NACCHO Aboriginal Health #ACCHO Deadly Good News stories : Features #NT @MiwatjHealth at #GARMA2018 @DanilaDilba #WA @TheAHCWA #QLD @QAIHC_QLD @Apunipima #VIC @VACCHO_org #ACT @June_Oscar #WomensVoices

1.WA : AHCWA : $1 million of funding for the Aboriginal Health Council of Western Australia to help empower Aboriginal communities to improve their health and wellbeing

2.1 NT : William Tilmouth, the chairman of Children’s Ground, delivers his speech at Garma 2018

2.2 NT : Danila Dilba ACCHO supporting Homeless Week in Darwin

2.3 : Low aromatic fuel available for sale in Darwin, in a win for remote communities in the region battling petrol sniffing.

3.1 NSW : Aboriginal Chronic Conditions Conference promotes ACCHOs

3.2 Bulgarr Ngaru ACCHO  Grafton hosted a morning tea breast screening

4.VIC : VACCHO signs an MoU with Peter McCallum Cancer Clinic 

5.QLD : The Queensland Aboriginal and Islander Health Council and Apunipima Cape York Health Service brought on-board to support delivery of the ice addiction program in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities.

6.ACT : The Wiyi Yani U Thangani team is heading Canberra

 View hundreds of ACCHO Deadly Good News Stories over past 6 years

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1.WA : AHCWA : $1 million of funding for the Aboriginal Health Council of Western Australia to help empower Aboriginal communities to improve their health and wellbeing

It gives me great satisfaction to see this program progress to the next phase. Delivering programs like this locally is important because it is those who are on the ground that understand the issues facing their communities best, and can provide input into how to best address those particular issues.

As the first program of its kind in Western Australia, I am proud to be part of a State Government that supports initiatives to help Aboriginal individuals, families and community organisations improve their health and wellbeing.

I look forward to seeing this program continue to progress as we work toward increasing the mental health and wellbeing of Aboriginal people across Western Australia.

WA Mental Health Minister Roger Cook:

As the Family Wellbeing Project enters its next phase, Aboriginal communities across Western Australia are receiving training from the Aboriginal Health Council of Western Australia to deliver the program to help improve mental health and wellbeing.

The Family Wellbeing Project is the first program of its kind in Western Australia and aims to empower Aboriginal individuals, families and community organisations to take greater control over their lives, and fully participate in the community to help improve their health and wellbeing.

Death by suicide is a major cause of early death in Aboriginal people. In 2016, the death by suicide rate for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians was more than three and a half times the rate of non-indigenous Australians.

The Aboriginal Health Council of Western Australia is currently training Aboriginal Medical Services, Aboriginal workers and community members in the Central Desert region to build their capacity to take ownership, so they can go on to deliver the Family Wellbeing Project in their own communities.

More training is taking place in the Perth metropolitan region in August, with training expected to be completed in the Central Desert, Perth metropolitan, South-West and the Goldfields regions by the end of the year.

By the end of 2019, it is expected the Pilbara, Kimberley and Murchison/Gascoyne regions will all have received training, so the program can then be delivered on a local level, by local people, across the State.

For support, call beyondblue on 1300 224 636 for 24/7 free counselling or Lifeline in a crisis situation on 13 11 14.

2.1 NT : William Tilmouth, the chairman of Children’s Ground, delivers his speech at Garma 2018

 ” The Uluru Statement from the Heart is the collective statement from our people across nations. There should be no debate. What has been asked for is clear.

These days my energy is on lifting the voice and governance of the grassroots. Where the answers lie.

At Children’s Ground we see what can happen when you are culturally empowered ­‐ a whole community, family and kids are mobilised into taking ownership and control and being a part of their own destiny.

William Tilmouth, the chairman of Children’s Ground, delivers his speech at Garma 2018.

Mr Timouth is also Chair of Congress ACCHO Alice Springs

WATCH VIDEO HERE

Firstly I want to recognise the traditional owners of this beautiful country and your ancestors. I recognise the old people who are our past and present and the young people who are our next generation and future. To distinguished and special guests.

My thanks to the Yothu Yindi Foundation for having me and the Children’s Ground team here today.

This year Garma is about truth telling. I will share some of my truths.

My key message today is this. Don’t keep creating a foundation for our children that is fragmented and fractured. But create a foundation that is solid and grounded in the depth of our heritage, spiritually, culture language and identity.

As opposed to what is now more of the same.

The tired, worn-out, tried and tested forced and failed policies of assimilation and yesteryear. A system designed by colonisation to disempower us to fracture us and our families. Designed to take and whittle away at everything that we held close and that defined us as a people.

