NACCHO Aboriginal Health #ACCHO Deadly Good News stories : Features Kimberley Aboriginal Medical Services #WomensAFLFooty #BecauseofHerWeCan #herruleshergame @DeadlyChoices #JuniorMurriCarnival @IUIH_ #NSW @AHMRC #IndigenousHealthSummit #VIC #Tasmanian Aboriginal Centre hosting #OCHREday2018

1. This weeks Feature : Kimberley Aboriginal Medical Services (KAMS) health workers are kicking a few health goals with their women’s footy team #becauseofherwecan

2.1 National : NACCHO Chairs and Executive appear at Constitutional recognition relating to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples

2.2 National : NACCHO in partnership to Improving medication management in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities

2.3.NACCHO supporting the eye health needs of Indigenous people

3.QLD : Much more than Sport at Deadly Choices Junior Murri Carnival

4.Vic : $13.7 million to continue Aboriginal Children in Aboriginal Care (ACAC) and receive culturally sensitive planning and case management from an Aboriginal Community Controlled Organisation (ACCO)

5.NSW : AHMRC and NSW Health #IndigenousHealthSummit report

6. NT AMSANT Nomination open for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Practitioner Excellence Awards

7. TAS : National ACCHO’s  to travel to Hobart in August for the National NACCHO Male Health Conference : Registrations Free

8. SA Tackling Tobacco Team – Nunkuwarrin Yunti Campaign

 View hundreds of ACCHO Deadly Good News Stories over past 6 years

How to submit a NACCHO Affiliate  or Members Good News Story ?

 Email to Colin Cowell NACCHO Media    

Mobile 0401 331 251

Wednesday by 4.30 pm for publication each Thursday /Friday

 

1.WA Kimberley Aboriginal Medical Services (KAMS) health workers are kicking a few health goals with their women’s footy team #becauseofherwecan

In 2018 Kimberley Aboriginal Medical Services (KAMS) identified an opportunity to partner with West Kimberley Women’s Football League. KAMS saw this as a chance to not only promote the benefits of team sport but to link Aboriginal Medical Services to local teams.

KAMS looks forward to the bright future of women’s footy in the Kimberley and the benefits this brings to the health of entire communities

Come and see these footy players who also happen to be KAMS Aboriginal Health Worker students this Friday at the NAIDOC celebration in front of the police station. They can test your blood sugar levels or blood pressure. You can also chat to them about health worker training at KAMS

When women’s footy started in Broome it was a first for many. For us old girls it was something we always wanted to do growing up, because although we got to kick the footy around with our dads and brothers, God forbid us girls could take to the field!

Today for these young guns, Darliah Killer and Sophira “Lala” Buaneye, their footy careers have just begun. This is their start to something far bigger! From their ‘grass roots’ beginnings on the dirt oval in Looma to the green grass of Broome, yet I hope to see them go all the way to the MCG in professional women’s AFL.

Broome Girls Academy has watched them grow over the past five years, their effortless talents and naturally ease with the football leaves us all in awe and sometimes envy.

To these girls and all the others who can make an AFL dream a reality – be thankful to the many women who have gone before you who worked tirelessly to make Womens footy happen. Grab every opportunity, and the football with both hands!

#becauseofherwecan

#herruleshergame

2.1 National : NACCHO Chairs and Executive appear at Constitutional recognition relating to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples

 ” It depends on whether you go a functional representation—whether it’s legal services, health services, educational services or whatever, as representation for a voice, or you go from another elected structure, depending on what its functions are.

From the community-controlled health perspective, I’d definitely support the establishment of a health commission, because we are such an integrated part of the health architecture of this country and we’re getting better results, I believe. We do need to grow our delivery of comprehensive primary health care in the areas where we don’t deliver at the moment in order to make sure that we can avoid preventable hospital admissions which, I believe, we do do where we’re working very well.

That’s the high cost to the states—the overrepresentation of Aboriginal people in hospitals, just like in jails, at the negative end of the spectrum. Whereas, if we invested more in our model of the community-controlled health care at the local level, we could lower hospital admissions in my experience. I think a health commission has an important role to play.

The biggest failures are in economic development and wealth creation for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people. I think much more needs to be done in areas where there is little or no employment in creating innovative employment and wealth creation initiatives, given that we own so much land.

