NACCHO Aboriginal Health #ACCHO Deadly Good News stories : Features Pat Turner CEO co hosting @NITV #ThePoint #Budget2018NACCHO @GidgeeHealing #BecauseofHerWeCan @awabakalltd @Wuchopperen @CAACongressPlus News from #NSW #QLD #VIC #ACT

1.1 National : Our NACCHO CEO Pat Turner co hosts a special Indigenous Health edition of NITV The Point 3 May 2018

1.2 National : NACCHO’s Budget proposal to accelerate Closing the Gap in Indigenous Life Expectancy

1.3 National : SistaQuit needs a few more ACCHO sites for an Indigenous smoking cessation trial for pregnant Aboriginal & Torres Strait Islander women who smoke 

2.1 QLD : Gidgee Healing Mt Isa An Indigenous health forum with more than advice for women

2.2 QLD  : Wuchopperen Health Service to raise awareness for Domestic Violence Prevention Month

3.NSW :Awabakal ACCHO Newcastle : Australian Ninja Warrior star Jack Wilson signs on to help fight chronic Indigenous obesity

4. ACT : Winnunga ACCHO leads the way May 27 , Reconciliation Day, to recognise and celebrate reconciliation in the ACT between Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people and non-Aboriginal people.

5.1 NT : Congress Alice Springs Foetal alcohol spectrum disorder diagnostic centre opens in Alice Springs amid ‘huge demand’

5.2 NT : Sir Michael Marmot visits Congress Alice Springs  

6.VIC : Planning the Closing the Gap future

 View hundreds of ACCHO Deadly Good News Stories over past 6 years

How to submit a NACCHO Affiliate  or Members Good News Story ?

 Email to Colin Cowell NACCHO Media    

Mobile 0401 331 251

Wednesday by 4.30 pm for publication each Thursday /Friday

 

1.National : Our NACCHO CEO Pat Turner co hosts a special Indigenous Health edition of NITV The Point 3 May 2018

View the full program here

https://www.sbs.com.au/ondemand/video/1214949955803/the-point-3-may

In my view, the only way to improve outcomes for Aboriginal people – no matter what the sector – is to put Aboriginal programs in Aboriginal hands

It would come as no surprise to any of you to hear me say that an ideal Australia should be one without any gaps between Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australians

We are all aware of the gap between Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australians and how a succession of well-intended Governments have struggled to make any progress

Just look at the situation for our young people

At the moment, Indigenous children starting school have twice as many developmental hurdles

Young Aboriginal people are almost five times as likely to commit suicide

Young Aboriginal people are over 30-times more likely to be in juvenile detention

None of us want to see these sorts of statistics

None of us want to see the horrific system failures such as Dondale ever repeated again

We must build a fair and just society in which first Australians can flourish on equal terms and in which our kids get the chance they deserve

We need to do this by putting Aboriginal programs into Aboriginal hands

Closing the health gap with #715 Health checks

The gap in health and life expectancy between Aboriginal and other Australians is not closing

The burden of disease for the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Island population is 2.3 times higher than for the rest of the population – Funding should reflect this

But it is much higher in remote areas

Yet a dangerous myth persists that Aboriginal and Torres Strait people receive ample funding

To address the disparity, the Commonwealth, in particular, needs to do more

The Commonwealth must lift expenditure not just to match the States’ spend of $2 per Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander for every $1 for the rest of the population, but to match the burden of disease – i.e. $2.30 for every non-Indigenous dollar The Commonwealth only spent $1.21 per Aboriginal and Torres Strait Island person for every $1 spent on the rest of the population

The Closing the Gap targets should remain

But the Government seems to be walking away from these targets and reinventing a softer scheme in which it is less accountable

Until Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples are fully engaged and have control over their health and wellbeing any ‘refresh’ will be marginal at best, and certainly won’t close the gap

We need radically different action to achieve the targets, but let’s start simply by putting Aboriginal programs in Aboriginal hands

1.2 National : NACCHO’s Budget proposal to accelerate Closing the Gap in Indigenous Life Expectancy

On Budget night follow #Budget2018NACCHO

Aboriginal Health Download NACCHO Pre #Budget2018 Submission : Budget proposals to accelerate #ClosingTheGap in #Indigenous life expectancy

1.3 National : SistaQuit needs a few more ACCHO sites for an Indigenous smoking cessation trial for pregnant Aboriginal & Torres Strait Islander women who smoke 

The SISTAQUIT Study aims to improve the provision of timely, evidence-based smoking cessation care to pregnant Aboriginal & Torres Strait Islander women who smoke and who attend an Aboriginal Medical and Health Service for their ante-natal care.

