NACCHO Aboriginal Health News Alert : #WICC2016 will provide opportunities to share information about cancer and Indigenous peoples internationally

WICC2016logo

“Greater understanding of the burden of cancer among Indigenous populations is of major importance to public health given that poorer outcomes contribute to the lower life expectancies experienced by many Indigenous peoples.

WICC 2016 will provide opportunities to foster new collaboration, enhance capacity, and share knowledge and information about cancer and Indigenous people internationally.

“Navigating one’s way through the health care system can be arduous and fraught with uncertainty and fear for any cancer patient.

This common problem can be exacerbated for an Indigenous person. Indigenous adult cancer patients report substantial unmet supportive care needs, including provision of transport and appropriate travel arrangements, suitable accommodation for both the patient and their support person and extra psychological support.”

Assoc Prof Gail Garvey (chair), Menzies School of Health Research, Australia : A major focus of Menzies research is on improving Indigenous cancer patients’ experiences through their cancer journey and cancer outcomes.

Garvey, who is #WICC2016 Committee Chair, said cancer has been largely overlooked among Indigenous populations globally, despite research showing they have significantly greater mortality and lower cancer survival rates.

Cancer is the second leading cause of death among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people and is responsible for more deaths each year than diabetes and kidney disease.

Marie McInerney is covering #WICC2016 for the Croakey Conference News Service

Cancer in Indigenous populations globally has largely been overlooked, despite evidence that Indigenous people in some areas have significantly greater mortality and lower cancer survival rates .

Indigenous people comprise about 6% of the world’s population, and their poorer health and social disadvantage are of increasing international interest, as evidenced by the formation of a United Nations Permanent Forum on Indigenous Issues two decades ago

Greater understanding of the burden of cancer among Indigenous populations is of major importance to public health given that poorer outcomes contribute to the lower life expectancies experienced by many Indigenous peoples. In attempts to reduce the global burden of cancer we need to also acknowledge and address the considerable cancer burden affecting Indigenous peoples around the world.

WICC 2016 will provide opportunities to foster new collaboration, enhance capacity, and share knowledge and information about cancer and Indigenous peoples internationally

Other keynote speakers and presenters include:

  • Professor Tom Calma AO – Chancellor, University of Canberra and National Coordinator of Tackling Indigenous Smoking (Australia)
  • Professor Richard Sullivan – Professor of Cancer & Global Health at Kings College London, Director at the Institute of Cancer Policy (UK)
  • Dr Linda Burhansstipanov – Director of Native American Cancer Research (US)
  • Dr Chris Wild– Director of International Agency for Research on Cancer (France)
  • Professor Helen Zorbas AO – CEO of Cancer Australia (Australia)
  • Associate Professor Gail Garvey –Principal Research Fellow at Menzies School of Health Research (Australia)

Our aim is to reduce Indigenous cancer disparities. We will achieve this by bringing together Indigenous communities and experts working in a variety of disciplines to discuss the latest findings in the field and to stimulate the development of international collaborations and encourage high quality cancer research

Cancer Australia at the World Indigenous Cancer Conference 12-14 April 2016
Cancer Australia is pleased to be a major sponsor of the inaugural World Indigenous Cancer Conference (WICC) being held in Brisbane 12-14 April 2016 and hosted by Menzies School of Health Research.

The theme for the conference is ‘Connecting, Communicating, and Collaborating across the Globe’.

Cancer in Indigenous populations globally has largely been overlooked, despite evidence that Indigenous people in some areas have significantly greater mortality and lower cancer survival rates. 1,2,3 Indigenous people comprise about 6% of the world’s population, and their poorer health and social disadvantage are of increasing international interest, as evidenced by the formation of a United Nationals Permanent Forum on Indigenous Issues two decades ago. 4

Cancer Australia at the WICC
Cancer Australia’s CEO Professor Helen Zorbas AO will be a key speaker in the international plenary panel session ‘Priorities moving forward’.

