Aboriginal Health News : Our #NACCHO Members #Deadly good news stories #NT #NSW #QLD #WA #SA #VIC #TAS

1.1 National: NACCHO members elect new Chair and Deputy

1.2 NACCHO TV view NACCHO AGM videos on line

1.3 Heart Foundation survey Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander heart health resources

2.ACT : Deadly Choices promote Deadly Roos at Winnunga Nimmityjah ACCHO 

3.QLD : Johnathan Thurston 2018 Queensland Australian of the Year

 4. 1 WA : Kalgoorlie Tackling Indigenous Smoking (TIS) team – Make a Change” hip hop project

4.2 WA  : SWAMS celebrates two decades of Aboriginal health care

5. 1 NSW : Wellington Aboriginal Corporation Health Service (WACHS) clocks up 25 years

5.2 NSW : Katungul Aboriginal Corporation has joined forces with the Institute for Urban Indigenous Health Brisbane (IUHI) to deliver the Deadly Choices program on the Far South Coast.

6. Vic : VAHS Healthy Lifestyle Ambassadors win title

7.NT Miwatj Health Service : Christina’s Story on Quit Smoking Tobacco

8 SA : Artists painting their Indigenous songlines to stay healthy and strong

 View hundreds of ACCHO Deadly Good News Stories over past 5 years

How to submit a NACCHO Affiliate  or Members Good News Story ? 

 Email to Colin Cowell NACCHO Media    

Mobile 0401 331 251

Wednesday by 4.30 pm for publication each Thursday

1.1 National: NACCHO members elect new Chair and Deputy

National Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation (NACCHO) members have elected John Singer as their new Chairperson and Donella Mills as Deputy Chairperson at the last week NACCHO Annual General Meeting in Canberra

See Background

https://nacchocommunique.com/2017/11/03/news-from-nacchoagm2017-143-accho-members-vote-in-new-naccho-chair-and-deputy-chair/

1.2 NACCHO TV view NACCHO AGM videos on line

View over 40 videos HERE

https://www.facebook.com/pg/NacchoAboriginalHealth/videos/?ref=page_internal

1.3 Heart Foundation survey Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander heart health resources

 

The Heart Foundation is committed to improving the heart health of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples.
In this survey, we are seeking your feedback on how we can improve the use and effectiveness of our Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander heart health resources, for both health professionals and Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people and communities.
 
We would greatly appreciate your time and opinions on our information resources and tools, to better understand the:
 
use and awareness of our resources,
– cultural appropriateness of our resources for the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Community,
– suitability of the language, format and style of our resources.
We recognise that your time is valuable and thank you for your help. Link below
 

 

2.ACT : Deadly Choices promote Deadly Roos at Winnunga Nimmityjah ACCHO 

“Winnunga is excited to be part of the Deadly Choices Deadly Roos campaign. The more organisations like ours can work together, the closer we can move towards Closing the Gap and improving the health outcomes in our communities”,

Winnunga Nimmityjah CEO Julie Tongs OAM.

“We know from our Deadly Choices campaign that people respond to health promotion messages from celebrities and sporting legends.

Partnerships like this one with the Deadly Roos and Winnunga Nimmityjah are a powerful vehicle for positive change in the lifestyle of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples.”

Institute for Urban Indigenous Health CEO, Adrian Carson, echoed Ms Tongs’ sentiment.

Pictured above Julie Tongs with the Deadly Choices team and Team NACCHO Oliver Tye and Kayla Ross

Prevention being better than cure is the message of the day at Winnunga Nimmityjah Aboriginal Health and Community Services today, as the Narrabundah clinic welcomed Australian rugby league legends in Canberra for their 2017 Rugby League World Cup game against France.

Australian Kangaroos squad members Cooper Cronk and Dane Gagai, and Coach Mal Menginga, joined former Kangaroo Steve Renouf to spread the word about the importance of getting regular health checks. The clinic visit is one of a series of events throughout Australia during the 2017 World Cup.

In September, Federal Minister for Indigenous Health, Ken Wyatt AM announced that legendary Kangaroos coach Mal Meninga and other Indigenous and non-Indigenous players would become ambassadors for the Institute for Urban Indigenous Health’s Deadly Choices program, to extend its message across Australia.

