NACCHO:Supporting the new National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Plan

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Special Interest Group

Workshop and Annual General Meeting

Public Health Action:

SUPPORTING THE NEW NATIONAL ABORIGINAL AND TORRES STRAIT ISLANDER HEALTH PLAN

PHAA Annual Conference SIG workshop, Sunday 9 September 2012

5:00-6:30pm Riverbanks Room 1 Adelaide Convention Centre

National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Plan

In November 2011 the Australian Minister for Health announced the development of a new National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Plan to succeed the National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Strategic Framework (2007-2013). The National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Plan is being developed by the Australian Government, working with and state and territory governments and Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples and organisations.

The stated aim of the plan is to map the role of Government, health care and service providers as well as Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities in undertaking to close the gap in life expectancy and infant mortality between Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians.

National Congress of Australia’s First Peoples

An advisory group co-chaired by the Department of Health and Ageing and the National Congress of Australia’s First Peoples will inform the development and content of the National plan, and the National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Equality Council, chaired by Professor Ian Anderson, will provide strategic policy advice.

The National Congress of Australia’s First Peoples was incorporated in late 2010 to re-create a national representative body for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander policy. The vision of Congress is to be a national leader and advocate for recognising the status of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples as First Nation peoples.

The PHAA Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Special Interest Group meeting is being held to invited leaders in Aboriginal health policy in Australia to discuss the National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Plan and other reforms, as well as the work of Congress, and to discuss how SIG members and the PHAA can further support this work.

Speakers will provide a fifteen minute presentation followed by a 20 minute discussion with the audience.

Workshop purpose:

To inform participants on the recent developments in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health policy including the development of the National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Plan and the work of the National Congress of Australia’s First Peoples.

Facilitators: Vanessa Lee Senior Lecturer, Indigenous Health, The University of Sydney & Convenor, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander SIG, PHAA and Jessica Stewart, Manager, Aboriginal Health Research and Evaluation, NSW Ministry of Health & SIG Co-Convenor

Speakers:

  • Jody Broun,Co-Chair ,National Congress
  • Dr Mark Wenitong, National Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation
  • Kim Morey, Manager, Aboriginal Health Branch, South Australia Department for Health and Ageing

Workshop format:

Presentations will be given by each of the speakers with audience participation and the identification of key actions to be progressed by the SIG and by you as a public health practitioner!

SIG Workshop convenors:

Vanessa Lee vanessa.lee@sydney.edu.au 0417 983 001 and Jessica Stewart Jessica.stewart@doh.health.nsw.gov.au 0403 062 345.

Registration is FREE please email Vanessa or Jessica prior to the day to secure a seat

One comment on “NACCHO:Supporting the new National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Plan

  1. The health solution is really easy and can also be self-sustaining economically. Help make Kakadu Complex available to all remote communities and save the expense of these medical talkfests. They smack of more white Australians depending on Aborigines staying on welfare so they have a job.

    The unique blend of 11 Australian wild foods and 14 other global superfoods has been shown to be protective against many of the diseases of nutrition so prevalent in Aboriginal communities today.

    A trial in a Halls Creek aged care facility and in anecdotal results across the country in a wide range of ethnic groups have shown the benefits in blood glucose response, anti-inflammatory effects and normalization of blood pressure. Weight loss has also been successful with easy and permanent weight loss and appetite control.

    I welcome comments and any offers of further trials in test groups is invited. vic@cherikoff.net