NACCHO Aboriginal Health #ACCHO Deadly Good News stories : Features #NSW @awabakalltd #QLD @TAIHS__ #VIC @VAHS1972 #SA #WA #Tasmanian Aboriginal Centre #ACT #NT Plus @FaCtS_Study #IGAwards2018

1.1 National : Reconciliation Australia’s 2018 Indigenous Governance Awards Closes 30 June

1.2 National : Partnerships and up to $40,000 funding for each Aboriginal communities to conduct research to find out what communities need to promote and improve safety for families closes 29 June 2018

2.QLD : Townsville Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Corporation for Health Services (TAIHS),Wins AGPAL Aboriginal Medical Service of the Year Award

3.1 NSW : Why Aboriginal Community Controlled Health organisations like Katungul Aboriginal Community Corporation and Medical Service (ACC&MS) works best for Aboriginal people.?

3.2 NSW : Awabakal ACCHO Quit Crew Tackling Indigenous Smoking

4 .VIC : Yohanand sees his role as helping to run VAHS so it can improve Indigenous health in Victoria.#NRW2018

5.WA : Listen in, as Jodi from the TIS team at Wirraka Maya ACCHO , offers a few key messages to help you protect those around you from harmful second-hand smoke

6. SA : Ultramarathon is no sweat for Zibeon Fielding in quest to raise funds for remote dialysis treatment

7. NT : AMSANT  : Inaugural NT Aboriginal Leadership and Governance Forum to be held Alice Springs

8.1 TAS : Tasmanian Aboriginal Centre ACCHO featured in primary health magazine

8.2 TAS : Tasmanian Aboriginal Centre : A treaty with Aboriginal people of Tasmania

9.ACT May 28 Australia’s first Reconciliation Day public holiday

 View hundreds of ACCHO Deadly Good News Stories over past 6 years

How to submit a NACCHO Affiliate  or Members Good News Story ?

 Email to Colin Cowell NACCHO Media    

Mobile 0401 331 251

Wednesday by 4.30 pm for publication each Thursday /Friday

1.1 National : Reconciliation Australia’s 2018 Indigenous Governance Awards Closes 30 June

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander-led organisations that place culture at the heart of their governance are invited to apply for the 2018 Indigenous Governance Awards (IGAs), which were launched today.

Reconciliation Australia and BHP Billiton are proud to run the awards for the first time in partnership with the Australian Indigenous Governance Institute, a national centre of governance excellence.

Established in 2005, the IGAs publicly recognise and celebrate outstanding Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander-led organisations and projects that make extraordinary contributions to communities and the nation.

Organisations that are displaying effective Indigenous governance are encouraged to apply, with prizes including corporate mentoring, feedback from the judging panel, media and networking opportunities, and a share in $60,000.

Reconciliation Australia CEO Karen Mundine said it was important to showcase the high achievers in Indigenous governance, so that they get the accolades they deserve – and so that broader Australia understands their important contributions.

“For more than a decade, the IGA winners have shown that so much is possible when Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander develop innovative and robust systems of governance by putting culture at the heart of what they do,” Ms Mundine said.

Australian Indigenous Governance Institute CEO Michelle Deshong said governance was the foundation stone that enabled Indigenous peoples and communities to build a prosperous future.

“The ability to come together, set goals, and put things in place to achieve their goals, allows people to build a self-determined future,” Ms Deshong said.

“For Indigenous peoples, this means navigating a complex and interconnected web of cultural, environmental, economic and political influences. Celebrating those who have done this well fills us with ideas, confidence and inspiration.”

The two award categories are Category A: Indigenous-led incorporated organisations and Category B: Indigenous-led non-incorporated initiatives or projects.

Winners in each of the two categories will receive $20,000, and highly commended organisations in each category will each be awarded $10,000. Ms Mundine said the IGAs have a history of attracting high caliber nominations from organisations around the country, from the bustling capital cities to our most remote communities.

“In 2018, we want to see applications from organisations and projects that are making a difference in their communities, through community engagement, varying governance models and cultural practices.

Applications or recommendations for the 2018 Indigenous Governance Awards can be made online at http://www.reconciliation.org.au/iga or by calling 02 6273 9200. Applications close Saturday 30 June 2018.

There are two award categories:

  • Category A: Outstanding examples of Indigenous governance in Indigenous incorporated organisations.
  • Category B: Outstanding examples of Indigenous governance in non-incorporated initiatives or projects.

Each category is looking for governance that demonstrates:

  • Innovation
  • Effectiveness
  • Self-determination and leadership
  • Cultural relevance and legitimacy
  • Future planning, sustainability and governance resilience.

