NACCHO Aboriginal Health #ACCHO Deadly Good News stories : Features @DeadlyChoices #NSW Armajun #QLD @GidgeeHealing and Carbal ACCHO #VIC @VAHS1972 #SA @AHCSA #WA #Tasmanian Aboriginal Centre #ACT #NT @DanilaDilba Plus @FaCtS_Study #IGAwards2018

1.1 National : Reconciliation Australia’s 2018 Indigenous Governance Awards Closes 30 June

1.2 National : Partnerships and up to $40,000 funding for each Aboriginal communities to conduct research to find out what communities need to promote and improve safety for families closes 29 June 2018

1.3 NACCHO offers discounted subscriptions and trials of the Clinical Decision Support System UpToDate for all practices

2.1 SA : Aboriginal Health Council of South Australia, Moorundi Aboriginal Controlled Community Health Service, Quitline and Puyu Blasters jion forces in Murray Bridge health promotion

2.2 SA : Pika Wiya Aboriginal Health Service hosted a Social and Emotional Wellbeing Day on Tuesday, June 5 to address chronic diseases in a culturally sensitive way.

3.NSW : Armajun Aboriginal Health Services tours New England to understand the challenges facing our Indigenous communities

4.QLD : Carbal Medical Services expands health services for the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander community

5.VIC : VAHS and Deadly Choices health promotion at the AFL Long Walk

6.NT : Danila Dilba ACCHO staff came out in force for the Larrakia Nation Family Fun day 

7.WA :Tracy Westerman visited Karratha for Indigenous mental health in the Pilbara

8. TAS: The latest Virgin aircraft Tinamirakuna named after the Macquarie River in lutruwita (Tasmania)

9.ACT : Winnunga Nimmityjah Aboriginal Health Service $11 million delayed

 View hundreds of ACCHO Deadly Good News Stories over past 6 years

How to submit a NACCHO Affiliate  or Members Good News Story ?

 Email to Colin Cowell NACCHO Media    

Mobile 0401 331 251

Wednesday by 4.30 pm for publication each Thursday /Friday

1.1 National : Reconciliation Australia’s 2018 Indigenous Governance Awards Closes 30 June

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander-led organisations that place culture at the heart of their governance are invited to apply for the 2018 Indigenous Governance Awards (IGAs), which were launched today.

Reconciliation Australia and BHP Billiton are proud to run the awards for the first time in partnership with the Australian Indigenous Governance Institute, a national centre of governance excellence.

Established in 2005, the IGAs publicly recognise and celebrate outstanding Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander-led organisations and projects that make extraordinary contributions to communities and the nation.

Organisations that are displaying effective Indigenous governance are encouraged to apply, with prizes including corporate mentoring, feedback from the judging panel, media and networking opportunities, and a share in $60,000.

Reconciliation Australia CEO Karen Mundine said it was important to showcase the high achievers in Indigenous governance, so that they get the accolades they deserve – and so that broader Australia understands their important contributions.

“For more than a decade, the IGA winners have shown that so much is possible when Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander develop innovative and robust systems of governance by putting culture at the heart of what they do,” Ms Mundine said.

Australian Indigenous Governance Institute CEO Michelle Deshong said governance was the foundation stone that enabled Indigenous peoples and communities to build a prosperous future.

“The ability to come together, set goals, and put things in place to achieve their goals, allows people to build a self-determined future,” Ms Deshong said.

“For Indigenous peoples, this means navigating a complex and interconnected web of cultural, environmental, economic and political influences. Celebrating those who have done this well fills us with ideas, confidence and inspiration.”

The two award categories are Category A: Indigenous-led incorporated organisations and Category B: Indigenous-led non-incorporated initiatives or projects.

Winners in each of the two categories will receive $20,000, and highly commended organisations in each category will each be awarded $10,000. Ms Mundine said the IGAs have a history of attracting high caliber nominations from organisations around the country, from the bustling capital cities to our most remote communities.

“In 2018, we want to see applications from organisations and projects that are making a difference in their communities, through community engagement, varying governance models and cultural practices.

Applications or recommendations for the 2018 Indigenous Governance Awards can be made online at http://www.reconciliation.org.au/iga or by calling 02 6273 9200. Applications close Saturday 30 June 2018.

There are two award categories:

  • Category A: Outstanding examples of Indigenous governance in Indigenous incorporated organisations.
  • Category B: Outstanding examples of Indigenous governance in non-incorporated initiatives or projects.

Each category is looking for governance that demonstrates:

  • Innovation
  • Effectiveness
  • Self-determination and leadership
  • Cultural relevance and legitimacy
  • Future planning, sustainability and governance resilience.

