NACCHO Aboriginal Health #ACCHO Members Good News Stories from #WA #VIC #SA #NSW #QLD #NT #TAS #ACT

Photo above : South West Aboriginal Medical Service (SWAMS)  staff at a recent community meeting for the new Busselton outreach clinic opening today are (from left) Aboriginal Health Worker Talicia Jetta, Playgroup Leader Gwen Gray and Indigenous Outreach Worker Janene Gray. See story 1 below

1.Western Australia :  South West Aboriginal Medical Service (SWAMS)

2.Victoria: Victorian Aboriginal Health Service

3. South Australia  : Nunkuwarrin Yunti

4. NSW : Redfern AMS and Galambila/Durri/Werin

5.Queensland : Gurriny Yealamucka Health Services Aboriginal Corporation 

6. Northern Territory :  Danila Dilba Health Service /AMSANT

7. Tasmanian Aboriginal Centre

8. Winnunga Nimmityjah Aboriginal Health Service ACT

How to submit a NACCHO Affiliate

or Members Good News Story ? 

 Email to Colin Cowell NACCHO Media             Mobile 0401 331 251

Wednesday by 4.30 pm for publication each Thursday

Picture above : The Free NACCHO App contains a geo locator, which will help you find the nearest Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation (302 Clinics ) in your area and

 Provides heath information online and telephone on a wide range of topics and where you can go to get more information or assistance should you need urgent help

Download details HERE

1.Western Australia :  South West Aboriginal Medical Service (SWAMS)

“Being able to provide quality health care to our community is vital. It’s about building capacity to our services, so our clients have more opportunities to access support,” Ms Nelson said.

“We are proud that Busselton is our fourth outreach clinic located in the South West, including Brunswick Junction, Collie and Manjimup.

“SWAMS is pleased the Busselton clinic will operate from the Busselton Health Campus, as this prime location means easier access to additional services for our clients, if needed.”

SWAMS CEO Lesley Nelson said the new clinic, located at the Busselton Health Campus, would enable SWAMS to improve access to primary health care services for the Noongar community.

New SWAMS Busselton outreach clinic to boost services

The South West Aboriginal Medical Service (SWAMS) will boost services in Busselton with the opening of its new outreach clinic today .

SWAMS CEO Lesley Nelson said the new clinic, located at the Busselton Health Campus, would enable SWAMS to improve access to primary health care services for the Noongar community.

The Busselton clinic will operate from 10 am to 4 pm on Mondays and Thursdays, and include a Women’s Health Clinic on the last Thursday of every month.

Clients will have access to GP’s, Aboriginal Health Workers and Indigenous Health Workers on-site, with referrals to other specialised SWAMS staff available.

“SWAMS supports Aboriginal health through a range of tailored programs and services, which can include bulk billing, patient transport and home visits,” Ms Nelson said.

“This clinic would not be possible without the support of the WA Country Health Service (WACHS) and our partnership with GP Down South, for our chronic disease program.

“Establishing an outreach clinic in Busselton further cements SWAMS’ vision to provide high-quality, holistic and accessible services to the South West Aboriginal community. SWAMS looks forward to collaborating with other agencies on this vision.”

2.Victoria: Victorian Aboriginal Health Service

From VAHS Healthy Lifestyle Page

Or watch NACCHO TV interview with Laura Thompson

Regional Co-ordinator Healthy Lifestyle and Tobacco Cessation VAHS

Hear out stories, share our stories

Close the Gap Day is on the 17 March and in the lead up to this event, Oxfam have worked with VAHS Healthy Lifestyle Team  to share the stories of two of our very own VAHS staff members, Uncle Reg Thorpe and Jacob Nelson. Jacob’s story will follow in the coming weeks.

Their stories are emotional and powerful reminders of how many Aboriginal people in Victoria, are more likely to experience poorer health outcomes than non-Aboriginal people.