I have a good command of English but I cannot speak my own language

A system designed to favour the oppressor and to keep the oppressed down and dependent on the meagre rations and handouts. To divide us giving preference and voice to some and not to others.

It is up to all of us to think seriously about what we are doing, why we are doing it and how we are doing it.

Our kids don’t need to be fixed. Our kids need to grow up as Aboriginal children with rights and opportunities, with a voice and the ability to control their own destination.

I am mix-matched – a creation by others who decided they knew what was best for me. I am a product of assimilation. I am a product of being denied my identity, my family, my country, culture and my language.

In the west I am a success. I was the kid who came good – became a model working citizen, living in my own home, paying my rent in advance, hiding my identity and keeping my relatives at a distance.

What you see today, you might think is acceptable – but to me it’s not.

Why? Because I have spent a lifetime, along with my brothers and sisters, trying to rebuild and recapture all that was stolen and denied us.

The tragedy of all that is that not one Aboriginal person escaped the policy that was then and still is in the mindset of decision makers today.

Assimilation is just a heartbeat away in everything we aspire to achieve as a people.

There are too many sorries and not enough truths

I have a good command of English but I can not speak my own language. I have grandchildren but I was denied my mother and father.

Sometimes I don’t know where I belong or where I’m going – or who am I?

That is a question that you are left with: Who am I?

Coming here was hard for me, coming back up north. I was stolen and taken to Croker Island. Minjilang and its people hold some of my fondest memories as a child. There was heaps of nature but very little or no nurture. Notwithstanding the efforts of the cottage mothers who had to spread their love over 12 or so distraught children each.

Leaving Alice Springs was hard because I still cling onto home.

I am the sum of my experiences and my experiences are such that my life doesn’t have the cultural integrity and grounding that it should have.

I’m not recognised in native title.

I’m not recognised in land rights.

When my father’s traditional lands were given back, my brother and I were not even notified of the ceremonial handback. The apology meant nothing to me – there are too many sorries and not enough truths.

I get the chance to speak here because I have made the English language my friend and people feel comfortable with that. But what does it mean to have a voice, if that voice is not really heard or understood?

We are talking about constitutional change. Recognition in white society. Legislative changes that has to happen.

The Uluru Statement from the Heart is the collective statement from our people across nations. There should be no debate. What has been asked for is clear.

These days my energy is on lifting the voice and governance of the grassroots. Where the answers lie.

At Children’s Ground we see what can happen when you are culturally empowered ­‐ a whole community, family and kids are mobilised into taking ownership and control and being a part of their own destiny.

William Tilmouth is the chair of Children’s Ground.

This is the speech he gave at Garma festival 2018

2.2 NT : Danila Dilba ACCHO supporting Homeless Week in Darwin

Greet to see the Danila Dilba crew as well as staff from different businesses and organisations from Darwin today at Mindil beach for Homelessness Week. Right now, more than 116,000 Australians are homeless, meaning 1 in every 200 people.

It was great to see the support from local organisations working together today to help homeless people and campaign for increased support. #HW2018

2.3 : Low aromatic fuel available for sale in Darwin, in a win for remote communities in the region battling petrol sniffing.

The Shell Coles Express service station in Winnellie has become the first site in Darwin to stock low aromatic fuel, joining around 175 other outlets across the Northern Territory, Queensland, South Australia and Western Australia.

Minister for Indigenous Affairs, Nigel Scullion said that low aromatic fuel was a proven success in reducing harm.

“Petrol sniffing can have a major impact on the health and wellbeing of individuals, their families and entire communities.

“Research has shown that the rollout of low aromatic fuel has reduced the instance of petrol sniffing by 88 per cent in communities with low aromatic fuel since 2005. We know that a comprehensive regional approach works best, which is why I am pleased that low aromatic fuel is now available from one outlet in Darwin.

“This will allow anyone travelling to communities from Darwin to fill up with low aromatic fuel, or take low aromatic fuel with them for use in small engines such as boat engines or lawn mowers. Low aromatic fuel is already available in almost all Northern Territory communities outside of Darwin.

“This is good news for communities, visitors and contractors or other workers bringing machinery and fuel into communities.

“The Australian Government helps to reduce the impact of petrol sniffing through the supply of low aromatic fuel, working in partnership with fuel manufacturers, retailers, distributors and mechanics.

“I commend Viva Energy Australia for their work to make low aromatic fuel available in Darwin, which will help to improve health and wellbeing in remote communities.”

Scott Wyatt, CEO of Viva Energy Australia said, “We are incredibly proud to have supported the government’s petrol sniffing prevention program since 2007, and over the past four years we have been manufacturing the product at our Geelong refinery and supplying it into the Northern part of Australia.