 We’ve never been given the resources to really develop that in a way that is consistent with our culture and our responsibilities to country, along with making sure that all of the residents get a fair cut of the wealth that’s created. “

Pat Turner NACCHO CEO responding to Senator Dodson’s question “ How would bodies like NACCHO or First Nations controlled organisations sit with the voice? “ Picture above from WA hearing

Download or Read the 23 Page Transcript HERE

NACCHO Appearance at Constitutional Recognition

2.2 National : NACCHO in partnership to Improving medication management in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities

Equitable access and effective use of medicine is critical to closing the gap in health and life expectancy between Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders and other Australians.

Professor Amanda Wheeler from Griffith University’s Menzies Health Institute Queensland, has formed a partnership with the Pharmacy Guild of Australia and the National Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation (NACCHO).

The research team will work with Aboriginal Health Services and community pharmacies to promote culturally appropriate medication review services and Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health and well-being.

The Pharmacy Guild is the peak organisation for community pharmacy owners and they are working with the Commonwealth Department of Health on the Pharmacy Trial Program (PTP). The PTP aims to trial new and expanded community pharmacy programmes to improve health outcomes for consumers and/or extend the role of pharmacists in the delivery of primary healthcare services through community pharmacy.

“The Pharmacy Guild and Griffith researchers have been working together for quite some time,” says Professor Wheeler.

“It’s long been known that Indigenous communities face some big problems with access to medicines, advice and review services, it’s just not a simple fix,” she says.

“Establishing and maintaining trust and respectful relationships are crucial elements of what we’re trying to achieve.”

Professor Adrian Miller, formerly of Griffith University, will be subcontracted through Central Queensland University and will lead governance from an Indigenous research/cultural responsiveness perspective. NACCHO is viewed as a critical partner to further support appropriate community engagement and service provision.

This is the third major research project Professor Wheeler has conducted in partnership with the Pharmacy Guild into improving services provided by community pharmacies.

The research will develop, implement and evaluate the outcomes of culturally appropriate medication review services for Indigenous peoples (known as the IMeRSe Feasibility Study), which will be delivered by community pharmacists working with patients and staff of Aboriginal Health Services.

The purpose of the service is to empower patients to better manage their medicines, enhance adherence, avoid medication-related problems and prevent hospitalisations.

This will be a two-year feasibility study across Queensland, Northern Territory and New South Wales and is funded by the Australian Government Department of Health (see http://6cpa.com.au/pharmacy-trial-program/indigenous-medication-review-service-feasibility-study/).

2.3.NACCHO supporting the eye health needs of Indigenous people

Vision 202 CEO Judith Abbott and Policy and Advocacy Manager Danielle Williams met with Indigenous Health Minister Ken Wyatt and NACCHO Deputy CEO Dawn Casey to discuss the eye health needs of Indigenous people and those in aged care

3.QLD : Much more than Sport at Deadly Choices Junior Murri Carnival

Participation in any Deadly Choices program requires individuals to commit to a comprehensive health check and complementing health management plan, so there’s strong health values associated with the brand,

We get real outcomes across the whole spectrum of the community; from infants, adolescents and our elders, everyone is positively affected.

To date, comprehensive health care management plans for more than 35,000 individuals have been activated among an Indigenous population of almost 70,000 in South-east Queensland.”

Deadly Choices ambassadors, former Brisbane Broncos, Queensland and Australian rugby league players Steve Renouf

Up to 600 South-east Queensland families are expected to converge on the St Lucia grounds of the University of Queensland on July 2-4, where competition in rugby league and netball will be staged for children (6-12 years), during the Deadly Choices Junior Murri Carnival.

And as with all Deadly Choices initiatives, mandatory health checks will have taken place before confirmation of each individual registration to this free event. The directive is one wholeheartedly supported by notable Deadly Choices ambassadors, former Brisbane Broncos, Queensland and Australian rugby league players Steve Renouf and Petero Civoniceva, plus fellow former NRL player Preston Campbell.

“The Junior Murri Carnival is a very important part of the Deadly Choices event mix, with overall health and well-being of communities at its core.

“This program enables us to motivate kids into ideal lifestyle choices with respect to nutrition, exercise and education.”

Deadly Choices is providing a national blueprint towards greater life expectancy among Australia’s Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander populations, with Civoniceva relishing the opportunity to contribute.

“Deadly Choices is well engrained within communities throughout South-east Queensland, ensuring members are healthy, active and obviously educated around what needs to be done to be living a very healthy lifestyle for themselves and their families,” said Civoniceva.

“Programs like the Junior Murri Carnival will hopefully light the fire within our little people in what they want to achieve in life and make positive steps towards achieving those goals and chasing their dreams.”

Rugby league in particular has been synonymous with Indigenous representation from the great Artie Beetson, our first ever Maroons captain in State of Origin; a wonderful man and leader who left a tremendous legacy.

