NACCHO #HealthBudget18 Coverage 3/5 Read and Download the Top 10 Peak Health Organisation Press Release responses to #Budget2018NACCHO

1.NATSIHWA welcomes the 2018 budget announcements of additional funding to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peak Health Workforce Professional Bodies

2. IAHA : Allied health undervalued in 2018 Federal Budget

3.AIDA funded to continue our work in improving health outcomes for Indigenous Australians

4.1 AMA : SAFE AND STEADY HEALTH BUDGET, BUT BIGGER REFORMS ARE STILL TO COME

5.NRHA :RURAL HEALTH BUDGET $$ WELCOME – BUT NOT ENOUGH

6.AHHA : Health data boost right step on the road to reform

7. PHAA : Budget 2018 – prevention focus goes missing

8.RACGP : Signs Federal Government beginning to recognise vital role of specialist GPs in Australia’s healthcare system

9.CHF Health budget includes welcome consumer focus

10. Vision 2020 Australia welcomes the Australian Government’s investment to target major causes of vision loss in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities.

Post 1 of our NACCHO Posts on #Budget2018 NACCHO

Post 2 will be the NACCHO Chair Press Release

Post 3 will be Health Peak bodies Press Release summary

Post 4 will be Government Press Releases

Post 5 Opposition responses to Budget 2018 (Monday )

ALL NACCHO BUDGET COVERAGE HERE

1.NATSIHWA welcomes the 2018 budget announcements of additional funding to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peak Health Workforce Professional Bodies

“Today’s budget announcement presents an important opportunity for NATSIHWA. It will enable us to progress key strategic priorities, including the development of a National Mentor program to support Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander Health Workers and Health Practitioners. This is a very exciting time for our members”

Mr Karl Briscoe, NATSIHWA CEO.

Download full Press Release

1.NATSIHWA BUDGET Media Release 2018

The National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Workers Association (NATSIHWA) welcomes the 2018 Australian Government budget announcement that signal growth in funding for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander workforce organisations.

These organisations (NATSIHWA, CATSINaM, IAHA and AIDA) work togetherto support the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health workforces and improve health outcomes for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.

“We thank the Australian government for the continued support of NATSIHWA. This funding will not only enhance the sustainability of our profession, but will also lead to opportunities that promote the recognition and professionalism of Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander Health Workers and Health Practitioners” said Ms Josslyn Tully, NATSIHWA Chairperson.

In particular, the budget announcement support the progression of NATSIHWA’s strategic plan 2017-2020. Key strategic priorities for NATISHWA over the next 12 months, include the:

  • Development of a National Mentoring Program for Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander Health Workers and Health Practitioners;
  • Implementation of the National Professional Development Symposium which will bring together over 100 Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander Health Workers and Health Practitioners in Alice Springs in October 2018;
  • Continuation of Regional forums to support professional development and networking of Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander Health Workers and Health Practitioners in regions across Australia;
  • Development of further educational resources to support individuals and services in defending Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander Health Workers and Health Practitioners’ Scope of Practice; and,
  • Enhanced influence of national policy and program that improve Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health and health workforce outcomes that support a culturally safe work environment.

“NATSIHWA looks forward to progressing these initiatives with our membership, which includes over 750 full members who are qualified Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander Health Workers and Health Practitioners across Australia”, said Ms Josslyn Tully

2. IAHA : Allied health undervalued in 2018 Federal Budget

Improving Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health and wellbeing must remain a national priority. Action is needed to improve outcomes for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.

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2. Media-Release_allied-health-undervalued-in-2018-Federal-Budget

Those actions must involve: a coherent strategy to tackle the causes of disadvantage and enable our people to achieve their potential; governments showing the stamina to address issues that come from generations of trauma and disadvantage; and commitment to work with, hear and respect Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people and the knowledge they bring to issues that shape their lives.

IAHA now has a commitment of funding for a further four years. We also have a commitment of $1.55M per year in additional funding to share with our fellow Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health workforce peak organisations: AIDA, CATSINAM and NATSIHWA. We have proven our approaches deliver results and build the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health workforce.

IAHA has a significant advocacy role and interest in several other initiatives announced in the 2018-19 Budget, including measures responding to urgent needs across Australian communities, including:

  • $105M over four years to improve access to aged care for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people
  • $30M over four years for ear health assessment in pre-schools
  • $34.3M over four years for eye health and
  • Extra commitment to suicide prevention, additional mental health care.