Deadly Choices is a community-based healthy lifestyle campaign launched in 2013. There is particular focus on young people, as well as the importance of exercise, education, school attendance, quitting smoking, and regular preventive health checks.

Through media campaigns, sports carnivals and community events Deadly Choices has prompted:

  •  almost 19,000 annual health check-ups in South East Queensland;
  •  1,155 smoke-free household pledges; and
  •  more than 3,300 smoker interventions.

Community members who get their 715 Health Check at a participating Aboriginal Medical Service – such as Winnunga Nimmityjah – during the World Cup can score a special edition Deadly Kangaroos World Cup jersey.

3.QLD : Johnathan Thurston 2018 Queensland Australian of the Year 

HE IS a legend on the field, a hero in the community — and now Johnathan Thurston is on his way to becoming Australian of the Year.

The NRL star was last night recognised for his tireless commitment to helping others, taking out the 2018 Queensland Australian of the Year award at a ceremony in Brisbane.

His stellar career as a rugby league player is matched by his community endeavours, which includes championing the Achieving Results through Indigenous Education academy and serving as an ambassador for an anti-ice campaign ran by the Apunipima Cape York Health Council.

4. 1 WA : Kalgoorlie Tackling Indigenous Smoking (TIS) team – Make a Change” hip hop project

 

The Tackling Indigenous Smoking (TIS) team at Bega Garnbirringu Health Service created a music video to educate and empower young people in the Goldfields region to not take up smoking. The hip hop music video was created during a week-long workshop in June 2017.

The Bega Garnbirringu TIS team also created TV ads, radio ads and other informational materials by using the video as a main theme.

The Bega Garnbirringu TIS team engaged and educated the hip hop participants on smoking cessation through regular visits. Participants included East Kalgoorlie Primary School and Kalgoorlie-Boulder Community High School students (Clontarf and Kalgoorlie Girls Academy).

Participants were also informed about smoking issues and how to change the culture of smoking. Participants were provided with information about second-hand smoke and prevention strategies. The education sessions assisted participants to create a hip hop song. The participants were given the opportunity to write poetry/raps which included local heritage and culture in their health messages, vocal coaching and learnt how to create a video clip.

In less than four months, the hip hop video received more than 5,700 views on Bega Garnbirringu YouTube channel. Community Members liked the video sharing on Facebook and other social media platforms. Community Members recognised participants in the video, and complimented them on their enthusiasm, participation and efforts.

The participants were interviewed informally during and after the workshop. It was reported that they loved and enjoyed the workshop. Participants were aware of smoking harms and recognise support services of Bega Garnbirringu TIS team that delivers education to the local community on a regular basis. Participants noted that they will never smoke, and ask family and friends to not smoke or to quit smoking.

The Hip Hop video can be found here. The TV advertisement can be found here. The GWN7 promotional segment can be found here.

4.2 WA  : SWAMS celebrates two decades of Aboriginal health care

The South West Aboriginal Medical Service (SWAMS) is celebrating its milestone 20th birthday with a week-long festival of events being held across the South West from 16-22 December 2017.

SWAMS, an Aboriginal Community Controlled organisation, plays a pivotal role in improving the quality of life for Aboriginal people in the South West, through the delivery of culturally focused primary health care.

“Twenty years ago, no such service existed. Aboriginal people were dying from preventable disease, diabetes was rife, and a lack of cultural awareness in tertiary medicine made it difficult for Aboriginal people to get the specialist care needed,” SWAMS CEO Lesley Nelson said.

“All that has changed now. We are a thriving organisation with highly trained staff working across six clinics to improve the quality and quantity of life for thousands of Aboriginal people under our care,” Ms Nelson said.

“This isn’t just a celebration for SWAMS. This is a celebration for an entire community and for those community members who had a vision for better Aboriginal health care back in 1997.”

“We still have a long way to go, but I think it’s safe to say that they would be proud of the organisation SWAMS has become and the difference we make to the community.”

The celebrations will take place in Bunbury, Busselton, Manjimup, Collie and Harvey and will include a series of free family picnics in each town, featuring a BBQ lunch, birthday cake and entertainment.

The highlight of the festival programme is a ticketed 20th Anniversary Gala Evening at the Bunbury Regional Entertainment Centre, with live entertainment by The Merindas and comedian Kevin Kropinyeri.

