Aboriginal Health News : Our final 2017 #NACCHO Members #Deadly good news stories #NT #NSW #QLD #WA #SA #VIC #ACT #TAS @IndigenousWFPHA

1.International : Our Indigenous public health takes a leap forward on the international stage

2. National : NACCHO Sol Bellear AM tribute and Bellear family thank you 

3.1 NSW : Katungul ACCHO Our thanks to CEO Robert Skeen providing this years ”  Secret Santa “

3.2 NSW : Wellington ACCHO to feature in ‘Break it Down’ Mental Health Series

3.3 NSW : Tharawal ACCHO Dr Josie Guyer is the inaugural winner of the RACGP Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Growing Strong Award

4. Nganampa Health Council operates a Smoking Cessation and Healthy Lifestyles program encouraging Anangu to lead healthy lifestyles

5.VIC : @VACCHO_CEO Jill Gallagher AO named Treaty Advancement Commissioner

6.AHCWA :Western Australia joins the nationally delivered National Disability Insurance Scheme NDIS

7. NT : AMSANT : Racism likely at play in low Indigenous kidney transplants

8.QLD ATSICHS Brisbane Reports record Health Checks

9.Tasmania : Ida West Aboriginal Health Scholarship closes 21 December

10.ACT : Winnunga News : Download November 2017 Edition

 View hundreds of ACCHO Deadly Good News Stories over past 5 years

How to submit a NACCHO Affiliate  or Members Good News Story ?

Our First News Post in 2018 will be January 18 

 Email to Colin Cowell NACCHO Media    

Mobile 0401 331 251

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1.International : Our Indigenous public health takes a leap forward on the international stage

The World Federation of Public Health Associations (WFPHA) is pleased to announce the formation of its first Indigenous Working Group.

Watch Video Here

In April 2017, at the 15th World Congress on Public Health, over 40 Indigenous delegates at the Yarning Circle supported the formation of an Indigenous Working Group. This working group was ratified by the Governing Council of the WFPHA on the 15th of November 2017.

It is estimated that there are 370 million Indigenous People across 70 countries around the world. Many Indigenous Peoples are a minority in their own country, experience poorer health, have lower life expectancy and are among the most disadvantaged people in their population.

Michael Moore, President of the WFPHA, said “The formation of this group demonstrates the WFPHA commitment to working with Indigenous peoples from around the world to improve their health and wellbeing.”

The group will be co-chaired by Adrian Te Patu from New Zealand who is also a member of the Governing Council, and Carmen Parter from Australia who is the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Vice President for the Public Health Association of Australia. Emma Rawson from New Zealand and Summer May Finlay from Australia are co-vice chairs.

“The Indigenous Working Group aims to assist in reducing the health disparity and inequities experienced by Indigenous people globally,” said Mr Te Patu.

Mr Te Patu recognizes the “differences among Indigenous peoples but also our similarities which are the strengths of this group.”

The Working Group is underpinned by the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous People. Self-determination is a key component of the Declaration; therefore the Indigenous Working Group will be led by Indigenous peoples.

“It is important to recognize that this group embodies Indigenous self-determination and will be led by Indigenous peoples,” said Mr. Moore.

“To address public health concerns among Indigenous peoples culturally appropriate solutions are required. The Governing Council understands that Indigenous Nations know what is required and have the skills and capacity to address the issues they face,” said Mr Moore.

Carmen Parter, Co-Chair said “This is an opportunity for Indigenous peoples to come together to support each other and seek out research collaborations that develop the evidence base that informs global Indigenous public health policies.”

The Working Group’s objectives are: to bring together Indigenous peoples from around the world to share and learn from each other, engage in collective advocacy, partner with existing international groups working in Indigenous affairs, and source any funding or in-kind support to support the work of the Indigenous Working Group.

Indigenous members of WFPHA are invited to join the Working Group, with non-Indigenous people invited to join as associate members.

The Working Group hopes to hold its first face to face meeting in May 2018 at the WFPHA General Assembly in Geneva.

More information about the Working Group can be found on the WFPHA website: http://www.wfpha.org/about-wfpha/working-groups/indigenous-working-group.

