NACCHO Aboriginal Women’s Health #Saveadate #nwhs18 Features this week : Three major events #WomensVoices #NAIDOC18 Because of her we can #WomensConference 11-12 July 2018 in Sydney

In 2018 the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Social Justice Commissioner June Oscar AO is leading a national conversation with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women and girls to hear their priorities, challenges and aspirations for themselves, their families and their future.

National talks started in the regional city of in north-west Victoria on Monday and will be heading to Melbourne on Wednesday -Friday then will continue throughout the year, visiting more than 30 locations

See details below or HERE

NAIDOC Week 2018 will also celebrate the invaluable contributions that Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women have made – and continue to make – to our communities, our families, our rich history and to our nation.

And finally just a reminder applications to present a workshop at the National NAIDOC Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Woman’s Conference 11-12 July 2018 in Sydney need to be submitted by COB this Friday 23 February 2018.

In this week’s NACCHO Save a date we feature these 3 major Women’s Business events

  1. June Oscar Wiyi Yani U Thangani (Women’s Voices)
  2. NAIDOC 2018: Because of her, we can!
  3. Part 3 National NAIDOC Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Woman’s Conference

As CEO of NACCHO  Patricia Turner is at the forefront of community efforts to in health outcomes.

Follow to learn how she and other top influencers want to shape Australia’s women’s health at the National Women’s Health Summit

Download the NACCHO Aboriginal Health 2018 Save A Date calendar

NACCHO Save a Date 2018 Updated 20 Feb

View #WomensVoices Magnolia Maymuru – Project Ambassador

Part 1 June Oscar Wiyi Yani U Thangani (Women’s Voices)

A MESSAGE FROM THE ABORIGINAL AND TORRES STRAIT ISLANDER SOCIAL JUSTICE COMMISSIONER

Dear friends,

I am the first Aboriginal woman appointed to the role of the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Social Justice Commissioner at the Australian Human Rights Commission.

It is my role to raise awareness of the human rights of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples, and to provide guidance to Government on how to promote and protect these rights.

Fighting for the rights of the most vulnerable people in our communities, including our women and children, have been at the core of my advocacy and remains a core focus of my role.

It has been a little over 30 years since the findings from national consultations with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women were published in a report called, ‘Women’s Business’.

This report represents the first time that the views of Aboriginal women were directly sought by the Commonwealth Government.

I hope to continue this important work, and to hear from Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women over the next 18 months so that their voices can shape their futures.

I strongly encourage all Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women and girls, as well as those who support us, to engage in these national conversations.

This process belongs to you all, as Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women and girls and I look forward to hearing from you.

Yaninyja.

Thank you.

June Oscar AO, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Social Justice Commissioner.

June Oscar AO is a proud Bunuba woman from the remote town of Fitzroy Crossing in Western Australia’s Kimberley region. She is a strong advocate for Indigenous Australian languages, social justice, women’s issues, and has worked tirelessly to reduce Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder (FASD).

The Commissioner has indicated that her term will place a strong emphasis on:

Championing community voices;

Promoting strengths-based community-driven approaches to addressing Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander disadvantage; and

ensuring that Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women and girls have the enabling conditions to fully participate in policies, programs and decisions that affect them.

Wiyi Yani U Thangani (Women’s Voices) will explore:

the needs, challenges and aspirations of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women and girls today

the key achievements in relation to the rights of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women and girls over the past 30 years

ways to enhance the lives of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women and girls so that they can lead happy, healthy and fulfilling lives

ways to promote and protect culture.Wiyi Yani U Thangani (Women’s Voices)  will run from late 2017 and throughout 2018 and will speak with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women and girls from across the country either at a series of community meetings or via our online submission process.