IAHA CEO Donna Murray said “For initiatives to deliver for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people, community must be involved in how those measures are developed and implemented. This applies to new measures and to addressing existing acute allied health shortages in health, disability, aged care and other social services.”

A culturally safe and responsive skilled workforce, is critical in working with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people and communities. To ensure the workforce has the skills needed to deliver results, strategies and solutions need to be developed and delivered in partnership with IAHA, our members and communities.

“IAHAs success thus far in developing and implementing innovative allied health career pathway programs and supports, providing leadership opportunities and development, mentoring, in partnering and in promoting person-centred, multidisciplinary care needs to be leveraged further. We, therefore, welcome a stronger partnership with Government to enable this success to continue and grow”, said Ms Murray.

IAHA chairperson, Nicole Turner, commented “By leading and facilitating inter-professional approaches that fit with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander notions of health and wellbeing, we’ve supported and enabled rapid growth in the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health workforce. But we still represent less than 1 percent of the allied health workforce. Our workforce must continue to grow. Continued funding for IAHA is a vital step in the right direction.”

IAHA welcomes the $550M allocated to the Stronger Rural Health Strategy and the aim of ensuring the right health professionals are available when and where they are needed. However, IAHA remains concerned and disappointed that acute shortages in rural and remote allied health services have been largely ignored, and particularly that there appears to be almost no gain for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities who have little or no access to allied health services at present.

CEO, Donna Murray, added “IAHA will continue to advocate for the National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Plan and Implementation Plan to be fully funded. IAHA will continue to seek opportunities to work constructively with Government to achieve this result.”

3.AIDA funded to continue our work in improving health outcomes for Indigenous Australians

This week the Australian Government announced the 2018/2019 Budget to the Australian public. The Australian Indigenous Doctors’ Association (AIDA) welcomes the news of increased government investment into Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peak workforce organisations of $33.4 million over four years from 2018-2019.

Download full Press Release

3.AIDA-budget-response_MEDIA-RELEASE-9-May-2018

We take this as a tangible measure of the genuine commitment of the Turnbull Government to work with us to build the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health workforce.

As the only professional association for both Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander doctors and medical students, AIDA is committed to improving the health of our people and enriching the health profession by growing the numbers of Indigenous doctors.

This renewed funding certainty will allow AIDA, through our strong relationships with key stakeholders, to keep supporting efforts to increase the cultural safety of mainstream medical education and health care systems.

This continued financial support from the government means job security for our employees, increased resourcing for emerging issues and the ability to continue to implement our long-term strategic agenda.

This includes:

  •  Development of our 2018 policy priorities
  •  Further investment in Indigenous-led health research
  • The delivery of a cultural safety program for doctors, by Indigenous doctor
  • Ongoing support to our student and doctor member base

Doing things with, not to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples

AIDA encourages the Turnbull Government to maintain its stated commitment to work in a consultative and collaborative way with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples.

We remain concerned that there is no commitment in the 2018/19 Budget to adequately resource the Implementation Plan for the National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Plan 2013-2023.

AIDA maintains that this is the roadmap for the government to work with us to genuinely redress health disparity and deliver culturally appropriate and needs-based health care to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples.

We encourage the government to commit to implementing the social determinants of health framework into future Indigenous health policy development.

AIDA also remains concerned about the lack of targeted funding commitment around Closing the Gap.

We maintain that measureable targets, accountability mechanisms and appropriately funded policy design and program delivery are essential to closing the gap on Indigenous disadvantage.

With this renewed funding certainty, AIDA will continue working towards our vision for an Australian health care system that is free of racism, and one that affords Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples the health care they have a right to expect and receive.

4.1 AMA : SAFE AND STEADY HEALTH BUDGET, BUT BIGGER REFORMS ARE STILL TO COME

VIEW NACCHO TV HERE

The Government has tonight delivered a safe and steady Health Budget, which outlines a broad range of initiatives across the health portfolio – but some of the bigger reforms and the biggest challenges are yet to come.

AMA President, Dr Michael Gannon, said the Government has provided some necessary funding to aged care, mental health, rural health, the PBS, and medical research, with many decisions directly responding to AMA policy.