Gala tickets can be purchased from http://www.trybooking.com/329821 or from the SWAMS administration building located at 3/30 Wellington Street, Bunbury (cash only).

SWAMS 20th Anniversary Festival events:

Please refer to the attached schedule.

For more information on the SWAMS 20th Anniversary Festival, contact the office on (08) 9791 1166 or email info@swams.com.au.

5. 1 NSW : Wellington Aboriginal Corporation Health Service (WACHS) clocks up 25 years

“From little things big things grow.”

That is what founding member of the Wellington Aboriginal Corporation Health Service (WACHS), Aunty Joyce Williams, said to herself 25 years ago when the service was launched.

It has certainly been the case for the organisation which flourished over the last two decades to now service locations across the state.

The milestone was celebrated with the help of community members, ambassadors and services at Pioneer Park on Friday – a sight to behold for Aunty Joyce who reminisced on the service’s early days.

“From little things big things grow – I always said that and I believe it,” she said.

“It’s still happening, it’s still growing.

“Look at all the students here – in years to come these children will remember this day.”

Aunty Joyce gave credit to CEO Darren Ah-See who she said has done a wonderful job in the organisation’s progression.

WACHS chairperson, Marsha Hill, agreed the milestone was a big day for the indigenous community of Wellington.

The Move it Mob Style crew kept school students entertained.

“It is a massive milestone acknowledging the Elders who set up the service,” she said

“It took a lot of time, effort and dedication for a mob of people in a time that it wasn’t a positive experience for Aboriginal people.”

She said the service initially started with one drug and alcohol worker, and has since grown to employ close to 100 staff members across NSW.

“It has allowed opportunities for staff to train and earn professional qualifications so the best quality service can be delivered to the community,” Marsha said.

She added the service has expanded across the state to include Moree, Dubbo, Mt Druitt, and soon to be Penrith and the Blue Mountains.

“It’s a really good service to work for and an absolute pleasure to see our community healthy and have access to the best and quality health care,” Marsha said.

Friday’s celebrations were attended to by local schools and services, QuitBFit ambassadors, and special guests including Move it Mob Style, NRL and former NRL players Timana Tahu, Nathan Merritt, Ash Taylor, Will Smith Braidon Burns, and Tyrone Roberts.

5.2 NSW : Katungul Aboriginal Corporation has joined forces with the Institute for Urban Indigenous Health Brisbane (IUHI) to deliver the Deadly Choices program on the Far South Coast.

Steve Renouf (left), Aidan Sezer (centre), and Jack Wighton (right) were on hand to help promote Katungul’s partnership with Deadly Choices.

Rugby league legend Steve Renouf announced the partnership at a community event in Narooma on Saturday, November 4.

Current Canberra Raiders players Jack Wighton and Aidan Sezer also attended the event at NATA Oval.

The partnership expands the delivery of Deadly Choices across Australia, representing an ongoing commitment by community controlled health organisations to Close the Gap in Indigenous life expectancy.

Deadly Choices is a community-based healthy lifestyle campaign launched in 2013. It has a particular focus on young people, as well as the importance of exercise, education, school attendance, quitting smoking, and regular preventive health checks.

Renouf said the partnership with Katungul was an important part of Deadly Choices’ aim to spread its Indigenous health message across Australia.

“The big thing for Deadly Choices is we get Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people who historically weren’t getting their health check to get them,” he said.

“We’ve launched a partnership with the Kangaroos and the Rugby League World Cup. We were in Canberra on Friday night, and we launched a week ago in Melbourne with the Victorian Aboriginal Health Service down there.”

Robert Skeen, CEO of Katungul, said the partnership was an achievement born from months of planning.

“We are really excited to partner with Deadly Choices to further expand the program and the benefits it provides to community,” he said.

“We’re empowering our community to make Deadly Choices, by getting their health checked and spreading the message that prevention is better than cure.”

Wighton and Sezer, both of an Indigenous background, helped promote the new partnership, with Wighton stressing the importance of such events.

“I love coming out to these things,” he said. “Helping our people is a big thing, and these events are giving a rise to people getting healthy.”

Sezer also sees the importance in community events, and thinks the pathway to health is often a mindset.