1.2 National : Partnerships and up to $40,000 funding for each Aboriginal communities to conduct research to find out what communities need to promote and improve safety for families closes 29 June 2018

The Australian National University is seeking partnerships with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities to conduct research to find out what communities need to promote and improve safety for families. We want to partner and work with local organisations and communities to make sure the research benefits the community.

Who are we?

We work at the Australian National University (ANU). The study is led by Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander researchers. Professor Victoria Hovane (Ngarluma, Malgnin/Kitja, Gooniyandi), along with Associate Professor Raymond Lovett (Wongaibon, Ngiyampaa) and Dr Jill Guthrie (Wiradjuri) from NCEPH, and Professor Matthew Gray of the Centre for Social Research and Methods (CSRM) at ANU will be leading the study.

Study Question: What would it take to address Family Violence in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Communities?

How are we going to gather information to answer the study question?

A Community Researcher (who we would give funds to employ) would capture the data by interviewing 100 community members, running 3 focus groups for Men / Women / Youth (over 16).  We would interview approx. 5 community members to hear about the story in your community.

We know Family Violence happens in all communities. We don’t want to find out the prevalence, we want to know what your communities needs to feel safe. We will also be mapping the services in your community, facilities and resources available in a community.  All this information will be given back to your community.

What support would we provide your service?

We are able to support your organisation up to $40,000 (including funds for $30 vouchers), this would also help to employ a Community Researcher.

Community participants would be provided with a $30 voucher to complete a survey, another $30 for the focus group, and another $30 for the interview for their time.

What will we give your organisation?

We can give you back all the data that we have captured from your community, (DE identified and confidentialised of course).We can give you the data in any form you like, plus create a Community Report for your community. There might be some questions you would like to ask your community, and we can include them in the survey.

How long would we be involved with your community / organisation?

Approximately 2 months

How safe is the data we collect?

The data is safe. It will be DE identified and Confidentialised. Our final report will reflect what Communities (up to 20) took part in the study, but your data and community will be kept secret.  Meaning, no one will know what data came from your community.

If you think this study would be of benefit to your community, or if you have any questions, please do not hesitate to contact Victoria Hovane and the FaCtS team on 1800 531 600 or email facts.study@anu.edu.au.

2.QLD : Townsville Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Corporation for Health Services (TAIHS),Wins AGPAL Aboriginal Medical Service of the Year Award

 ” A very BIG congratulations to our deadly health team for winning the AGPAL Aboriginal Medical Service of the Year Award.  This is an incredible recognition for all the hard work our health staff do, and the commitment they show to our community. And, thanks to Aunty Di Ross for making the trip to Melbourne and attending the dinner on Friday night, so that she could accept the award on our behalf “

TAIHS ACCHO MOB

AGPAL is excited to announce the winners for the AGPAL & QIP Excellence Awards.

With six award categories open for nominations,our judging panel were wowed by the numerous stories of team work, innovation, safety and quality, and quality improvement initiatives. We thank everyone who took the time to submit a nomination.

The Excellence Winner and Highly Commended Recipient for each category was announced at the AGPAL& QIP 2018 Conference Gala Dinner, held on Friday 18 May 2018 at the Grand Hyatt Melbourne. These achievements were recognised over the period 30 June 2015 to 30 December 2017.

Due to the high calibre of nominations for the QIP Community Organisation of the Year Award, our judging panel created an extra award category announced on the night to recognise the significant efforts two organisations have undertaken to recognise diversity.

Please join us in congratulating each of the AGPAL & QIP award winners, listed below.

 

AGPAL Aboriginal Medical Service of the Year Award

Excellence Winner – Townsville Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Corporation for Health Services (TAIHS), Queensland

Highly Commended – Nidjalla Waangan Mia, Western Australia

Please join us in congratulating each of the AGPAL award finalists, listed below.

Finalists  AGPAL Aboriginal Medical Service of the Year Award

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Community Health Service, Queensland

Awabakal Medical Service, New South Wales

Ngaanyatjarra Health Service, Northern Territory

3.1 NSW : Why Aboriginal Community Controlled Health organisations like Katungul Aboriginal Community Corporation and Medical Service (ACC&MS)works best for Aboriginal people.?

The CEO of a NSW based  Aboriginal community controlled health service says it’s important for  Government and other  non -Aboriginal health practitioners to understand what they actually do and why throwing lots of money at  health service delivery is not the only solution.

A recent   mainstream media report suggested that  the roll out  of Aboriginal only services is  “driving a dangerous racial wedge and putting Australia on a slippery slope towards its own form of apartheid “….. but  despite the claim the Katungul Aboriginal Community Corporation and Medical Service (ACC&MS) has  successfully provided   health care to  Koori people on the Far South Coast of New South Wales for the last 46 years.

CEO Robert Skeen told CAAMA  NEWS  that as well as being the largest employer of Koori  people on the far south  coast  ….Katungul also  has a large knowledge  base of older  people  who  are still actively involved in the sector.

