Aboriginal Health News : Our #NACCHO Members #Deadly good news stories #NT #NSW #QLD #WA #SA #VIC #ACT #TAS

info@swams.com.auOct 25

1. National NACCHO CEO Pat Turner and @AMSANTaus @CAACongress respond #NTRC #DonDale Royal Commission demands sweeping change – But how can we make it happen

2.1 QLD : Deadly Choices : A re-elected Labor Government will provide $16 million for expansion of the Deadly Choices Healthy Lifestyle Program statewide

3.1 NSW Leonie Morcome celebrates 30 years at Biripi Aboriginal Medical Centre

3.2 Bulgar Ngaru Aboriginal Medical Service supports Camp ‘on country’ for men and boys

4.SA Nganampa Health Service desert war waged against deadly disease outbreak

5. ACT : ABORIGINAL AND TORRES STRAIT ISLANDER HEALTH PERFORMANCE FRAMEWORK 2017 REPORT (ACT)

6. NT : ABORIGINAL AND TORRES STRAIT ISLANDER HEALTH PERFORMANCE FRAMEWORK 2017 REPORT (NT)

7. VIC Message from VAHS CEO ” Congratulations one of our VAHS members Lidia Thorpe first Aboriginal Woman to be elected to a seat in the Victorian Parliament

8.Tas : Tasmanian Aboriginal Centre : Ida West Aboriginal Health Scholarship

9.WA : SWAMS celebrates two decades of Aboriginal health care

 View hundreds of ACCHO Deadly Good News Stories over past 5 years

How to submit a NACCHO Affiliate  or Members Good News Story ? 

 Email to Colin Cowell NACCHO Media    

Mobile 0401 331 251

Wednesday by 4.30 pm for publication each Thursday

1. National NACCHO CEO Pat Turner and @AMSANTaus @CAACongress respond #NTRC #DonDale Royal Commission demands sweeping change – But how can we make it happen

 

Read all press releases here

2.1 QLD : Deadly Choices : A re-elected Labor Government will provide $16 million for expansion of the Deadly Choices Healthy Lifestyle Program state wide

A re-elected Labor Government will provide $1.7 million to fund the expansion of the popular Deadly Choices Healthy Lifestyle Program for Indigenous communities in north west Queensland, Labor candidate for Traeger Danielle Slade announced.

The funding is part of a $16 million expansion of the Deadly Choices program statewide announced by Health Minister Cameron Dick.

Ms Slade said the Institute of Urban Indigenous Health would work with local Indigenous service providers across the State to roll out the successful preventive health and positive lifestyle choices program in Mount Isa and in Gulf communities.

“It is well known that Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people experience poorer health outcomes than Queenslanders generally,” Ms Slade said.

“This is not acceptable. Encouragingly, however, things are starting to improve.

“Closing the gap between Indigenous and non-Indigenous Queenslanders across a range of performance areas has been a focus of the Palaszczuk’s Government’s efforts over the last three years.

“This is why the government has been to strengthen Indigenous health services and programs throughout the state.

“The Deadly Choices Healthy Lifestyle Program continues to be a powerful vehicle for positive change in Queensland’s Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities.

“It is kicking goals when it comes to improving health knowledge, attitudes and lifestyle behaviours in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.”

Ms Slade said that since the start of the program in 2012–13, there had been a significant increase in the number of health checks undertaken by Indigenous Queenslanders.

“Deadly Choices focuses on increasing levels of physical activity, reducing smoking, better nutrition and regular health checks,” she said.

“The support of the Brisbane Broncos and prominent Indigenous ambassadors and sporting identities has proven to be a winning formula for the program.

“Research confirms that screening at Deadly Choices community days results in community members being twice as likely as other Indigenous people to engage with their local health service for a full health check.”

Ms Slade said the $1.7 million funding injection also provide employment opportunities for eight Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people as program facilitators, personal trainers, data managers and multi-media officers.

“By working with Indigenous communities and service providers and programs such as Deadly Choices, we are gradually making headway in closing the gap of disadvantage in Indigenous communities.

“This is made possible by delivering better outcomes in health, life expectancy, education, employment and economic participation,” she said.

Mr Dick said as was the case for all Queenslanders, much of the chronic disease burden in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities was avoidable, and could be prevented through adopting healthy lifestyles and identifying health risks earlier.