If you want any further information concerning this project or if you have any issues which may be related to your involvement in the project, you can contact the Commission by email: wiyiyaniuthangani@humanrights.gov.au

or phone: 02 9284 9600

Pictures from Mondays #WomensVoices workshop in Mildura

 

Mildura – Session 2 Tuesday 20th February 2018 9:30am – 12:30pm Quality Hotel Mildura Grand, Seventh Street, Mildura 3500

Register via email wiyiyaniuthangani@humanrights.gov.au

Mildura – Session 3 Tuesday 20th February 2018 2:00pm – 5:00pm Quality Hotel Mildura Grand, Seventh Street, Mildura 3500

Register via email wiyiyaniuthangani@humanrights.gov.au

Melbourne – Session 1 Wednesday 21st February 2018 4:00pm – 7:00pm Mantra Bell City, 215 Bell Street, Preston VIC 3072

Register via email wiyiyaniuthangani@humanrights.gov.au

Melbourne – Session 2 Thursday 22nd February 2018 9:30am – 12:30pm Mantra Bell City, 215 Bell Street, Preston VIC 3072

Register via email wiyiyaniuthangani@humanrights.gov.au

Melbourne – Session 3 Thursday 22nd February 2018 2:00pm – 5:00pm Mantra Bell City, 215 Bell Street, Preston VIC 3072

Register via email wiyiyaniuthangani@humanrights.gov.au

Melbourne – Session 4 Friday 23rd
February 2018
9:30am – 12:30pm Mantra Bell City, 215 Bell Street, Preston VIC 3072

Register via email wiyiyaniuthangani@humanrights.gov.au

 

Part 2 NAIDOC 2018: Because of her, we can!

Statement by National NAIDOC Co-Chairs Dr Anne Martin & Mr Ben Mitchell

NAIDOC Week 2018 will celebrate the invaluable contributions that Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women have made – and continue to make – to our communities, our families, our rich history and to our nation.

Under the theme – Because of her, we can! – NAIDOC Week 2018 will be held nationally from Sunday 8 July and continue through to Sunday 15 July.

As pillars of our society, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women have played – and continue to play – active and significant roles at the community, local, state and national levels.

As leaders, trailblazers, politicians, activists and social change advocates, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women fought and continue to fight, for justice, equal rights, our rights to country, for law and justice, access to education, employment and to maintain and celebrate our culture, language, music and art.

They continue to influence as doctors, lawyers, teachers, electricians, chefs, nurses, architects, rangers, emergency and defence personnel, writers, volunteers, chief executive officers, actors, singer songwriters, journalists, entrepreneurs, media personalities, board members, accountants, academics, sporting icons and Olympians, the list goes on.

They are our mothers, our elders, our grandmothers, our aunties, our sisters and our daughters.

Sadly, Indigenous women’s role in our cultural, social and political survival has often been invisible, unsung or diminished.

For at least 65,000 years, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women have carried our dreaming stories, songlines, languages and knowledge that have kept our culture strong and enriched us as the oldest continuing culture on the planet.

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women were there at first contact.

They were there at the Torres Strait Pearlers strike in 1936, the Day of Mourning in 1938, the 1939 Cummeragunja Walk-Off, at the 1946 Pilbara pastoral workers’ strike, the 1965 Freedom Rides, the Wave Hill walk off in 1966, on the front line of the Aboriginal Tent Embassy in 1972 and at the drafting of the Uluru Statement.

They have marched, protested and spoken at demonstrations and national gatherings for the proper recognition of our rights and calling for national reform and justice.

Our women were heavily involved in the campaign for the 1967 Referendum and also put up their hands to represent their people at the establishment of national advocacy and representative bodies from the National Aboriginal Congress (NAC) to ATSIC to Land Councils and onto the National Congress for Australia’s First Peoples.

They often did so while caring for our families, maintaining our homes and breaking down cultural and institutionalised barriers and gender stereotypes.

Our women did so because they demanded a better life, greater opportunities and – in many cases equal rights – for our children, our families and our people.

They were pioneering women like Barangaroo, Truganini, Gladys Elphick, Fannie Cochrane-Smith, Evelyn Scott, Pearl Gibbs, Oodgeroo Noonuccal, Celuia Mapo Salee, Thancoupie, Justine Saunders, Gladys Nicholls, Flo Kennedy, Essie Coffey, Isabel Coe, Emily Kame Kngwarreye, Eleanor Harding, Mum Shirl, Ellie Gaffney and Gladys Tybingoompa.