Cancer Australia will be hosting a facilitated seminar session ‘Putting the National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Cancer Framework into practice’ with a panel of five leaders from cancer control and Indigenous health sectors. Panellists include:

  • Professor Jacinta Elston,  Dean Indigenous Health in the Division of Tropical Health and Medicine, James Cook University (Facilitator)
  • Ms Amanda Mitchell, Deputy Chief Executive Officer, Aboriginal Health Council of South Australia
  • Ms April Lawrie-Smith, the new Chair of the National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Standing Committee
  • Professor Tom Calma AO, National Coordinator Tackling Indigenous Smoking
  • Dr Mark Wenitong, Public Health Medical Adviser Apunipima Cape York Health Council
  • Professor Helen Zorbas AO, CEO Cancer Australia

Staff will be presenting oral presentations on:

To view or download the Framework please visit here

We invite you to share the Framework with you networks and contacts, so that collectively we can address the priorities to improve cancer outcomes for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples.

Spread the Word!
Please share the National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Cancer Framework to improve Indigenous cancer outcomes.

1. Suggested content for your newsletter
Cancer Australia’s National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Cancer Framework identifies the national priorities for the many communities, organisations and governments whose combined efforts are required to address the disparities and improve cancer outcomes for Indigenous Australians.

Cancer Australia’s Framework provides high-level guidance and direction to all sectors to harness, maximise and leverage collaborative arrangements to improve cancer outcomes for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.

The findings in this Framework can assist in the development or review of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander cancer control plans and strategies to ensure collectively we are targeting the priorities that sit within each of our areas of influence.

2. Suggested Tweets

• Hear Prof Tom Calma explain the importance of National ATSI Cancer Framework! http://ow.ly/RqUxm #ATSI #Cancer #WICC2016

• How can we improve Indigenous cancer outcomes? Read the Framework! http://ow.ly/RqSOD #NationalATSICancerFramework #WICC2016

• We can work together to improve Indigenous cancer outcomes http://ow.ly/RqSOD #NationalATSICancerFramework #WICC2016

 

Study reveals true scale of Indigenous lung cancer disparity

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people are almost eight times more likely to die from lung cancer than non-Indigenous Australians living in remote areas, new University of Sydney research shows.

In the first and largest study of its kind, PhD candidate Kalinda Griffiths from the Sydney Centre for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Statistics investigated intersecting disparities in lung cancer care and outcomes amongst at-risk communities in NSW.

“It’s important to take into consideration the compounding effects of socioeconomic disadvantage and geographic locality when considering treatment and outcomes. You can’t look at Aboriginal disparity in isolation; we need to consider the complete picture,” said Griffiths, who is a former Northern Territory Young Australian of the Year.

“Existing studies into Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander lung cancer rates usually only estimate for one measure: Indigenous status. But this neglects the fact that Aboriginal people often have multiple social statuses, which can be measured in different ways.”

As part of her PhD thesis, Griffiths examined linked data for 20,846 people diagnosed with lung cancer from the NSW Central Cancer Registry between 2001 and 2007. She then investigated the interrelationship between incidence, treatment, survival and mortality, based on socioeconomic status, Indigenous status and geographic location.

The results also revealed a gap in available data into lung cancer treatment for Indigenous patients.

“This might be due to people not accessing services, and this may depend on the patient’s remoteness or socioeconomic status. Being isolated from services, not having trust in the healthcare system and family responsibilities may prevent Indigenous people from accessing treatment options.”

Kalinda will continue to explore new ways to tackle such disparities in health outcomes for Indigenous people as an inaugural Wingara Mura Leadership Program Fellow. Launched in 2016, this new program aims to assist Indigenous early career academics with tailored guidance and support as they complete their PhD studies.

The full results will be presented at the World Indigenous Cancer Conference in Brisbane on 12 April 2016.

Expressions of interest for the 2016 Wingara Mura Leadership Program (Academic Stream) close on Sunday 24 April 2016. For more information visit: http://www.sydney.edu.au/recruitment/wingara-mura

 NACCHO weekly Save a Date / News summary : Improving communications

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