“You can see from the turnout how much the Indigenous community appreciates the fact that Deadly Choices have provided this day for them to enjoy,” he said.

“I think it (staying healthy) is more about people keeping a good mind-frame, and taking days like this as a blessing to come down and enjoy it.”

In September, Federal Minister for Indigenous Health Ken Wyatt AM announced that legendary Kangaroos coach Mal Meninga and other Indigenous and non-Indigenous players would become ambassadors for the Deadly Choices program.

Community members who get their 715 Health Check at a participating Aboriginal Medical Service – such as Katungul – during the World Cup can score a special edition Deadly Kangaroos World Cup jersey.

6. Vic : VAHS Healthy Lifestyle Ambassadors win title

Congratulations to NJS Storm for winning the grand final at the A.C.T Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Netball Tournament! What an honour to be able to take home the trophy in memory of Neil Smith! Good job to the girls who played all 8 games undefeated. We are proud to have you as healthy lifestyle ambassadors! Enjoy the victory!

#vahsHLT #BePositive #BeBrave #BeStrong #StaySmokeFree

7.NT Miwatj Health Service : Christina’s Story on Quit Smoking Tobacco

Check out the incredible Christina from Galiwin’ku, Elcho Island, NT, Australia her sharing story on why she decided to quit smoking tobacco.

Ft. our legendary #YakaNgarali workers, Glen Gurruwiwi and Oscar Datjarranga.

We could not be more proud of the strength and determination Christina has shown in her quitting journey. If you want to #StartTheJourney like Christina, contact Glen or Oscar today!

8 SA : Artists painting their Indigenous songlines to stay healthy and strong

Dorothy Ward taps her head and her heart as she explains the process of painting her songlines.

“My family had the knowledge, the knowledge with culture, of every dreamtime rock hole … they bring the story into the painting,” she says.

“They start doing their own dreaming, from their grandmother or grandfather. They bring that story up to the canvas, they make it known, they do it with their mind and heart and it strengthens them and they be, you know, they strong.”

Article originally published here

https://www.theguardian.com/australia-news/2017/oct/17/the-artists-painting-their-indigenous-songlines-to-stay-healthy-and-strong

Ward is one of several hundred Indigenous artists who travelled to Adelaide for the Tarnanthi festival of contemporary Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander art at the weekend.

She is sitting with other artists from the Warakurna arts centre in remote Western Australia. Warakurna represents artists from the Ngaanyatjarra lands, communities whose country is on the Western Australian side of the Gibson desert, 330km east of Uluru.

They are waiting for the three-day art fair to begin. Twenty-four stallholders, representing Indigenous arts centres from around Australia, have brought their best work to Adelaide to sell in the Tandanya National Aboriginal Cultural Institute. The art fair is part of the Tarnanthi festival of contemporary Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander art, a citywide festival that runs until 22 October.

In the Ngaanyatjarra lands, as in many remote communities, art is one of the main sources of income.

“Art provides another income stream,” Warakurna arts centre’s manager, Jane Menzies, tells Guardian Australia. “One can’t live off the Centrelink dole payments. It’s woeful, unsustainable out there … the cost of living is so high.”Welfare payments range between $540 a fortnight for the unemployment benefit and $890 for the aged care pension. Once the bills are taken out, it’s barely enough to cover the cost of petrol.

“A lot of our artists are travelling for funerals, and funerals are not just 10km up the road, it’s 800km up the road,” Menzies says. “The elders are doing this sometimes three times a month. The cost of doing this is much higher than the money that they receive from the government.”

Art is also a way of building resilience in communities straddling the divide between Indigenous cultural traditions and the western expectations of state and federal governments.

“It empowers people to share their knowledge, to collaborate and paint that knowledge and ensure that it has a place that’s ongoing: a legacy, which clearly has huge benefits for mental health and wellness,” Menzies says.

The role of art as cultural maintenance is particularly important when people become too old or unwell to travel on country themselves.

Once a week, a busload of artists from Warakurna travel 100km down the Great Central Road to Kungkarrangkalpa aged care facility in Wanarn to paint and hear the stories of old people who can no longer return home.

“It gives the old people an opportunity to paint their Tjukurrpa [a Ngaanyatjarra word meaning culture or dreaming] with artists and to see their family,” Menzies says.