The Deadly Choices Healthy Lifestyle Program will help Indigenous people have regular health assessments, learn about healthy lifestyles and make healthier choices. It will include activities such as:

  • community days and sporting events featuring rock climbing, jumping castle, Zumba, traditional Indigenous games, arts and crafts, sprint races, traditional food, physical activities for Elders, and Good Quick Tukka food choices.
  • tackling Indigenous smoking
  • sporting events including Murri Rugby League Carnival
  • Deadly Choices leadership camp
  • school education program – focusing on leadership and mentoring, chronic disease awareness, tobacco, nutrition, physical activity, harmful substances, healthy relationships and awareness of and access to health services.

The Deadly Choices Healthy Lifestyle Program also complements the Palaszczuk Government’s diabetes and chronic disease prevention focus of the My Health for Life program, which aims to reach 1600 Indigenous people across Queensland over four years.

CEO of the Institute for Urban Indigenous Health Adrian Carson welcomed the new funding, saying it would bring life-saving and life-changing benefits for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Queenslanders.

“More and more of our community are participating in Deadly Choicescommunity days and sporting events,” Mr Carson said.

“We know that people participating in Deadly Choices events are twice as likely as other Indigenous Queenslanders to engage with their local health clinic.

“This means more Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people are being exposed to health assessments and follow-up health care.

“We are encouraged by this recognition that health promotion and early identification of illness are vital to closing the health gap and welcome the Government’s commitment to supporting our preventive health efforts,” Mr Carson said.

“The size and scope of this initiative also means the creation of quite a number of jobs for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people through their involvement in delivering the Deadly Choices preventive health and health promotion program.”

CEO of Gidgee Healing in Mount Isa Dallas Leon said the Deadly Choicesprogram equipped young people with the knowledge to not only adopt healthy lifestyles themselves, but also to become healthy role models for family, friends and the broader community.

“This has proved to be by far the most effective way of influencing behaviour change,” Mr Leon said.

Mr Dick said a re-elected Labor Government would also provide $500,000 for expansion of multimedia, community engagement and education programs to promote the sexual health of Indigenous Queenslanders.

This would be be done through incorporating sexual and reproductive health promotion and screening for sexually transmissible infections into community events, school-based education activities and health checks.

Further, a Labor Government would provide a one-off $75,000 grant to the Queensland AIDS Council to work with Deadly Choices and the Queensland Injectors Gealth Network to develop strategies to reach LGBTIQ Indigenous people and injecting drug users.

3.1 NSW Leonie Morcome celebrates 30 years at Biripi Aboriginal Medical Centre.

“It’s a milestone I’ve reached in my life as I continue to strive to work in Aboriginal health which I take as a passion in my work and my community.”

These are the words of Leonie Morcome who has celebrated 30 years of work with the Biripi Aboriginal Medical Centre.

Leonie started in 1987 after being urged to become a trainee health worker.

“The following Monday I came into work and I haven’t looked back,” she said.

She later attended university to receive her first qualification in Aboriginal health before becoming a public health worker in 1991.

A stint in senior health work followed before becoming a cultural security and safety co-ordinator and a family health worker (working with domestic violence and sexual assault cases).

“We make sure we continue their journey with them along the way to get a better outcome for what they need,” she said.

Leonie said she has seen many changes in Aboriginal health over her career and inspires her cultural awareness students to do the same.

When she started in the profession, Leonie saw drug, alcohol, diabetes and AIDS as major health factor to Aboriginal people. Today, it’s health, nutrition, cancer and diabetes as leading health issues. Leonie added that she takes a “holistic approach” when discussing Aboriginal health.

“It’s not just the major health problems we face, it’s the deal with the social well-being of it all and holistically we look at other areas to do with housing, education and mental health,” she said.

Having worked in an assistant management role, Leonie said would like to be in a mentor/manager position in the future and act as a role model for the Biripi people.

She encouraged young people to take up a career as a health worker.

“I want them to strive to reach goals and be dedicated,” she said.

“They’re going to be our next generations and will be leading the way as we get older.”

She also encouraged health workers and nurses to continue to work together.

“We all work together side-by-side and we come across the same pathway but we walk down that pathway together,” she said

2.2 Bulgar Ngaru Aboriginal Medical Service supports Camp ‘on country’ for men and boys

INSPIRING VISIT: Michael Laurie and former NRL player Nathan Hindmarsh with two of the camp participants

GROUP of Aboriginal boys and young men recently got the chance to experience their Aboriginal culture “on country” at a camp at Woody Head in the heart of Yaegl country.The five-day camp featured a combination of cultural learning, sports, fishing, fun, fresh air, and good advice for the future.

