NACCHO Aboriginal Health : Our #ACCHO Members Good News Stories from #NT #WA #VIC #SA #NSW #QLD @KenWyattMP

1. NSW Jullums , Bullinah and Bulgarr Ngaru ACCHO/AMS

2. NSW Wellington Aboriginal Corporation AMS

3. South Australia Nunyara Aboriginal Health Service 

4.Western Australia : Aboriginal Health Council of WA.

5.Victorian Aboriginal Health Service (VAHS)

6. NT 6. NT Katherine West Health Board

7. QLD Deadly Choices and  Gurriny Yealamucka Health Service

 For NACCHO the acceptance that our Aboriginal controlled health services deliver the best model of integrated primary health care in Australia is a clear demonstration that every Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander person should have ready access to these services, no matter where they live.

 Lets celebrate and share our ACCHO’s success

How to submit a NACCHO Affiliate

or Members Good News Story ? 

 Email to Colin Cowell NACCHO Media     Mobile 0401 331 251

Wednesday by 4.30 pm for publication each Thursday

 

1.Jullums (Lismore), Bullinah (Ballina), Bulgarr Ngaru Medical Aboriginal Corporation (Casino, Maclean and Grafton) Clinic’s

The idea of these workshops is to raise awareness around the different signs and symptoms of heart disease, and also around prevention and management of the disease.

“This is a new, collaborative approach to addressing this issue, but we’re also working together with existing avenues such as healthy lifestyle and exercise programs to assist participants to make the most of what they’ll be learning.”

Aboriginal Chronic Care Officer with NNSWLHD, Anthony Franks

A series of workshops is being held in Northern NSW to raise awareness of the risk factors for heart disease and engage with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women on ways to reduce their chances of becoming one of the statistics.

Download dates and venues Northern NSW Workshops dates and Venues

ABORIGINAL and Torres Strait Islander women are at least three times more likely to be hospitalised due to heart disease than their caucasian counterparts.

Heart disease is the leading single cause of death among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians.

The program consists of three one-day workshops, with the first being held in March at various sites across the North Coast.

The participants will attend each of the three workshop days in March, May and July, with the aim of continuing the education and providing feedback and follow up at the later meetings.

The workshops are a collaboration between the Northern NSW Local Health District (NNSW LHD), local Aboriginal Medical Services (AMS), North Coast Primary Health Network (NCPHN), Solid Mob, and the NSW and Queensland Government health coaching services, Get Healthy and On Track. They are funded by the National Heart Foundation.

Workshops are being held in Grafton, Muli, Casino, Ballina, Maclean, Goonellabah and Tweed Heads.

2. Wellington Aboriginal Corporation Health Service 

Health expo to change bad habits in men

The Wellington Aboriginal Corporation Health Service hosted the QuiBFit Aboriginal Men’s Health Expo in Dubbo.

About 120 men participated from across the region which includes Orange, Coonabarabran, Walgett, Wellington, Dubbo, Parks and Goodooga.

A major focus was tackling Indigenous smoking and mental health and wellbeing.

Wellington Aboriginal Corporation Health Service chief executive Darren Ah See said a lot of th e focus in the Indigenous health sector is on “mums and bubs”.

“It’s good to have an event like this for men because they are the reluctant ones about getting their health checks”, he said.

“We want to try to change that norm and get men to take responsibility not only around their health and wellbeing but to be the leaders of their communities and families.

“It’s all about social and health wellbeing but it is also about mentorship and trying to encourage families and individuals to head in the right direction”.

The expo culminated with a corroboree, with more than 300 people attending.

Western NSW Local Health District Aboriginal health and wellbeing director Brendon Cutmore said it was extremely important to focus on preventive health at the expo.

“It is really our opportunity as Aboriginal men to take control of our lives, whether that be through eliminating some of the negative habits people have, things such as smoking, drugs and alcohol, “he said.

“Coming to these types of event sand having discussions around how to make your life healthier, how to be a leader in the community and how to be a leader in your family and how your actions reflect on the people around you – that’s a big take home message.

 3.Nunyara Aboriginal Health Service Whyalla SA

 “ I encouraged Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women to attend the gathering in Whyalla to benefit from the stories and experiences of their peers.