Listen to the full interview here :

3.2 NSW : Awabakal ACCHO Quit Crew Tackling Indigenous Smoking

This Sunday the 27th of May the Awabakal Quit Crew will be heading over to Boolaroo Rugby fields, home to the mighty Awabakal United Eagles Women’s League tag and Men’s Rugby League Team.

The Quit Crew will have giveaways and prizes to be won. Join us from 12pm – 4pm

4 .VIC : Yohanand sees his role as helping to run VAHS so it can improve Indigenous health in Victoria.#NRW2018

They were one of my clients before, and that got me reading the Federal Government’s Closing the Gap report. That’s when I became aware of the differences in health outcomes between Aboriginal people and the rest of Australia,

The biggest fact that stood out to me was life expectancy, where the average gap with the rest of Australia is more than 10 years. In this day and age?

It’s well documented that many Aboriginal people would rather not go to a mainstream clinic, which is why a lot health issues have gone unaddressed for years. A health service run by Aboriginal people for Aboriginal people makes it easier for them to talk about the issues they’re facing.”

Yohanand – who also goes by John – came across the life expectancy figures when working as a senior consultant at chartered accountants Saward Dawson, who have many not-for-profit clients, including VAHS

With an annual turnover of around $20 million and some 200 staff, the VAHS is Victoria’s largest Aboriginal-controlled health service, and John says community control allows it to make a difference

Download Summary-of-VAHS-Strategic-Plan-2017-2022

Yohanand is now VAHS’s Chief Financial Officer, a position he gained in early 2017, just before starting his MBA at Melbourne Business School thanks to a scholarship funded by our Senior Executive MBA Class of 2003.

“If it wasn’t for the scholarship, I wouldn’t have even thought about applying for the program. It really encourages me that there are other people out there who think about the challenges we face and how hard it is to attract people with the skills that are needed to run a business.”

As a not-for-profit organisation, Melbourne Business School is committed to helping passionate people like Yohanand improve the lives of others.

Yohanand sees his role as helping to run VAHS as well as possible so it can improve Indigenous health in Victoria.

“It’s won’t be me that makes a change in health outcomes for Indigenous Victorians, but I can help hire the right people and have as many clinics operate across Victoria as possible to achieve that outcome.

“I’ve always been very passionate about the not-for-profit sector, and I want to make sure that, wherever I work at, I’m always making a difference that will last beyond me. It’s not just about me being there.”

5.WA : Listen in, as Jodi from the TIS team at Wirraka Maya ACCHO , offers a few key messages to help you protect those around you from harmful second-hand smoke.

Are you aware of the dangers of passive smoking?

Listen in, as Jodi from the TIS team at Wirraka Maya, offers a few key messages to help you protect those around you from harmful second-hand smoke.
If you need help quitting smoking, give us a call on 08 9172 0444#WMHSAC #BeAtYourBest #WirrakaMaya

VIEW HERE

6. SA : Ultramarathon is no sweat for Zibeon Fielding in quest to raise funds for remote dialysis treatment

 ” Mr Fielding was running to raise money for The Purple House, an organisation that provides dialysis to some of Australia’s most remote communities.

Aside from the more than $40,000 raised so far, he wants to promote a healthy lifestyle to other Indigenous Australians.”

From ABC TV COVERAGE

Photo: Rob De Castella and Zibeon Fielding celebrate after the big race. (Facebook: Indigenous Marathon Project)

I’m knackered. My legs are blown out, I’m about to kick the feet up and have a sleep.”

Starting at 4am in the APY Lands town of Indulkana, Zibeon Fielding has just finished a 62-kilometre ultramarathon.

The feat, which is about the same as running one and a half full marathons, comes just five weeks after Mr Fielding completed the Boston Marathon.

It would be hard to find two more different experiences.

“The temperature and the weather conditions were horrible that day, and it was just bucketing down rain,” he said of running in Boston.

“It was minus 15 degrees and you couldn’t feel any circulation from your elbow to your fingertips.”

In the APY Lands, Mr Fielding completed the entire ultramarathon on an unsealed road, which varies from gravel to red dirt.

He also had to contend with wildlife — early on he spotted a pack of dingoes while he was still running in the dark.

“You’re out running on your own, where in Boston there are thousands of other runners,” he said.

Mr Fielding was running to raise money for The Purple House, an organisation that provides dialysis to some of Australia’s most remote communities.

Aside from the more than $40,000 raised so far, he wants to promote a healthy lifestyle to other Indigenous Australians.

“I’m here to make a change, with Indigenous people and their health and wanting to be a role model and lead a brighter and better future,” he said.

“I want to see more of our people becoming healthy so they can have better lives.”

‘The first 42 kilometres was just a warm-up’

The seasoned runner is an alumni of the Indigenous Marathon Project.