Please follow the Working Group on Twitter @IndigenousWFPHA

2. National : NACCHO Sol Bellear AM tribute and Bellear family thank you 

#SolsLastMarch #StateFuneral for Sol Bellear AM ” Remembered as a giant of a man “ 

3.1 NSW : Katungul ACCHO Our thanks to CEO Robert Skeen providing this years ”  Secret Santa ”

3.2 NSW : Wellington ACCHO to feature in ‘Break it Down’ Mental Health Series

 ” Wellington’s Indigenous community left a film crew inspired as they took part in a workshop aimed at creating conversation about mental health for Indigenous people. 

Charity organisation, Desert Pea Media (DPM), spent two weeks in Wellington recently working on a media project with around 20 local students, councilors, community members and organisations.”

Originally published here

‘Break it Down’ – a story-telling project funded by NSW Primary Health Network – involves six communities around Western NSW. Participants assist crew in writing and recording a song, before shooting a music video and creating a series of short films with a focus on community members.

The material will be compiled into a mental health awareness campaign using a ‘90s hip hop approach. It will be worked into the curriculum, across social media and other broadcast opportunities.

Creative director, Toby Finlayson, said the content produced in Wellington was nothing short of amazing.

“Both the high schools have been involved which isn’t a common thing, but a really fantastic example of the community coming together to do something positive,” he said.

Toby said the stories shared by William Hill, Kristy White and Mary Henderson were particularly inspiring.

“One of the films we created was with William Hill who tells his story about his reconnection with culture and country, and how that helped him grow as a person,” he said.

“Mary grew up in Wellington on Nanima Reserve and shared her story of what life was like during the mission days, how things are different and the shameful treatment of Indigenous people in NSW, and especially Wellington in the past.

“It is very important for young people to understand the context of their community and history of their older community members still here in Wellington.”

Toby said participants were very responsive to discussing mental health in what was a challenging but creative process.

“It’s not easy talking about this stuff, and not a lot of people want to talk about it, so young people who live and breath the trauma and grief associated with life in Indigenous communities I think were really brave and inspirational to see them taking leadership and responsibility for change,” he said. “We were really inspired by the Wellington Indigenous community.”

3.3 NSW : Tharawal ACCHO Dr Josie Guyer is the inaugural winner of the RACGP Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Growing Strong Award.

‘As the Aboriginal parent that I have, Mum has always inspired me, She’s had quite a tough life; things haven’t been easy for her but she’s always very encouraging. Seeing how proud my mum is of me for winning this award, it just makes me feel like everything is worth it.

’Aboriginal people seem to have a different level of connection when you tell them that you’re Aboriginal as well,’ And I certainly have a different level of empathy and understanding, coming from an Aboriginal family with similar health problems that I see my patients having.”

‘That’s really rewarding and I think allows me to be a better doctor.’

When discussing the kind of emotions stirred by winning the Growing Strong Award, Dr Guyer is definite in her response.

Originally published HERE

RACGP President Dr Bastian Siedel presented Dr Guyer with the Growing Strong Award at GP17 in October.

The Growing Strong Award was established in 2017 to support Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander general practice registrars.

Winning this award is a particularly significant feat for someone who is relatively new to the world of general practice. Dr Guyer worked as a nurse for the best part of 20 years before deciding she wanted a new challenge.

Now in her second year as a general practice registrar, Dr Guyer works with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander patients at the Tharawal Aboriginal Corporation in Airds, on the outskirts of Sydney, where she strives to contribute to closing the healthcare gap.

Dr Guyer feels that developing a close connection with her patients is one of the most important steps to improve health outcomes.

‘Aboriginal people seem to have a different level of connection when you tell them that you’re Aboriginal as well,’ she said.

‘That’s really rewarding and I think allows me to be a better doctor.’

Dr Guyer has found that connecting on this level also helps to educate her patients on preventive health measures.

‘It does take a lot of perseverance, but I think [educating patients about] preventive health is really important and empowers them to make changes to their lifestyle,’ she said.

‘I talk to kids and parents about valuing education, because I really think that’s the only way we can make changes.’

Dr Guyer cites the people with whom she has worked during her own education as invaluable throughout her journey as a general practice registrar.

‘I’ve met doctors who have been fantastic mentors. Especially because they are quite open and honest about sharing their journey with us as registrars, and often medicine is not an easy road,’ she said.

‘It’s really good to know that sometimes it’s tough and that’s okay, you just keep persevering. That has been really encouraging.’