The study involves a randomized controlled trial testing the SISTAQUIT intervention against ‘usual care’ (all sites receive SISTAQUIT either now or later).

We will to do this through on-site face to face interactive webinar training, free trial resources, free oral NRT for all study sites and financial reimbursement to both study sites and Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women who consent to participate in the study.

The SISTAQUIT Team are aiming to recruit 30 study sites nationally and are very excited to have already recruited 22 ACCHOs from NSW, Queensland, NT, WA and SA.

We would love to hear from any ACCHOs who would be interested in becoming a study site or those who would like more information on the study.

If your service would like to be a part of this vital trial to help us understand how to provide the best chance of quitting during pregnancy then please call or email Ms Joley Manton on (02) 4033 5720 Mobile 0439 613 836 or email: joley.manton@newcastle.edu.au or sistaquit@newcastle.edu.au

2.QLD  : Gidgee Healing Mt Isa An Indigenous health forum with more than advice for women

The first Indigenous Women’s Health Forum launched at the Mount Isa Golf Clubhouse on Tuesday, May 1.

Gidgee Healing Regional Manager of Deadly Choices Daniella Solakovic said Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women have some of the poorest health statistics, so the aim of this event is for women to come together to hear from their peers and specialists on key aspects of health and share their personal experiences.

Originally Published here

The two-day event discussed the subjects of nutrition, sexual health, domestic violence, cancer and wellbeing and self care.

Ms Solakovic said they wanted the women to leave after the event with confidence.

“Confidence with the knowledge acquired from the topics we have discussed. Confidence to share the information with others in the community, confidence to access the support services within the community and confidence to remember they are worthy, loved and not alone,” she said.

The second day of the event had a pamper element as the women participated in a number of wellness based activities.

“We had weaving classes, cooking, nail painting, yoga, waxing, face masks and even hair cutting,” Ms Solakovic said.

“We want to acknowledge women and the hard work they do on a day-to-day basis.”

Special guest speaker and Deadly Choice ambassador Rhonda Purcell said meeting together and building networks is were we can get strength from one another.

“We come from a long line of women in our culture from which to draw strength from.

“I grew up in a house with domestic violence and saw a lot of things a child should never see,” Ms Purcell said

I can say today, I got my strength from my mother, she is my inspiration and always will be.”

Special Guest Shellie Morris is an indigenous Australian singer who in 2014 won the NAIDOC National Artist of the Year award.

Ms Morris has worked with numerous organisations using music as a healing tool.

“Meeting together like this is like a moment of respite used to empower us to be strong and know our self worth and that we can achieve anything,” she said.

2.2 QLD  : Wuchopperen Health Service to raise awareness for Domestic Violence Prevention Month

Wuchopperen Health Service Limited will hold outreach, clinic – based and online activities across Domestic Violence Prevention Month (May 1 – 31) to raise awareness of domestic and family violence and the pathways to change.

Social and Emotional Health Acting Manager Spencer Browne said Domestic Violence Prevention Month was all about encouraging people to speak up.

‘Wuchopperen’s theme for Domestic Violence Prevention Month 2018 is #SaySomething. Wuchopperen is encouraging anyone  affected by domestic or family violence to say something, whether it’s to ring an organisation like ours and ask for help, or check in on someone you are concerned about, speaking up makes a difference.’

‘Wuchopperen recognises that domestic and family violence harms individuals, families and communities and we have a range of culturally appropriate, specialised programs to provide advice, care and support for people experiencing, or committing domestic violence.

‘Our services include men’s and women’s yarning groups, youth programs, specialist counselling for men and women, a psychologist and clinical psychologist, court support and free legal advice.

‘Wuchopperen is committed to supporting healthy, respectful relationships which generate healthy families and healthy communities.’

Activities

#SaySomething Social Media Campaign

Community organisations, local schools and individuals will be encouraged to use the hashtag to promote domestic and family violence prevention and awareness.

Sample messages include:

[SCHOOL] says domestic and family violence is everyone’s business #SaySomething #DVPM18

[ORGANISATION] says healthy relationships matter #SaySomething #DVPM18

Week 1

Tuesday 1 – Friday 4 May

School based activities – domestic and family violence education and awareness, healthy relationships education and awareness

Week 2 

Tuesday 8 May, Wednesday 9 May

Wuchopperen male and female Family Support Workers providing outreach services at Manoora Community Centre

Murray St, Manoora

Thursday 10, Thursday 11, Friday 12 May

Wuchopperen male and female Family Support Workers providing outreach services at the Mooroobool Community Hub

Shang St, Mooroobool

Week 3 

Monday 14 – Friday 18 May

Information and awareness activities at Stockland Shopping Centre and Pease St IGA

Week 4 

Tuesday 21 – Friday 25 May

Community event at Wuchopperen Manoora featuring guest speakers, the community sector and a healthy meal

This release can be accessed online here.

