Feb 2012 CEO update-Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Services (ACCHSs) Funding Policy Review

Registrations: In December 2011, OATSIH wrote to Healthy for Life Services and announced that only 50% of Healthy for Life Services had registered to use OCHREstreams and extended the deadline to the end of January 2012. By February 2012, several ACCHSs still remain unregistered with OCHREstreams. These services were contacted by OATSIH.

 OATSIHhave advised that the first collection of nKPIs data will be regarded as ‘a trial’ for the purposes of diagnosing any problems with the technical use of the OCHREStreams.

 NACCHO is pursuing a MoU with AIHW to:

 a. Establish a framework to:

(i) improve the quality and availability of health information and data from ACCHSs,

(ii) ensure that ACCHSs data is compiled in an appropriate manner, is used and shared by the parties consistent with applicable legislation and in accordance with agreed ‘Data Principles’.

(iii) facilitate the sharing of ACCHSs health information and data in response to research requests approved in accordance with this MOU.

b. Support ACCHSs to be influentially involved in decision-making regarding the culturally appropriate and respectful collection, use, disclosure and stewardship of health information and data from ACCHSs.

c. Work co-operatively towards the development of processes that enhance the capacity of NACCHO and Affiliates and ACCHSs to promote ACCHSs health information and data in a meaningful way.

 OSR: A range of issues have been identified around the new OSR Reporting Tool with regard to process and technical details.

 After making representation to OATSIH they have agreed to delay implementation of the new OSR until such time as the sector has had input into the final draft.  In 2012 the existing version will be used however it will not be done as a paper based system but rather through OCHREStreams as a transition to moving towards electronic reporting throughout the sector.

 

One comment on “Feb 2012 CEO update-Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Services (ACCHSs) Funding Policy Review

  1. Indigenous primary health care key performance indicators (2013)
    http://meteor.aihw.gov.au/content/index.phtml/itemId/457994
    Description:

    As part of the National Indigenous Reform Agreement (NIRA), the Council of Australian Governments (COAG) agreed that the Department of Health and Ageing, in partnership with the state and territory health departments and in collaboration with the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare, would develop a set of national key performance indicators (KPIs) for Indigenous specific primary health care services.

    The Indigenous primary health care national key performance indicators (KPIs) will monitor, inform, and provide a direct line of sight between the activities of federal and state- and territory-funded services that provide primary health care to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people, and the COAG Closing the Gap targets, in particular the targets for life expectancy and child mortality.

    The indicators will enable monitoring of the contribution of this part of the health system in achieving Closing the Gap targets. The KPIs are intended to:

    • indicate the major health issues pertaining to the regular client population of Indigenous-specific primary health care services (especially those of maternal health, early childhood and the detection and prevention of chronic diseases)

    • outline the extent to which government-funded Indigenous-specific primary health care services collect, record and review pertinent data on these issues, and

    • reveal changes in health risks or outcomes that may be driven by the quality of care that government-funded services provide to their clients.

    Initially the KPIs will provide measures of the extent to which various general indicators of individual health and health-related behaviours among the Indigenous population are being captured by a targeted small number of government-funded Indigenous-specific primary health care services.

    It is anticipated that, over the next few years, both the level of detail explored by the KPIs and the number of health care services contributing to the KPIs will increase. Further indicators will also be added to the indicator set as new national data definitions are developed and incorporated into the Indigenous primary health care data set specification (IPHC DSS).

    The population of interest in the KPIs is the regular client population of an OATSIH-funded primary health care service that is required to report against the Indigenous primary health care key performance indicators. A regular client is defined as a client who has an active medical record; that is, a client who attended the OATSIH-funded primary health care service at least 3 times in 2 years.