessment and an Aboriginal cultural lens to support the children and families.

They have evidence that empowered decision making improves outcomes, particularly family reunification. The BDAC CEO, Raylene Harradine and Section 18 Pilot team have shown dedication, empathy and long term commitment in getting the program right for their organisation and clients, so that they can share their learning and program model with other ACCOs.

Their leadership in community has created waves of innovation in delivering cultural models of care to vulnerable Aboriginal children, carers and their families, achieving shared outcomes for all.

VACCHO and the Alliance walk away feeling inspired by all to do the best we can for our Koori children and young people, congratul

 

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