NACCHO Aboriginal #MensHealthWeek and #OchreDay2018 Launch : Download 30 years 1988 – 2018 of Aboriginal Male Health Strategies and Summit recommendations

1989 National Aboriginal Health Strategy (NAHS)

1994 National Aboriginal Health Strategy: An Evaluation 1989

1999 The 1st National Indigenous Male Health Convention, held at Ross River Homestead

2000 NSW Aboriginal Male Health Plan

2002 Dr Mark Wenitong Indigenous Male Health Report for OATSIH

2002 National Framework for the Improvement of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Male Health (2002) Dr Mick Adams

2003 National Strategic Framework for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health

2008 National Aboriginal Male Health Summit -Ross River NT 22 Key Recommendations

2009 Federal Governments response (12 Months later ) to 2008 Summit recommendations

2010 Review of Indigenous Male Health by HealthInfoNet

2010 National Male Health Policy Supporting Document -Social determinants

2013 National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Plan 2013-2023 

2013 – 2030 NACCHO BluePrint for Aboriginal Male Healthy Futures for generational change

 2013 -2018 National NACCHO Ochre Day Summits  : Registrations and program open for this years 2018 event in Hobart  

The two day conference is free: To register

 

Please note these entries below are only a snap shot of the thousands of Aboriginal Health reports and strategies published over the past 30 years

If you feel we have missed any important documents etc. that you feel we should add

Please Contact : Colin Cowell Editor Email nacchonews@naccho.org.au

1989 National Aboriginal Health Strategy (NAHS)

“Health to Aboriginal peoples is a matter of determining all aspects of their life, including control over their physical environment, of dignity, of community self-esteem, and of justice. It is not merely a matter of the provision of doctors, hospitals, medicines or the absence of disease and incapacity.”

The National Aboriginal Health Strategy (NAHS) was developed by the National Aboriginal Health Strategy Working Group in 1989 following extensive national consultations with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander individuals, organizations and communities and with governments.

It was a landmark document providing agreed direction for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health policy in Australia.

In July 2003, the National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Council stated that the NAHS was ‘never fully implemented [but] remains the key document in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health.

It is extensively used by health services and service providers and continues to guide policy makers and planners.’

Detailed Information:
Key priorities identified in the 1989 National Health Strategy included building community control of Aboriginal health services, increasing Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander participation in the health workforce, reforming health system and increasing funding to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health services.

The strategy also supported increased community education, health promotion and prevention, improvement of the effectiveness and adequacy of essential services such as sewerage, water supply and communication, and building effective intersectoral collaboration.

It noted that Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities must participate in research to ensure it is ethical and research findings must be monitored and reviewed to ensure implementation.

1994 National Aboriginal Health Strategy: An Evaluation 1989

Download 1994 health_eval_execsum

1999 The 1st National Indigenous Male Health Convention, held at Ross River Homestead

Provided an opportunity for Indigenous males from around Australia to express their views and share their experiences of health. Delegates to the Convention explored strategies to improve the health and well-being of Indigenous males, their families and their communities.

Download the Report 1999 growing_up_as_an_indigenous_male

2000 NSW Aboriginal Male Health Plan :

WHAT WE KNOW WORKS IN ABORIGINAL MEN’S HEALTH

Download 2000 NSW ATSI Male Health

1.Addressing men’s health through separate gender strategies to women’s health

Developing separate strategies for men’s health and women’s health can be highly effective in the short term. If a men’s health clinic is not at a main health centre but is housed a few blocks away, Aboriginal men are more at ease, are more likely to consult a male doctor for a specific problem, and are more likely to return for follow up. The concept of separate gender strategies also applies to health promotion.

2.Employing more men within the NSW health sector

There are fewer Aboriginal male health workers compared to Aboriginal female health workers. Aboriginal male health workers may draw Aboriginal men to primary health care facilities, because men feel more comfortable accessing services where they know they can talk to another man about men’s business. Increasing the number of Aboriginal male health workers within primary health care settings is therefore desirable

3. Making health services relevant for Aboriginal men, their lives and interests

The achievement of Aboriginal men in sport has been a source of great pride and many Aboriginal men are able to demonstrate community leadership through this success. Sports and fitness programs are an important part of Aboriginal community development in general. This is especially true for the health of young people, as sports and fitness programs are likely to contribute to their physical and emotional wellbeing. Physical fitness programs can form a focus for active life skills, as opposed to negative coping mechanisms such as alcohol and substance abuse and other destructive behaviours.

