NACCHO Aboriginal Health #ACCHO Deadly Good News stories : Features #NSW #QLD @QAIHC_QLD #VIC @VAHS1972 @DeadlyChoices #WA @TheAHCWA #NT #ACT

1.1 National : Funding opportunity for ACCHO’s : Indigenous Australians’ Health Programme (IAHP) $35 Million Available

2.1 NSW : For NSW ACCHO members Indigenous bubs need to be counted for a passport to life

2.2 NSW : Wellington Aboriginal Corporation Health Service (WACHS) Taylor and co arrive to help raise Organ Tissue Donation awareness in Indigenous communities

3.ACT New $12 Million facility for Winnunga ACCHO as they celebrate 30 years

4. 1 QLD : GALANGOOR Duwalami Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Service TEN YEARS MAKES YOU MORE STRONG

4.2 QLD : QAIHC helps Palm Island lay health foundation plan for next 10 years

5. WA :  AHCWA staff are currently in the Kimberley’s completing the Gibb River Challenge to raise money for the RFDS.

6. TAS: Tasmanian Aboriginal Centre Remembering Kikatapula

7. SA: Please help Zibeon get people back home for treatment and give generously to help open the doors to the first remote dialysis clinic on the APY lands.

8.1 VIC : VAHS Deadly Choices Education session Friday 18 May

9. NT Congress Alice Spring new Tackling Smoking Ads

 View hundreds of ACCHO Deadly Good News Stories over past 6 years

How to submit a NACCHO Affiliate  or Members Good News Story ?

 Email to Colin Cowell NACCHO Media    

Mobile 0401 331 251

Wednesday by 4.30 pm for publication each Thursday /Friday

1.1 National : Funding opportunity for ACCHO’s : Indigenous Australians’ Health Programme (IAHP) $35 Million Available

The objective of the IAHP is to provide Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people with access to effective high quality health care services in urban, regional, rural and remote locations across Australia.  This includes through Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Services, wherever possible and appropriate, as well as mainstream services delivering comprehensive, culturally appropriate primary health care.

WEBSITE

The expected outcomes of the IAHP include improvements in:

  • The health of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people;
  • Access to high quality, comprehensive and culturally appropriate primary health care; and
  • System level support to the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander primary health care sector to increase the effectiveness and efficiency of services.

Implementation of the IAHP aligns with the Aboriginal and Torres Strait islander Health Plan 2013-2023: Implementation Plan which focusses on systematic service improvement and addressing geographic disparities through more effective and innovative regional arrangements.  The Implementation Plan can be found on the department’s Implementation Plan for the National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Plan 2013-2023 website.

 

About the Major Capital Works Program Grant Opportunity

This Grant Opportunity is for Expression of Interest applications as Stage One in a two-stage application process for funding under the IAHP Major Capital Works Program.  The objective of this Grant Opportunity is to improve access for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples to safe and effective essential health services through the provision of culturally appropriate, fit for purpose health infrastructure across Australia.  Further information on the type of activities and projects eligible to be funded under this Grant Opportunity are included in the IAHP Major Capital Works Program Stage One EOI Guidelines.

Eligibility:

Organisations will be eligible to apply if they satisfy all of the eligibility criteria outlined in the IAHP Major Capital Works Program Stage One EOI Guidelines and the IAHP Major Capital Works Program Stage One EOI Application Form, which includes that the organisation must currently receive primary health care funding to deliver clinical services under the IAHP.

Total Amount Available (AUD):

$35,000,000.00

Instructions for Lodgement:

All applications must be submitted on the IAHP Major Capital Works Program EOI Stage One Application Form, following the instructions and eligibility requirements included in the Application Form and Grant Opportunity Guidelines, and emailed to Grant.ATM@health.gov.au by the stated closing date and time.

Before completing the application form, please read the documents attached to this Grant Opportunity Package which include the Grant Opportunity Guidelines, the IAHP Guidelines, the application form, and the department’s funding agreement standard terms and conditions.

2.1 NSW : For NSW ACCHO members Indigenous bubs need to be counted for a passport to life

The NSW Registry of Births Deaths & Marriages has found that up to 10 percent of Indigenous babies are going unregistered in some parts of NSW.