It is important that these gatherings to take place in regional areas so Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women living outside of Adelaide have the chance to network and share community news.

Previous gatherings have been very successful and attracted many participants from across the state.

These events are also an opportunity for the State Government to strengthen ties with local service providers and gain insight into matters affecting the community.

Status of Women Minister Zoe Bettison

Co-facilitator’s Kimberley from OfW and Zena Wingfield for the in Whyalla today

The first State Aboriginal Women’s Gathering for 2017 was held in Whyalla this week

The gathering took place on Tuesday 28 March at Nunyara Aboriginal Health Service, Whyalla Stuart.

The gatherings gave Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women an opportunity to discuss a range of issues and share news from their communities.

Guest speakers presented information on topics including health, women’s legal services, sports and recreation, mental health and wellbeing, and caring support.

Status of Women Minister Zoe Bettison said the gatherings give women the opportunity to learn from each other, share experiences and discuss issues, in a safe and supportive environment.

The Office for Women has partnered with Whyalla’s Nunyara Aboriginal Health Service to convene this event.

Background

In 2016, five separate State Aboriginal Women’s Gatherings were held across the state to make it easier for women in regional areas to participate.

Whyalla was identified as a significant location for the first gathering of 2017 as a way to provide support and information to Aboriginal women in the region.

Gatherings have also been planned for 2017 in the Far West Coast and the South East.

For more information about the State Aboriginal Women’s Gatherings visit www.officeforwomen.sa.gov.au

4. Aboriginal Health Council of WA.

“ The prevalence of ear disease and hearing loss in Aboriginal kids has a major effect on their speech and educational development, social interactions, employment and future wellbeing,

While many children are vulnerable to chronic ear disease, in WA it represents a significant burden for Aboriginal children who can experience their first onset within weeks following birth.

Aboriginal children can also have more frequent and longer lasting episodes compared to non-Aboriginal children.”

AHCWA Chairperson Michelle Nelson-Cox said poor ear health was a significant problem among Aboriginal people, particularly children.

Training program to improve ear health among Aboriginal people

A training program to assist Aboriginal Health Workers to provide ear health care to their communities is being delivered around the state by the Aboriginal Health Council of WA.

The two week ear health training program was delivered in four different locations last year, and 23 Aboriginal Health Workers (AHWs) have graduated from the course so far.

The program is scheduled to be delivered in at least four more locations this year including Perth, Broome and Kalgoorlie. More trainings will be scheduled for the second half of the year.

The program teaches AHWs how to manage ear infections, carry out screening, identify risk factors and plan ear health promotion and strategies.

AHCWA Chairperson Michelle Nelson-Cox said poor ear health was a significant problem among Aboriginal people, particularly children.

“The prevalence of ear disease and hearing loss in Aboriginal kids has a major effect on their speech and educational development, social interactions, employment and future wellbeing,” she said.

“While many children are vulnerable to chronic ear disease, in WA it represents a significant burden for Aboriginal children who can experience their first onset within weeks following birth.

“Aboriginal children can also have more frequent and longer lasting episodes compared to non-Aboriginal children.”

Ms Nelson-Cox said people in regional areas were more susceptible to ongoing ear problems.

“Children living in remote communities have some of the highest rates of chronic ear disease in the world,” she said.

“We want to spread the message in regional communities that early detection and treatment of ear diseases in children is vital to ensure optimum development of speech, language, and to minimise the long term effects on educational performance.”

AHCWA has also launched a giant inflatable ear to be used as an interactive teaching tool among Aboriginal communities.

Koobarniny, which means ‘big’ in the Noongar language, is believed to be the first of its type in Australia.

Koobarniny is currently being used at different events around the metropolitan area, but it’s hoped it will travel to regional areas in the future.

 5. Victorian Aboriginal Health Service (VAHS)
 
 7. QLD Deadly Choices and  Gurriny Yealamucka Health Service

It’s been a great couple of days in the North with today’s visit by Steve Renouf, Lote Tiquiri & Brisbane Broncos James Roberts at the DC Yarrabah Gurriny Yealamucka Health Service Aboriginal Corporation

Please share this post

 

 

 

NACCHO welcomes feedback/comment:Leave a Reply

Please log in using one of these methods to post your comment:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s