4. Providing incentives for Aboriginal men to be involved

Successful programs often provide some kind of incentive to Aboriginal men to encourage them to become involved. This might be access to the local golf course, or to the local gym; or it could be providing a meal to encourage a more informal atmosphere and sense of fellowship.

5. Developing services within the terms set down by local men

A program or service will have greater success if it aims to be relevant to the needs of local Aboriginal men. For example: in one area, Aboriginal men were embarrassed about seeing a female health worker in a sexual health clinic; so they worked together to establish a separate clinic in a location where they felt more comfortable. As a result attendance increased by 600 per cent.

6.Recognising men’s role in Aboriginal society and how that role influences their health

The role of men in Aboriginal society has changed tremendously in only a few generations. Aboriginal men have experienced a loss of their traditional role in both society and family. This results in despair, shame, and a sense of inadequacy. Some men feel that they cannot contribute to their communities any more. This can be influenced by programs and services that highlight a positive role for Aboriginal men in their communities and families.

7.Addressing the high costs of medication

Compared to non-Aboriginal men, Aboriginal men suffer a higher burden of ill health, and have a significantly lower income, so the cost of medication is an important issue. Aboriginal men need to be informed about any benefits they are eligible for, which can reduce the cost of medication.

8. Increasing the numbers of medical practitioners with an understanding of, and time to deal with, Aboriginal men’s needs

Local medical practitioners should be encouraged to work closely with local Aboriginal health workers, and to develop partnerships with them. In local areas is it essential to increasing the number of health practitioners who understand the needs of local men, and whom local men feel comfortable consulting.

9. Working in partnership

Partnerships are about working collaboratively in an environment based on respect, trust, and equality.

Aboriginal health workers across NSW need to be encouraged to provide the kinds of programs and services that most benefit Aboriginal men in their communities, through partnership between health service delivery and projects of community interest.

10. Developing an evidence base to improve services

Research is needed to develop an evidence base on which to improve service delivery for Aboriginal men.

Issues in need of further research include: how to integrate men’s health programs into existing Aboriginal primary health care services; how to increase the participation of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander men in the research process; how to better target research that aims to improve Aboriginal men’s health; how to improve access to health services for Aboriginal males in urban, rural and remote areas; and what strategies and programs provide the best health outcomes for Aboriginal men. There also needs to be greater encouragement to publish existing research.

2002 Dr Mark Wenitong Indigenous Male Health Report report for OATSIH

This report by Dr Mark Wenitong was commissioned by the Office for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health in response to the continuing need for accessible information around the needs and issues facing Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander males

Download 2002 Wenitong malehealthprelim

Approximately half of Australia’s Indigenous population is male. Knowledge of the status of their health, although not complete due to limitations on Indigenous identification, is an area of acute need.

A ‘gendered approach’ to health is not a new idea and it is becoming more apparent that gender is a key determinant of health in Australia.

The interaction between gender and health has been well recognised and has proved very useful with respect to women’s health. It may be possible to achieve better health access and outcomes for Indigenous males by considering this approach.

This report is an overview of Indigenous male health. It takes account of the:

  • historical, social and cultural background of Indigenous males and its relationship to health and behaviour;
  • fact that Indigenous males do not necessarily want a complete isolationist approach, and regard Indigenous women and family as a significant support and integral part of their health;
  • documented lack of Indigenous males in the health workforce at all levels.

2002 National Framework for the Improvement of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Male Health (2002) Dr Mick Adams

Download 2002 Indigenous Male Health – Adams Mick

2003 National Strategic Framework for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health

This National Strategic Framework is not a replacement of the 1989 NAHS.

It is a complementary document, which addresses contemporary approaches to primary health care and population health within the current policy environment and planning structures. It aims to guide government action over the next ten years through a coordinated, collaborative and multi-sectorial approach supported by Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health stakeholder organisations.

Download 2003 nsfatsihcont

Development

This National Strategic Framework was developed following consultation on the National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Strategy: Draft for Discussion, February 2001, produced by the National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Council (NATSIHC).

The Draft for Discussion was based on the 1989 NAHS and the report of its 1994 evaluation.