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4.1 Safe and Steady Health Budget, But Bigger Reforms Are Still to Come

4.2 AMSA Rural

AMSA Rural enthusiastically supports the changes to rural bonding and the opportunities presented by the Junior Doctor Training Program and the National Rural Generalist Pathway.

While the MDMS network may represent an expensive mis-step in addressing rural health workforce shortages, with funds better spent on rural Specialty Training Places, the announcement of better targeting, monitoring and planning for future rural workforce needs is encouraging.

Overall, AMSA Rural welcomes the government’s renewed focus on health equity for rural and regional communities, and looks forward to hearing more details of the Stronger Rural Health Strategy.

Download full Press Release

4.2 AMSA RH MR-  RURAL HEALTH IN FOCUS

5.NRHA :RURAL HEALTH BUDGET $$ WELCOME – BUT NOT ENOUGH

New funding to attract more doctors to country areas has been welcomed by the National Rural Health Alliance, Australia’s peak body for rural and remote health.

“We are pleased tonight’s Federal Budget allocates $550 million over 10 years to help fill the health workforce gaps that exist in so many parts of country Australia,” said Alliance CEO Mark Diamond.

The government says it will deliver 3,000 new specialist GPs, and 3,000 additional nurses over ten years mainly through providing end to end training in country areas.

“It’s not only doctors and nurses that are missing outside major cities. Equally there are not enough allied health professionals. Some areas have no psychologists, no physiotherapists, no occupational therapists,” Mr Diamond said.

A new Workforce Incentive Program will provide some funds to general practices to employ more nurses, doctors and, for the first time, allied health workers.

Download full Press Release

5. National Rural Health Alliance

6.AHHA Health data boost right step on the road to reform

‘The lack of any concrete action on preventive health is concerning—it has been allowed to slip down health budget priorities, despite its proven benefits in preventing big health bills later. This particularly applies to dental health, which once again has been overlooked.

‘In terms of Closing the Gap in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health, we note some modest investments, including the commitment of $5 million per year for the next 3 years to address trachoma in Aboriginal communities’, Ms Verhoeven said.

‘It is disappointing that the government didn’t take the opportunity to address one of our pre-Budget recommendations to make the administrative changes to ensure patients discharged from hospital have access to Closing the Gap prescriptions.

This would have been a practical and relatively inexpensive measure to improve health outcomes for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples.’

7.1 PHAA : Budget 2018 – prevention focus goes missing

Tonight’s national Budget continues to fund the health care systems, but is woefully short on preventative health measures to keep Australians from becoming sick in the first place, according to Public Health Association Australia (PHAA) Chief Executive Michael Moore AM.

“Despite repeated advice – and repeated commitments in principle – the Government is still not developing a preventative health focus for our health system,” said Mr Moore.

“It’s true there are a few modest measures tonight – including additional vaccinations funded, very welcome measures to promote mental wellbeing, and the Good Sports Program to reduce alcohol consumption in sporting contexts.”

“But Australia’s people will continue to experience avoidable chronic disease in the years ahead. People who should be destined to live healthy lives will not because of the preventable diseases they will suffer. While we need to look after the aged populations and those requiring medical treatment, we need to focus even more heavily on the younger generation we are failing,” Mr Moore said.

“The inevitable cost to Budgets far into the future will be greater than the investments that might have been funded.”

“What is also noticeable is that there are no preventive measures in this budget which impact negatively on industry.”

“Just last week we saw Australia’s first ever dedicated conference of preventative health professionals, with 300 expert Australians gathering in Sydney to debate the way forward to a more preventive approach to health and wellbeing.

“Yet tonight, preventive health has again been relegated to a low priority.”

“Future Health Ministers and Treasurers will rue the mistakes of this generation, including tonight’s Budget, in failing to invest in preventive health.”

Mr Moore also acknowledged Minister for Aged Care and Indigenous Health Ken Wyatt for securing a number of important initiatives in Indigenous health, Australia’s most agonizing continuing health crisis.

