NACCHO Aboriginal Health #ACCHO Deadly Good News stories : From #NT #QLD #NSW #VIC #WA Features New Optimal Care Pathway for our mob with cancer provides principles & guidance to ensure that #cancer care is culturally safe and responsive @CancerAustralia

1.VIC : Melanie Hill Lane Aboriginal Health Worker and Cancer Survior from MDAS ACCHO Kerang has been part of developing Australia’s first Indigenous Cancer Protocol

2.1 NSW : Penrith is set to become the home of a new primary health care service that will help to address the health needs of the local Aboriginal community.

2.2 NSW: Summer Hunt now in charge at Coomealla Health Aboriginal Corporation #becauseofherwecan

3.1 NT : Congress Alice Springs : Blow Breathe Cough video activity in Western Arrernte

3.2 NT Danila Dilba ACCHO Deadly Choices Building up a new generation of future leaders

4.1 WA: AHCWA : Commencing the delivery of the Certificate II Family Well-being

5.1 QLD : Rapid Response Syphilis Testing at Wuchopperen Health Service

 View hundreds of ACCHO Deadly Good News Stories over past 6 years

 

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1.VIC : Melanie Hill Lane Aboriginal Health Worker and Cancer Survior from MDAS ACCHO Kerang has been part of developing Australia’s first Indigenous Cancer Protocol

“Melanie Hill Lane with her children (From L) Dakoda 11, Chardae 9,Taj 13 and Kai 16. Picture: Daryl Pinder.”

When Melanie Lane was diagnosed with cancer six years ago, she became part of a grim and growing statistic: the rising number of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders afflicted by the disease, with a 40 per cent greater likelihood of dying from it than non-indigenous Australians.

A non-smoker and Aboriginal health worker, the mum of four was blown away by her surprise lung tumour diagnosis at the age of 37 during a scan for an unrelated complaint.

Now recovered, she says the treatment and round of surgeries that cleared her two years later — including a partial lung removal — would probably have been a vastly better experience with a new cancer protocol being launched this week by Indigenous Health Minister Ken Wyatt.

Download Optimal care pathway for Aboriginal and
Torres Strait Islander people with cancer

optimal-care-pathway-for-aboriginal-and-torres-strait-islander-people-with-cancer

The Australian-first “Optimal Care Pathway for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people with cancer” includes a detailed series of printed resources to be distributed throughout the health system aimed at practitioners and patients. It works from the principle that indigenous Australians have specific cultural needs and their outcomes will be better if these are taken into account.

Low screening rates and later-stage diagnoses are troubling hurdles, according to Jacinta Elston, pro-vice-­chancellor (indigenous) at Monash University and, like Ms Lane, a contributor to the new Cancer Australia resource.

“We know Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders are not getting the best out of the system,” said Professor Elston, a breast cancer survivor herself. “Whether it’s late presentation to healthcare services or lack of access to same-stage treatment, which could be to do with cultural appropriateness of services or people living in poverty not having the same access.

“Or Stolen Generations, where people have a lot of other things going on in life, or people living with chronic diseases; if you’re living with other diseases … then being in the right mindset to do all the right preventative things might be difficult.”

With cancer now the second- leading cause of death of indigenous Australians after cardiovascular disease, Mr Wyatt predicted the new approach could have a significant effect on attempts to close the gap on indigenous health disadvantage.

“The impacts of trauma across generations of our people, including historical events, must be acknowledged and addressed,” he said. “It is important for health services and programs to understand that the biological impact of stress and trauma can be an underlying cause of poor health.”

VIEW VIDEO

Prof Tom Calma explains how the new Optimal Care Pathway will help to ensure quality care for Indigenous Australians with cancer to improve their treatment experience & outcomes

A new, first of its kind, Optimal Care Pathway released today identifies approaches to quality care for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people with cancer to improve their cancer treatment experience and outcomes.

Cancer is the third leading cause of fatal burden of disease for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people who are, on average, 40 per cent more likely to die from cancer than non-Indigenous Australians.

Healthcare that is patient-focused and that is respectful of, and responsive to, the preferences, needs and values of patients, is critical to good health care outcomes.

The Optimal Care Pathway for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people with cancer provides health services and health professionals across all sectors in Australia with principles and guidance to ensure that care is responsive to the needs of Indigenous people.

Cancer Australia is calling on health professionals and health services involved in the delivery of cancer care at every level to read, use, adopt and embed the Optimal Care Pathway for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people with cancer into their practice.

The Optimal Care Pathway is accompanied by consumer resources, which outline what patients should expect on the cancer pathway, and the care they should be offered, from tests and diagnosis, through to treatment and care after treatment, management of cancer that has spread, and end-of-life care.

Cancer Australia has partnered with the Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS) Victoria, in collaboration with Cancer Council Victoria, to develop this first population-based Optimal Care Pathway for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people with cancer.

Cancer Australia gratefully acknowledge the contribution of Cancer Australia’s Leadership Group on Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Cancer Control, who provided high level expert advice and guidance throughout the development of the Optimal Care Pathway.

