NACCHO Indigenous Health Research News: Tom Calma urges quarantining of Indigenous research funding

ctg-breakfasat-m-cooke-t-calma-and-nash

The NHMRC has close to a 6 per cent target now for funding to go towards Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander projects, We’re calling on the ARC to match it.”

While the ARC did have a dedicated stream of funding for Indigenous grants, it was a very small proportion of the overall pool. A quarantined funding would create a virtuous circle for Indigenous researchers starting with capacity building.

We have a recorded 10 years life expectancy gap between Indigenous and non-Indigenous peoples in Australia.

“When I wrote the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Social Justice Report chapter on achieving health equality within a generation in 2005, the gap was 17 years. But there’s still a significant gap compared to our Indigenous brothers and sisters in New Zealand and Canada and the United States where they enjoy five to six years.”

Professor Calma, who is chairman of the Poche Centre for Indigenous Health Network and chancellor of the University of Canberra.

From The Australian

File Picture above NACCHO Chair Matthew Cooke with Former Rural Health Minister Fiona Nash and Professor Tom Calma at a recent Close the Gap event Parliament House Canberra

One of the country’s most senior Indigenous figures, Tom Calma, has called on the Australian Research Council to quarantine a proportion of its funding for research into indigenous matters.

Professor Calma said the ARC should match the proportion of designated funding for indigenous research as the National Health and Medical Research Council does.

See NACCHO Research News : Call for research priorities in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health

Research

“At Poche Melbourne we are trying to develop leadership among Indigenous people with a university qualification and also to get more Indigenous PhDs through,” Professor Calma said. “But this is coming out of philanthropic and university money.

“My belief is that philanthropic money should be used for the establishment of programs, not for keeping them going.”

An ARC spokeswoman said it “had no plans to quarantine a certain percentage of national competitive grants programs funding for Indigenous programs”. She said Indigenous research was supported across the range of NCGP areas, including in education, performing arts, health, policy, law, economic development, history and languages.

She said the dedicated scheme, Discovery Indigenous, funded research led by indigenous researchers, as well as higher degree and early career researchers.

The fund was valued at $4 million this year. The spokeswoman said a 2012 Indigenous research network initiative provided $3.2m across four years.

The Poche Indigenous Health Network is a made up of six research centres in five universities.

It was the result of a donation of more than $50m from philanthropists Greg and Kay van Norton Poche, who made their fortune by creating the courier and logistics company StarTrack Express, which was sold to Australia Post and Qantas for $750m in 2003.

Professor Calma is also chairman of the Co-operative Research Centre for Remote Economic Participation, or Ninti One. But he said a change in government focus was threatening public-good CRCs such as his.

Press Release

Poche Patron calls for increased funding for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander research projects

Professor Tom Calma AO has called on the Australian Research Council (ARC) to match the proportion of funding provided by the National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC) for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander research projects.

Addressing the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Research Showcase, presented by The Poche Centre for Indigenous Health at the University of Sydney, the Chair and Patron of The Poche Indigenous Health Network said: “The NHMRC now has a target of between 5-6 percent for funding to go towards Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander projects.”

“We’re calling on the ARC to match it. If we can expand the funding for research in this area, it’s better for all of us, particularly for the communities we’re doing our research for.

“I also strongly encourage senior public servants and policy makers to engage in the research, as research forums like today should be informing public policy,” Professor Calma added.

Speaking about the importance of research in this area, Professor Calma said: “We have a recorded 10 years life expectancy gap between Indigenous and non-Indigenous peoples in Australia.

“When I wrote the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Social Justice Report chapter on achieving health equality within a generation in 2005, the gap was 17 years. But there’s still a significant gap compared to our Indigenous brothers and sisters in New Zealand and Canada and the United States where they enjoy five to six years.

“All of our research projects are looking at ways we can influence the way we close that gap.”

Professor Calma also thanked The Poche Centre at the University of Sydney for supporting the annual Health Research Showcase, the fifth since the centre was established in 2008.

“They’re an opportunity to bring together different research elements of the University, to be able to share experiences but also look at ways in which we can work better together,” he said.

“If we can encourage more targeted initiatives, we’ll always get better outcomes.”

The Poche Centre for Indigenous Health at the University of Sydney was established and funded by philanthropists Greg Poche AO and Kay Van Norton Poche, along with their friend and co-founder, Reg Richardson AM. They have gifted more than $50m in the past seven years to harness the skills, expertise and resources of the University of Sydney and four other universities to contribute towards Aboriginal health.

The centre draws upon a combination of Commonwealth, State and philanthropic funds and partners with Aboriginal Community Controlled and other organisations to provide specialist health services for Aboriginal people. They also build and support education and career pathways for Aboriginal people, and develop opportunities for students and graduates to participate in Aboriginal health service delivery.

Committed to the ongoing development of a strong research vision and strategy, the centre’s annual Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Research Showcase brings together an array of health researchers, scholars and community collaborators.

This year’s showcase covered three themes: evidence and discourse; meaningful collaboration in Indigenous health; and health, lifestyle and wellbeing. The University of Sydney faculties involved include the Faculty of Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, Faculty of Dentistry, Faculty of Pharmacy, School of Nursing and Midwifery as well as colleagues from The George Institute for Global Health.

 

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