It took into account the recommendations of the 1991 Royal Commission into Aboriginal Deaths in Custody, the Bringing Them Home Report, submissions made to the House of Representatives Inquiry into Indigenous Health and its final report entitled Health is Life. It also considered existing state and territory, regional and local Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health policies, strategies and plans. All these have been fundamental to shaping this National Strategic Framework.

NATSIHC comprises members from the Commonwealth Government, the Australian Health Ministers’ Advisory Council representing State and Territory governments, NACCHO, ATSIC, the TSRA, the Australian Indigenous Doctors Association, the Congress of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Nurses and individuals with specific expertise appointed by the Commonwealth Minister responsible for health. The chairperson of the National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC) also sits on NATSIHC as an ex officio member.

2008 National Aboriginal Male Health SummitRoss River NT 22 Key Recommendations

Inteyerrkwe Statement

We the Aboriginal males from Central Australia and our visitor brothers from around Australia gathered at Inteyerrkwe in July 2008 to develop strategies to ensure our future roles as grandfathers, fathers, uncles, nephews, brothers, grandsons, and sons in caring for our children in a safe family environment that will lead to a happier, longer life that reflects opportunities experienced by the wider community.

We acknowledge and say sorry for the hurt, pain and suffering caused by Aboriginal males to our wives, to our children, to our mothers, to our grandmothers, to our granddaughters, to our aunties, to our nieces and to our sisters.

We also acknowledge that we need the love and support of our Aboriginal women to help us move forward.”

In 2008 with the national focus on the NT intervention over 400 Aboriginal males from around to participate in a men’s Health Summit at the Ross River Camp

There was a need for Aboriginal men to get back control and understanding of their roles as fathers, uncles, brothers and sons in caring for children in a safe family environment that leads families and the community having a happier, healthier, longer life that reflects opportunities experienced by the wider community

Download 90 Page Report

2008 National Male Health Summit of Reports 1 and 2

Download the media report from summit

Final report Media Coverage 2

There has been over a decade of work by Aboriginal men to establish male health in the policy debates, but as I will outline later I feel we now need to move beyond the policy struggle to implementing the vision.

Patrick Dodson has been quoted that: “There has been a process of undermining the role and status of Aboriginal men within our society since the early days of Australia’s colonisation and continuing in recent commentary around the Northern Territory Intervention”.

When you add to this the rapid changes in the role of males within that colonising society and the consequent dislocation of non-Aboriginal males and their struggle to define new self-images, it is no wonder that Aboriginal males may struggle to make sense of the contemporary world.

And if those critical views of us as Aboriginal males are expressed with no effort to understand our cultural values, or the pressures caused by the colonial relationships and contemporary social transformations, then we become alienated from this society.

This alienation is at the core of the struggle for male health and wellbeing, as it acts to debase men, stripping away their dignity and the meaning in their lives.

We therefore need to confront these social relationships that shape our health.

Out of the hundreds of ideas that have been discussed and developed over the last three days at Ross River, some of the key recommendations that have come out of this forum are as follows:

  1. Establishment of community-based violence prevention programs, including programs specific to Aboriginal men.
  2. Establishment of places of healing for Aboriginal men, including men’s shelters/’sheds’, short term ‘drying out’ places for men, and more resources for long-term rehabilitation of Aboriginal men with alcohol and other drug problems, preferably within their own community. Also ‘half-way’ houses to either give ‘time out’ or time to move slowly back into work/family/training, preferably to be run by Aboriginal men.
  3. Tax-free status for three years for identified communities for Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal professionals to attract much-needed doctors, health workers, teachers and police. Also incentives to employ Aboriginal people in similar positions.
  4. Building the capacity of Aboriginal men in literacy and numeracy to access locally-based jobs, and better support for establishing local Aboriginal-controlled businesses to tap into the minerals boom, agriculture, aquaculture or whatever business activity is relevant to their traditional country. Also the linking of education and training to locally-based employment.
  5. ‘Unfinished business’ – This Summit calls on the Federal Government and the Northern Territory Government to respond to its final report within three months (by the end of September, 2008).

