NACCHO Aboriginal Health and Smoking Research : The Don’t Make Smokes Your Story advertising is helping smokers to quit

history

 ” The Don’t Make Smokes Your Story Campaign was effective because it reflected the impact of smoking on family and community.

The evaluation showed

  •  9 per cent of people interviewed had quit as a result of seeing the campaign and
  • 27 per cent had cut down on their smoking.
  • A further 26 per cent intended to quit in the next month

The campaign shares the story of a young man who decides to quit to make sure he will be around to look after his children as they grow,

Approximately 39 percent of Indigenous Australians aged 15 years and over are daily smokers, which is nearly three times the rate for other Australians.

Smoking is estimated to account for one-in-five Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander deaths, so changing attitudes to smoking is vital to closing the gap on health.”

Assistant Minister for Health and Aged Care, Ken Wyatt

 ” Most of our people understand that smoking is harmful to themselves, to their children, to partners and to the community. One in five of our mob die from smoking related diseases and many others are sick because of smoking.

Passive smoking, that’s breathing in somebody else’s smoke, is as dangerous as smoking a cigarette and children are amongst those most affected. We all need to take on the challenge and make our homes, our cars, our social events, our meeting places, our council rooms and our workplaces smoke free.”

Tom Calma National Coordinator for the Australian Government’s Tackling Indigenous Smoking Program- see full message below

A significant portion of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander smokers have taken action to quit smoking after seeing the Don’t Make Smokes Your Story advertising campaign.

Watch video here

Assistant Minister for Rural Health, Dr David Gillespie, said an independent evaluation of the campaign by ORC International found that it had generated high awareness and was very effective.

The campaign, launched in May this year, focuses on Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people aged 18 to 40 years who smoke or have recently quit.

“This is an important campaign that seeks to empower Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander smokers to quit smoking for themselves and their families,” Dr Gillespie said.

Don’t Make Smokes Your Story – National Tobacco Campaign

TV script – 45 seconds

Ted and his family sitting on the back steps with his guitar.

VO: Family is everything to me.

We see Ted in the kitchen with his extended family.

VO: I can’t imagine life without them, to be honest.

We see Ted in the hospital with an oxygen mask on his face. A close up of his finger with a pulse monitor attached.

VO: I’ve had my battles with smokes.

We see Ted’s wife standing at his hospital bedside.

VO: My lungs got pretty bad

We see a close up of Ted’s face with the oxygen mask.

VO: Sometimes I could hardly breathe and that was tough on everyone.

We see Ted and his sons outside together.

VO: and that was tough on everyone.

In a flashback, we cut to a younger Ted at a skate park, smoking with a mate. We then see them passing cigarettes to each other as they sit in the skate bowl.

VO: I’m not sure why I smoked; I just did.

We see Ted playing with his children in the backyard.

VO: My kids, Jarrah and Yani, I wanted to be there for them, so I quit. I’ve quit before; I just kept trying.

We see Ted kicking a football with his children.

VO: now I can keep up with them in the yard….

Ted helps his children riding their bikes on the street.

VO: …and I’ve got more money to spend on better things.

We see Ted standing in front of his house taking a selfie with his Mum.

VO: Mum and the Aunties are pretty happy that I quit.

We see Ted with his extended family in the kitchen.

VO: They didn’t want me to die from smokes like Dad did.

We see Ted’s face and a shot of Ted standing in front of his house with his children playing football behind him.

VO: My name is Ted, and family is my story.

SUPER: DON’T MAKE SMOKES YOUR STORY.

Quit now: My Quitbuddy logo, Quitline 137848, Australia.gov.au/quitnow, Australian Government crest

VO: Don’t make smokes your story. Download the app, call the Quitline, or visit quitnow.

SUPER: Authorised by the Australian Government, Canberra.

ANNCR: Authorised by the Australian Government, Canberra.

“The Coalition Government is committed to reducing high Indigenous smoking rates.”

The campaign highlights the dangers of smoking, the reasons for quitting, and the tools and support available to help support people who have quit. It featured on television, radio, print, online and outdoor media, with a strong presence in regional and remote communities.

quit

The evaluation showed

  •  9 per cent of people interviewed had quit as a result of seeing the campaign and
  • 27 per cent had cut down on their smoking.
  • A further 26 per cent intended to quit in the next month.

Calls to the Quitline increased over the campaign period and downloads of the My QuitBuddy app reached more than 30,000 new users.

Download here

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The campaign complements the Coalition Government’s $116.8 million Tackling Indigenous Smoking program which delivers targeted smoking prevention and cessation activities.

Video message – Professor Tom Calma

Welcome to the Quitnow website.

My name is Tom Calma. I am from Darwin and I am Kungarakan on my mother’s side and Iwaidja on my father’s side.

As the National Coordinator for the Australian Government’s Tackling Indigenous Smoking Program, it’s my job to support those working with our mob to quit, or not take up smoking.

If you need help to stop smoking or you want to try and help somebody else quit, then you’ve come to the right place.

This website has got all the information you need about how to quit and what support services are available to help you on your journey.

Most of our people understand that smoking is harmful to themselves, to their children, to partners and to the community. One in five of our mob die from smoking related diseases and many others are sick because of smoking.

Passive smoking, that’s breathing in somebody else’s smoke, is as dangerous as smoking a cigarette and children are amongst those most affected. We all need to take on the challenge and make our homes, our cars, our social events, our meeting places, our council rooms and our workplaces smoke free.

Smoking or breathing in somebody else’s smoking while you’re pregnant also puts a mum and the baby at higher risk of health problems, and some of these problems can affect the baby for life.

Children with parents who smoke are more likely to take up smoking themselves. Be a positive role model for the children around you and break the smoking cycle.

Not only is smoking bad for your health, it is also expensive. Think about how much money you and your family could save if you support each other to quit!

Now most smokers want to quit and have tried to quit. While our people have done a fantastic job in quitting smoking, we still have a long way to go.

I ask my brothers and sisters, Aunties and Uncles and young ones to give up smoking or not take it up. I also ask you to help others you care about to choose the no smoking path. That way we can all lead long and healthy lives.

So enjoy the website and I wish you all the best in quitting and staying smoke free. Don’t make smokes your story!

Background

The Australian Government has strengthened its commitment to closing the gap in Indigenous life expectancy, with the launch of the latest phase of the National Tobacco Campaign.

Don’t Make Smokes Your Story features new advertising materials specifically targeted at encouraging Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander smokers to make a serious quit attempt, not just for themselves but also for the health and wellbeing of their families.

Approximately 39 per cent of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people over the age of 15 are daily smokers, 2.8 times the smoking rate for other Australians. It is estimated that smoking accounts for one in five Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander deaths.

The Don’t Make Smokes Your Story campaign aims to change this. It tells the inspiring story of Ted, a mid-thirties Aboriginal and South Sea Islander man who decided to quit smoking for his family, to make sure he’d be around to look after his kids. The campaign highlights the dangers of smoking, the reasons for quitting, and the tools and support available to help people stay quit.

Find out more from your nearest ACCHO or

The Quit Now website has more useful information about quitting smoking.

 

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