The Public Health Association welcomed a number of specific initiatives in tonight’s Budget:

  • Improving physical activity with a $50.4m investment to get people moving and expanding other physical activity.
  • Funding to expanding four forms of vaccinations, including Pertussis, and a targeted program to address low vaccination rate areas.
  • A National Injury Prevention Strategy for children and older people, including a program to prevent water and snow sport injuries
  • Additional funding for suicide prevention

Download 2 full Press Release

7.1 PHAA Prevention

7. 2 PHAA

NACCHO would also wish Michael a healthy future

8.RACGP Signs Federal Government beginning to recognise vital role of specialist GPs in Australia’s healthcare system

 

The Federal Government’s commitment to fund training for general practice is a sign political leaders are finally beginning to understand the vital role of specialist GPs in Australia’s healthcare system.

Royal Australian College of General Practitioners (RACGP) President Dr Bastian Seidel commended the government for investing to fund a world class, contemporary postgraduate training program for medical graduates through Australian medical colleges and in particular through the RACGP.

“We are cautiously optimistic that the penny has finally dropped,” Dr Seidel said.

“A commitment to unconditionally fund postgraduate GP training will ensure that all Australians have access to a doctor with specialist qualifications in general practice, and this has not always been the case.

Additionally, the commitment to support 3,000 international medical graduates (IMGs) to attain Fellowship as a specialist general practitioner is welcomed.

“Far too often, doctors without any postgraduate qualifications were placed in so called ‘areas of need’ and ‘district workforce shortages’.

“They were asked to work there with little or no professional support or continuous professional training.

“The funding made available in this year’s Federal Budget will finally start to rectify this shortcoming.”

Dr Seidel said while Australian GPs would be pleased with the Federal Government’s commitment to improving general practice training, there were still significant issues that needed to be addressed before the next Federal election. The indexation of general practice consultation item numbers, whilst welcome, does not go far enough.

Dr Seidel said he would like to see the Federal Government show its commitment to general practice by increasing the Medicare rebate for GP attendances by 18.5% to bring specialist GPs into line with other medical specialist attendance items.

“We must see coherent and cohesive funding for general practice that reflects the expertise of all specialist GPs.

“Appropriate investment in general practice has been proven, repeatedly, to be the most cost-effective way to deliver effective healthcare to the Australian population, particularly as the numbers of patients with chronic conditions continue to increase.

“Patients want to spend more time with their GP, and the evidence shows that time with your GP is good for patients,” Dr Seidel said.

“The Federal Government can really make a difference to the quality of care GPs are able to provide Australians by increasing this rebate before the Federal election and as a matter of urgency

 

9.CHF Health budget includes welcome consumer focus

The #digitalhealth slides from @CHFofAustralia #HealthBudget18 response. Note : Funding for things where digital health is a big part. Especially interesting is the work happening with Healthy Active Beginnings.Thx @deanhewson ‬

All 23 slides here:

Record funding for hospitals from 2020 and a $5 billion rise for aged care are contained in a Federal Budget which also provides for more consumer-focused approaches to care and research.

Download full Press Release

9. CHF Federal Health Budget

10. Vision 2020 Australia welcomes the Australian Government’s investment to target major causes of vision loss in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities.

Vision 2020 Australia welcomes the Australian Government’s investment to target major causes of vision loss in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities.

Download full press release

10. Vision Australia welcomes Eye Health Funding

The Government’s 2018-19 budget allocated $34.3 million to the eye health issues that disproportionately impact on Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.

Vision 2020 Australia CEO Carla Northam said “Our members consistently tell us that the three major causes of vision loss for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people are eye problems associated with diabetic retinopathy, uncorrected refractive error and the length of time people wait for cataract surgery.

“With the right amount of funding, we can address these debilitating eye conditions.”

Dr Dawn Casey, Acting CEO of the National Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation (NACCHO) welcomed the focus on providing eye health checks, especially for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people who have diabetes. “We need to do all we can to make sure all Aboriginal people with diabetes have an annual eye test. At the moment, only around half are getting their eyes checked every year.”

Professor Hugh Taylor from Indigenous Eye Health, the University of Melbourne identified access to cataract surgery as needing serious attention. He said “Vision loss from cataract is twice as common in Indigenous Australians and they have to wait almost twice as long for surgery.”

Professor Taylor added “Eye care services at the local and regional levels must be planned and resourced to meet population-based needs.”

While the details on how the Government will spend the $34.3 million are unclear, Vision 2020 Australia believes that activity must focus on cutting cataract surgery wait times, making sure everyone with diabetes has an annual eye test and getting glasses to people who need them. Through these measures the Government will meet its commitment to address the major causes of vision loss in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities.

 

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