See all 22 recommendations in this next section

 

2009 Federal Governments response (12 Months later ) to 2008 Summit recommendations

Download Government Response

2009 Federal Government Response malehealthsummitjun09

2010 Review of Indigenous Male Health by HealthInfoNet

Download

2010 Indigenous Male Health Healthindonet

2010 National Male Health Policy Supporting Document -Social determinants

SOCIAL DETERMINANTS AND KEY ACTIONS SUPPORTING MALE HEALTH

2010 Social determinants revised 170510

2013 National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Plan 2013-2023 

The National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Plan 2013-2023 was developed to provide an overarching framework which builds links with other major Commonwealth health activities and identifies areas of focus to guide future investment and effort in relation to improving Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health.

On 30 May 2014 Senator the Hon Fiona Nash, Assistant Minister for Health, announced that an Implementation plan would be developed outlining the Commonwealth’s coordinated efforts to improve Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health outcomes.

National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Plan 2013–2023 (online)
PDF version: National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Plan 2013–2023 – PDF 6280 KB

2013 – 2030 NACCHO BluePrint for Aboriginal Male Healthy Futures for generational change

NACCHO has long recognised the importance of an Aboriginal male health policy and program to close the gap by 2030 on the alarming Aboriginal male mortality rates across Australia.

Aboriginal males have arguably the worst health outcomes of any population group in Australia.

To address the real social and emotional needs of males in our communities, NACCHO proposes a positive approach to Aboriginal male health and wellbeing

NACCHO, its affiliates and members are committed to building upon past innovations and we require targeted actions and investments to implement a wide range of Aboriginal male health and wellbeing programs and strategies.

We call on State, Territory and Federal governments to commit to a specific, substantial and sustainable funding allocation for the NACCHO Aboriginal Male Health 10 point Blueprint 2013-2030

 

This blueprint sets out how the Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Services sector will continue to improve our rates of access to health and wellbeing services by Aboriginal males through working closely within our communities, strengthening cultural safety and further building upon our current Aboriginal male health workforce and leadership.

We celebrate Aboriginal masculinities, and uphold our traditional values of respect for our laws, respect for elders, culture and traditions, responsibility as leaders and men, teachers of young males, holders of lore, providers, warriors and protectors of our families, women, old people, and children

The NACCHO 10-Point Blue print Plan is based on a robust body of work that includes the Close the Gap Statement of Intent and the Close the Gap targets, the National Framework for the Improvement of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Male Health (2002), NACCHO’s position paper on Aboriginal male health (2010) the 2013 National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Plan (NATSIHP), and the NACCHO Healthy futures 10 point plan 2013-2030

These solutions have been developed in response to the deep-rooted social, political and economic conditions that effect Aboriginal males and the need to be addressed alongside the delivery of essential health care.

Our plan is based on evidence, targeted to need and capable of addressing the existing inequalities in Aboriginal male health services, with the aim of achieving equality of health status and life expectancy between Aboriginal males and non-Aboriginal males by 2030.

This blueprint celebrates our success so far and proposes the strategies that governments, NACCHO affiliates and member services must in partnership commit to and invest in to ensure major health gains are maintained into the future

NACCHO, our affiliates and members remain focused on creating a healthy future for generational change and the NACCHO Aboriginal Male Health 10 point Blueprint 2013-2030 will enable comprehensive and long-term action to achieve real outcomes.

To close the gap in life expectancy between Aboriginal males and non-Aboriginal within a generation we need achieve these 10 key goals

1. To call on government at all levels to invest a specific, substantial and sustainable funding allocation for the, NACCHO Aboriginal Male Health 10 point Blueprint plan 2013-2030 a comprehensive, long-term Aboriginal male Health plan of action that is based on evidence, targeted to need, and capable of addressing the existing inequities in Aboriginal male health

2. To assist delivering community-controlled ,comprehensive primary male health care, services that are culturally appropriate accessible, affordable, good quality, innovative to bridge the gap in health standards and to respect and promote the rights of Aboriginal males, in urban, rural and remote areas in order to achieve lasting improvements in Aboriginal male health and well-being

3. To ensure Aboriginal males have equal access to health services that are equal in standard to those enjoyed by other Australians, and ensure primary health care services and health infrastructure for Aboriginal males are capable of bridging the gap in health standards by 2030.

4. To prioritise specific funding to address mental health, social and emotional well-being and suicide prevention for Aboriginal males.

5. To ensure that we address Social determinants relating to identity culture, language and land, as well as violence, alcohol, employment and education.