“And now with Greg Inglis as captain of Queensland, it’s fantastic to have such great role models and people out there achieving amazing things and showing our young people that if you work hard and dream big, you can achieve anything.”

Testament to this mantra is Preston Campbell, who despite his diminutive frame escalated himself to cult status in the NRL, claiming the 2001 Dally M Player-of-the-Year title and securing a 2003 premiership ring with the Penrith Panthers.

“Sharing the good word among community around positive health, both physically and mentally, is something I believe in and feel privileged to be a part of through Deadly Choices,” confirmed Campbell.

“It’s all positive, making a difference in communities and providing a chance to give back. I love being at events like the Junior Murri Carnival, spending time and staying connected with community.”

From Caboolture down to Tweed Heads, across to Stradbroke Island and into Laidley, there were more than 9,000 new patients accessing local Aboriginal health services during the 12 months to June 2017, through Aboriginal Health Clinics under the jurisdiction of IUIH, the management arm of Deadly Choices.

“There’s an obvious appetite and consciousness among south-east Queensland communities to become more responsible for their own health,” confirmed IUIH CEO Adrian Carson.

Extensive health services provided by communities – for communities, are offered via the IUIH network, which has just topped 20 allied health clinics, following the acquisition of a fully-equipped Margate health service.

“Collectively it equates to happier, healthier communities.

“Importantly, life expectancy among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders will increase as will the overall quality of life for all individuals through this strategic health practice framework.

“With the Indigenous population of south-east Queensland expected to double to more than 150,000 people over the next 15 years, the importance of our communities continuing to make healthy choices are an imperative, as are the positive frameworks we’re establishing through programs like the Junior Murri Carnival.”

4.Vic : $13.7 million to continue Aboriginal Children in Aboriginal Care (ACAC) and receive culturally sensitive planning and case management from an Aboriginal Community Controlled Organisation (ACCO)

 ” We’ve invested $225 million in Aboriginal child and family services since 2014 – more than doubling the investment by the previous Liberals Government.

The future of Aboriginal children matters – and that’s why we will continue to prioritise Aboriginal self-determination and focus on improving outcomes for them.”

Minister for Families and Children Jenny Mikakos

The Andrews Labor Government is expanding key supports for vulnerable Aboriginal children in care to ensure they remain connected to culture, community and country.

At the Aboriginal Children’s Forum today, Minister for Families and Children Jenny Mikakos announced $13.7 million to continue Aboriginal Children in Aboriginal Care (ACAC), which enables Aboriginal agencies to assume legal responsibility for the welfare of a child in care.

The Australian-first initiative – which began last year – allows a child to receive culturally sensitive planning and case management from an Aboriginal Community Controlled Organisation (ACCO) that understands their needs.

Under the new funding boost, two extra case work teams will be recruited by 2020, to triple the number of Aboriginal children to receive case management to 108.

This funding – part of $53.3 million announced in the Victorian Budget 2018/19 to support Aboriginal children – will also enable ACAC to be delivered by a further two ACCOs, with a total of 216 children authorised plus a fourth ACCO in pre-authorisation phase by 2020.

A further $6.4 million will be provided to ACCOs to grow their services, and support an estimated 331 Aboriginal people to complete a VET or higher degree – including in social work or community services – or traineeships.

The Labor Government is also working to address the overrepresentation of Aboriginal young people in the youth justice system by enhancing culturally appropriate programs.

As part of the $10.8 million investment through the latest Budget, $5 million will be used to continue to expand the Koori Youth Justice Program, which provides community-based intervention and responses for Aboriginal young people at risk of entering the criminal justice system.

The program provides early intervention assistance to Aboriginal young people while at school, as well as camps and other connecting-to-culture activities. There has been a 27 per cent increase in the number of young people engaged in this program since 2017.

The Labor Government is prioritising Aboriginal child and family services under its landmark Roadmap for Reform agenda and the ground-breaking tripartite agreement, Wungurilwil Gapgapduir: Aboriginal Children and Families Agreement.

We are building family and community capacity, reducing the number of Aboriginal children in care and keeping children who cannot live safely at home connected to their extended family, culture and country.

5.NSW : AHMRC and NSW Health #IndigenousHealthSummit report

The 5th Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Summit featured big discussions from leading thinkers, policymakers and practitioners – on stage, on CroakeyTV and on Twitter – on how to reset Indigenous health.

In this final post in Croakey’s coverage from the one day biennial #IndigenousHealthSummit event in Sydney, you can watch a compilation of interviews with presenters and organisers by Croakey contributing editor Summer May Finlay, and check out graphic artwork depicting the discussions (by Devon Bunce from Digital Story Tellers), and some tweets and selfies that captured some themes and moments in the day.