Speaking at the South Sydney Rabbitohs’ Indigenous Round, NSW Registrar of Births Deaths & Marriages Amanda Ianna launched a new campaign to encourage Aboriginal mums to register their bubs, as well as a new range of commemorative birth certificates.

“The number of Indigenous people still not registering births is far too high,” Ms Ianna said.

“It causes problems for children when they need a birth certificate to enrol in school or organised sport or, when they’re older, get a driver’s licence or tax file number.

“A birth certificate is a passport to many things in life that we often take for granted.

“Some mums are under the misconception they have to pay to register their baby or they assume the hospital does it for you. That’s not the case.”

The ‘Our Kids Count’ campaign encourages Aboriginal mums to register their bubs and includes this video: http://www.bdm.nsw.gov.au/Aboriginal

Ms Ianna also unveiled a new range of commemorative birth certificates, including three new skin tone variations on the best-selling ‘baby handprint’ design.

“For parents, the commemorative certificates allow them to honour their cultural heritage while celebrating one of the most significant events of their lives,” she said.

“They are designed for people of all backgrounds, including Indigenous communities, recently arrived migrants and multicultural families who now call NSW home.”

In addition to the handprints, there is also a Ken Done original, May Gibbs’ favourite characters Snugglepot and Cuddlepie and two Bananas in Pyjamas designs.

Who can I ask for help?

Our team are here to help, so you can phone 13 77 88 to yarn.

Speak to your local Aboriginal Medical Service, Local Aboriginal Land Council, Cultural Centre, Aboriginal Health Practitioner or community centre. Staff in hospitals and medical practices or your local Aboriginal Liasion Officer can give you information.

For more information on the certificates visit:

http://www.bdm.nsw.gov.au or call 13 77 88

2.2 NSW : Wellington Aboriginal Corporation Health Service (WACHS) Taylor and co arrive to help raise Organ Tissue Donation awareness in Indigenous communities

Having all played on the weekend, Ash Taylor, Braidon Burns, Tyrell Fuimaono and Will Smith jump on a bus … where are they going?

The quartet of NRL guns head to Kennard Park, Wellington, naturally.

While most top flight rugby league players stay at home or enjoy some much deserved family time after game day, Taylor gave that up to lead a small convoy to the bush to help promote a worthy cause.

Originally published HERE

The foursome was spreading the organ tissue donation message, a day put on by Donate Life, in conjunction with the Wellington Aboriginal Corporation Health Service (WACHS) and Organ Tissue Donation Services (OTDS) to raise awareness within Aboriginal communities in the Central West.

For the Gold Coast Titans halfback, one touted as a future State of Origin No.7 for the Maroons, coming out to an area he’s previously supported was a no-brainier.

The fact there was a bit of footy on at the same time was just the icing on the cake.

“I’ve been here a few times. I watched a game here last year too,” Taylor said before kick-off of the first grade game between the Cowboys and Westside on Sunday.

Taylor hails from Toowoomba while Burns is originally from Coonamble.

“It’s always a good game here,” Taylor continued.

“I love coming out and watching country footy, it reminds me of home. I’m really excited to watch it.”

3.ACT New $12 Million facility for Winnunga ACCHO as they celebrate 30 years

The Winnunga Aboriginal Health Service, which celebrated 30 years of excellence last weekend, will soon be able to continue to do its important work in a brand new facility with support from the ACT Government.

Minister for Health and Wellbeing Meegan Fitzharris and Minister for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Affairs Rachel Stephen-Smith will join Winnunga Nimmityjah Health and Community Services and the ACT Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Elected Body on Saturday to reaffirm the ACT Government’s commitment to the service, which delivers on an election promise for a new Winnunga Nimmityjah facility.

“Winnunga Nimmityjah plays such an important role in our community and delivers quality health services to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in our region every day,” Minister Fitzharris said.

“The ACT Government’s support of Winnunga Nimmityjah is long standing and I hope our partnership will grow so we can continue to focus our efforts on closing the gap in health outcomes for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.

“I’m very pleased to announce that the $12 million funded in last year’s Budget will be provided to Winnunga Nimmityjah as grants to build a modern new facility that Winnunga Nimmityjah will own. The ACT Government will support Winnunga Nimmityjah throughout the delivery of the project.

