NACCHO #Healthelection16 #Aboriginal #health : Nash launches New anti-smoking campaign aims to Close the Gap

Smoking

“The Don’t Make Smokes Your Story featured new advertising materials that focus on the values within Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities, such as the health and wellbeing of their families.

“But the fact that Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people over the age of 15 are 2.8 times more likely than other Australians to be daily smokers means there is a clear need for focused encouragement and support.

“It is estimated that smoking accounts for one in five Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander deaths and about one-third of their burden from cancers and cardiovascular disease.

Minister for Rural Health Fiona Nashhttps://youtu.be/zG8vlSIPgXQ

See more here http://www.australia.gov.au/quitnow

Watch here https://youtu.be/zG8vlSIPgXQ

The Coalition Government will launch the latest phase of the National Tobacco Campaign tonight as it aims to Close the Gap in smoking rates.

“It is important that we reduce tobacco smoking among all Australians,” Minister Nash said.

“But the fact that Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people over the age of 15 are 2.8 times more likely than other Australians to be daily smokers means there is a clear need for focused encouragement and support.

Don’t Make Smokes Your Story is the most recent phase of the Australian Government’s sustained and multi-faceted approach to reducing smoking rates over the past several decades—an ongoing initiative that has resulted in a substantial decline in national smoking rates.

The Australian Government has invested $10 million for the campaign, in addition to the $116.8 million for the Tackling Indigenous Smoking program.

Don’t Make Smokes Your Story – National Tobacco Campaign

TV script – 45 seconds

Ted and his family sitting on the back steps with his guitar.

VO: Family is everything to me.

We see Ted in the kitchen with his extended family.

VO: I can’t imagine life without them, to be honest.

We see Ted in the hospital with an oxygen mask on his face. A close up of his finger with a pulse monitor attached.

VO: I’ve had my battles with smokes.

We see Ted’s wife standing at his hospital bedside.

VO: My lungs got pretty bad

We see a close up of Ted’s face with the oxygen mask.

VO: Sometimes I could hardly breathe and that was tough on everyone.

We see Ted and his sons outside together.

VO: and that was tough on everyone.

In a flashback, we cut to a younger Ted at a skate park, smoking with a mate. We then see them passing cigarettes to each other as they sit in the skate bowl.

VO: I’m not sure why I smoked; I just did.

We see Ted playing with his children in the backyard.

VO: My kids, Jarrah and Yani, I wanted to be there for them, so I quit. I’ve quit before; I just kept trying.

We see Ted kicking a football with his children.

VO: now I can keep up with them in the yard….

Ted helps his children riding their bikes on the street.

VO: …and I’ve got more money to spend on better things.

We see Ted standing in front of his house taking a selfie with his Mum.

VO: Mum and the Aunties are pretty happy that I quit.

We see Ted with his extended family in the kitchen.

VO: They didn’t want me to die from smokes like Dad did.

We see Ted’s face and a shot of Ted standing in front of his house with his children playing football behind him.

VO: My name is Ted, and family is my story.

SUPER: DON’T MAKE SMOKES YOUR STORY.

Quit now: My Quitbuddy logo, Quitline 137848, Australia.gov.au/quitnow, Australian Government crest

VO: Don’t make smokes your story. Download the app, call the Quitline, or visit quitnow.

SUPER: Authorised by the Australian Government, Canberra.

ANNCR: Authorised by the Australian Government, Canberra.

Approximately 39 per cent of Indigenous Australians aged 15 years and over are daily smokers.

The Australian Government has committed to halving the 2008 smoking rate of 47 per cent among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people by 2018, and to reducing the overall smoking rate to 10 per cent in the same period.

“A smoker’s health will improve gradually after quitting and mortality is about the same as a non-smoker if quitting is achieved by the age of 45,” Minister Nash said.

“The Australian Government is committed to reducing the devastating impacts of smoking on Australians and we know from the results of previous phases that anti-smoking campaigns work.”

Don’t Make Smokes Your Story will be rolled out nationally across television, print, radio, outdoor and online.

National Tobacco Campaign materials and information on how to quit smoking are available at http://www.australia.gov.au/quitnow

Additional support to quit smoking is available by downloading the free My QuitBuddy mobile app or call the Quitline on 13 7848.

 

 

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