6.To improve access to and the responsiveness of mainstream health services and programs to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people’s health  services are provided commensurate Accessibility within the Primary Health Care Centre may mean restructuring clinics to accommodate male specific areas, or off-site areas, and may include specific access (back door entrance) to improve attendance and cultural gender issues

 7.To provide an adequate workforce to meet Aboriginal male health needs by increasing the recruitment, retention, effectiveness and training of male health practitioners working within Aboriginal settings and by building the capacity of the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health workforce.

8 To identified and prioritised (as appropriate) in all health strategies developed for Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Services (ACCHSs) including that all relevant programs being progressed in these services will be expected to ensure Aboriginal male health is considered in the planning phase or as the program progresses. Specialised Aboriginal male health programs and targeted interventions should be developed to address male health intervention points across the life cycle continuum.

9. To build on the evidence base of what works in Aboriginal health, supporting it with research and data on relevant local and international experience and to ensure that the quality of data quality in all jurisdictions meets AIHW standards.

10. To measure, monitor, and report on our joint efforts in accordance with benchmarks and targets – to ensure that we are progressively reaching our shared aims.

NOTE : Throughout this document the word Male is used instead of Men. At the inaugural Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Male Health Gathering-Alice Springs 1999, all delegates present agreed that the word Male would be used instead of the word Men. With the intention being to encompass the Male existence from it’s beginnings in the womb until death.

Throughout this document the word Aboriginal is used instead of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander. This is in line with the National Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation (NACCHO) being representative of Aboriginal People. This does not intend to exclude nor be disrespectful to our Brothers from the Torres Strait Islands.

 2013 -2018 NACCHO Ochre Days : Registrations open for this years event in Hobart  

 First Ochre Day Canberra 2013 with present and past 2 NACCHO chairs

The week-long #MensHealthWeek focus offers a “timely reminder” to all men to consider their health and wellbeing and the impact that their ill health or even the early loss of their lives could have on the people who love them. The statistics speak for themselves – we need to look after ourselves better .

That is why I am encouraging all men to take their health seriously, this week and every week of the year, and I have made men’s health a particular priority for Indigenous health.”

Federal Minister for Indigenous Health and Aged Care Ken Wyatt who will be a keynote speaker at NACCHO Ochre Day in August

Canberra 2013

Brisbane 2014

Adelaide 2015

Perth 2016

Darwin 2017

Hobart 2018

Reports from all

 

To celebrate #MensHealthWeek NACCHO has launches its National #OchreDay2018 Mens Health Summit program and registrations

The NACCHO Ochre Day Health Summit in August provides a national forum for all Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander male delegates, organisations and communities to learn from Aboriginal male health leaders, discuss their health concerns, exchange share ideas and examine ways of improving their own men’s health and that of their communities

More Details HERE

All too often Aboriginal male health is approached negatively, with programmes only aimed at males as perpetrators. Examples include alcohol, tobacco and other drug services, domestic violence, prison release, and child sexual abuse programs. These programmes are vital, but are essentially aimed at the effects of males behaving badly to others, not for promoting the value of males themselves as an essential and positive part of family and community life.

To address the real social and emotional needs of males in our communities, NACCHO proposes a positive approach to male health and wellbeing that celebrates Aboriginal masculinities, and uphold our traditional values of respect for our laws, respect for Elders, culture and traditions, responsibility as leaders and men, teachers of young males, holders of lore, providers, warriors and protectors of our families, women, old people, and children.

More Details HERE

NACCHO’s approach is to support Aboriginal males to live longer, healthier lives as males for themselves. The flow-on effects will hopefully address the key effects of poor male behaviour by expecting and encouraging Aboriginal males to be what they are meant to be.

In many communities, males have established and are maintaining men’s groups, and attempting to be actively involved in developing their own solutions to the well documented men’s health and wellbeing problems, though almost all are unfunded and lack administrative and financial support.

To assist NACCHO to strategically develop this area as part of an overarching gender/culture based approach to service provision, NACCHO decided it needed to raise awareness, gain support for and communicate to the wider Australian public issues that have an impact on the social, emotional health and wellbeing of Aboriginal Males.

It was subsequently decided that NACCHO should stage a public event that would aim to achieve this and that this event be called “NACCHO Ochre Day”.

The two day conference is free: To register

 

 

One comment on “NACCHO Aboriginal #MensHealthWeek and #OchreDay2018 Launch : Download 30 years 1988 – 2018 of Aboriginal Male Health Strategies and Summit recommendations

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