1.2 National : Partnerships and up to $40,000 funding for each Aboriginal communities to conduct research to find out what communities need to promote and improve safety for families closes 29 June 2018

The Australian National University is seeking partnerships with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities to conduct research to find out what communities need to promote and improve safety for families. We want to partner and work with local organisations and communities to make sure the research benefits the community.

Who are we?

We work at the Australian National University (ANU). The study is led by Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander researchers. Professor Victoria Hovane (Ngarluma, Malgnin/Kitja, Gooniyandi), along with Associate Professor Raymond Lovett (Wongaibon, Ngiyampaa) and Dr Jill Guthrie (Wiradjuri) from NCEPH, and Professor Matthew Gray of the Centre for Social Research and Methods (CSRM) at ANU will be leading the study.

Study Question: What would it take to address Family Violence in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Communities?

How are we going to gather information to answer the study question?

A Community Researcher (who we would give funds to employ) would capture the data by interviewing 100 community members, running 3 focus groups for Men / Women / Youth (over 16).  We would interview approx. 5 community members to hear about the story in your community.

We know Family Violence happens in all communities. We don’t want to find out the prevalence, we want to know what your communities needs to feel safe. We will also be mapping the services in your community, facilities and resources available in a community.  All this information will be given back to your community.

What support would we provide your service?

We are able to support your organisation up to $40,000 (including funds for $30 vouchers), this would also help to employ a Community Researcher.

Community participants would be provided with a $30 voucher to complete a survey, another $30 for the focus group, and another $30 for the interview for their time.

What will we give your organisation?

We can give you back all the data that we have captured from your community, (DE identified and confidentialised of course).We can give you the data in any form you like, plus create a Community Report for your community. There might be some questions you would like to ask your community, and we can include them in the survey.

How long would we be involved with your community / organisation?

Approximately 2 months

How safe is the data we collect?

The data is safe. It will be DE identified and Confidentialised. Our final report will reflect what Communities (up to 20) took part in the study, but your data and community will be kept secret.  Meaning, no one will know what data came from your community.

If you think this study would be of benefit to your community, or if you have any questions, please do not hesitate to contact Victoria Hovane and the FaCtS team on 1800 531 600 or email facts.study@anu.edu.au.

1.3 NACCHO offers discounted subscriptions and trials of the Clinical Decision Support System UpToDate for all practices. 

 Download the brochure

UpToDate Brochure – Staying UpToDate

UpToDate is an evidence-based clinical decision support system and extensive medical database. Used to answer clinical questions, improve medical knowledge and helps provide consistent, best practice care on the full spectrum of medical conditions.

It is proven to change the way medical professionals practice medicine, and is currently used across a range of our practices.

Key features of UpToDate® include:

  • Evidence-based medical content that is researched, created, and continually updated by over 6,500 leading physicians
  • Practice Changing Updates – highlights specific new recommendations and/or updates that UTD anticipate may change usual clinical practice
  • 25 Specialties – UTD contains all of the internal medicine subspecialties (at a level that meets the needs of the subspecialist), all of primary care, internal medicine, ob/gyn, pediatrics, general surgery, and more – all in one resource.
  • Graphics Search – This powerful search engine feature allows you to search tens of thousands of pictures, charts, movies, illustrations and more – all without ever leaving UpToDate®
  • Medical Calculators – More than 165 medical calculators are available with the subscription
  • Drug Information – A select drug database of more than 5,600 unique drug entries (in partnership with Lexicomp®) including adult, pediatric, and international drugs and a drug interactions tool that provides graded adverse reaction information between drug-to-drug and drug-to-herb interactions.
  • Patient Information – UTD includes more than 1,500 Patient Information articles about the most common medical conditions and therapies.
  • Accredited Education Resource – accredited from a range of colleges including the RACGP & ACRRM allowing staff to earn CME/CPD Points

Contact details

James Dixon from UpToDate

In the meantime, don’t hesitate to contact me at james.dixon@wolterskluwer.com or Mobile: 0401 855 882, if you have any questions.

2.1 SA : Aboriginal Health Council of South Australia, Moorundi Aboriginal Controlled Community Health Service, Quitline and Puyu Blasters jion forces in Murray Bridge health promotion

Smoking is more than just an expensive habit – it steals lifetimes and tears families apart, those present at a World No Tobacco Day event have been told.

In Edwards Square, Murray Bridge last Thursday, several Aboriginal health organisations joined forces to warn about the long-term consequences of smoking.

Originally published here

T-shirts designed by local artist Harley Hall were given out as people pledged to live smoke-free, or help friends and family do so; sausages were cooked and songs sung.

Mr Hall said smoking had always been a big part of his family.

He had lost both of his nannas to emphysema, he said; his father had had lung cancer and his mother now had a reduced lung capacity as well.

“So much of our community is smoking,” he said.