In 2016, he and 11 other Indigenous Australians ran the New York Marathon after six months of training.

World champion marathon runner Rob De Castella developed the initiative and was on hand for the entire ultramarathon, encouraging Fielding along the way.

“I’m incredibly proud,” he said.

“This is the face of Indigenous Australia that I want all Australians to see.

“I think it is so important for our country to have these really bright, shining lights — our Aboriginal and Islander men and women.”

Mr De Castella said the 62-kilometre run was no easy feat.

“To run 62 kilometres, that’s a marathon, and then you almost need to keep going for another half marathon,” he said.

“We talk about hitting the wall at 30 kilometres, and the struggle to get through — the battle of the mind over the body over that last 12 kilometres.

“The 42 kilometres was just a warm-up for Zibeon.”

He said Mr Fielding’s achievements were a testament to kind of change he wanted to see coming out of the Indigenous Marathon Project.

“It’s not about taking a group of Indigenous people to New York to run a marathon, it is about what they do afterwards,” Mr De Castella said.

“The journey really starts when you cross the finish line and that’s exactly what we’ve seen with Zibeon.

“Doing something that is hard — running a marathon in six months — gives you an incredible sense of pride and self-respect.

As for his next challenge, Mr Fielding hasn’t ruled out going even further.

But first, food.

“Hopefully I’ll get a snag, if I could find a burger that’d be great,” he quipped.

7.1 NT : AMSANT  : Inaugural NT Aboriginal Leadership and Governance Forum to be held Alice Springs

The Office of Aboriginal Affairs’ Inaugural NT #Aboriginal #Leadership and #Governance Forum will be held in Alice Springs next Friday, 25 May. #AGMP Manager, Wes Miller, will be a panelist at the event.

Registration is free and open now at www.tinyurl.com/yaupmbhg. We hope to see you there!

7.2 NT : AMSANT  : Re shaping the Youth Justice System

8.1 TAS : Tasmanian Aboriginal Centre ACCHO featured in primary health magazine

Download a copy primaryhealthmatters8-v5

WHEN Primary Health Tasmania started looking at commissioning mental health services for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people, our research pointed to a need for a strong focus on social and emotional wellbeing.

To do this, we needed to build our understanding about how resources could best be used to improve social and emotional wellbeing by turning to local Aboriginal communities themselves.

Primary Health Tasmania worked with seven organisations to co-design services aimed at building resilience and empowering people to have a role in managing their mental health.

Australian Government-funded activity encompasses a range of culturally appropriate events, from on country experiences and grief and loss workshops, to mental health

Programs designed to build the capacity of service providers to better support the social and emotional wellbeing of Aboriginal clients were also commissioned.

They aim to help strengthen different organisations’ health-related knowledge.

The following organisations have been commissioned to deliver services to support the social and emotional wellbeing of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people:

  • Cape Barren Island Aboriginal Association (north east)
  • Circular Head Aboriginal Corporation (north west)
  • Flinders Island Aboriginal Association (north east)
  • Karadi Aboriginal Corporation (south)
  • Rural Health Tasmania (north west)
  • South East Tasmanian Aboriginal Corporation (south)
  • Tasmanian Aboriginal Centre (statewide).

“These programs were crafted by listening to the expert advice of these organisations, most of which are Aboriginal community-controlled organisations,” Primary Health Tasmania’s Susan Powell says.

Adopting a co-design approach that included the learnings of established local organisations was critical to giving the programs the best chance of success for Aboriginal people taking part in them, she says.

“We asked them to propose services they thought had the best chance of improving the social and emotional wellbeing of local Aboriginal people, based on what they know is needed and will work,” Ms Powell says. 

8.2 TAS : Tasmanian Aboriginal Centre : A treaty with Aboriginal people of Tasmania

9.ACT May 28 Australia’s first Reconciliation Day public holiday

This year will proudly have Australia’s first Reconciliation Day public holiday on Monday 28th May. Reconciliation Day and is a time to learn more about Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander cultures and histories, to share that knowledge and help us grow

Members of the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander community can access Transport Canberra’s Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Community Bus to attend the event. The bus will be departing from Bay 4 of the Queanbeyan bus interchange on Morisset Street from 9.30am on Monday 28 May, and will shuttle between the interchange and the event throughout the day. See below schedule for approximate timings – places are limited.

9.30am – Queanbeyan Bus Interchange, Bay 4
10am – Glebe Park

10.30am – Queanbeyan Bus Interchange, Bay 4

11am – Glebe Park

11.30am – Queanbeyan Bus Interchange, Bay 4

12pm – Glebe Park

12.30pm – Queanbeyan Bus Interchange, Bay 4

1pm – Glebe Park

2.15pm – Glebe Park to Queanbeyan Bus Interchange, Bay

 

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