Uncle Reg’s story focuses on his love for his family, the importance of self-care and the benefits of physical activity and living a healthy lifestyle.  As well as, the important role all staff at VAHS play in caring for the Community.

https://youtu.be/_dqc1z_qFgQ

3. South Australia  : Nunkuwarrin Yunti

Closing the Gap Day

Closing the Gap Day is approaching and with it comes various community events. These events are aimed at bringing people together to share information and to take action to reduce health inequality.

The Northern Health Network are holding a Closing the Gap Day from 11.30am- 2.30pm on Thursday 23rd March at Tauondi College, Lipson Street, Port Adelaide.

There will be free entertainment, lunch provided and a range of community stalls.

 4. NSW : Redfern AMS and Galambila/Durri/Werin

 

The Hon Ken Wyatt meeting with Redfern AMS chair Sol Bellear and CEO Laverne Bellear 

Aboriginal medical services have proved the longevity of Aboriginal people, so we need the bigger spread and more Aboriginal medical services probably in the next 5-10 years.

We probably need another 100 to 150 Aboriginal medical services throughout the whole country, in cities and remote communities as well, so we’ll be pressuring Ken to make available more funds for the establishment of Aboriginal Medical Services.

”The Aboriginal Medical Service in Redfern is pleased to have Ken Wyatt as the new Minister for Aged Care and Indigenous Health, but have called for improvement.

Sol Bellear AM, Chair  of the Aboriginal Medical Service in Redfern

View NACCHO TV 30 Minute Doco About Redfern AMS

The Minister meeting with AMS Staff and board members

The Minister meeting Laurel Robinson and Beverly Briggs ( members of the Sapphires )

LAUREL ROBINSON, Beverly Briggs and Naomi Mayers are the three original members of the Sapphires, the first popular Aboriginal all-female group. The movie based on the band’s story is now the most successful Australian film of 2012. Laurel’s son Tony Briggs wrote the play it is based on, and adapted that into a screenplay.

The film depicts the Sapphires as Australia’s answer to the Supremes, and how they were talent-spotted to perform soul numbers for the troops in Vietnam.

March 2017 Eora Elders Olympics

Now in it’s third year, the March 2017 Eora Elders Olympics provided Elders like the Redfern AMS team with an opportunity to enjoy and participate in sporting activities that will promote good health and active ageing.

The Elder Olympians engage in modified sporting activities, competing in a friendly environment. Elders are also connected to expert advice relating to health and well-being to address their nutritional, physical and recreational needs in the lead up, during and after each event which empowers Elders to live healthily

4. NSW : Galambila/Durri/Werin

The READY MOB Tackling Smoking and Healthy Lifestyles team are passionate about raising the awareness of the health impacts of tobacco smoking and chronic disease in Aboriginal communities and promoting positive lifestyle changes.

READY MOB is: Really Evaluate And Decide Yourself Make Ourselves Better.

The name also signifies that the team is READY to work with the community to promote healthy lifestyles.

READY MOB staff can travel to your community in the Mid North Coast to provide health promotion and education about smoking and healthy lifestyles and run healthy lifestyle program and activities. If you would like invite

READY MOB team to your community please email readymob@galambila.org.au or 0428 277 941.

We promised you our first ‘Deadly ‘n’ Ready’ film clip from your youth! In this clip, the youth of the mid borth coast taking the first steps in ‘breaking up with smokes’. Are you ready to end your relationship with Smokes? drop into your Local Aboriginal Medical Service for support 2day. #deadlynready #readymob #smokefreecommunity #buttoutkidsabout

VIEW here and/or  Like the Ready Mob Facebook Page

 

Galambila AMS Coffs Harbour

Durri AMS

Werin AMS  Port Macquarie

 5.Queensland : Gurriny Yealamucka Health Services Aboriginal Corporation 

 ” International women’s day is an opportunity for recognition and celebration of women’s achievements in Yarrabah and the wider community,”

To me, ‘Be Involved, Lead the Way’, means to continue to mentor women as up and coming leaders and advocators for change.”

Sue Andrews (pictured above ) from Gurriny Yealamucka Health Services Aboriginal Corporation  .GYHSAC is a community-run health organisation , NACCHO member at Yarrabah FNQ delivering primary and preventative health care programs.