“Family means everything to us blackfellas, so it’s time to start now, time to take the pledge.”

Harold Bundamarra Stewart, now aged in his 60s, said he finally managed to quit 25 years ago.

“I struggled all my life,” he said.

“I had my first cigarette when I was 15 years old.

“Now I’ve dedicated my life to helping get that message out there about the dangers of smoking.”

It was a significant factor in diabetes, he said, and three or four other diseases came along with it.

He urged all smokers to seek help from health services.

“It’s very important to have support,” he said.

“I struggled – I quit seven times in my life and always went back.

“But you can give up successfully.”

The event was organised by the Aboriginal Health Council of South Australia, Moorundi Aboriginal Controlled Community Health Service, Quitline and Puyu Blasters.

Get help: Quitline 13 78 48, Moorundi Aboriginal Controlled Community Health Service 8531 0289.

 

2.2 SA : Pika Wiya Aboriginal Health Service hosted a Social and Emotional Wellbeing Day on Tuesday, June 5 to address chronic diseases in a culturally sensitive way.

HEALTH: Pika Wiya CEO Alan Morris and Country and Outback Health Indigenous Health Project Officer Jacinta McKenzie at Pika Wiya’s Social and Emotional Wellbeing Day

Originally published HERE

The theme of the event, which was held in conjunction with Country and Outback Health, was ‘Wellness our way’, bringing a host of traditional healers on site for consultation.

The event showcased programs that focus on mental and physical personal care, such as Stepping Stones, headspace and Family Violence Legal Service Aboriginal Corporation.

Pika Wiya CEO Alan Morris highlighted the importance of integrating traditional healers into medicine.

“We (Pika Wiya) are the largest users of traditional healers, or Ngangkari’s, outside of the APY,” Mr Morris said.

“Using bush medicine to heal mind, spirit and body are integral to the ongoing success of the Aboriginal community.

“Their medicine and ways of healing compliment the more traditional western medicine.”

Tom Powell from Red Dust Healing was a guest speaker at the event, focusing on how to deal with grief, loss and trauma.

Country and Outback Health’s Indigenous Health Project Officer Jacinta McKenzie said the day was all about caring for the mind and making better choices.

“Every person and family has different things going on within their life to overcome to be able to get to that next stage,” she said.

“Grief and loss; we have a lot in the community that impacts on people as well. We try to encourage people to look after themselves a bit better to try to deal with it separately.”

The event also gave the organisations the chance to bring Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people into Pika Wiya to complete their Medicare Health Assessment.

3.NSW : Armajun Aboriginal Health Services tours New England to understand the challenges facing our Indigenous communities

Service providers with Aboriginal clients are invited to attend a local workshop this month to understand the challenges facing our Indigenous communities.

SEE EVENTS Calendar

The workshops have been developed by Spirit Dreaming for the Armajun Aboriginal Health Service in response to feedback they received from communities in the areas where they provide primary health care services: Tenterfield, Armidale, Glen Innes, Inverell, Tingha and Walcha.

Originally published HERE

“The workshops came about through consultation with our communities in our service region,” said Armajun program manager James Sheather.

“They’ve told us there is a need for more mental health wellbeing services in community, so we are hoping these workshops will start the ball rolling by providing community and service suppliers with information sessions to help them understand the issues being faced by their clients.”

Mr Sheather said the workshop would challenge and test past perceptions of Aboriginal Peoples and their culture.

“It is designed to address cultural realities in order to improve service delivery to Aboriginal clients and co-workers,” he said.

“We will explore the three major issues which impact on Aboriginal peoples of today; transgenerational trauma; lateral violence and cultural loads.”

Facilitator Mel Brown, an Aboriginal Ngunnawal woman, will identify and ask participants to consider the actual and potential impacts of these issues upon their community.

“She will also show them available resources and help them develop the skills for managing clients and families who are affected by these issues,” Mr Sheather said.

The Tenterfield workshop will be held at the Visitor Information office on June 15 between 9.30am and 3.30pm.

4.QLD : Carbal Medical Services expands health services for the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander community

Carbal Medical Services has opened a new centre in Guy St as it prepares to ramp up its clinical practice and community services.

CEO Brian Hewitt said the clinic in Warwick was “bulging at the seams”.

“We now deliver 29 different programs across the darling downs on top of the two full clinics that we operate in Warwick and Toowoomba.”

Originally published HERE

The increased services in Warwick will address an growing demand for culturally appropriate medical care in the region.

Carbal Medical Services now has 7000 clients across the Darling Downs.

Toni Park with Carbal Medical Centre patient, Githabul elder Amos Close. Photo Jayden Brown / Warwick Daily News
Toni Park with Carbal Medical Centre patient, Githabul elder Amos Close. Photo Jayden Brown / Warwick Daily News Jayden Brown

“If we identify a gap, we don’t sit around and wait for funding. We will set up a program and make it happen,” Mr Hewitt said.