When they age they go there and they paint, paint, paint

Dorothy Ward

Ward, who takes part in the visits every Friday, says it helps to keep both older and younger people “healthy and strong”.

“They keep the knowledge into their system, whole body, to work through it,” she says. “When they age they go there and they paint, paint, paint.”

Across the border in the Anangu Pitjantjatjara Yankunytjatjara lands in South Australia, art is playing a more direct role in improving the health of people in remote communities. They are holding an auction to raise money to pay for nurses to run a dialysis centre at Pukatja, a remote community formerly known as Ernabella. Pukatja is about 1,300km north of Adelaide and 420km south of Alice Springs.

Since the Northern Territory closed its borders to out-of-state dialysis patients in 2009, dialysis patients in Pukatja and other APY communities have had to travel more than 1,000km south to Port Augusta

or to Adelaide, to receive treatment.

Purple House, a community-controlled health organisation based in Alice Springs that has helped six remote communities in the territory and three in WA open local dialysis centres, has secured a federal funding grant to build a four-chair dialysis centre and nurses’ accommodation in Pukatja.

But the funding does not cover operational costs. Purple House has already raised $180,000 and hoped to raise the final $150,000 needed to cover the first 12 months at an auction on the last day of the art fair on Sunday.

Leading artists from the APY lands’ prolific arts centres, including Jimmy Pompey, Robert Fielding Punnagka and Nura Rupert, donated works to the auction. A number of the artists also have pieces showing in the Tarnanthi exhibition at the Art Gallery of SA, which will run until January.

The largest piece at the auction, a women’s collaborative work from Tjala Arts, was expected to sell for $30,000 alone.

It sold for $69,000 and has been donated to the SA Museum to form part of an installation with dialysis machines about the impact of kidney failure in remote communities.

In total, the auction raised $169,300, enough to open the doors of the new dialysis centre.

Addressing the crowd following the auction, one Pukatja/Ernabella elder, who had been living in Adelaide to receive dialysis, said she was going to roll up her swag and “hit the road to Ernabella!”.

Others who might otherwise have put off treatment to avoid leaving their home will also be able to receive treatment locally, Purple House chief executive Sarah Brown says.

“There are a number of senior artists who have got family on dialysis and this will mean that they’ll be able to get home from Adelaide, Port Augusta and Alice Springs back to the APY lands, and there’s a lot of people who know that they’re going to need dialysis soon who may actually otherwise choose not to start dialysis and pass away on country,” she says. “And if that happens, all their cultural knowledge and all their creative spirit will be lost to the whole of Australia.”

Diabetes is the second leading cause of death for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples, behind heart disease. According to Australian Bureau of Statistics figures, rates of death from diabetes in 2016 were 4.9 times higher for Indigenous Australians than non-Indigenous Australians.

Indigenous people are five times more likely to be hospitalised from chronic kidney disease, whether linked to diabetes or other causes, than non-Indigenous Australians. In remote communities in the central desert region, Brown says, rates of kidney disease can be between 15 and 30 times the national average.

Purple House opened its first remote dialysis centre at Kintore in the Pintupi homelands, 550km west of Alice Springs, in 2004.

Paniny Mick and Wawiriya Burton with the APY women’s painting. Photograph: Tjala Arts

“We started to get people home, very gently and quietly and carefully, and people’s health just improved enormously,” Brown says. “People who had been stuck in town painting for carpetbaggers, dodgy art dealers, were suddenly back out in their community able to support their family through painting for their art centre.”

The Kintore clinic and the central Purple House clinic in Alice Springs were kickstarted by funds raised at an art auction, just like the Pukatja centre. Subsequent centres have been built and run using mining royalties, government grants and philanthropic donations.

Brown hopes a new Medicare item number for remote community dialysis, proposed by the expert taskforce conducting a review of the Medicare Benefits Scheme, will provide ongoing funding.

“So then we know as long as people want to go home for dialysis and they’re well enough to go that we’ll have the money to be able to do it,” she says. “We’re really hoping that that’s going to start in the next year or so, and the donated money will run the service up until then. Anything left can go to making sure that this service is really robust and we’re working to help people get home safely.”

  • Guardian Australia travelled to Adelaide courtesy of the Art Gallery of South Australia.

 

 

 

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