Aboriginal Health Workers leadership are very active in the community : NACCHO files

The announcements for Yarrabah’s Young Woman of the Year and Woman of Year were highlights of a program of local speakers at a luncheon to mark International Women’s Day this year.

Nominees included Thelma Yeatman, Sue Andrews, Kirra-Lei Kynuna and Bryanna Smith.

Winners, Gwenneth Yeatman and Destiny Kynuna, said they were honoured to be recognised by their peers, colleagues, families and friends.

Speakers on the day said the theme ‘Be involved, lead the way’ held particular resonance for them.

“International Women’s Day acknowledges and respect all the women from around the world for their contribution to their country and, importantly, their families,” Yarrabah Cr Nadine Cannon said.

Traditional Owner group Gunggandji-Mandingalbay Yidinji also said the day was significant.

“International Women’s Day is a global movement created to unite, empower and inspire women globally to change perceptions, dispel myths, destroy stereotypes and create equality for all women,” Gunggandji-Mandingalbay Yidinji Peoples PBCAC CEO Helen Tait said.

“It’s a step into creation, to allow women to build confidence and step out of their comfort zone into their greatness to live a life aligned with their passion and to be bold.

“Be the change, disrupt the norm and link arms with like-minded women to be the creators of change for the next generation.

“‘Being involved and leading the way’ means to inspire others to connect with their passion, align with their values and live life on purpose.

“Great leaders don’t set out to be a leader, they set out to make a difference.

6. Northern Territory : Danila Dilba Health Service /AMSANT

A Northern Territory Aboriginal health service is working to improve the way Indigenous mothers access health care during their pregnancy and is improving generational health practices along the way.

Aboriginal health practitioner and team leader at the Danila Dilba centre in Palmerston, Tiana McCoy, said a success of the clinic’s model had been using Indigenous healthcare workers to connect with women who would not access health care otherwise.

Photo: Natalia Moore-Deagan says the Indigenous health workers are one reason she goes to Danila Dilba. (ABC News: Lucy Marks)

 A Northern Territory Aboriginal health service is working to improve the way Indigenous mothers access health care during their pregnancy and is improving generational health practices along the way.

Aboriginal health practitioner and team leader at the Danila Dilba centre in Palmerston, Tiana McCoy, said a success of the clinic’s model had been using Indigenous healthcare workers to connect with women who would not access health care otherwise.

“The family support workers who go out into the community and engage the women into the service they become familiar with who people are and they really do come in and they’re comfortable coming in which is excellent,” she said.

Some women access the mother’s clinic for the first time during a monthly gestation diabetes testing session, but healthcare workers are using the three-hour clinic to screen for other conditions and educate the women on general health in an environment that provides a culturally safe service.”The family support workers who go out into the community and engage the women into the service they become familiar with who people are and they really do come in and they’re comfortable coming in which is excellent,” she said.

Some women access the mother’s clinic for the first time during a monthly gestation diabetes testing session, but healthcare workers are using the three-hour clinic to screen for other conditions and educate the women on general health in an environment that provides a culturally safe service.

“They can come in and access the midwives to do their antenatal checks, they can use that time for their children to access other services within the clinic,” Ms McCoy said.

As a result, she said women were engaging with the clinic throughout their whole pregnancy.

“We try and aim for seven antenatal visits throughout the pregnancy, we’re actually hitting that mark, if not more, so for mum and baby that’s huge,” she said.

“It means we’ve got better health outcomes, we’ve got better birth weights and they can access the other services as well so it’s definitely a huge success with engaging the women within our services.”

Tiana McCoy

First time mother Lez Hall, 20, went with her partner to the clinic for the first time and said the service made her feel secure.

“For my first time it’s good to have a midwife with me and everything, so it’s good for my first pregnancy,” Ms Hall said.

“I don’t know much about pregnancy because it’s my first time so it’s good that I know that they’ll tell me what I have to do throughout my nine months.”

Others patients, like 23-year-old Natalia Moore-Deagan, return for their antenatal and diabetes checks, which they only access through the Danila Dilba clinic.

“One of the main reasons [I only come here] is they have Indigenous health workers,” she said.