For more information

2.1 NSW : Penrith is set to become the home of a new primary health care service that will help to address the health needs of the local Aboriginal community.

Wellington Aboriginal Corporation Health Service (WACHS) recently announced the opening of the new Penrith Aboriginal Medical Service clinic, which is set to help fill the gap in the health needs of Aboriginal locals.

WACHS’ Executive Manager of Business Services, Adam Stuart, said the clinic will deliver a comprehensive primary health care service, similar to the services offered at their Greater Western Aboriginal Health Service centre in Mt Druitt.

“We look forward to establishing a new service to really address something that is probably a gap in the health needs of the Aboriginal population in that area,” he said.

“There is a whole range of access barriers sometimes to the hospital system, so this is about a service that provides a culturally safe service for that area and that community.”

The new clinic will create six positions with a GP, nurses, Aboriginal health workers and transportation aids set to help make up the service.

Mr Stuart said these services were a recognition of the Aboriginal population’s health needs in the Nepean Blue Mountains region.

“We know that the Aboriginal population in the Nepean and western Sydney area is one of the largest numbers in the country and the demographics of that population show they are a lot younger community,” he said.

“The other thing is that we know that the disparities in health outcomes is well documented, so we want to look at a primary health care service that can assist in going some way in addressing that need.”

Mr Stuart said it was important to provide better access to care for the Aboriginal community.

“We are trying to address those access barriers and what we would consider our preventable hospital admissions that can be prevented by timely access to appropriate primary health care,” he said.

Located in Lawson Street, Penrith, the establishment of the clinic was a result of funding provided by the Department of Health and the Ministry of Health in 2017.

“We want to acknowledge the support of NSW Ministry of Health and the local health district for providing $1.5 million in capital works funding,” Mr Stuart said.

2.2 NSW: Summer Hunt now in charge at Coomealla Health Aboriginal Corporation #becauseofherwecan 

Above :Incoming Coomealla Health Aboriginal Corporation CEO Summer Hunt, chairperson Jan Etrich and outgoing CEO Barry Stewart.

COOMEALLA Health Aboriginal Corporation (CHAC) has appointed Summer Hunt as its new chief executive officer.

Ms Hunt will transition to the role after three years working as deputy CEO to Barry Stewart.

Mr Stewart and Ms Hunt were appointed in 2015 in the roles of CEO and deputy CEO respectively, and at that time implemented a three-year plan for Mr Stewart to oversee a set of key changes required to stabilise and improve the organisation. Ms Hunt undertook an intensive on-the-job training program before moving into the CEO role.

3.1 NT : Congress Alice Springs : Blow Breathe Cough video activity in Western Arrernte 

Australian Hearing and Menzies School of Health Research have collaborated to create an animated version of this classroom favourite: the Blow Breathe Cough activity in Western Arrernte . Check it out!

View Video HERE 

3.2 NT Danila Dilba ACCHO Deadly Choices Building up a new generation of future leaders

Deadly Choices ran a session on Leadership at Moulden Primary School with the grade 5s, followed by playing a traditional Indigenous game called Edor. Our Deadly Choices team recently added Moulden Primary school, meaning we can now deliver education on healthy lifestyles to school kids of all ages. Building up a new generation of future leaders.

4.1 WA: AHCWA : Commencing the delivery of the Certificate II Family Well-being

With the Aboriginal Health Council of Western Australia – AHCWA commencing the delivery of the Certificate II Family Well-being, AHCWA Youth Committee members have taken the opportunity to participate and develop our skills. We have found it to be very beneficial not only for our professional careers in the Health Sector, but also our personal lives 💫

For more info on the Certificate II Family Well-Being, please contact AHCWA on 9227 1631.

5.1 QLD : Rapid Response Syphilis Testing at Wuchopperen Health Service

Wuchopperen Health Service Limited  rolled out rapid, point of care testing for syphilis on Monday 13 August.

The tests are part of an $8.8 million Australian government initiative to combat the syphilis outbreak in northern Australia.

Wuchopperen CEO Dania Ahwang said she welcomed the new tests.

‘These tests will make a difference to the health of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in northern Australia, and may even save lives.’

‘We welcome the Australian Government’s investment in this critically important public health issue.’

‘I urge Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people aged 15 – 39 to come in for a point of care test from Monday onwards. If you are outside that age group and have concerns, standard blood tests are always available.’

Wuchopperen Medical Director Dr Jacqueline Mein said the new tests offered a range of benefits.

‘The finger prick test takes 15 minutes to get a result compared to a standard blood test which can take a number of days to get processed,’ she explained.

‘This means that the client can get their results fast, and any follow up tests or treatment can be booked in on the spot.’

‘Point of care testing reduces the risk of the condition being passed on while clients are waiting for their results, or of not being able to get in touch with a client once the results are in.’

‘I
n the event of a positive test, it also makes it easier to find out who a client may have passed the condition on to.’

Wuchopperen has received 3000 tests, and will be offering them to all clients aged 15 – 39. The tests are available from the Manoora and Edmonton facilities from Monday 13 August.

Image: Registered Nurse Amon Nteziryayo conducting a rapid test

 

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