 

3.NSW :Awabakal ACCHO Newcastle : Australian Ninja Warrior star Jack Wilson signs on to help fight chronic Indigenous obesity

Jack Wilson, the ‘Deadly Ninja’ from Channel 9’s Australian Ninja Warrior (ANW) series visited with Awabakal on Monday 23 April, showing off his deadly ninja moves and helping to inspire the Indigenous community.

Jack is a proud Indigenous Australian from Mount Isa who is on a mission to educate Aboriginal men, women and children to live a healthy lifestyle and always reach for their goals.

See full media coverage here

During his time on ANW Jack was best known for proudly wearing traditional body paint and Budgie Smugglers in the colours of the Aboriginal flag.

After a difficult upbringing, Jack has overcome his struggles with drug and alcohol abuse to become a successful distance runner and role model to Indigenous youth. He has now partnered with Awabakal to become an ambassador for their Indigenous health programs.

“Jack is the type of personality that our young people will really connect with and look up to,” says Raylene Gordon, Chief Executive Officer of Awabakal.

“His connection to culture and ability to overcome the challenges in his life is really inspiring,” Raylene continued.

Jack’s recent visit to Awabakal included an exercise session and motivational talk with the participants of their Knock Out Health Challenge, which is a collaboration between Awabakal and Love the Life (LTL) to encourage healthy living amongst staff and Awabakal community members.

Awabakal also arranged for Jack to show the Awabakal kids his moves at the Ninja Parc obstacle course at Howat Gym in Cooks Hill as part of their school holiday program. This was intended as a fun and engaging activity which helped to inspire and educate the kids to exercise and navigate the obstacles in everyday life.

For more details about Awabakal’s services and work with the Indigenous community, visit http://www.awabakal.org or phone (02) 4918 6400.

4. ACT : Winnunga ACCHO leads the way May 27 , Reconciliation Day, to recognise and celebrate reconciliation in the ACT between Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people and non-Aboriginal people.

IGPA CANBERRA CONVERSATION PUBLIC LECTURE SERIES

RECONCILIATION IN THE ACT – ARE WE THERE YET?

DATE: Thursday 31 May 2018

TIME: 12.30pm – 1.30pm

VENUE: Function Room, Theo Notaras Multicultural Centre, 180 London Circuit, CANBERRA CITY

ABOUT: On 27 May 2018 the residents of Canberra will enjoy a public holiday, Reconciliation Day, to recognise and celebrate reconciliation in the ACT between Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people and non-Aboriginal people.

This seminar will explore the extent to which genuine and sustainable progress has been made in achieving reconciliation in the ACT.

Discussion will centre on a range of data, summarised below, which reflects the extent to which Aboriginal people in Canberra continue to experience disadvantage and of the adequacy of the local response to these matters, including the degree of self-determination accorded the Aboriginal community.

  •  Native title has been completely extinguished in the ACT;
  •  Canberra’s Indigenous students fall two years behind their non-Indigenous peers in educational outcomes;
  • Canberra’s Indigenous people are 21 times more likely to be incarcerated compared to non-Indigenous people, and the ACT has the second highest rate of Indigenous incarceration in Australia;
  • An Aboriginal child in Canberra is 12 times more likely than a non-Aboriginal child to be removed, under a care and protection order, from its parents and the ACT has the second highest rate of removal of Aboriginal children in Australia;
  •  7.6% of Canberra’s Aboriginal community report that they live in housing in which they do not have access to working sewerage facilities;
  •  46% of Indigenous males and 39% of indigenous females in the ACT over the age of 15 used an illicit drug or other substance in the last year; and
  • 35% of Aboriginal children in Canberra live in poverty;

This IGPA seminar is co-sponsored by Winnunga Nimmityjah AHCS and is jointly convened by Professorial Fellow Jon Stanhope AO and Adjunct Professor Dr Khalid Ahmed PSM.

THE PANEL JULIE TONGS OAM has been the Chief Executive Officer of Winnunga Nimmityjah Aboriginal Health Service since 1998. Julie is a Wiradjuri woman and was born in Whitton. She has more than 30 years’ experience working in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander affairs and in particular in advising, formulating, implementing and evaluating public health initiatives, programs and policy at a local, regional and national level.