Dr Guyer’s determination is supported through her passion for general practice.

‘I love the diversity in general practice, and the challenges that come with chronic and complex care,’ she said. ‘Also dealing with the social determinants of health, because they obviously play a big part in the general wellbeing of people.’

Dr Guyer is grateful for having had the opportunity to attend GP17 in Sydney in October, where she was inspired by the people she met and heard speak during presentations. She was humbled to be the first recipient of the Growing Strong Award, which was presented to her by RACGP President Dr Bastian Siedel.

Dr Guyer hopes this type of honour will instil ambition in future Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander general practice registrars.

‘Aboriginal [and Torres Strait Islander] people can become doctors, because I’ve done it,’ she said. ‘That’s a really powerful story to tell people

4. Nganampa Health Council operates a Smoking Cessation and Healthy Lifestyles program encouraging Anangu to lead healthy lifestyles.

The Tjitkita Nyuntu Ngayuku Malpa Wiya – Smoking Cessation program have created this incredible painting to be used for health promotion and as a resource on the APY Lands.

The painting tells the story of smoking and its effect on children.

We are committed to reducing smoking rates and making all houses and cars smoke free to protect children from the health effects of smoking.

It is possible for Anangu to give up smoking and if you would like help, talk to our clinic staff. #NHCPeople

5.VIC : @VACCHO_CEO Jill Gallagher AO named Treaty Advancement Commissioner

 

Aboriginal Health, Healing , Self Determination Reconciliation and a #Treaty

6.AHCWA :Western Australia joins the nationally delivered National Disability Insurance Scheme NDIS

The State Government has confirmed that Western Australia will be joining the nationally delivered National Disability Insurance Scheme.

This will see the end of the WA NDIS trial.

All current participants in the WA NDIS trial will transfer to the nationally delivered Scheme from April 2018 until 31 December 2018.

For more information, please visit

7. NT : AMSANT : Racism likely at play in low Indigenous kidney transplants

Low kidney transplant rates for Indigenous Australians are “shocking”, “unacceptable”, and are likely to be driven by racism, the Australian Medical Association (AMA) has said.

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander dialysis patients are less likely than other Australians to receive a transplant — remote patients have a tenth of the chance, and urban patients a third of a chance, research suggests.

“I’m shocked by those figures. A ten-fold gap is entirely unacceptable,” AMA president Dr Michael Gannon said.

“The topic of racism in our health system is an uncomfortable one for doctors, nurses, but it has to be one of the possible reasons for this kind of disparity.

“If there’s reasons why Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders are not being transplant-listed, they need to be investigated, but the problems need to be fixed.”

Indigenous Health Minister Ken Wyatt said he was disheartened by the disparities, and will urge the Australian Organ and Tissue Donation and Transplantation Board to look into the issue.

“I’d describe it as extremely disappointing,” Mr Wyatt said.

“It’s something I want to focus on for the next 12 months of starting to heighten the awareness — we have to have more Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people accessing organs.”

A patient must undergo a “work-up” of health tests to be accepted on to the active waiting list for a new kidney, and each state and territory operates a separate wait list.

Read full article here

8.QLD ATSICHS Brisbane Reports record Health Checks

Our community accessed our primary health more than ever in 2017. This year you mob had 4857 health checks which is a 36% increase and we saw 2863 new patients. A healthy choice is a deadly choice!

Each year we prepare a series of publications highlighting our achievements.

We are proud to present Our Community, Our Work, Our Stories, our 2016-17 Annual Report

We believe it provides valuable insights into the key issues affecting our community in Brisbane and Logan and how we are working towards reinstating the wellbeing of our people – person by person, family by family, generation by generation.

Take a look at what we have achieved over the past 12 months.

http://e.issuu.com/embed.html#27714854/55404302

Download our 2016-17 Annual Report

Download our 2016-17 Financial Statements

To get a hard copy of our annual report or financial statements email marketing@atsichsbrisbane.org.au

9.Tasmania : Ida West Aboriginal Health Scholarship closes 21 December

10..ACT : Winnunga News : Download November 2017 Edition

DOWNLOAD PDF HERE

Winnunga AHCS Newsletter November 2017

Thank you for your support of our NACCHO Good News Stories in 2017

 

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