Male elders (fathers, uncles, grandfathers and other prominent community members) provided cultural guidance to the 12 boys aged between eight and 16 years old. The older men told stories of growing up and of their life experiences.

HAPPY CAMPERS: Enjoying the five-day cultural camp at Woody Head.

The camp was held by Waanyji Yaegl Aboriginal Men’s Corporation, with the assistance of local businesses and community organisations, including CRANES, Social Futures, Bulgar Ngaru Aboriginal Medical Service, Birrigan Gargle Local Aboriginal Land Council, Yaegl Local Aboriginal Land Council, Maclean RSL Club, Maclean Bowling Club, Gurehlgam Corp, and Bi-Rite.

John Skinner, director of Waanyji Yaegl and a Police Aboriginal Community Liaison Officer at Grafton, said the camp taught the boys respect for themselves and for others. There was a focus on making smarter lifestyle choices which would help young people succeed in life. The older participants also learnt responsibility, as they were given the task of looking out for the younger boys.

The young people were introduced to various service providers, including Solid Mob, who run a quit smoking program, Bulgar Ngaru Aboriginal Medical Service, Aboriginal Community Health, Warruwi ,who advocate for responsible gambling, and Police Aboriginal Community Liaison Officers.

A guest appearance by former Parramatta Eels and Australian Kangaroos player Nathan Hindmarsh proved an inspiration. Nathan started by outlining his glory days as a champion rugby league player. He then described his descent into a nightmarish existence as his gambling addiction took control, and how he managed to take charge of his life once again.

This was the first camp that Waanyji Yaegl has held, and both organisers and participants considered it to be a great success. The organisers are keen to hold further camps next year.

The young participants were so energised by the camp that they later indicated they too, wished to set up their own group. This idea is wholeheartedly supported by the older Yaegl males.

Waanyji Yaegl was established in July 2016 to help meet the needs of Aboriginal men in the Lower Clarence area. They meet regularly in Maclean with chairman and Yaegl elder Lester Mercy organising the get-togethers.

Waanyji Yaegl is holding a community barbecue at Hillcrest Hall, Hillcrest Aboriginal Reserve, Maclean on Friday, November 24 from 9.30am-noon. Everyone is welcome to attend. The barbecue will give the public the opportunity to learn more about the great work the men are undertaking and their plans for the future.

4.SA Nganampa Health Service desert war waged against deadly disease outbreak

SA

An outbreak of a potentially deadly strain of meningococcal bacterial infection in remote South Australian Indigenous communities has been countered by an extraordinary vaccination program that covered almost 2500 people across 100,000sq km in just over a month.

Four cases of the W strain have been diagnosed in the vast Anangu Pitjantjatjara Yankunytjatjara Lands this year in an outbreak that has also hit communities in the southern Northern territory where health authorities have also been working against time and distance to protect vulnerable residents – especially children. At least three of the people diagnosed are aged under 12.

In the APY Lands, which cover much of far north South Australia , the Nganampa Health Service staffed by indigenous health workers used its own detailed population register to reach 2483 people in October and early November.

About 3000 people live on the lands and the program’s reach has included more than 600 transient people outside communities.

Two of the diagnosed cases were in Amata and there was one each in Fregon and Pukatja (formely Ernabella).

The most recent diagnosis was confirmed in early October and none has been found since.

Nganampa medical director Professor Paul Torzillo told the Advertiser that the local health organisation’s database was key to the building of an immunisation barrier against the disease.

“We have consistently achieved childhood immunisation rates which are higher than those of non-aboriginal children in SA and in fact across the country, “Prof Torzillo said.

The APT campaign initially focused on people aged 1 to 19, and was then extended to all people aged over two months. By early this month 84 per cent of the first target group were vaccinated as well as 76 per cent of all people.

North of the border, NT authorities have been immunising against the A,C, Y and W strains in remote communities.

Federal health authorities are considering a national immunisation program that covers these four strains, Free vaccination against the C Strain is already available for children aged 12 months.

Symptoms can include fever, headache, neck stiffness and aversion to bright lights joint pain and a rash. Babies may refuse food and drink.

5. ACT : ABORIGINAL AND TORRES STRAIT ISLANDER HEALTH PERFORMANCE FRAMEWORK 2017 REPORT (ACT)

b17d4c2d-d580-489d-9def-6bf1835a7a06

The Australian Institute of Health and Welfare has released a new reports today: Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Performance Framework 2017 report: Australian Capital Territory.