Having LAF now available at the Shell Coles Express Winnellie service station in Darwin is an important step for people filling up in Darwin before heading to remote communities.”

3.1 NSW : Aboriginal Chronic Conditions Conference promotes ACCHOs

ACCN Co-Chair Bob Davis on how the @NACCHOAustralia sector provides culturally safe local health services & the burden of multiple funding sources.

MC for   conference was Troy Combo from Bulgarr Ngaru Medical Aboriginal Corporation (Casino)

 

Need for transformative change that includes social determinants. Build environments that support self mgt & healthy living.

3.2 Bulgarr Ngaru ACCHO  Grafton hosted a morning tea breast screening

On Wednesday the 1st of August, Bulgarr Ngaru Grafton hosted a morning tea breast screening in Maclean for our female patients that were eligible to have a mammogram done.

During the wait, there was a deadly morning tea provided for the Elders and patients to enjoy. A spread of fruit, vegetables, cake and sandwiches!

The morning was a success! Having several patients arrive for their appointment and to then share a nice morning tea while taking in the beautiful weather with our staff (Kristy-Lee, Fiona and Jaleesa) and our well respected Elders.

If you are between the ages of 40 to 74 years and are interested in having your breast screening mammogram done, the team at Bulgarr will be organising a group booking for the months of September and November. We encourage you to get into contact with Kristy-Lee, at the Grafton AMS and ask how you can make your appointment!

4.VIC : VACCHO signs an MoU with Peter McCallum Cancer Clinic 

 

Peter Mac CEO Dale Fisher: cancer outcomes for Aboriginal peoples are not good enough. As a specialist centre we have an obligation to improve these outcomes. We want to be leaders in a culturally safe way.

WATCH VIDEO here 

5.QLD : The Queensland Aboriginal and Islander Health Council and Apunipima Cape York Health Service brought on-board to support delivery of the ice addiction program in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities.

 

The Queensland state government is investing $5.4 million across two years towards helping regional families break the cycle of ice addiction.

Almost one-in-three children who go into state care have a parent with a current or previous methamphetamine problem, child safety minister Di Farmer said on Sunday.

The new ‘Breakthrough for Families’ program aims to help parents break the cycle of addiction so they can safely look after their children.

“This drug causes rapid damage within families. Most of the harm is to children under the age of five, and usually happens less than a year after the parent starts using ice,” Farmer said in a statement.

“These families need specialist help if they aspire to being good parents to their children.”

The program will target Cape York, Townsville, Cairns, the Sunshine Coast, Logan and Caboolture, Mackay, Darling Downs, West Moreton and South West, and the Wide Bay.

It will include individual support sessions, public workshops and forums, and will be delivered by Apunipima Cape York Health Service, Lives Lived Well, Drug Arm and Bridges Aligned Service.

The Queensland Aboriginal and Islander Health Council and Apunipima Cape York Health Service brought on-board to support delivery of the ice addiction program in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities.

6.ACT : The Wiyi Yani U Thangani team is heading Canberra

June Oscar AO and her team are excited to hear from Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women and girls across the country as a part of the Wiyi Yani U Thangani Women’s Voices project.

Whilst we will not be able to get to every community, we hope to hear from as many women and girls as possible through this process. If we are not coming to your community we encourage you to please visit the Have your Say! page of the website to find out more about the other ways to have your voice included through our survey and submission process.

We will be hosting public sessions as advertised below but also a number of private sessions to enable women and girls from particularly vulnerable settings like justice and care to participate.

Details about current, upcoming and past gatherings appears below, however it is subject to change. We will update this page regularly with further details about upcoming gatherings closer to the date of the events.

Canberra, Wreck Bay and Nowra

Canberra
Location Date Time Address Who? Registration
Gugan Gulwan Youth Aboriginal Corporation Tuesday 28 August 2018 9:00am – 1:00pm 1 Gratton Court Waniassa ACT 2903 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Women and Girls Register
The Department of the Prime Minister and Cabinet Tuesday 28 August 2018 2:00pm – 5:30pm Central Plaza 16 Bowes Place, Phillip ACT 2606 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Women in the Australian Public Service only Register
Women’s Legal Centre Wednesday 29 August 2018 12:30pm – 4:30pm Conference Room, Ground Floor, 21 Barry Dr, Turner ACT 2601 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Women and Girls Register
Wreck Bay
Jervis Bay High School Thursday 30 August 2018 12:00pm – 4:00pm Dykes Avenue Jervis Bay ACT 2540 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Women and Girls Register
Nowra
Nowra Showground Friday 31 August 2018 09:00am – 1:30pm Committee Room, Nowra Showground, 20 West Street, Nowra NSW 2541 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Women and Girls Register

 

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