NACCHO Tackling Indigenous Smoking NEWS : DOH tender for National Best Practice Unit for TIS

Smoking

Tobacco smoking is the most preventable cause of ill health and early death among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people and is responsible for around one in five deaths,”

Through the Council of Australian Governments (COAG), the Australian government has committed to six targets to close the gap in disadvantage between Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australians across health, education and employment.

Two of these targets relate directly to the health portfolio: to close the gap in life expectancy within a generation (by 2031); and to halve the gap in mortality rates for Indigenous children under five within a decade (by 2018).”

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As the federal government seeks to raise the average lifespan of Indigenous individuals closer to levels enjoyed by the rest of the population smoking remains under the gun, blamed for one-fifth of the Indigenous death rate.

A recent Health Department tender seeks to add a national organisation to run a drive against smoking by Aboriginal and Torres St Island individuals, to complement existing anti-tobacco regional programs run under the banner of Tackling Indigenous Smoking.

The organisation or consortium chosen to support the current TIS program will be referred to as the National Best Practice Unit for TIS.

Closing date for applications is September 1, Melbourne-based tenders specialist TenderSearch says. Contract execution is listed for October-November and release of operational guidelines for January-February 2016.

Download the 2 Tender documents here

Health-010-1516 – RFT

Health-010-1516 – DRAFT Contract for Services

The NBPU managing supervisory body will be expected to work mainly with grant recipients funded under the TIS program for regional tobacco control activities, with support and leadership from Professor Tom Calma, the national co-ordinator tackling Indigenous smoking.

The to-do list starts with developing and maintaining operational guidelines for tobacco use reduction among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people. It will provide organisational support to grant recipients responsible for implementing evidence-based approaches to tobacco control.

It will help them develop and implement performance indicators and data collection methods, and

The NBPU will facilitate workforce development for the project, disseminating evidence and information on best practice, building a community of practice, and promoting a culture of evaluation and continuous improvement for the TIS program. There will also be advice and assistance to the department.

“Tobacco smoking is the most preventable cause of ill health and early death among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people and is responsible for around one in five deaths,” the tender document said.

“Through the Council of Australian Governments (COAG), the Australian government has committed to six targets to close the gap in disadvantage between Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australians across health, education and employment.

“Two of these targets relate directly to the health portfolio: to close the gap in life expectancy within a generation (by 2031); and to halve the gap in mortality rates for Indigenous children under five within a decade (by 2018).

“Under the COAG National Healthcare Agreement, Australian governments have committed to halve the daily smoking rate among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander adults (18 or older) from 44.8 per cent in 2008 to 22.4 per cent by 2018.

“Work to reduce high rates of smoking has resulted in a reduction of seven percentage points since 2002, accompanied by a significant increase in the proportion of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people who have never smoked.”

Indigenous-specific activities were required because the strong history and impact of mainstream action in Australia had failed to deliver equivalent reductions in smoking rates within the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander population, the tender document said.

The Medical Journal of Australia noted recently that the Talking About the Smokes health project from the Menzies School of Health Research indicated that the majority of Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander smokers want to quit.

 

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