The new community services centre in Guy St would focus on delivering health programs to tackle smoking, drug and alcohol abuse and low-intensity mental health.

The Warwick clinic also plans to increase the number of doctors to cater to rising demands for GP and allied health care.

Practice manager Kerry Stewart said the waiting list for doctor appointments signified the community’s investment in health.

“We certainly get a strong engagement from the community,” Ms Stewart said.

She put the success down to staff cultural awareness training and empowering patients.

“There is a focus on assisting people to take initiative on their own health which makes them want to attend their appointments,” Ms Stewart said.

 

EVERYONE COUNTS: Carbal helps Indigenous and non-Indigenous people of all ages.
EVERYONE COUNTS: Carbal helps Indigenous and non-Indigenous people of all ages. Contributed

Patients travel from as far as Stanthorpe and Inglewood to access specialised care in Warwick.

Ms Stewart said the expansion of services for the community’s Indigenous population was a positive step in reconciliation week.

“Being able to offer more services for Indigenous people in the community contributes to the broader reconciliation movement and making Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people feel valued.”

“It is a long road but if everyone works together we will eventually get there in closing the gaps.”

4.2 :  Queensland State Minister for Health checks out Gidgee Healing Deadly Choices Program

Steven Miles, Queensland State Minister for Health and Paul Woodhouse, North West Hospital and Health Service Chair who came down to Mount Isa Special School today to check out the Deadly Choices program!

5.VIC : VAHS and Deadly Choices health promotion at the AFL Long Walk

Check it out the Essendon legend himself Anthony McDonald-Tipungwuti wearing the VAHS Deadly Choices Shirt out during the warm up for Dream Time at the G. The other players also wore the shirts as well… What a moment !

If you want your very own VAHS Deadly Choices Shirt just like Tippa the only way you can get one is to complete a health check at VAHS. So call us and book your health check on 03 9419 3000

6.NT : Danila Dilba ACCHO staff came out in force for the Larrakia Nation Family Fun day 

Danila Dilba staff came out in force for the Larrakia Nation Family Fun day to celebrate their 20th Anniversary at the Jingili Water Gardens on 26 May.

It was a great day with lots of cultural activities and community coming down. Congratulations to Larrakia Nation for this important milestone and thanks to all our staff who helped out on the day. #LivingStronger #LivingLonger

7.WA :Tracy Westerman visited Karratha for Indigenous mental health in the Pilbara

Pioneering Aboriginal psychologist and WA Australian of the Year winner Tracy Westerman visited Karratha last week to deliver specialised training in indigenous mental health to psychologists and social workers from across the region.

Originally published HERE

Over a two-day workshop at the Karratha Leisureplex, the internationally recognised psychologist spoke to local staff about how to identify signs of mental health issues such as depression in Aboriginal clients and intervene early in a culturally appropriate way.

The event marks the first time Dr Westerman, who grew up in Tom Price, has returned to the Pilbara since winning WA Australian of the Year in November.

She said the training would fill in gaps in professionals’ knowledge on indigenous mental health, which was too often “invisible” in mainstream psychology training.

“We get people skilled up in identifying the different signs of depression and knowing how to treat depression in a more culturally specific way, because the more we can get conditions at an early stage, the more we can prevent the escalation of those issues in the community more generally,” she said.

“I want people to be more tuned into those early signs and also how to work on and prevent mental health issues in Aboriginal communities, which are often very different to working with non-indigenous communities.”

The workshop, which was supported by the WA Primary Health Alliance and facilitated by Mission Australia, was attended by about 40 mental health and drug and alcohol counselling staff from Mission Australia, headspace, Hedland’s Youth Involvement Council and Bloodwood Tree.

Mission Australia Hedland clinical lead Amanda MacBride said Dr Westerman’s training was invaluable for her and her colleagues for its focus on indigenous mental health.

“We can get cultural training but it’s general, and we can get more mental health training in our field, but to find that combination is rare, so that’s what makes this so enriching because we need that combination up here in the Pilbara,” she said.

“You are going to have Aboriginal clients here … so you need those tools.”

8. TAS: The latest Virgin aircraft Tinamirakuna named after the Macquarie River in lutruwita (Tasmania)

 

9.ACT : Winnunga Nimmityjah Aboriginal Health Service $11 million delayed

About $11 million has been set aside over three years for a new facility for Winnunga Nimmityjah Aboriginal Health Service, a 2016 election promise.

The majority of the money will be delivered to Winnunga later than proposed, with about $8 million of the funding being delivered in 2020-21

NACCHO welcomes feedback/comment:Leave a Reply

Please log in using one of these methods to post your comment:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s