Julie has been a national leader and strong advocate of quality improvement initiatives within the Aboriginal Community Controlled sector. She is the recipient of a number of awards, including the ACT Governor General’s Centenary Medal, the ACT Indigenous Person of the Year, and the ACT Local Hero Award. In 2012 Julie was honoured with the Medal of the Order of Australia.

LOUISE TAYLOR is currently the Deputy Chief Executive Officer of Legal Aid ACT. Louise is a Kamilaroi woman born and raised in inner city Sydney. For a significant portion of her career Louise was a specialist Family Violence prosecutor at the Office of the ACT Director of Public Prosecutions.

Louise has a particular interest in women’s issues especially in relation to family, domestic and sexual violence and is passionate about the importance of access to justice for women, particularly for Aboriginal and other marginalised women. She is a long time Convenor of the ACT Women’s Legal Centre Management Committee, a past member of the ACT Domestic Violence Prevention Council and former Chair of the ACT Ministerial Advisory Council on Women. Louise was the 2009 recipient of the ACT International Women’s Day Award, and is a member of the Law Council of Australia’s Indigenous Legal Issues Committee.

5.1 NT : Congress Alice Springs Foetal alcohol spectrum disorder diagnostic centre opens in Alice Springs amid ‘huge demand’

 

The Northern Territory’s first diagnostic centre for foetal alcohol spectrum disorder has opened in Central Australia — where paediatricians estimate one in five children could suffer from the disorder.

Key points:

  • It is estimated more than 500,000 Australians have FASD but it is often not diagnosed
  • The new centre aims to diagnose children early so they can get listed on the NDIS
  • Early diagnosis could also help keep those with the disorder out of prison

 

The centre, launched by the Central Australian Aboriginal Congress (CAAC), will use the first commonly adapted diagnostic tool to ensure early diagnosis of the disorder.

It will also offer a team of paediatricians, psychologists and other health professionals like speech pathologists to help asses at-risk children.

Foetal alcohol spectrum disorder (FASD) is an impairment to the brain caused by mothers consuming alcohol while pregnant.

It causes severe developmental delays, disability, learning difficulties, memory impairment and behavioural problems.

Known as the invisible disability, people with FASD can often go undiagnosed and untreated.

Yet it is estimated more than 500,000 people have FASD in Australia.

Congress child and family services senior manager Dawn Ross said the centre would help ensure those impacted were diagnosed early and services would be immediately available.

“Many children are presenting with [developmental] delays and Congress felt that it was important to not only do full health checks, but that wraparound services and support was given for children,” Ms Ross said.

“Every parent wants to know if there’s a delay that there’s a service out there that’s going to be provided for them.”

Diagnosis could keep children out of prison

Dr James Fitzpatrick, a paediatrician and researcher working with children who have FASD, said 36 per cent of people in juvenile detention in Western Australia had the disorder.

Not only would early diagnosis help get children listed on the National Disability Insurance Scheme and accessing support, he believed it could help lower prison rates.

Drug and Alcohol Services Australia chief executive Carol Taylor agreed, saying a lot of the youth problems in Alice Springs stemmed from intellectual impairment, and “throwing them in prison won’t solve the problem”.

Disorder is a ‘threat to culture’

While Ms Taylor welcomed the new centre opening, she warned that demand would be huge, particularly from Indigenous residents.

“We do have a lot of babies that come into DASA, they’re almost all Aboriginal kids,” Ms Taylor said.

For this reason, Dr Fitzpatrick indicated that reducing the impacts of the disorder could also help preserve Indigenous culture.

“[FASD] is a threat to the very culture that needs to be passed on through stories, song and tradition,” he said.

5.2 NT : Sir Michael Marmot visits Congress Alice Springs  

6.VIC : Planning the Closing the Gap future

The national Closing the Gap agenda and the Victorian Aboriginal Affairs Framework are being refreshed this year. These are important documents. They guide policy and funding priorities in Aboriginal affairs, and set out how government will be held accountable for achieving those priorities.

Aboriginal people know what’s best for themselves, their families and their communities. That’s why the Victorian Government will be led by Aboriginal Victorians around what the new Closing the Gap agenda and Victorian Aboriginal Affairs framework should look like.

Throughout the first half of 2018, there will be a range of opportunities for Aboriginal Victorians to have their say and lead the refresh of both national and Victorian frameworks.

For more information on Closing the Gap or the Victorian Aboriginal Affairs Framework see the Discussion Guide and Factsheet.

 

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