Ms Moore-Deagan is in the last trimester of her third pregnancy and said she had learnt to improve her health during pregnancy.

“It’s good, it’s healthy, my whole pregnancy for three of my children now has been very healthy and no problems,” she said.

“I’ve learnt to eat healthy, drink healthy and also take my iron tablets.”

The clinic has diagnosed seven cases of gestational diabetes in the past six months and after going on to received treatment and education about diet and exercise, four of women had babies of a healthy weight.

“We’ve seen ladies come in with their first pregnancy they ended up on oral medication and the second pregnancy, they’re diet control so that’s a good step,” Sumaria Corpus said.

The senior gestational diabetes educator said she was working to treat pregnant women and also educate them to prevent future generation from developing diabetes and associated health problems.

“As we’re seeing a lot of young people, from the age of nine years onwards, with diabetes, so this is the best place to stop that chain effect, giving them the right information, giving them the right support so people can make a choice of change and that’s the biggest thing.”

While all the are in Canberra

our Delegates and at the enjoying  in Alice Springs

7. Tasmanian Aboriginal Centre

Watch Video and hear spoken word here

The TAC is an Aboriginal community organisation developed in the early 1970s and funded by the federal government since 1973. It was incorporated as the Aboriginal Information Service in November 1973 and changed its name to Tasmanian Aboriginal Centre (TAC) in August 1977.TAC represents the political and community development aspirations of the Tasmanian Aboriginal community. For an account of its early development see here and here.

Some of its main achievements include:

  • Negotiation of Aboriginal land returns in 1995, 1999, 2005
  • Return of ancestral remains from overseas and Australian institutions
  • Legislative recognition of Aboriginal cultural fishing rights
  • Apology to the Tasmanian Stolen Generations
  • Financial compensation to members of the Stolen Generations
  • Negotiation of land purchases for community ownership
  • Establishment of a range of Aboriginal community services
  • Retrieval and revival of Tasmanian Aboriginal language
  • Improved accountability of Aboriginal heritage protection
  • Establishment of the only Aboriginal Registered Training Organisation in Tasmania
  • Establishment of Tasmanian government services to members of the Aboriginal community

We provide the following services:

  • Community advocacy
  • Cultural heritage programs including land based activities and camps
  • Emotional and social wellbeing programs
  • Exercise and nutrition programs
  • Housing advocacy and home buyers assistance
  • Land management programs on returned lands
  • Law reform and community legal education
  • Legal Service – see here
  • Music and cultural festivals
  • Nutrition advice
  • Palawa kani language retrieval and revival program
  • Prison visiting
  • Publications and publication support
  • Registered training for Aboriginal Health Workers and Cultural Heritage Workers
  • Youth diversion program

8. Winnunga ACT

 Launch Winnunga Nimmityjah Aboriginal Health Service’s new Aboriginal Domestic Violence Safety Plan.

 ” New resources have been created for the ACT’s Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander community to better support victims and perpetrators of domestic and family violence.

Today I helped launch Winnunga Nimmityjah Aboriginal Health Service’s new Aboriginal Domestic Violence Safety Plan.”

Deputy Chief Minister, Yvette Berry, says new resources have been created for the ACT’s Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander community to better support victims and perpetrators of domestic and family violence

Picture Above : From NACCHO TV Interview with Julie Tongs Watch Here

The initiative by Winnunga is one of twelve projects that received funding as part of the 2015-16 ACT Women’s Safety Grant Program.

With its $80,710 grant, Winnunga has taken a leading role in helping prevent abuse by developing six fact sheets for the ACT’s Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander community.

These culturally sensitive resources will provide invaluable information about the support services available to both the victims and perpetrators of domestic and family violence.

The fact sheets will support Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people to be better informed.

There is much work still to be done as a community to provide more coordinated and effective support for victims, and to hold perpetrators to account. I look forward to continuing to work closely with Winnunga to help prevent domestic and family violence.

Winnunga received the largest grant from the 2015-16 ACT Women’s Safety Grant program, designed to assist community organisations play their part in eliminating domestic and family violence.

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