Today, they are trailblazers like Joyce Clague, Yalmay Yunupingu, Evonne Goolagong Cawley, Nova Peris, Carol Martin, Elizabeth Morgan, Barbara Shaw, Rose Richards, Vonda Malone, Margaret Valadian, Lowitja O’Donoghue, June Oscar, Pat O’Shane, Pat Anderson Jill Milroy, Banduk Marika, Linda Burney and Rosalie Kunoth-Monks – to name but a few.

Their achievements, their voice, their unwavering passion give us strength and have empowered past generations and paved the way for generations to come.

Because of her, we can!

The National NAIDOC poster competition and award nominations will open in the coming weeks. Aboriginal and Torres Strait islander artists aged 13+ are encouraged to start working on artwork which reflects the 2018 theme. Keep an eye on the website and the National NAIDOC Facebook page for more details.

Part 3 National NAIDOC Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Woman’s Conference

Just a reminder applications to Present a Workshop at the National NAIDOC Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Woman’s Conference 11-12 July 2018 in Sydney need to be submitted by COB this Friday 23 February 2018.

Whilst the Speakers Agenda to the main Forum is full there is an opportunity for you to participate and share your knowledge and promote the fabulous work you are doing in your workplace by Presenting a Workshop.

We know our woman are doing incredible work in a number of areas such as Aboriginal organisations, Indigenous Woman in Business, Health, Aboriginal Education, Resource Sector, Hospitality, Govt/ non Govt sector, Indigenous Employment, Finance, Law, Universities, CEO’s, Writers and Cultural Workshops, Aboriginal Art/ Craft Sector, STEM, Children in Care, Aboriginal Tourism, Indigenous Leadership, Stolen Generation, Religious groups, Community organisations particularly NFP’s to name a few.

We would love you to come and share that knowledge so
if you wish to Present a Workshop please email sharon@ngiyani.com who will email you the paperwork to complete. Applications will then be assessed and you will be advised if it is accepted.

Just a reminder of the format:

Day 1 – Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Woman only
Day 2- Open to all Woman to attend.

NB: Non-Indigenous woman are strongly encouraged to co-present with an Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander Woman if Presenting a Workshop on Day 2.

So you may also wish to nominate either Day 1 or Day 2 to Present your Workshop on your application. Where possible we will attempt to ensure this happens but we can’t guarantee it due to the huge volume of Workshop applications received.

There will be approximately 20 Workshops running concurrently over 3 different time slots after lunch each day@ 45 mins each

1.00 -1.45 pm Workshop 1
2.00- 2.45 pm Workshop 2
3.00 – 3.30 pm afternoon tea
3.45 – 4.30 pm Workshop 3
4.30 – 5.00 pm Plenary Session

The times vary slightly on the second day

This is an official NAIDOC Event, the Conference organisers Christine Ross Consultancy and Sharon Kinchela and Chris Figg from Ngiyani Pty Ltd will be in Sydney next week to finalise the venue and meet with potential Sponsors.

We will be announcing the Conference venue next Monday 26 February 2018. But a heads up is given we will have hundreds of Woman from across Australia attending this historic Conference it will be held at one of the large Universities in Sydney.

We will release information on accomodation surrounding the University when official Registrations open end of March 2018.

Just a reminder cost pp to attend is $350 for 2 days, or $175 for 1 day, this covers coffee/ tea/ morning/ afternoon tea and lunch over the 2 days and venue hire.

We are still urgently seeking Sponsorship so if your Company has a RAP that celebrates NAIDOC week, Diversity Program, Gender Equity Program then we welcome you as a Sponsor.

We need Sponsors to ensure this conference happens. So please contact

christine.ross@live.com.au for a Sponsorship Package or ring 0417462213

There will be a Conference Dinner on Wednesday 11 July 2018, additional cost to attend approx $80 pp. This is optional with details to follow.

Conference organisers are Christine Ross Consultancy and Ngiyani Pty Ltd – organised by Aboriginal woman for Aboriginal woman.

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