“The ACT Government has committed to work closely with Winnunga on the new facility, and planning and preliminary work has already commenced,” said Minister Fitzharris.

Minister Stephen-Smith said each year more than 4,000 people used Winnunga’s wide range of services.

“Winnunga Nimmityjah means strong health in the Wiradjuri language, and Canberra is lucky to have had such a strong and supportive health service for local Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders for the last 30 years

4. 1 QLD : GALANGOOR Duwalami Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Service TEN YEARS MAKES YOU MORE STRONG

GALANGOOR Duwalami Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Service in Hervey Bay, Queensland, has celebrated 10 years of business

Director Graham Douglas said the service has been working to close the Health gap in the local community but there’s still plenty more to be done.

“We’re going really well, the Wakka Wakka man told the Koori Mail. “We get specialists in once a month as well as the general clinic services, which are always busy. We moved to a new clinic in 2017 and we had to have two buildings next to each other to meet the demand.”

Mr Douglas said marking 10 years was an important milestone for the service.

“We’ve had our ups and downs, “he said. “Back in 2008 we only had three staff and they all did two jobs each. We are growing now. We’ve been working hard and we haven’t stopped looking out for the community. We are doing really well. We’re thinking smart’.

Mr Douglas said now with more staff, the aim of the service remains the same- it’s always for the community.

“We’ve got a few success stories, he said.

“It’s about seeing smiles on people’s faces when they get stronger and healthier.”

4.2 QLD : QAIHC helps Palm Island lay health foundation plan for next 10 years

Guests included Townsville Hospital and Health Service boards Chair Tony Mooney, Northern Queensland Primary Health Network Director Suzanne Andrews and QAIHC – Queensland Aboriginal and Islander health Council Board Chair Kieran Chilcott, who signed a statement of intent recommitting to Closing the Gap on Palm Island.

A plan that will lay the foundation for a healthier Palm Island for the next 10 years was launched in the north Queensland Aboriginal shire last month.

The Palm Island health Action Plan 2018 to 28 was launched at the local PCYC before a large audience that included Elders community members and invited guests.

Photo Suzanne Andrews and story originally published in Koori Mail

Palm Island Major Alf Lacey said it was significant for the community.

“It means a lot to our community when decision makers respect us and involve us in the planning and delivery of things that affect us deeply, he said. “Our community is a unique community and therefore our desire to Close the Gap needs a unique solution. This plan strikes that balance. It is important to celebrate success; however, we need to remain focused on the long journey ahead in meeting the objectives of this plan”.

Ethel Wharton, who was the matron at Palm hospital from 1967 for about 20 years and was presented with a photo and a card acknowledging her service .

State Townsville MP Scott Stewart said the Palm Island Health Action Plan would provide a clear road map for the future delivery of health care.

“This is a document developed by Palm Islanders for Palm Islanders, he said. ”The community has told us how they want to be cared for and what they need to live strong, long and healthy lives. Today we launch the plan in partnership with community and commit to making their vision a reality.”

Mr Mooney said the Health Service and Council had embraced the opportunity to grow the influence Palm Islanders had over their own health.

“There is evidence that shows when people have greater engagement with their health they have better health outcomes,”he said. “Good primary health is essential to warding off chronic illness, being healthy and living longer. Our excellent staff at Palm’s Joyce Palmer Health Service will always be there when people get sick but this new centre is all about helping Palm Islanders stay well.” Mr Stewart said key components of the plan were already being implemented with the $16.5 million Palm Island Primary Care Centre under construction.

The project is being funded through 8.5 million for the State Government’s Significant Regional Infrastructure Project program, $4.7 million from the Making Tracks Indigenous Health Investment Strategy and $3.3 million from the Townsville Hospital and Health Service.

“We are already seeing the first green shoots of what this plan will deliver for Palm Islanders,” Mr Stewart said.

“This centre will expand and improve Palm Islanders access to primary health services and provide a hub for social and emotional wellbeing and dental maternal and child health services. A transition will begin to slowly transfer delivery of these services to the community.”

In coordination with the launch a Palm Island Primary Health Fair was held at the PCYC.

The event included sporting clinics by the Townsville Fire and former North Queensland Cowboys star Ray Thompson, a healthy lunch catered locally, interactive primary health stalls and local entertainment.