See: https://www.aihw.gov.au/reports/indigenous-health-welfare/health-performance-framework-2017-act/contents/table-of-contents

 

6. NT : ABORIGINAL AND TORRES STRAIT ISLANDER HEALTH PERFORMANCE FRAMEWORK 2017 REPORT (NT)

The Australian Institute of Health and Welfare has released a new report today: Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Performance Framework 2017 report: Northern Territory. See: https://www.aihw.gov.au/reports/indigenous-health-welfare/health-performance-framework-2017-nt/contents/table-of-contents

7. VIC Message from VAHS CEO ” Congratulations one of our VAHS members Lidia Thorpe first Aboriginal Woman to be elected to a seat in the Victorian Parliament

23658458_1731518593555883_7267874717336594946_n

Dear Community

VAHS wishes to congratulate one of our VAHS members Lidia Thorpe following her election win on Saturday for the seat of Northcote.

As is reported in the news VAHS understands Lidia is the first Aboriginal Woman to be elected to a seat in the Victorian Parliament. It has come as no surprise.

As a descendent of a proud family, VAHS knows her mother and grandmother will be beaming with pride at what she has achieved.

VAHS knows Lidia will have the Aboriginal Community at heart. The Green’s Party has chosen wisely to endorse and support Lidia. Along with the Leader of the Greens at the National level (the Hon Richard Di Natale, a former Doctor of VAHS in the mid-2000’s) who no doubt backed her, Lidia will find her journey into politics at a local and state level challenging. However, she is a quick learner and will no doubt have the advice from her close followers and family and through that, she will prove to be a force.

I am sure that the Aboriginal Community and other people from across the State of Victoria will gain some and maybe many benefits from her time in the Victorian parliament.

As our National NAIDOC theme for 2018 says, “Because of her – we can”, VAHS recognises that our people have survived because some very strong women have supported us in our lives; I know Lidia’s family are proven in that respect and I am sure Lidia will follow in their footsteps.

VAHS wishes her well and are confident that she will be a great asset to the Greens party and the Victorian parliament.

Mick Graham
VAHS Chief Executive Officer

So please come and celebrate this momentous occasion with MP Lidia Thorpe, following her election win on Saturday for the seat of Northcote!

When: This THURSDAY 23 November
Time: 6pm-7:15pm
Where: VAHS Preston (238-250 Plenty Rd, Preston

8.Tas : Tasmanian Aboriginal Centre : Ida West Aboriginal Health Scholarship

23659196_2011850218830676_8155446170518275347_n

9.WA : SWAMS celebrates two decades of Aboriginal health care

SWAMS 20th Anniversary Festival Flyer A4

The South West Aboriginal Medical Service (SWAMS) is celebrating its milestone 20th birthday with a week-long festival of events being held across the South West from 16-22 December 2017.

SWAMS, an Aboriginal Community Controlled organisation, plays a pivotal role in improving the quality of life for Aboriginal people in the South West, through the delivery of culturally focused primary health care.

“Twenty years ago, no such service existed. Aboriginal people were dying from preventable disease, diabetes was rife, and a lack of cultural awareness in tertiary medicine made it difficult for Aboriginal people to get the specialist care needed,” SWAMS CEO Lesley Nelson said.

“All that has changed now. We are a thriving organisation with highly trained staff working across six clinics to improve the quality and quantity of life for thousands of Aboriginal people under our care,” Ms Nelson said.

“This isn’t just a celebration for SWAMS. This is a celebration for an entire community and for those community members who had a vision for better Aboriginal health care back in 1997.”

“We still have a long way to go, but I think it’s safe to say that they would be proud of the organisation SWAMS has become and the difference we make to the community.”

The celebrations will take place in Bunbury, Busselton, Manjimup, Collie and Harvey and will include a series of free family picnics in each town, featuring a BBQ lunch, birthday cake and entertainment.

The highlight of the festival programme is a ticketed 20th Anniversary Gala Evening at the Bunbury Regional Entertainment Centre, with live entertainment by The Merindas and comedian Kevin Kropinyeri.

Gala tickets can be purchased from http://www.trybooking.com/329821 or from the SWAMS administration building located at 3/30 Wellington Street, Bunbury (cash only).

SWAMS 20th Anniversary Festival events:

Please refer to the attached schedule.

For more information on the SWAMS 20th Anniversary Festival, contact the office on (08) 9791 1166 or email info@swams.com.au.

Oct 25

One comment on “Aboriginal Health News : Our #NACCHO Members #Deadly good news stories #NT #NSW #QLD #WA #SA #VIC #ACT #TAS

NACCHO welcomes feedback/comment:Leave a Reply

Please log in using one of these methods to post your comment:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s