Aboriginal Health #IVoiceUluru Referendum : Federal Government to receive ultimatum on Indigenous ­recog­nition today

 ” Malcolm Turnbull will be delivered an ultimatum today on indigenous constitutional recog­nition, with the Referendum Council report he and Bill Shorten commissioned 18 months ago making clear that nothing less than an advisory body to parliament and a separate treaty process will be ­acceptable.”

Report from the Australian

 ” We seek constitutional reforms to empower our people and take a rightful place in our own country. When we have power over our destiny our children will flourish.

They will walk in two worlds and their culture will be a gift to their country.
We call for the establishment of a First Nations Voice enshrined in the Constitution.

Makarrata is the culmination of our agenda: the coming together after a struggle.

It captures our aspirations for a fair and truthful relationship with the people of Australia and a better future for our children based on justice and self-determination “

The Uluru Statement from the heart in full part 2

“In 1988 I came to Sydney to celebrate Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander survival. We made an impact at the Centenary, and the Government promised a National Treaty with First Nations at Barunga in response to the Barunga Statement.”

“Like many times before and since the Barunga Statement, the promise for National Treaty was broken. The Uluru Statement from the Heart seeks to correct that.”

Press release  from the Uluru Statement Working Group see Part 3

Part 1 The Australian

The Prime Minister and Opposition Leader will have to decide how much political risk they are prepared to take in their own partyrooms on the proposals, after an outbreak of opposition from both sides to last month’s “Uluru statement from the heart” on which the report is based.

Mr Turnbull and Mr Shorten have consistently said any referendum question must have the support of indigenous Australia, and Referendum Council co-chairman Mark Leibler has said he would not support recommending a course of action “unless it’s got good prospects for success”.

Focus will next turn to the annual Garma cultural festival in northeast Arnhem Land, where key players will spend time in Aug­ust thrashing out details.

The council, comprising six indigenous and eight non-indigenous members, has backed the full Uluru Statement, which was the result of 12 nationwide dialogues leading up to a constitutional convention at Uluru.

The statement’s preamble, which includes the call for a “First Nations Voice enshrined in the Constitution” and the establishment of a “Makarrata commission to supervise agreement-making … and truth-telling about our history”, was the only part publicly released after the Uluru convention last month.

However, the Uluru meeting focused in much more detail on how the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander place in Australian history should be viewed, how the document’s recommendations were ­arrived at and how they could be implemented.

About 250 participants at the Uluru convention helped craft a narrative tracing a seven-part trajectory under the rubric of “our story”, beginning with an explanation of the pre-European system of law that bound together hundreds of language groups or nations.

They noted that in many indigenous groups these laws remained strong, such as the Meriam people’s “Malo’s law” — one of the features in the High Court’s Mabo judgment that dispelled terra nullius and led to the creation of native title legislation.

Uluru participants discussed a series of “guiding principles” to inform the council’s report, which included the need to involve “substantive, structural reform”, to “tell the truth of history” and to make sure they provided “a mechanism for First Nations agreement-making”.

Part 2 ULURU STATEMENT FROM THE HEART

We, gathered at the 2017 National Constitutional Convention, coming from all points of the southern sky, make this statement from the heart:

Our Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander tribes were the first sovereign Nations of the Australian continent and its adjacent islands, and possessed it under our own laws and customs.

This our ancestors did, according to the reckoning of our culture, from the Creation, according to the common law from ‘time immemorial’, and according to science more than 60,000 years ago.

This sovereignty is a spiritual notion: the ancestral tie between the land, or ‘mother nature’, and the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples who were born therefrom, remain attached thereto, and must one day return thither to be united with our ancestors.

This link is the basis of the ownership of the soil, or better, of sovereignty. It has never been ceded or extinguished, and co-exists with the sovereignty of the Crown.

How could it be otherwise? That peoples possessed a land for sixty millennia and this sacred link disappears from world history in merely the last two hundred years?

With substantive constitutional change and structural reform, we believe this ancient sovereignty can shine through as a fuller expression of Australia’s nationhood.

Proportionally, we are the most incarcerated people on the planet. We are not an innately criminal people. Our children are aliened from their families at unprecedented rates. This cannot be because we have no love for them. And our youth languish in detention in obscene numbers.

They should be our hope for the future.

These dimensions of our crisis tell plainly the structural nature of our problem.

This is the torment of our powerlessness.

We seek constitutional reforms to empower our people and take a rightful place in our own country. When we have power over our destiny our children will flourish.

They will walk in two worlds and their culture will be a gift to their country.
We call for the establishment of a First Nations Voice enshrined in the Constitution.

Makarrata is the culmination of our agenda: the coming together after a struggle.

It captures our aspirations for a fair and truthful relationship with the people of Australia and a better future for our children based on justice and self-determination.

We seek a Makarrata Commission to supervise a process of agreement-making between governments and First Nations and truth-telling about our history.

In 1967 we were counted, in 2017 we seek to be heard. We leave base camp and start our trek across this vast country.

We invite you to walk with us in a movement of the Australian people for a better future.

ULURU REPS CALL FOR URGENT VOICE PROGRESS

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander delegates from across Australia travelled to Sydney for the inaugural Uluru Statement working group meeting.

The meeting with representatives from 13 regions across the entirety of the country reaffirmed the determination to see a constitutional voice to parliament for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.

Over the weekend, they publicly announced that they propose that the proposed voice for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders should be representative, embedded within the Constitution, and such that it provides greater self-determination. They further report that a roadmap will be proposed to the Prime Minister and Opposition Leader that includes the timing for the constitutional process and then legislative development for the body and the Makarrata Commission.

During the historic two day meeting, the group gathered at the site of the 1938 Day of Mourning protest, reflecting on the brave and unrelenting efforts of their Indigenous forebears of the struggle.

Newly elected Co-Chair Josie Crawshaw, one of three Co-Chairs for the 29 strong work group reflected on her lifetime involvement in activism for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander rights.

Ms Crawshaw is from the Northern Territory, she reflected that “In 1988 I came to Sydney to celebrate Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander survival. We made an impact at the Centenary, and the Government promised a National Treaty with First Nations at Barunga in response to the Barunga Statement.”

“Like many times before and since the Barunga Statement, the promise for National Treaty was broken. The Uluru Statement from the Heart seeks to correct that.” Ms Crawshaw said.

Suzanne Thompson, another of the Co-Chairs is from Barcaldine, a place known for early struggles for the great Australian “fair go”. She expressed the need for continuing bi-partisan support and engagement with the proposals in the statement. “We need all organisations, left, right, and indifferent to join us in saying it is time to settle this unfinished business so that our country, with its most ancient and unique culture, can reconcile our past and look to our future.

Ms Crawshaw and Ms Thompson join Thomas Mayor as Co-Chairs. They on behalf of the group are calling for a national movement of all Australians to join the #1VoiceUluru movement.

 

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