Full Report HERE

 

6. NT AMSANT Nomination open for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Practitioner Excellence Awards

The 2018 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Practitioner (ATSIHP) Excellence Awards are open for nominations. Minister for Health, Natasha Fyles, said the awards are an opportunity to acknowledge the outstanding performance and contribution made by our ATSIHP workforce.

“Our dedicated Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health practitioners play a unique and important role in providing primary health care across the NT, often in challenging circumstances and locations,” Ms Fyles said.

“I encourage the community to get behind the awards and nominate someone you know to be doing a great job in one of the categories.”

The ATSIHP categorise are:

  • Remote Practitioner
  • Urban Practitioner
  • Specialist Practitioner
  • New Practitioner

Ms Fyles said the ‘Legend’ Award will be presented to the overall winner from the four award categories.

Assistant Minister for Suicide Prevention, Mental Health and Disabilities, Ngaree Ah Kit, said Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Practitioners play an important role in catering to the health needs of Indigenous Territorians.

“The ATSIHP awards are a fantastic mechanism to celebrate their wonderful contributions and the positive impact they have had on clients and the wider community and I encourage all Aboriginal health service users to nominate a worthy practitioner today,” Ms Ah Kit said.

These awards are managed by the Northern Territory Department of Health and are delivered in partnership with

United Voice, the Aboriginal Medical Services Alliance Northern Territory and the Rotary Club of Darwin Sunrise.

Nominations close 5.00 pm on Friday 20 July 2018, with recipients announced at an event in Alice Springs in September.

For more information please visit the ATSIHP website http://www.atsihp.nt.gov.au/ or contact Aboriginal Workforce Development, People and Organisational Capability on (08) 8922 7096 or ATSIHPexcellenceawards.doh@nt.gov.au

7. TAS : National ACCHO’s  to travel to Hobart in August for the National NACCHO Male Health Conference : Registrations Free

The recent week-long #MensHealthWeek focus offered a “timely reminder” to all men to consider their health and wellbeing and the impact that their ill health or even the early loss of their lives could have on the people who love them. The statistics speak for themselves – we need to look after ourselves better .

That is why I am encouraging all men to take their health seriously, this week and every week of the year, and I have made men’s health a particular priority for Indigenous health.”

Federal Minister for Indigenous Health and Aged Care Ken Wyatt who will be a keynote speaker at NACCHO Ochre Day in August

To celebrate #MensHealthWeek NACCHO has launches its National #OchreDay2018 Mens Health Summit program and registrations

The NACCHO Ochre Day Health Summit in August provides a national forum for all Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander male delegates, organisations and communities to learn from Aboriginal male health leaders, discuss their health concerns, exchange share ideas and examine ways of improving their own men’s health and that of their communities

More Details HERE

All too often Aboriginal male health is approached negatively, with programmes only aimed at males as perpetrators. Examples include alcohol, tobacco and other drug services, domestic violence, prison release, and child sexual abuse programs. These programmes are vital, but are essentially aimed at the effects of males behaving badly to others, not for promoting the value of males themselves as an essential and positive part of family and community life.

To address the real social and emotional needs of males in our communities, NACCHO proposes a positive approach to male health and wellbeing that celebrates Aboriginal masculinities, and uphold our traditional values of respect for our laws, respect for Elders, culture and traditions, responsibility as leaders and men, teachers of young males, holders of lore, providers, warriors and protectors of our families, women, old people, and children.

More Details HERE

NACCHO’s approach is to support Aboriginal males to live longer, healthier lives as males for themselves. The flow-on effects will hopefully address the key effects of poor male behaviour by expecting and encouraging Aboriginal males to be what they are meant to be.

In many communities, males have established and are maintaining men’s groups, and attempting to be actively involved in developing their own solutions to the well documented men’s health and wellbeing problems, though almost all are unfunded and lack administrative and financial support.

To assist NACCHO to strategically develop this area as part of an overarching gender/culture based approach to service provision, NACCHO decided it needed to raise awareness, gain support for and communicate to the wider Australian public issues that have an impact on the social, emotional health and wellbeing of Aboriginal Males.

It was subsequently decided that NACCHO should stage a public event that would aim to achieve this and that this event be called “NACCHO Ochre Day”.

The two day conference is free: To register

8. SA Tackling Tobacco Team – Nunkuwarrin Yunti Campaign

9.ACT : Winnunga ACCHO June Newsletter

Download Here

Winnunga AHCS Newsletter June 2018

 

 

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