5. WA :  AHCWA staff are currently in the Kimberley’s completing the Gibb River Challenge to raise money for the RFDS.

The 12 staff members left Derby on Sunday, travelling on the Gibb River Rd, reaching Ellenbrae station last night. Next stop is Home Valley Station where they’ll be able to have a hot shower and a much-needed rest.

The Gibb River Challenge is a socially competitive 660km team relay event raising community awareness and money for charity. The event runs over one week from Derby to El Questro.

6. TAS: Tasmanian Aboriginal Centre Remembering Kikatapula

This week marks the death of Kikatapula, also known in life as ‘Black Tom’ or Tom Birch.

From the east coast, he saw the first ships arriving in lutruwita; was stolen from his family and brought up around Richmond; rejoined his tribe; was arrested for murder but released; spoke several Aboriginal languages.

was a major figure in the wars of resistance; later joined Robinson’s expeditions as a guide; contracted dysentery at Wybalenna and died during this week in 1832 at pataway, the area around today’s town of Burnie.

waranta tangara Kikatapula, mangina rrala;
lungkana rruthina pataway-ta. Krakani nayri, ngini.
We mourn Kikatapula, brave warrior; killed at pataway.
Rest peacefully, beloved ancestor.

7. SA: Please help Zibeon get people back home for treatment and give generously to help open the doors to the first remote dialysis clinic on the APY lands.

Zibeon Fielding is a 24 year old man from Mimili Community and an Aboriginal Health Worker at ‘Local’ in the far-north-west region of South Australia on the Anangu Pitjantjatjara Yankingtjara Lands(APY). Zibeon is determined, passionate and wants to help his people live long, healthy and happy lives.

In 2016, Zibeon was selected into the Indigenous Marathon Project (IMP), a foundation established by World Champion Robert De Castella. A testament to his determined spirit, Zibeon tried out for the squad for four consecutive years before being accepted into the program. Zibeon has now trained under the IMP, completed a New York City Marathon and is now taking on his biggest challenge yet.

Please help Zibeon get people back home for treatment and give generously to help open the doors to the first remote dialysis clinic on the APY lands.

THE CHALLENGE

Zibeon’s challenge….and dream, is to run an Ultra Marathon – 62km from his community of Mimili, to neighbouring Indulkana. It’s a long, long way…the length of ONE AND A HALF MARATHONS through harsh desert country and further than he has ever run before.

As part of his training Zibeon is now set to run another ‘WORLD’S BIG SIX MARATHON’ in Boston (USA), April 16th 2018. (Proudly sponsored by Epic Good Foundation http://epicgood.com.au/)

With the support of the South Australian Film Corporation, Zibeon is filming his journey towards the run and will share the mental and physical obstacles he endures. He will reveal what’s required to push the boundaries of ones physical capacity and provide an educational journey that allows the audience to share his pain, moments of doubt and absolutely dogged perseverance.

Zibeon will start his run on 20th of May.

THE GOAL

The ultimate goal is to raise $50,000 for The Purple House – Western Desert Dialysis. The money will be used to help get the doors open at the first remote dialysis unit on the APY lands – Pukatja / Ernabella SA.

Opening in 2018, the new dialysis unit will provide much needed ‘on country’ dialysis for Anangu people. Indigenous people from remote Australia are being diagnosed with kidney failure at unprecedented rates and without ‘on country’ treatment options, dialysis patients are forced to relocate Alice Springs or Adelaide…many miles from home.

With every step he takes…millions over the 5 months training and 5+ hour final ultra marathon, Zibeon is striving to bring about positive change to all those he cares about and even to those he doesn’t know yet. Zibeon hopes to reconnect old people with their homes and inspiring young people to do right by themselves.

With your help, Zibeon will get the doors open at the new Pukatja Dialysis Unit and start to bring people home to country and their families.

WHAT CAN YOU DO TO HELP?

Please click the ‘DONATE’ button and give generously, SHARE on social media and follow Zibeon on his epic journey

DONATE HERE $20 $50 $100 Etc

8.1 VIC : VAHS Deadly Choices Education session Friday 18 May

 

9. NT Congress Alice Spring new Tackling Smoking Ads

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